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Moby- Dick

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					                     M o b y - D i c k
By Herman Melville
        “Call me Ishmael”         -Moby Dick; or, The Whale




Furious waves crash over the side of the small
  boat you’re rowing in. The harsh wind from
  the sea pelts your face, but you’re more
  concerned with the sharks circling around your
  boat. Suddenly, something enormous and
  white shoots from the sea, and your heart
  almost stops. In front of you is the largest and
  most terrifying creature you’ve ever seen. The
  sailor next to you mutters an oath and says in a
  low voice, “It’s her. It’s Moby Dick.”
       Moby Dick; or, The Whale
. In Moby Dick, Herman Melville uses destiny to
   twist lives of his characters in a way they don’t
   expect. This theme can be seen in an unlikely
   friendship, the circumstances in which our
   narrator begins his journey, and the prophecy
   of Captain Ahab’s death.
                            Herman Melville
•   Aug. 1st, 1819: Birth

•   1839: Melville goes on his first sea voyage as a cabin

    boy

•   1841-1844: Melville sails on Acushnet, stays on a

    Marquesas Islands, and then sails on USS United

    States, all of which provides inspiration.

•   1846- late 1800’s: Most of Melville’s writing is done.

•   1850: Melville moves to Massachusetts and meets

    Nathaniel Hawthorne.

•   1851: Moby Dick is published.

•   Sept. 28th, 1891: Death
                  The Story
• “Ishmael”, a sailor, travels to Nantucket.
• “Ishmael” meets Queequeg, a harpooneer, and the two
  find work on the Pequod, a whaling boat.
• Captain Ahab is introduced, and the crew learns that
  they are hunting Moby Dick.
• Captain Ahab’s prophecy is revealed, misleading Ahab.
• Starbuck (the 1st mate) tries to keep everyone alive.
• The Pequod spots Moby Dick and begins the chase.
        Characters

•Ishmael
•Queequeg
•Captain Ahab
                   Ishmael
• Narrator
• First time on a whaling boat
• Only survivor at the end
                     Queequeg
•   Cannibal Prince
•   Very well mannered
•   Still, slightly out of place in America
•   Always sticks to his morals
•   Excellent Harpooneer
•   Becomes a friend of Ishmael
Ishmael and Queequeg’s friendship
• Afraid of each other when they first meet
• Both seem very different from one another
  – Educated American
  – Cannibalistic Prince

  • Both become friends, and end up sailing together
    on the Pequod.
                   Friends?
• “Had not the stranger stood between me and
  the door, I would have bolted out of it quicker
  than ever I bolted a dinner.”                –Ishmael upon seeing Queequeg (Melville 24)


• “You no speak-e, I kill-e.”            -Queequeg upon seeing Ishmael in his bed (Melville
  26)


• “and said that henceforth we were married;
  meaning, in his country’s phrase, that we were
  bosom friends; he would gladly die for me, if
  need should be.” -Ishmael talking about his new friendship with Queequeg (Melville 56)
         Choosing the Pequod
• Makes more sense for Queequeg to choose a
  boat, since he’s been a whaler
• Insists that Ishmael must choose (according to
  Yojo)
• Seems like a supernatural force is guiding
  them
• Shouldn’t there be a happy ending then?
                                        Yojo
“Yojo earnestly enjoined that the selection of
  the ship should rest wholly with me,…and..,
  had already pitched upon a vessel…and in that
  vessel I must immediately ship myself, for the
  present irrespective of Queequeg.”

     - Ishmael referring to his conversation with Queequeg about choosing a boat. (Melville 73)
                    Captain Ahab
•   Lost his leg to Moby Dick
•   Maddened with need for revenge
•   Insane
•   “He’s a queer man, Captain Ahab- so some
    think- but a good one. Oh, thou’lt like him well
    enough; no fear, no fear. He’s a grand, ungodly,
    god-like man, Captain Ahab; doesn’t speak
    much; but, when he does speak, then you may
    well listen. Mark ye, be forewarned; Ahab’s
    above the common;”             -Peleg to Ishmael (Moby Dick 85)
              Ahab’s Destiny?
• Prophecy:
  – Fadallah’s death
  – Two coffins
  – Hemp can only kill him
                    Destiny
• Captain Ahab is misled by his death prediction,
  and thinks he cannot die at sea.
“Drive, drive in your nails, oh ye waves! To their
  uttermost heads drive them in! ye but strike a
  thing without a lid; and no coffin and no hearse
  can be mine: - and hemp only can kill me! Ha!
  ha!”
                                    -Captain Ahab
                                  (Moby Dick 607)
                        Finis
     “A person often meets his destiny
on the road he chose to avoid it.”
                 -Jean de La Fontaine

The characters of Moby Dick had their own destinies twisted
in a way they did not expect. Examples of this can be seen in
Queequeg and Ishmael’s friendship, the start of Ishmael’s
journey on the Pequod, and Captain Ahab’s reaction to his
prophecy.
                                 Credits

                                                          Timeline help
• Music                              •     American Authors: 1600-1900 by Kunitz
  –   Enya                                 and Haycraft. “Melville, Herman”
  –   Lord of the Rings              •     Encyclopedia of American Literature: The
  –   Memoirs of a Geisha                  Age of Romanticism and Realism: 1815-
  –   Pan’s Labyrinth                      1914 by Paddock. Vol.11. “Melville,
  –   Pirates of the Caribbean             Herman”
  –   Saw                            •     Moby Dick; or, The Whale by Herman
                                           Melville. “Publisher’s Preface”.
  –   Yiruma
                                     •     http://www.online
   Excerpts:                              literature.com/melville/
      Moby Dick; or, The Whale      •     http://people.brandeis.edu/~teuber/melvi
                                           llebio.html
     PowerPoint:
                                     •     http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/melvillest
      Kaitlin Barton                       ories/section2.rhtml
                                     •     www.kirjasto.sci.fi/melville.htm

				
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posted:8/9/2012
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