Seven Waste in Lean Manufacturing by hcj

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									Seven Waste in Lean
  Manufacturing
             Description of Waste
   Waste or “Muda” in lean
    manufacturing is
    considered to be any
    activity or resource in an
    organization that does
    not add value to an
    external customer.
    There are Seven specific
    types of waste in lean.
                 Overproduction
    Manufacture of products in advance or in
                     excess
    of demand wastes money, time and space.

   Point to consider when trying to eliminate this waste:
Can the operation produce to order rather than produce
 for inventory?
           Unnecessary motion
    Resources are wasted when workers have to
      bend, reach or walk distances to do their
                       jobs.

Workplace assessment should be conducted to design a
 more efficient environment.

Process to consider while eliminating this waste:
What aids, such as fixtures, new equipment, or special
 tools, could speed up the process?
                        Defects
    Any work that contains errors, mistakes or
      lacks something necessary is a defect.

   Point to consider while eliminating this waste:
Where can mistake-proofing be used to eliminate
 or reduce errors or rework?
                      Waiting
    Processes are ineffective and time is wasted
       when one process waits to begin while
                  another finishes.

 Point to consider while eliminating this waste:
The flow of operations should be smooth and continuous.
  Can some tasks be done in parallel rather than in series?
              Transportation
    Moving a product between manufacturing
     processes adds no value, is expensive and
    can cause damage or product deterioration.

Point to consider while eliminating this waste:
Can the process be configured to move product to the
 next operations (rather than have people do the
 moving)?
                    Inventory
Excessive inventory wastes resources through
      costs of storage and maintenance.

  Point to consider while eliminating this waste:
Is WIP (inventory) needed just-in-case or can we operate
   without it?
         Inappropriate processing
Over-processing occurs any time more work is
 done on a piece than what is required by the
 customer.

   Point to consider while eliminating this waste:
Can some tasks be combined or eliminated?

								
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