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					    Advocacy

WAAL Conference, Spring 2004
            Kathy Pletcher
Associate Provost for Information Services
   University of Wisconsin-Green Bay

                                             1
          Key Questions
   Who can advocate for librarians & libraries?
   What techniques and tools might be used
    to make libraries more visible?
   Where do we need to be heard?
   When is it important to step forward?
   Why should each of us be an active
    advocate?
                                                   2
      Definitions
Advocate (verb)
To speak or write in favor of;
to recommend publicly; to support

Advocate (noun)
A person who speaks in favor; one who
 pleads or argues publicly for something

                                           3
      Legislative Advocacy
   All politics are local: relate to local issues
   Ongoing relationships are best
   Be respectful of their concerns & time
   Be appreciative of any support
   Be informative; Make it easy for them
   Face-to-face; telephone; letters; email
   Be strategic; Be opportunistic
                                                     4
                 Advocacy
       Do’s                    Don’ts
   Use stories and           Don’t use jargon or
    examples                   acronyms
   Use simple language,      Don’t overwhelm
    less is better             with statistics
   Stick to key points       Don’t try to impress
   Articulate clearly        Don’t use sarcasm
   Aim for the right         Don’t go over your
    level                      allotted time

                                                      5
    Public Speaking Essentials

   Who is the target audience(s)?
   What is your message?
   How can you tailor your message?
   How do you get on their agenda?
   How do you plan for the speech?



                                       6
Audience Analysis
   Values
   Needs
   Constraints
   Demographics
   Environment
   Benefits/Risks


                     7
    Your Message

   Short & simple (5-10 words)
   Repeat message (rule of 3)
   Key points to support message (rule of 3)
   Why should they care?
   Hoped for outcomes?



                                                8
Organizing Your Speech
   Openings (styles will vary)
   Preview (tell ‘em what you’re going to tell ‘em)
   State main and sub-ideas (tell ‘em)
   Why should they care? (benefits)
   Review ideas (tell ‘em what you told ‘em)
   Conclusion: what should they do/know now?
   Say “Thank You” (cannot say this enough!)


                                                  9
Preparing Your Speech
   Use large font for easy reading
   Write our entire speech
   Edit ruthlessly!
   Rehearse standing up and using visuals
   Time yourself!!!
   Listen/look at yourself
   Prepare notes for prompts (ppt works)
                                             10
Before the Speech
   Dress the part
   Arrive early
   Check room setup; where will you be
    relative to the audience? relax
   Familiarize yourself with equipment;
   Find a clock or place your watch in view
   Greet/watch people (as appropriate)

                                               11
Delivering the Speech
   Be enthusiastic, animated, conversational
   Pace presentation, keep eye on clock, be
    prepared to make adjustments as needed
   Maintain good posture; eye contact; smile
   Have passion
   Don’t go over your time (unless invited!)


                                          12
     Handouts & Visuals

   Handouts with key points
   Quotable statements
   Use illustrations for things that are hard to
    explain or “cute”
   Have business cards ready


                                                    13
Ho w to Handle Questions
   Listen & Empathize
   Do not repeat negatives
   Reframe the question
   Be positive, honest, straightforward
   Don’t assume anything you say is “off the
    record”
   Anticipate questions, practice answers

                                           14
     Working with the Media

   Press releases
   Letters to the editor
   Build relationships for story contacts
   Be aware of their deadlines
   Respond as quickly as possible to requests
   Develop a pitch letter

                                                 15
     Public Writing

   Who is the audience?
   What is your message?
   Get their attention!
   Be personable
   Be simple, be brief, reiterate.
   Address tough questions

                                      16
      Press interviews
   Never repeat a negative
   Never give one-word answers
   Talk in soundbites! (12-20 seconds)
   Bridge, flag and hook




                                          17
      Publications
   News letter
   Brochures, bookmarks, posters
   Newspaper column
   Annual report or special report
   Recognizable graphic



                                      18
     What can we do?
   Understand the political culture
   Faculty Senate; Deans, Students
   Chancellors/Presidents
   Board of Trustees; Friends groups
   Legislature; County/Municipal Boards
   Congress; Federal agencies
   ALA; WLA, WAAL, other alliances
                                           19
Questions & Discussion


     Thank you!


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