Children and Poverty - PowerPoint by 7BO6s0

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									Children and Poverty
Introduction to Family Studies
Thinking about Poverty
   What percentage of the population is poor?
   What percentage of children are poor?
   What are poor children’s lives like?
 Terminology
     Poverty: Income below the federal poverty
      level (FPL)
          $$22,050 per year for a family of four
     Low-income: Income below 200 percent of
      the 2005 federal poverty level (FPL)
          $44,100 per year for a family of four


Source: http://www.childstats.gov/americaschildren/eco1.asp
Child Poverty
   How many children live in poverty?
   Children represent a disproportionate share of the
    poor in the United States
   25 percent of the total population, are children in the
    U.S.
   but
   35 percent of the poor population are children
   In 2008, 15.45 million children, or 20.7 percent,
    were poor.
           Child Poverty Rates in the U.S.
                  from 2006-1010
   50
   45
   40
   35                                                                              Below
                                                                                   Poverty
   30
   25                                                                              !50% of
   20                                                                              Poverty
   15
   10                                                                              200% of
                                                                                   Poverty
     5
     0
            2006         2007         2008         2009          2010
Source: Kids Count retrieved from
http://datacenter.kidscount.org/data/acrossstates/NationalProfile.aspx?cat=16&group=Category&loc=
Sources for Statistics on Child Poverty
     http://datacenter.kidscount.org/data/acrossstat
      es/Map.aspx?loct=2&ind=43&dtm=322&tf=3
      5
     http://datacenter.kidscount.org/data/acrossstates/NationalProfi
      le.aspx?cat=16&group=Category&loc=1&dt=1%2c3%2c2%
      2c4
     http://www.npc.umich.edu/poverty/
    Child Poverty varies by race and ethnicity
        The poverty rate for children also varies substantially by race
         and Hispanic origin, as shown in the table below
        Children Under 18 Living in Poverty, 2008
        All children under 18
        15, 451,000 or 20.7 %
        White only, non-Hispanic 4, 850,000 or 11.9%
        Black: 4,480,000 or 35.4 %
        Hispanic: 5,610,00 or 33.1 %
        Asian: 531,000 or 13.3 %


SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of the Census, Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage
in the United States: 2009, Report P60, n. 238, Table B-2, pp. 62-7.
    Child Poverty and Race/Ethnicity
   Latino/a and African
    American children are                             White

    disproportionately low                  11
                                                      African
    income.                       28
                                                      American
   Whites comprise the                          34   American
    largest group of low-    12                       Indian

    income children.                                  Asian/Pacific
                                                      Islander
                                       33
                                                      Hispanic
Effects of Poverty on Children
   Health
       Mortality
       Low birth weight
       Health problems
       Abuse
   Educational Outcomes
       High drop out rate
       Underfunded schools
Kidscount website
   What are poverty rates for Children in New
    Jersey?
    http://datacenter.kidscount.org/data/bystate/D
    efault.aspx
There Are No Children Here
   The Henry Horner Homes were not always bad
   In the 1960s there were groups like girl scouts
    who met regularly
   And the crime rate was lower
   But during the 1970s and 1980s drug and gang
    activity increased
There Are No Children Here
   The local Chicago government officials and the
    Chicago Housing Authority never wanted the Henry
    Horner Homes to be built in the first place
   The buildings were not well funded and were not
    well built
   So they never put much money into them, even from
    the beginning
   Later, in the 1980s, findings of a housing authority
    tour of the facilities revealing appalling conditions
    and history of neglect of Chicago’s public housing
There Are No Children Here
   In Philadelphia, and Newark -- high-rise
    public housing is being replaced by:
       two-story, low density townhouses
       Section 8 vouchers
   Strategies to increase home ownership:
     targeted at low to moderate income who
       can afford to pay a mortgage, but cannot
       get together enough $$ for a down payment
       & closing costs
Summary
   For a rich nation, the U.S. has high rates of
    child poverty
   Children are more likely to be in poverty than
    adults
   Child poverty varies by race and ethnicity

								
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