Cross-Contamination

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					Cross-Contamination


     & HACCP
Cross-Contamination:

 Micro organisms and contaminants
 cannot move by themselves
 They are carried to foods and
 contact surfaces by humans, rodents
 and insects.
 This transfer is referred to as
 “Cross-Contamination”
Cross-Contamination:

 Is the process where one item
 becomes contaminated and then
 contaminates a food or a tool.
Reducing Cross-contamination

3 steps to reducing cross-
    contamination.
1. Personal Cleanliness
2. Dish and Equipment Cleanliness
3. Pest Control
Personal Cleanliness
Decreasing the risk of spreading illness:
1. Wash your hands frequently
2. Keep fingernails short and clean
3. Keep cuts and wounds antiseptically
    bandaged and wear latex gloves.
4. Keep your hair clean and restrained
5. Do not eat, drink, smoke or chew gum in
    food preparation areas.
Equipment Cleanliness
 There is a difference between clean and
 sanitary
 Clean: means that there is no visible soil
 on it.
 Sanitary: means that harmful substances
 are reduced to safe levels.
 Sterilize: all living microorganisms are
 destroyed
Equipment Cleanliness
Dish and pot washing in a three compartment sink
  Scrape or pre-rinse; pre-soak cutlery
  Wash:
     minimum 45°C (113°F) with approved detergent
  Rinse:
     immersion in clear water; min. 45°C (113°F)
  Sanitize
     Immersion in clear water with appropriate chemical
     sanitizing solution; minimum 77°C (170°F) for 2 minutes
  Dry
Pest Control
 An insect or rodent infestation is
 considered a serious health hazard and
 should be dealt with immediately and
 thoroughly
 Pest must be controlled by:
   Building them out of the facility
   Creating an environment in which they cannot
   find food, water or shelter
   Relying on professional extermination
Pest Control
 Store all foods at least 15 cm (6 in.)
 off the floor and 5 cm (2 in.) away
 from walls
 Rotate stock to disrupt nesting places
 and breeding habits
 Provide good ventilation
 Clean up spills and crumbs
 immediately
HACCP Systems

Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points
 An effective and efficient system for
 maintaining sanitary conditions in all
 types of food service operations
HACCP Systems
  A Critical Control Point is any step during the processing of a
  food at which a mistake can result in the transmission,
  growth or survival of pathogenic bacteria


At each step there is some hazard of contamination:

  Poor Hygiene
  Contaminated Raw Food
  Cross-Contamination
  Improper Cooking
  Improper Holding
  Improper Cooling
  Improper Re-heating
HACCP focuses attention on the flow
of food through the foodservice
facility at critical points of the foods
receiving, storing, preparation,
cooking and serving.
HACCP combines a number of steps to
ensure that food is kept as safe as
possible.
Food Handling Procedures
Monitoring Techniques
Record Keeping
HAACP flow chart:
Helps employees:
  Identify procedures and foods that
 are likely to cause a food borne
 illness
 Develop facility procedures that will
 reduce the risk of food borne illness.
  Monitor procedures in order to keep
 food safe
We must look at the steps that food goes
through in the kitchen before it is served.



 Receiving
 Storing
 Food Preparation
 Cooking
 Food Holding and Serving
 Cooling
 Reheating
What if you see a hazard?

 Controlling Hazards:
 After you have identified the critical
 control points… follow the procedures
 to minimize the hazards.
Time and Temperature are 2
ways of controlling hazards.

 They have a huge impact on food safety
   High temperatures used when cooking kills most
   of the harmful bacteria in the food.

   Meats must reach a minimal internal
   temperature.

   Minimal internal temperature is the lowest
   temp at which foods can be safely cooked.

				
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