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					APPOSITIVE PHRASES
Chawanna B. Chambers
4 October 2011
Write a story about this picture.
What are they?
 An appositive is a noun or noun phrase that
 renames another noun right beside it. The
 appositive can be a short or long combination of
 words.

 This technique is commonly found in the work of
 sophisticated writers.




                              http://www.chompchomp.com/terms/appositive.htm
 Why do we use them?




Keeps your writing
from being boring!
Where do we place them?
   Beginning (Sentence Openers)
     One of eleven brothers and sisters, Harriet was a
      moody, willful child.
                            Langston Hughes, “Road to Freedom”


   Whom does the appositive rename?
Where do we place them?
   Middle (Subject-Verb Splits)
    A  man, a weary old pensioner with a bald dirty head
      and a stained brown corduroy waistcoat, appeared
      at the door of a small gate lodge.
                   Gordon Parks, “My Mother’s Dream for Me”


   Whom does the appositive rename?
Where do we place them?
   End (Sentence Closers)
     The   boy looked at them, big black ugly insects.
                                  Doris Lessing, African Stories


   Whom does the appositive rename?
Essential versus Optional
   Subject + Verb = Sentence

   Appositives are NOT essential parts of a sentence.

   If you remove the appositive from the sentence,
    what remains will still be a complete thought.
Example #1

   It went away slowly, the feeling of disappointment
    that came sharply after the thrill that made his
    shoulders ache.
   It went away slowly, the feeling of disappointment
    that came sharply after the thrill that made his
    shoulders ache.

   It went away slowly.

                           Ernest Hemingway, “Big Two-Hearted River: Part I”
Example #2
   That night in the south upstairs chamber, a hot little
    room where a full-leafed chinaberry tree shut all the
    air from the single window, Emmett lay in a kind of
    trance.
   That night in the south upstairs chamber, a hot little
    room where a full-leafed chinaberry tree shut all
    the air from the single window, Emmett lay in a kind
    of trance.
   That night in the south upstairs chamber Emmett lay
    in a kind of trance.
                              Jessamyn West, “A Time of Learning”
Stations
   Task
     Arrange  the strips to create a complete sentence with
      the appositive properly punctuated.
     Write the sentence (grammatically correct) in your
      Notes section.


   Time
    4   minutes per station
Imitations
Model: Beside the fireplace old Doctor Winter sat,
bearded and simple and benign, historian and
physician to the town.
                                  --John Steinbeck, The Moon is Down



Preposition article noun adjective noun verb,
adjective conjunction adjective conjunction adjective,
noun conjunction noun preposition article noun.

   Revise a sentence in your story to match this
   sentence structure. Be prepared to share.
Works Cited
Kamballur, Jimmy. Thiruvathira Dancer, India. National
  Geographic Magazine. Kerala, 2009.
Killgallon, Don. Sentence Composing for High School.
  Portsmouth: Boynton/Cook Publications, Inc., 1998.
Simmons, Robin L. The Appositive. 2011. 4 October
  2011
  <http://www.chompchomp.com/terms/appositive.ht
  m>.

				
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