Top 5 Sales Questions for MSPs

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					Top  5  MSP  Sales  Questions  Answered!


1.  How  do  I  consistently  bring  in  new  monthly  recurring  revenue  (MRR)  
clients?

The  fact  of  the  matter  is  this  isn’t  simple  to  answer;;  there  is  no  ‘silver  bullet.’  It  comes  
down  to  having  an  overall  sales  and  marketing  strategy  that  gets  you  in  front  of  enough  
prospects  consistently,  being  able  to  clearly  make  a  case  for  why  a  managed  service  is  
best  for  your  client,  and  being  able  to  effectively  persuade  the  prospect  into  believing  
that  you  should  be  their  provider.  When  they  see  that  the  outcome  of  partnering  with  
you  is  the  best  thing  for  their  business,  that’s  when  you  win  great  long-­term  MRR  part-­
ners.

The  reality  is  that  most  MSPs  are  not  very  good  at  developing  a  good  overall  sales  and  
marketing  strategy,  and  the  majority  are  speaking  to  way  too  few  prospects  on  a  regu-­
lar  basis  to  have  anything  other  than  a  trickle  of  new  clients.




decision  maker  for  everything  at  a  small  business.  Don’t  fall  for  the  VP  or  director’s  
line  that  it’s  their  call.  In  most  small  businesses,  dollars  being  spent  are  decided  by  the  
CEO/owner  of  the  business,  since  the  money  is  coming  right  out  of  their  pocket.




CEO  of  the  business.




First,  you  must  decide  if  that’s  the  strategy  you  really  want  to  pursue.  Getting  someone  
to  lay  off  an  in-­house  employee  is  a  tough  proposition  at  most  small  businesses;;  busi-­
ness  owners  don’t  want  to  feel  like  big,  heartless  companies.

You  may  be  better  off  selling  them  on  how  you  can  compliment  what  the  in-­house  per-­
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son  is  doing  to  create  a  better  overall  IT  experience  for  the  company.  This  gets  you  

easier.

If  you  decide  that  you  do  want  to  try  the  replacement  strategy,  it’s  critical  that  you  use  
facts  to  your  advantage.  You  want  to  remove  as  much  emotion  from  the  decision  as  
possible.  Important  facts  to  address:


       direct  cost  at  about  $55k/year  -­-­  that’s  more  than  $4500/month.  What  could  
       you  do  for  them  at  that  price?    
       It’s  impossible  to  give  one  IT  person  a  career  path  in  a  small  business;;  
       inevitably  that  person  is  going  to  get  stale  and  bored  and  cause  you  prob-­
       lems.

       to  many  different  technologies  and  businesses,  so  your  company  develop-­
       ment  is  going  to  be  constrained  by  their  limited  knowledge.
       Employees  get  sick,  take  vacations,  and  need  nights  off  -­-­  your  business  
       doesn’t.


something  that  makes  them  feel  good  about  justifying  the  decision  to  let  someone  go.




First,  you  need  to  understand  if  MRR  deals  are  even  right  for  them;;  managed  services  
is  not  necessarily  right  for  every  prospect.  If  they  don’t  really  need  and  want  those  ser-­
vices,  why  waste  time  continuing  to  try  to  sell  them?  Work  on  other  prospects!

However,  if  you  talk  with  100  small  businesses  and  none  of  them  seems  to  resonate  
with  your  managed  services  value  proposition,  there  is  something  wrong  with  your  
pitch.

You  are  most  likely  focusing  on  what  you  want  and  need  -­-­  more  recurring  revenue  
-­-­  and  not  on  what  they  want  and  need.  Everything  you  say  must  relate  and  equate  to  
value  for  your  prospective  client.  Your  presentation  must  clearly  communicate  how  your  
services  will  help  them  accomplish  THEIR  goals.    

Or  perhaps  it’s  something  with  you.  Perhaps  you  are  not  presenting  yourself  in  a  way  
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that  establishes  credibility  and  trust.  Or  you’re  not  handling  their  objections  well.

There  is  a  lot  to  cover  in  terms  of  being  great  at  sales;;  it’s  hard  to  know  exactly  where  
you  may  be  falling  short  relative  to  your  competition.




First,  you  need  to  build  a  business  model  that  works  for  you,  not  for  any  single  custom-­
er.  That  means  that  you  need  to  have  a  reasonable  set  of  options  that  should  suit  the  

it’s  no  one’s  fault  but  your  own.

                                                                                                       -­
er  for  a  prospect  to  attack  any  particular  component  because  of  its  cost.  Offer  one  price  
for  one  easy  to  understand  service  and  don’t  break  it  down.

Finally,  don’t  pitch  something  they  don’t  want  in  your  proposal;;  you  should  clearly  know  
what  features  they  want  and  and  include  those.  If  you  throw  in  24/7  coverage  when  all  
they  want  is  8-­5,  they  are  going  to  question  the  price  and  try  to  pull  it  out  of  your  offer-­
ing.    




Have  more  questions  regarding  selling  as  an  MSP?  

Contact  one  of  Kutenda’s  Consultants  to  learn  how  to  take  advantage  of  more  master  
selling  advice  from  Kutenda  CEO  Mike  Cooch  -­  previous  Founder  and  CEO  of  one  of  
the  fastest  growing  MSPs  in  the  industry.  

Email:  Consultants@Kutenda.com  
Phone:  303.416.4722




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