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					DARE TO BE AWARE




The Anti-Prejudice Consortium
Blackout PR
Lauren Hawes, Christian Mays, Cynthia Quinones, Andrea Rangel,
Lorena Santamaria
620 Peachtree Street
Atlanta, Ga. 30562
November 12, 2011

Dr. Richard Welch
APC Public Relations Director
Georgia State University
660 One Park Place
Atlanta, Georgia 30303



Dear Dr. Welch:

       This report was written to inform you of Blackout Public Relations: efforts to catapult
the Anti-Prejudice Consortium as the leading nonprofit organization against stereotypes in
Atlanta and to strengthen the APC’s individual donor base.

       To achieve this goal, we embraced the three-month task to develop a campaign that
would ignite individuals’ desire to get involved and donate. The purpose of the APC is to be a
resource and to partner with middle schools and their surrounding communities to address
prejudice, discrimination and bullying. The organization is driven and strengthened by
dedicated volunteers, sponsors, business partners, government and nonprofit sectors of the
community.

       With a fragile individual donor database, we focused where the organization needed it
the most—individual donor awareness. Our research showed that many students were not
aware of the APC’s programs or of contribution opportunities. We empowered college students
to consider donating and volunteering for the APC by hosting a promotional table. The main
purpose was to manage a campaign that was tailored to create exposure of the APC,
demonstrate opportunities to donate, and provide awareness to the key publics.

        Overall the goal was to establish continual communication among students about the
influence of the Anti-Prejudice Consortium and the opportunity for them to be influential
through volunteering and donating. We wanted to ensure that individuals would “Dare to Be
Aware” about the APC mission to “Stop Stereotypes” and stress that the Atlanta chapter cannot
prevail without their monetary donations.

       Thank you for the opportunity to create a campaign with your organization. Your time
and guidance was invaluable.

Sincerely,
Christian Mays
Blackout Public Relations
Group Liaison




                                                2
Table of Contents

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY                                   4-10
INTRODUCTION                                             4

SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS                                     4

ORGANIZATION ANALYSIS                                    5

PRIMARY RESEARCH                                     5-7

CAMPAIGN SUMMARY                                         7

AUDIENCES                                                8

GOALS, OBJECTIVES, STRATEGIES, AND TACTICS           8-9

EVENT SUMMARY                                           10

EVALUATION AND STEWARDSHIP                              10

APPENDIX                                           11-30
RESEARCH                                           12-24

----RESEARCH REPORT                                12-18

----FULL SURVEY RESULTS                            18-24

PLANNING                                           24-27

----GOALS, OBJECTIVES, STRATEGIES, & TACTICS       24-27

IMPLEMENTATION                                     27-29

----BUDGET                                              27

----CALENDAR                                       28-29

EVALUATION                                         29-30

----STEWARDSHIP PLAN                               30




                                               3
I. INTRODUCTION

With the rates of suicide and school fights increasing every year, it was imperative for the Anti-
Prejudice Consortium (APC) to increase awareness within the community. Today, students
don’t understand the effects of bullying, racism, and intolerance. Therefore Blackout Public
Relations created the Dare to be Aware campaign. By doing so, Blackout Public Relations
would increase awareness of the effects these behaviors have, to carry out the Anti-Prejudice
Consortium’s mission. The campaign title was inspired by a woman’s testimonial about her
child being bullied and how she believes these non-profit organizations are valuable.

Throughout our campaign, we focused not only on increasing awareness of our organization
but also on educating our publics on the prominence of bullying in middle schools across
Metro-Atlanta. In this way we added value to our campaign.

Even though the Anti-Prejudice Consortium was established 13 years ago, many people aren’t
aware of their presence in Atlanta. Also many don’t know that Georgia is ranked fourth in the
country for cases of bullying in schools. Focusing on the annual Power over Prejudice Summit
hosted by the client, the team promoted the organization through invitations to the event. We
also revamped our social media channels and held an event to promote the Anti-Prejudice
Consortium.

II. SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS

 According to the National Education Association, it is estimated that 160,000 children miss
school every day due to fear of attack or intimidation by other students. Through this site we
also found that 71 percent of students report incidents of bullying as a problem at their school,
90 percent of fourth to eighth graders report being victims of bullying, and one out of 20
students has seen a student with a gun at school.

Ways to bully have also changed dramatically over time. Bullying was primarily done physically,
verbally, or indirectly. The newer generations have had to face the addition of cyber bullying to
the list. Cyber bullying can be done through any electronic medium including text messaging,
pictures, videos, phone calls, emails, chat rooms, instant messaging, social media websites, etc.
Due to the anonymity that electronic bullying can provide, it has become popular and more
difficult to regulate.

Due to the fact that bullying is so prominent nationwide and because Georgia is ranked fourth
in the country for cases of bullying in schools, Blackout PR established that creating a more
aware public in the Metro-Atlanta area was critical to improve circumstances in our
communities.




                                                4
III.OGANIZATION ANALYSIS

Blackout Public Relations conducted a SWOT Analysis for the Anti-Prejudice Consortium and
found the following:

       STRENGTHS               WEAKNESSES                 OPPORTUNITES               THREATS

   ● Strong                ●    Low awareness         ●    Maximize online       ● May get
     network of                 rate in the                communications          drowned out
     past donors                community             ●    Build consistency       by other
   ● Steady flow of        ●    Weak online                with pamphlets and      similar
     annual                     presence                   newsletters             organizations.
     donations             ●    Anti Prejudice        ●    Build stronger        ● Lack of
   ● Centrally                  Consortium                 awareness of            branding
     located in the             overshadowed               organization among    ● Difficulty of
     downtown                   by Power Over              corporate and ‘low-     contacting
     Atlanta area               Prejudice                  hanging’ fruit          and impacting
   ● Issue is a                 Summit                     donors                  corporate
     popular topic         ●    Small staff                                        donors
     on a national         ●    Annual events
     and local level            limited to only
                                some students
                                each school




IV. PRIMARY RESEARCH

Providing information to the APC’s publics on the changes of bullying and the relevance of the
APC’s programs to help stop it became part of the mission that Blackout PR embarked on.
Before that was done though, it was necessary to research through surveys how our publics
decided which organization to donate and volunteer with. By understanding that thought
process it made the Dare to be Aware campaign more targeted and relevant.

Our survey reflected the following key factors among our publics:

           Time was the most influential factor when determining volunteer activities
           The majority of our participants were not involved or spent ten hours or less with
            the organization of their choice while the second majority spent more than 120
            hours a year
           Our participants were least involved with civil liberties organizations
           Our participants were most involved with cultural, religious, and gender based
            organizations
           Most of our participants had never played a leadership role in their organization



                                                  5
          Participants considered emotional reasons as the top choice of what made them
           participate or donate in an organization, followed by location, and then family and
           employment involvement
          Participants donated the most money to religion and medical research
          Less than $1,000 is donated per year by individual
          Only five of 53 participants were aware of the APC
          Of the five participants four were between the ages of 18-24 three were female and
           single, two were African-American, two were Caucasian, and all lived in various area
           codes within Atlanta.
          The majority of our participants were liberal




The Dare to be Aware campaign hosted by Black Out Public Relations conducted primary
research by evaluating the cross examination of surveys and interviews.

   Online Surveys:

      Because Black Out Public Relations knows that it is easier to connect with college
       students via Internet, but especially through social networking sites surveys were
       implemented through these sites and email.
      All survey participants were asked eight questions about their roles within their
       community on the bases of volunteer activities, leadership roles and individual
       donations. After the initial eight questions, all participants were asked about their
       knowledge of the Anti Prejudice Consortium. If they had no prior knowledge, they were
       directed to a thank you page in which they exited the survey. If they did have
       knowledge, they were asked a series of questions about their relationship with the Anti
       Prejudice Consortium followed by demographic questions to further interpret their
       data.
      By hosting the surveys online we received adequate results from various students of all
       age groups from the Georgia State University Community. The data provided an
       overview of people’s involvement within the community and what influences them to
       do so.




                                               6
      By doing these surveys in Google Docs, we were able to obtain our data in spreadsheet
       and percentage form. This allowed us to view our results in comparison with the overall
       goal of changing stereotypes and make individuals Dare to be Aware.

   Corporation Interviews:

      When determining who donates and what is considered upon doing so, the Dare to be
       Aware campaign wanted to know what corporations take into consideration when
       choosing whom to donate to. We asked individuals from corporations a series of
       questions to better understand their reasoning.
      We interviewed two representatives from Verizon Wireless and The Foundation Center.
      We came to the conclusion that corporations donate to candidates that undergo an
       application process and meet the proper guidelines of the corporation before approval
       is granted, which can take months. Usually, the corporation has a direct connection to
       an organization through an individual within the corporation or done on behalf of an
       employee. Most corporations get involved with the prevention or relegation of critical
       social issues like domestic violence prevention or the promotion of technology and
       better education.
      Corporations usually donate during the holiday season and many exercise the employee
       matching gift fund where the corporation will match or double the amount donated by
       its employees or affiliates.

V. CAMPAIGN SUMMARY

Blackout PR therefore had to make the Dare to be Aware campaign appealing to the publics
based on the information provided. Opinion leaders therefore became those in organizations
within cultural, religious, and gender based organizations. Other opinion leaders would be
those who had been affected by bullying or had emotional ties to it.

The dynamic behind Blackout PR’s event:

      Location was to be in the Unity Plaza at the Student Center because of how highly
       trafficked it is by teachers, students, and staff alike therefore reaching a variety of age
       groups and categories of individuals
       Promotional table was adorned with APC products that stated “Stop Stereotypes “on
       them including a banner
      The merchandise included bracelets and tote bags with the slogan
       All donations were made directly towards the APC
       Three members of Blackout PR distributed flyers while the other two went throughout
       the Student Center and approached individuals and groups about the organization with
       merchandise.
      Both groups had an email sign-up list and attained multiple contacts




                                                7
VI. AUDIENCES

   Target Audiences:

       Because college students were unaware about the Anti Prejudice Consortium here in
        Atlanta, we decided to reach out to them as a way to increase awareness about the
        organization with hopes of making them potential donors in the future. It was necessary
        to reach these individuals who are in their early to mid 20’s, as they will be entering
        their career fields and become more available to take part in philanthropic efforts.

   Primary Audience:

       Georgia State University Students:
       In August of this year Georgia State University reached its peak enrollment of 32,000
        students and accepted nearly 3,000 students into its freshmen class. Of the students
        who attend GSU, ninety percent of them are Georgia residents.
       It is logical to appeal to these students because they have ties to the community
        because they are residents and of the 32,000 students, it is possible to influence and
        educate a large number of the population on the Anti Prejudice Consortium and its
        efforts.
       Of the 32,000 students at Georgia State, the average age is 26 years old. Students are at
        the peak of their lives and looking for organizations to get involved with upon
        graduating college.

Secondary Audience:

       Corporations within in Atlanta:
       Atlanta, GA is home to several large corporations that are known not only locally, but
        worldwide as well. Atlanta houses corporations like Coca Cola, CNN, and Turner
        Broadcasting.
       The Anti-Prejudice Consortium already has close ties and relations to several
        corporations that act and serve as donors, but more relationships and long lasting ties is
        always a common goal.
       The Dare to be Aware campaign wanted to reach out to individuals within these
        corporations with hopes of generating more funds for the APC and all of its efforts.

VII. GOALS, OBJECTIVES, STRATEGIES, AND TACTICS

Goals

       To increase the knowledge of the Anti-Prejudice Consortium among our publics in the
        Metro-Atlanta area.

       Attain contact information of potential individual donors and volunteers.




                                                8
Objective 1

         Increase awareness of the Anti-Prejudice Consortium by 10 percent among our key
          publics in the Metro-Atlanta area by Dec. 8, 2012.

Strategy

         To establish more engaging and interactive ways to promote the Anti-Prejudice
          Consortium to our publics.


Tactics:

         Create an emotional short PSA that can be posted on social media websites, school
          campuses, and TV commercials due to the prevalence of the effect it has on our publics.
         Maximize online communities and customize them so they become more personal and
          interactive.
         Establish a better overall media presence with current and potential publics.
         Create bilingual pamphlets and newsletters and execute them on a consistent
          timetable.
         Create a relationship with the kids by sending them age appropriate & interactive
          newsletters.
         Distinguish the difference between the APC and POP Summit to refresh the APC brand.

Objective 2

         Increase the amount of contact information of potential individual donors and
          volunteers in the Metro-Atlanta area by 25 percent by Dec. 8, 2012.

Strategy

         To create more promotional/informational events for potential donors and volunteers,
          while maintaining current donor and volunteer relationships through enticing rewards
          and recognition.

Tactics

         Reach out to schools beyond the Metro-Atlanta area and begin creating a statewide
          presence that can extend to a national level.
         Create donation categories and benefits that apply accordingly to current and potential
          donors.
         Recognize past donors with benefits to maintain relationships.
         Revamp list of potential corporate/foundation/ individual donors.
         Create a college campus tour that informs individuals of the APC and its programs.




                                                 9
VIII.EVENT SUMMARY

Our event took place at Georgia State University’s Unity Plaza at the Student Center. Overall we
concluded that the event was successful because we not only generated awareness about the
organization, but we also raised funds.

     The team personally educated nearly 50 individuals about the effects of bullying, racism,
      intolerance, and how APC works to prevent it
     We distributed pamphlets with information about the APC workshops and volunteering
       options
     We sold 38 bracelets and five bags with the “Stop Stereotypes” slogan in order to
       spread the message
     Eighteen people registered to receive information about future volunteering
       opportunities

IX. EVALUATION AND STEWARDSHIP

Overall Blackout PR was successful with both objectives as the Dare to be Aware campaign thus
far has:

       Attained contact information of 18 volunteers of all ages
       Made approximately 50+ individuals aware of the APC
       Received $58 in donations in one hour and thirty minutes

Our stewardship plan includes:

       By creating a campus organization that represents the APC so that volunteers can be
        generated from Georgia State for the upcoming years POP Summit
       Contacting other universities to create an organization that represents the APC on their
        campuses
        Distributing flyers among Georgia State University and other campuses monthly, so
        that the APC can have more of a presence
       Campus organizations made can also go to nearby corporations and businesses that do
        and don’t currently donate to create relationships that tie back to the APC
        Measuring how much the APC becomes recognized throughout the year through these
        campus organizations

Our initiative in highlighting the importance of this issue on campus and off will hopefully
continue to engage participants and create new relationships. A lasting impression can be made
on this organization so that it spreads statewide and then nationally.




                                               10
APPENDIX                                            11-30
RESEARCH                                            12-24

----RESEARCH REPORT                                 12-18

----FULL SURVEY RESULTS                             18-24

PLANNING                                            24-27

----GOALS, OBJECTIVES, STRATEGIES, & TACTICS        24-27

IMPLEMENTATION                                      27-29

----BUDGET                                               27

----CALENDAR                                        28-29

EVALUATION                                          29-30

----STEWARDSHIP PLAN                                30




                                               11
RESEARCH
OPPROTUNITY STATEMENT

To make the Anti-Prejudice Consortium and the POP Summit programs more recognized to
potential sponsors.

BACKGROUND RESEARCH

The Anti-Prejudice Consortium (APC) is an Atlanta-based 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that
focuses on teaching young minds how to embrace their differences to fight against prejudices,
hate, and bullying in schools.

The APC was first created as an idea through Kathy Klatt and Louise Freedman. Both women
were involved in children’s organizations, and realized the increase in levels of violence and
prejudice in the younger generation. In hopes to educate them through awareness, the APC
was fully established as an organization in 1999.

The APC has since expanded and works throughout the year to host the Power Over Prejudice
Summit and POP School Program in public, private, and religious schools in the Atlanta area.
Participating counties include, Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, North and South Fulton, Gwinnett, and
Henry County.

The Power Over Prejudice Summit is a program that is held annually for three days at a
university campus downtown that focuses on teaching students and counselors important
concepts through activities and discussions. After Student Ambassadors and school Counselors
are chosen to participate and represent their schools, they learn about culture, race, gender
differences, bullying, prejudice, how to recognize and address these issues, and how to apply
what they have learned at their schools. The students and counselors only have to attend one
of the days offered and it is funded by the APC.

The POP School Program focuses on the same ideas and is also funded by the APC but it is done
after the POP Summit. It is student lead throughout the year and reinforces ideas learned
through the POP Summit. POP Summit Ambassadors are then in charge of creating a project
that is held school wide and promotes the fight against discrimination, stereotypes, and
bullying.

In the past fourteen years, the APC has hosted more than 6,200 middle school students and 465
school counselors at the POP Summit. The program is in high demand and fills up quickly
therefore demonstrating an effective impact in our communities.



                                               12
BACKGROUND RESEARCH ON ISSUE
   Ecological systems such as individual traits, family experiences, parental involvement,
    school climate, and community characteristics are all significant influencers in bullying
    behaviors either directly or indirectly. (Lee 28)

   Among middle school students, 23.2% of bully-victims reported being physically hurt by a
    family member and 22.8% reported witnessing some type of violence, compared with
    19.4% and 17.4%, respectively, among bullies and 13.6% and 14.8%, respectively among
    victims of bullying. (Lee 30)

   Exposure to violent family encounters is more common among bully victims than among
    bullies. (McKenna 305)

   Grade point averages and teacher-rated academic engagement were each predicted by
    both self-perceptions of victimization and peer nominations of victim reputation, controlling
    for demographic and school-level differences as well as overall declines in academic
    performance over time. (Juvonen 1)

   The results of a study done to find out how likely parents are to notify the school if their
    child is being bullied indicated that the more favorable parents’ perceptions of the climate
    were to the less likely they were to contact their child’s school or talk to their child in
    response to victimization. (Wassdorp 2)

   Parents’ perception of the climate and response choice also varied as a function of the
    child’s age and the form of bullying experienced. (Wassdorp 2)

   The most common types of victimization reported by students were denigration and
    harassment, and most cyber bullying took the form of harassment. (Popovic 4)

   The students with high levels of harassment were most likely to experience social-emotional
    problems and were more likely to experience indirect forms of victimization. (Wassdorp 2)

   Results indicate that students perceived weight-related verbal bullying as significantly more
    hurtful than other forms of bullying. (Newman 10-A)




                                                13
SWOT ANAYLYSIS
       STRENGTHS              WEAKNESSES                  OPPORTUNITES             THREATS

   ● Strong               ●    Low awareness          ●    Maximize online     ●   May get
     network of                rate in the                 communications          drowned out
     past donors               community              ●    Build consistency       by other,
   ● Steady flow of       ●    Weak online                 with pamphlets          similar
     annual                    presence                    and newsletters         organizations.
     donations            ●    Anti Prejudice         ●    Build stronger      ●   Lack of
   ● Centrally                 Consortium                  awareness of            branding
     located in the            overshadowed                organization        ●   Difficulty of
     downtown                  by Power Over               among corporate         contacting
     Atlanta area              Prejudice                   and ‘low-hanging’       and impacting
   ● Issue is a                Summit                      fruit donors            corporate
     popular topic        ●    Small staff                                         donors
     on a national        ●    Annual events
     and local level           limited to only
                               some students
                               each school




Primary Research Strategies
Our research focused on individual donors and foundations awareness of the Anti-Prejudice
Consortium, their beliefs and opinions toward donating and what influences their decision to
make financial contributions to nonprofit organizations. As discussed by our client, their
primary focus has been to establish a corporate funding base and they now desire to appeal to
individual donors and broaden their presence among corporate foundations.

What is Qualitative Interviewing?
Qualitative research is a method of research that yields non-numeric information (e.g., words,
text) generated by examining phenomenon that are not easily translated into numbers and/or
are not quantifiable (Schwandt, 1997). Data are gathered through an array of means—direct
observation, interviews, surveys, and questionnaires—with the final goal being a more
personal, and therefore, more valid response. In addition, it seeks to understand a given
research problem or topic from the perspectives of the local population it involves. Qualitative
research is especially effective in obtaining culturally specific information about the values,
opinions, behaviors, and social contexts of particular populations.




                                                 14
Why Interview?
“Interviewing may be defined simply as conversation with a purpose” (Berg, 2007, p. 89) the
purpose of conducting qualitative interviews was to gather in-depth information from
representatives of foundations. The researchers conducted interviews focused on how they
behave in the process that leads to decisions related to donating to nonprofit organization. The
representatives were asked a series of 5 questions and 2 probing questions that provide
information about how the foundations target their philanthropic investments to partners and
programs and what potential partners can do to become an eligible and prominent contender
in a competitive grant-award process.

Qualitative Methods?
The three most common qualitative methods, explained in detail in their respective modules,
are participant observation, in-depth interviews, and focus groups. Each method is particularly
suited for obtaining a specific type of information. (Broom, 2009, p.266)
• Participant observation is appropriate for collecting data on naturally occurring behaviors in
their usual contexts.
• In-depth interviews are optimal for collecting data on individuals’ personal histories,
perspectives, and experiences, particularly when sensitive topics are being explored.
• Focus groups are effective in eliciting data on the cultural norms of a group and in generating
broad overviews of issues of concern to the cultural groups or subgroups represented.
Conducting in-depth interviews the affects participants responses and how and which
questions researchers ask next. The interactive study design, data collection and research
questions are adjusted according to what is learned.

Type of Interview
Because the interview was focused on particular theme a semi-structured interview guide was
used. Thus, it is neither strictly structured with standardized questions, nor entirely “non-
directive.” It was also structured this way so interviewees can introduce new questions. For
example, Q6: What is the process that your organization takes when considering donations? A
following probing question could be, as a potential donor, what are you looking for from the
organizations that requested money?
Qualitative methods are especially well suited for asking open-ended questions that allow the
participant to answer with specific detail. Therefore, the interview questions were structured to
generate nuanced, rich descriptions from the representative of each foundation. For example,
we ask participants, Q9: What is the best avenue to provide you with information related to the
organization you donate to? With this method we were able to obtain descriptions of specific
situations and desire action sequences, maintain the integrity and focus of the interview
process.

What is Quantitative Research?
The general framework of quantitative research seeks to confirm a hypothesis about
phenomena; the instruments use a more rigid style of eliciting and categorizing responses to
question. In contrast to qualitative research, the use of highly structured methods such as
surveys.


                                               15
Why Surveys?
Surveys are the most common quantitative method used in public relations because this
quantitative method is a quick and efficient way of gathering information. (Broom, 2009, p.206)
Survey design can be cross-sectional or longitudinal. Cross-sectional constructions of surveys,
which are the primarily used, take a “snapshot” of the population, according to Stacks. The
cross-sectional design is used to find out how a particular population feels, thinks or believes at
a specific moment in time. Longitudinal designs gather data over a specified period of time. We
chose to use cross-sectional design for our research because our focus was to figure out
individual perceptions on donating and knowledge of the organization now.

The way that a survey is administered is a crucial component of research as well. There are
different methods of administering surveys, all of which have strengths and weaknesses. Mail,
telephone, person-to-person and Internet surveys are all used for different purposes. Although
mail surveys are cost effective, not intrusive and convenient for respondents, they have a slow
speed of return and a low return rate. Telephone surveys are quick to administer and have a
return rate. They are also not too costly, but they are intrusive and normally have design
constraints. Internet surveys are cost effective as well as quick to administer but they have lots
of design constraints. Person-to-person surveys have the highest cost and are very intrusive but
they generate detailed data and have flexible design elements.
Self- administered survey issued online is the emerging method of quantitative research. This
method may include graphic-based questionnaires that respondents’ access through a special
URL ad complete by clicking various multiple-choice opinions, text-based questionnaires that
are sent and completed via email, or a combination in which an email note invites respondents
to access a particular URL for participation. For this study researchers choose to administer
surveys online. The survey was created in Google documents in which the result will be
immediately assessable when at the end of the survey period. Facebook was the main medium
for administration because posting the surveys includes a greater convenience for respondents,
as well as efficiency for the researchers.

Strengths and Limitations of Interviews/Surveys
The strength of the interview was that researchers were able to get a detailed understanding of
what the participants look for when selecting grantees. Participants addressed how their wants
partnered with the potential candidates goals influences their decision to subsidize their
proposal, and their responses helped researchers make recommendations, build
communication strategies and formulate ideas for fundraising events.

Researchers conducted the interviews by phone and were able to follow-up and probe with
more questions based on the responses. The structured format of the interview gave
researchers an idea of where to take the interview, but since we wanted to limit the length of
the interview, participants may have already answered the questions before they were asked.
To respect the participants’ time, some questions were skipped, which also contributed to the
shortening of the interview length.



                                                16
In comparison to participant’s willingness to be interviewed, people seemed equally resistant to
filling out surveys. A limitation that the researchers faced was low response rates. For example,
Hawes stated that she received many calls from people questioning the validity of the Facebook
post, requesting participants for the survey. According to Brooms Culprit & Center’s Public
Relations Effective Public Relations, The Council for Marketing and Opinion Research has
proposed a new method of calculating online response rates that would account all request
because of junk mail filtering services.
If the participant was not knowledgeable about the Anti-Prejudice Consortium then they were
unable to complete the survey.

Sampling Approach
A convenience sample is simply one where the units that are selected for inclusion in the
sample, are the easiest to access. This is in stark contrast to probability sampling techniques,
where the selection of units is made randomly. (Broom, 2009, p. 365) In all forms of research, it
would be ideal to test the entire population, but in most cases, the population is just too large
that it is impossible to include every individual. This is the reason why the researchers choose
to implement convenience sampling. Many researchers prefer this sampling technique because
it is fast, inexpensive, easy and the subjects are readily available.

To form the best sampling frame possible to generate the most accurate answers, we
implemented convenience sampling. We chose this because it would produce an extensive
response from a diverse group of individuals that represent the target population as a whole.
Collectively, we used our resources at Georgia State and abroad to implement our surveys. For
example, we recruited participants via Facebook, Twitter, email and word of mouth. Recruiting
participants online was easily accessible to both researchers and participants. We chose
random participants based on their willingness to participate.

Questionnaire Design
The questionnaire design came about from thoughts and questions that we as a group raised as
well as the organization. After a meeting with our organization contact, Dr. Welch, he gave us
several questions to ask individuals about their community involvement, charitable donations,
and why they donate.

The measure we chose to use is to put the questionnaire in to a survey via Google form. We
chose the survey method through Google docs because they are efficient and easy to
distribute. The Google form also allows us to get immediate responses that are already
organized onto a spreadsheet. Also, because the surveys are distributed electronically, they are
cost efficient.

The survey in Google form allowed us to ask questions that allowed participants to check their
responses from the given choices, choose from lists, and rate their answers on a scale, and type
in their own individual answers to our questions. After initial questions about donations and
community involvement, participants were questioned about their knowledge of the Anti-
Prejudice Consortium. If participants were unfamiliar with the organization, they were sent to a


                                               17
thank you page, while others who did know about the APC went on to answer questions about
their individual involvement with the organization.

The follow-up questions were based on individual and organization relationships. After the
relationship questions, participants were asked questions that provides demographics for our
research. The demographics make the research more relevant and let us know whom we
targeted by age, race, gender and other factors.

Data Analysis
From our data we have realized that our audience includes a variety of demographics.
Individuals that we surveyed were surprisingly not as involved in leadership roles as those who
were by a difference of 10. Involvement in volunteer activities ranged in a large variety but
there was only a 3% difference between individuals who claimed they were very involved 26%
and 23% in individuals who said they were not involved at all. Our respondents also stated that
the majority of the involvement of people who volunteered was to those organizations that
dealt with “Cultural, Religious, and Gender Based” topics. The majority of our volunteers were
also not very active in the past year and those who were stated that they were only active for
approximately 10 hours. Donations were also geared towards religious individuals.

Qualitative and Quantitative Results

I. Survey Results

All survey participants were asked eight questions about their roles within their community
on the bases of volunteer activities, leadership roles and individual donations. After the initial
eight questions, all participants were asked about their knowledge of the APC. If they had no
prior knowledge, they were directed to a thank you page in which they exited the survey. If
they did have knowledge, they were asked a series of questions about their relationship with
the APC followed by demographic questions to further interpret their data.

Q1. How would you describe your level of volunteer activities?

Twenty-six percent of our participants stated that they were for the most part “involved” when
it came to volunteer activities. However, twenty-three percent agreed that they were “not very
involved.” This means that our participants varied on the participation within the community
and this creates an un-balanced distribution of representation for our research. If people are
not involved within the community, then their knowledge or involvement with the APC is sure
to be unlikely.




                                               18
                                                          1 - Not Very Involved     1223%
                                                           2                         8 15%
                                                           3                        1019%
                                                           4                        1426%
                                                          5-    Very Involved        8 15%

                        Not             Very
                        Very          Involved
                      Involved
Q2. How much influence does each of these factors have on how much time you spend on
volunteer activities?

87 percent of our participants stated that time was “influential” or “very influential” when
determining their volunteer activities. If people do not have time to volunteer because of
school, work or other aspects that influence time, then they are less likely to get involved with
the goals or mission behind the APC. Time is a direct reflection of the organizations participants
and potential participants in the future. Thirty percent of our participants said that costs were
“not influential” to their volunteer activities. This is likely because most volunteer opportunities
come at no cost to the individual volunteering. Also, individuals usually volunteer in their own
communities, making gas and other transportation costs not a factor. Overwhelmingly, thirty-
four percent of our participants said that costs were “influential” to their volunteer activities.
This may come about for volunteer activities in which funds are a necessity to keep an
organization about. Transportation, work and other aspects may be considered when
determining how cost effects someone’s volunteer decisions. Friend and family involvement did
not have as high of percentages as time, but it was a major factor. Forty-two percent of our
participants agreed that involvement from their family and friends are “influential” to their
volunteer activities. This comes in part from direct relations to an organization, family tradition,
peer pressure and several others. These factors show that people consider several aspects
when choosing how they embed volunteering into their lives.

                                                TIME

                                  Not Influential          6 11%
                                  Influential            24 45%
                                  Very Influential       22 42%


Q3. How much were you involved with an organization or program in the last 12 months?




                                                19
Within the past twelve months, people were not involved or spent ten hours or fewer
volunteering with an organization. Our sample is not involved with any organizations and this
may be the result of them not having time or money since they were college students.
However, several of our participants spent more than 120 hours with an organization so our
results are contradicting to most ideas or factors that may have skewed our results.

Q4. How many hours were you involved with this organization or program in the last 12
months? These responses were specific with what organizations that our participants were
involved with or chose to volunteer with.

Our participants were the least involved with civil liberties organizations. Ninety-one percent of
our participants stated that they had no volunteer hours with organizations as such.




Our participants were most involved with “Cultural, Religious, and Gender Based”
organizations. Fifty-two percent of our participants spent one or more hours with these
particular organizations. Individuals tend to relate more with their social institutions like church
and their gender. This question also correlates with family and friend involvement as they have
a direct effect on one another. Christopher Ellison says, “Frequent churchgoers report larger
social networks, more contact with network members, more types of social support received,
and more favorable perceptions of the quality of their social relationships than do their un-
churched counterparts. Further, most of these empirical patterns withstand statistical controls
for a wide range of covariates (Ellison 46).”

                    “Cultural, Religious, and Gender Based” Hours Involved




                                                20
Q5. Have you ever played a leadership role? If yes, which organizations?

Most of our participants have never played a leadership role. This is partly due their non-
involvement with volunteer activities. However, the leadership roles held was mostly in
“Cultural, Religious, and Gender Based” organizations with forty-two percent participants from
our sample. This question shows a direct relationship with their involvement with these
organizations and is a reflection of the previous question. According to Leadership Training
Tutorials, “Leadership development is vital because organizations take on the personality of
their leaders. Leadership training and development can maximize productivity, shape a positive
culture and promote harmony. To achieve this, key people must lead individuals and teams
using an appropriate leadership style (“Defining Leadership” N.P.).”



                  “Cultural, Religious, and Gender Based” Leadership Roles




Q6. What factors do you consider when choosing an organization to donate or participate in?

                     Location             2548%
            Employment Involvement        2038%
                Emotional Reasons         2956%
                Family Involvement        2038%
                       Other               7 13%




People may select more than one checkbox, so percentages may add up to more than 100%.

Fifth-six percent or twenty-nine of our participants stated that emotional reasons were the
logic for their involvement with an organization. For example, people support the American
Cancer Society or the Susan G. Komen for the Cure if they know someone, a friend or family



                                              21
member, who is battling or has battled cancer. A strong emotional tie to an issue promotes
involvement and donations from individuals.

Q7. Which types of organizations have you donated money to in the past 12 months?




Just as we found in previous survey questions, participants donated the most money to
“religious groups” with sixty-eight percent of participants donating. This data is similar in that
the majority of our participants hold strong ties to religion. Medical research had the second
most number of donors with forty-five percent. Both religion and medical research are directly
related to the number factor that people consider when donating which is emotional reasons.

Q8. On average, what is the range of how much money you donate per year?




Of our sample, seventy-seven percent of participants donate less than $1,000 per year. This
may be because of several reasons like economic instability or the majority of our participants
could be college students who are living on a fixed income. According to Leyla Norman, “The
average income for a college student, according to the National Center for Educational Statistics
in the study previously mentioned is $14,400. This is often supplemented by financial aid such
as scholarships and loans. Parental financial support can also help students pay their bills
(Norman).” With money being an issue for college students, they are less likely to donate more
than $1,000 to charity within a year.

Q9. Have you ever heard of the Anti-Prejudice Consortium of Atlanta?

Out of the 53 people who participated in our survey, only 5 knew about the APC. Because the
APC was not formed until 2000, it is a fairly new organization. With little over a decade in, the
organizations have thousands of students and hundreds of mentors and tutors, yet many are
not aware of APC or its community efforts.

                                        Aware of the APC




                                                22
II. Demographics

Demographics for our survey were only asked to the 5 participants who knew about the APC. All
other individuals who denied knowledge were prompted to a thank you page and exited the
survey.

Of the 5 participants, 4 of them were 18-24 year old, 3 of them were female, 3 of them were
single, 2 were African American and 2 were White, 2 were liberal and they all lived in various zip
codes within Atlanta.



What is your age?

                                             What is your biological sex?




What is your current marital status?



                                       Which one or ones do you belong to?




How would you best describe your political views?




III. Conclusion


                                               23
Most people that we surveyed are not involved in volunteer activities. Also, factors like time
and costs are directly related to how people determine their participation within an
organization. Those who did participate, held leadership roles or donated were overwhelmingly
involved with religious and gender-based organizations. Strong religious and social ties have a
direct effect on involvement within the community. Most people do not donate more than
$1,000 in a year and that there are underlying factors within our sample that may be the cause
of such. Disturbingly, almost all of our participants had no knowledge of the APC and increasing
awareness may be a future goal of the organization.

IV. References

"Defining Leadership." Leadership Training Tutorials. Leadership Training Tutorials & Articles.
Web. 9 Oct. 2011.
       <http://leadershiptrainingtutorials.com/index.php?q=Why_is_Leadership_so_Important
>.

Ellison, Christopher G., and Linda K. George. "Religious Involvement, Social Ties, and Social
Support in a Southeastern Community." Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 33.1
(1994): 46+. JSTOR. Web. 9 Oct. 2011. http://www.jstor.org/pss/1386636

Norman, Leyla. "What Is the Average College Student's Income?" E How Money. Demand
Media, 16 May 2011. Web. 9 Oct. 2011. <http://www.ehow.com/info_7934153_average-
college-students-income.html>.

Themes from Interviews

      Candidates must go through an application process in which all necessary guidelines are
       met. This may take several months for approval before an organization is eligible to
       receive donations.
      The recipient selected usually has a direct connection to an individual, most likely
       someone with a management position, within the corporation (ex. “In memory of”).
      Aspects surrounding but not limited to solving critical social issues, domestic violence
       prevention, use of technology and education.
      Donations usually take place around a holiday season such as Christmas.
      The employee-matching gift fund where a corporation will match or double its
       employee’s individual donations.

Positioning Statement

The Anti Prejudice Consortium is determined to maintain a realistic outlook of how prejudices
are sometimes applied towards peers. The APC is focused on making students and teachers
aware of how these prejudices are established and how hosting our yearly interactive POP
Summit can break them down. Unlike YWCA Enid, the APC allows the participants to attain a
more reflective understanding of how their actions affect not only them but also their peers, by
hosting the one day POP Summit where interactive activities demonstrate such actions.



                                                24
Goal

To revitalize the brand of the Anti-Prejudice Consortium so we can reach potential donors and
volunteers.

Key Publics

      Corporations
      Individuals
      Foundations
      Older Generations
      Students and Parents
      Diverse Audiences

Analysis of Key Publics

These publics were chosen according to the relevance that they held as stakeholders in
communities that we wanted to influence with the APC. The individuals chosen would impact
the APC by their support, the spreading of awareness of the APC, or by their donations.

Surveys

In order to plan our campaign, we conducted 50 surveys. Each member of the group e-mailed
the surveys to 10 people, to get information about the level of involvement on volunteer
programs and to understand, evaluate and analyze the knowledge people have about these
nonprofit organizations and what make people giving donations to organizations, such as Anti
Prejudice Consortium. The following are our statistical findings:

      Key Public Opinion about Anti-Prejudice Consortium
      80% of the key publics agreed or strongly agreed that APC was a reliable one, and had a
       good opinion about it. So, the biggest problem for the participants was the relationship
       between the organization and the people.
      The factors the public considers when choosing an organization to participate with are
       emotional reasons and location, family involvement and costs reasons.
      All of the key publics donated in the last year $100 or less, and they all had been
       donating to the Anti-Prejudice Consortium for one year.
      In relation with the first contact this public had with the organization, for 40% of them
       was the School Programs, 20% of them discovered the APC by internet, 20% first
       participated in a Community Event and the rest 20% first contact was the Art Against
       Prejudice Show.

On the whole, APC focuses on two key publics: Atlanta foundations that support charitable
activities in order to serve the common good and donators with a full-time job that participate
with these nonprofit organizations. APC focuses in three types of foundations:



                                              25
        Independent Foundations founded by an individual, a family or a group of individuals
        Corporate Foundations created and funded by companies as separate legal entities,
         operated by a board of directors that is usually comprised of company officials.
        Community/Public Foundations that are publicly supported operated by, and for the
         benefit of, a specific community or geographic region. They receive their funds from a
         variety of individual donors, and provide a vehicle for donors to establish endowed
         funds without incurring the costs of starting a foundation.


Communication

The public obtains news through web, email, blogs, newsletters, etc. Those unaware about the
issue of the APC are not seeking information. They are unaware of the issue as well as the
organization and may seek information should the issue become more relevant in their lives or
personal organizations. The publics are likely to act on any information it receives. They tend to
receive information all the time and only respond if the issue has direct ties or entities. Credible
sources for the public are company leaders and those involved with sponsorships or charitable
events and donations.

Public

Bases on the research, the key publics for this campaign are latent. A latent public monitors the
situation by anticipating change toward awareness. This campaign effort will provide
information about the issue and explain its significance to the public and present your
organization’s opinion or intended action.

Objective

To increase donations and awareness of the Anti-Prejudice Consortium among our publics by
15 percent come Dec. 8, 2012.

Strategy

To establish a better overall media presence with current and potential publics

Key Messages

Key Message 1: Bullying and discrimination are problems in the United States.

        31% of children experienced bullying by their peers during childhood, a further 7% were
         discriminated against and 14% were made to feel different or 'like an outsider'. 43%
         experienced at least one of these things during childhood.
        Around a third of boys (35%) and a quarter of girls (26%) admit they have bullied other
         children 'a little' and/or 'a lot'.
        Over 280,000 students are attacked in U.S high schools each month.



                                                26
         About 56 percent, of all U.S. students have witnessed a bullying crime take place while
          at school.

   Key Message 2: The Anti-Prejudice Consortium of Atlanta help area children and teens
   overcome prejudice, discrimination and stereotypes.

         The Anti-Prejudice Consortium (APC) provides programs that work to fight prejudice,
          increase tolerance, and promote respect among all people.
         Annually, APC hosts the Power Over Prejudice (POP) Summit (a one-day workshop on
          prejudice and discrimination to learn about cultural, racial, ethnic, socioeconomic and
          physical differences) and the In-School Follow-up (ISF) Program (a student-led program
          that circulates the lessons of cultural understanding, appreciation of diversity, tolerance,
          and non-violence to entire student bodies).
         More than 5,000 students and 400 counselors from metro public, private and religious
          schools have participated in the POP Summit.

Key Message 3: Donors and sponsors are needed for the Anti-Prejudice Consortium to continue
its mission.

         Nonprofits play an important role in both society and the community and must receive
          all funds from outside donors and sponsors.
         The APC’s corporate sponsors and donors are local and industry leaders who believe in
          the importance of ending bullying and discrimination and recognize how it could
          improve area communities in the future.

Tactics

         Maximize online communities and customize them so they become more personal and
          interactive.
         Create bilingual pamphlets and newsletters and execute them on a consistent
          timetable.
         Create a relationship with the kids by sending them age appropriate & interactive
          newsletters.
         Reach out to schools beyond the Metro-Atlanta area and begin creating a statewide
          presence that can extend to a national level.
         Create donation categories and benefits that apply accordingly to current and potential
          donors.
         Recognize past donors with benefits to maintain relationships.
         Distinguish the difference between the APC and POP Summit to refresh the APC brand.
         Revamp list of potential corporate/foundation/ individual donors.
         Create an emotional video to post on social media since 48 percent of our surveyors
          considered that a factor on why they donate.

BUDGET


                                                  27
The budget for this campaign was set to $250 to cover operating, human, and equipment costs.
Considering that there was no human nor operating costs because Blackout PR provided free
services and resources, the budget was maintained. Therefore the whole budget could be spent
for the event and the equipment needed for the event. The location itself was free and the
table and chairs were also free. The money went towards five “Stop Stereotypes” t-shirts,
rubber bracelets with the APC logo, drawstring bags that could be sold, and candy to entice the
publics, which were all provided by the APC.

CALENDAR
In order to continue with the campaign, keep in contact with the donor and foundations and
provide information about Anti Prejudice Consortium this is the planning we recommend for
the year 2012 (January-June).

      November 2011 implement a promotional event at Georgia State to generate
       awareness, increase individual donor and volunteer database.
      Launch a satisfaction survey about APC in January 2012
      Collect the APC satisfaction survey results and send them out in a special newsletter to
       our top donors to keep them informed
      Send a newsletter to the donors and foundations of APC, including the upcoming
       events’ information every three months
      Update the APC webpage weekly so that it is up-to-date and interacting with our publics
      Update the Facebook page daily with interactive statuses so that relationships are
       formed

October
    2-Sent the surveys of the research about APC
    3-Sent the surveys of the research about APC
    4-Sent the surveys of the research about APC
    5-Sent the surveys of the research about APC
    6-Sent the surveys of the research about APC
    7-Sent the surveys of the research about APC
    8-Sent the surveys of the research about APC
    9-Collected data and results from the surveys
    16- Finished the first draft (background, research, SWOT analysis, data
     analysis, results, key publics
    23- Defined goals, objectives, strategies, tactics for the campaign
    24- Defined goals, objectives, strategies, tactics for the campaign
    25- Defined goals, objectives, strategies, tactics for the campaign
November


                                              28
      11- First draft of the campaign book
      13- Meeting with the client to show the draft of the campaign
      15- Celebration of the 16th Annual 2011 POP Summit
      16- Celebration of the 16th Annual 2011 POP Summit
      17- Celebration of the 16th Annual 2011 POP Summit
      23- Second draft of the campaign book
      27- Create a satisfaction survey that the client will launch in the future
December
    5-Final campaign book presentation to the client
    23-Send major donors of APC newsletter with the whole year of events and
     results summary
    29- Update the APC website with a summary of the 2011 year activities,
     events, results and donations
    30- Send foundations and donors a letter to thank them for their donation
     and participation
In order to continue with the campaign, keep in contact with the donor and foundations and
provide information about Anti Prejudice Consortium this is the planning we recommend for
the year 2012 (January-June).

      November 2011 implement a promotional event at Georgia State to generate
       awareness, increase individual donor and volunteer database.
      Launch a satisfaction survey about APC in January 2012
      Collect the APC satisfaction survey results and send them out in a special newsletter to
       our top donors to keep them informed
      Send a newsletter to the donors and foundations of APC, including the upcoming
       events’ information every three months
      Update the APC webpage weekly so that it is up-to-date and interacting with our publics
      Update the Facebook page daily with interactive statuses so that relationships are
       formed

EVALUATION CRITERIA AND TOOLS
To evaluate the effectiveness that the APC has had throughout this campaign, we will measure
quantitative and qualitative data.

The APC will monitor the success of the campaign by:

   1. Seeing if the goal of the APC was met by the due date
   2. By the amount of exposure and interaction we receive from our publics
   3. The total amount of donors


                                              29
   4.  The amount of response there is to the media disseminated
   5.  The number of participating schools in and outside the Metro-Atlanta area
   6.  The number of total participating students at the POP Summit
   7.  Having monthly checkpoints in social media interactions
   8.  How many new email addresses we attain at each event
   9.  The involvement of past counselors and students and their continuing interest in the
       APC
   10. Creating two different surveys, one geared to those who have participated and one
       towards people who have not. Surveys will be interactive with feedback boxes provided.

STEWARDSHIP PLAN
Upon the conclusion of the campaign for the Anti-Prejudice Consortium, Blackout PR
suggests the following to maintain effective relations with participants, donors and sponsors:

1. In order to show appreciation for our donors, the Anti-Prejudice Consortium will host an
annual cocktail party. This event will be solely for past donors and will allow them to bring
other individuals who may be interested in becoming a donor as well.

2. To reward students involved with the Anti-Prejudice Consortium and its annual events,
schools with extraordinary students will receive reward parties that may consist of pizza or ice
cream. These students must exemplify that they have changed the stereotypes that the APC
attempts to change, such as bullying. This will be measured using the schools disciplinary
records.

3. The Anti-Prejudice Consortium will send bi-monthly newsletters and email blasts to all those
who have subscribed to show the past accomplishments and future efforts of the APC with
hopes to keep and produce new sponsors and donors. This newsletter will also update
individuals about future events and volunteer opportunities on behalf of the APC.

4. To overcome the prejudices that students face, the Anti-Prejudice Consortium will host a
multi-cultural day. This will allow students to represent their cultures with food and attire. By
doing so, students will learn to enjoy and be proud of their individual heritage.

5. The APC will also join Georgia State University’s Campus Events to participate in their annual
Holidays of the World event. By doing so, the APC can gain awareness on campus to older
audiences and perhaps potential donors or volunteers.

6. To get more students and schools involved, the Anti-Prejudice Consortium will reach out to
students in middle and high schools all over Georgia with hopes of creating awareness and
change nationwide. The APC will encourage all counties and school districts to hold events on
the APC’s behalf to overcome all stereotypical obstacles.




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