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POETRY IV

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					POETRY IV

    Rhyming Patterns
          and
        Rhythm
Rhyming Patterns
• One of the most fun things about poetry is
  how poets use rhyming patterns as they
  play with words and tell a story.

• See if you can figure out the rhyming
  patterns in the following poems….
The Lizard
The lizard is a timid thing
That cannot dance or fly or sing;
He hunts for bugs beneath the floor
And longs to be a dinosaur.


                                      John Gardner
The Lizard
The lizard is a timid thing (a)
That cannot dance or fly or sing; (a)
He hunts for bugs beneath the floor (b)
And longs to be a dinosaur. (b)


                                        John Gardner
The Crocodile
How doth the little crocodile
Improve his shining tail,
and pour the waters of the Nile
On every golden scale!

  How cheerfully he seems to grin!
  How neatly spread his claws,
  And welcomes little fishes in
  With gently smiling jaws.
                                     Lewis Carroll
The Crocodile
How doth the little crocodile (a)
Improve his shining tail, (b)
and pour the waters of the Nile (a)
On every golden scale! (b)

  How cheerfully he seems to grin! (a)
  How neatly spread his claws, (b)
  And welcomes little fishes in (a)
  With gently smiling jaws. (b)
                                      Lewis Carroll
February Twilight
I stood beside a hill
   Smooth with new-laid snow,
A single star looked out
   From the cold evening glow.

There was no other creature
   That saw what I could see --
I stood and watched the evening star
   As long as it watched me.
                                       Sara Teasdale
February Twilight
I stood beside a hill
   Smooth with new-laid snow, (a)
A single star looked out
   From the cold evening glow. (a)

There was no other creature
   That saw what I could see -- (b)
I stood and watched the evening star
   As long as it watched me. (b)
                                       Sara Teasdale
The Eagle
He clasps the crag with crooked hands;
Close to the sun in lonely lands,
Ringed with the azure world, he stands.
The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls;
He watches from his mountain walls,
And like a thunderbolt he falls.
                                 Alfred Tennyson
The Eagle
He clasps the crag with crooked hands; (a)
Close to the sun in lonely lands, (a)
Ringed with the azure world, he stands. (a)
The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls; (b)
He watches from his mountain walls, (b)
And like a thunderbolt he falls. (b)
                                  Alfred Tennyson
Rhythm
• Many poems have a definite
  rhythm or beat .

• See how the rhythm of this next
  poem adds to its meaning...
Train Song
Train Song
The End

				
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