EC7 3 Lesson Plans

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					                                                               Melanie Giambattista




                      Science Unit Plan

Grade 7 – Earth and Space Science: Earth’s Crust and Resources (EC)




                     Melanie Giambattista
                         ESCI 390AA
                         Mike McCoy
                     November 23rd, 2010




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                                         Science Unit Plan

                  Grade 7 – Earth and Space Science: Earth’s Crust and Resources (EC)

Outcome: EC7.3 – Investigate the characteristics and formation of the surface geology of Saskatchewan,
including soil; identify correlations between surface geology and past, present, and possible future land
uses. [DM, SI]




Lesson 1a: Dichotomous Key
       Indicator - d. Develop and use a classification key for rocks based on physical characteristics and
        method of formation

Attached Resources:
     Word Document Lesson 1a
           o Teacher Notes
           o Student Handout – Dichotomous Key/Spider Key
     Lesson 1a PowerPoint

Day 1 of 2 - Dichotomous Key - Classification with nails/buttons
Objectives:
     Students will know how to develop and use a classification key for nails/buttons based on the
        physical characteristics (color, size, type).
     Students will create a dichotomous key/spider key for nails/buttons.
     Students will feel enjoyment as they work collaboratively in groups.

Materials:
    A bucket of things for each group (Nails,
       buttons...)

Prior to lesson warm-up (10mins):                          These are examples of the types
In your science journal, write down everything you know    of nails that can be used.
about:
      What it means to classify something?
      If you have heard of a dichotomous key, what do you know about it?

Engage:
Introduce what it means to classify things? (10mins)
     What does it mean to classify something?
     How do you classify things?
     Look around that classroom, how would you classify your classmates?
                  Ex) Hair color, height, eye color, size of feet
     What is a dichotomous key?
Classify things (ex buttons or nails) (25mins)
     Split students into groups


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       Give each group a bucket of things (nails, buttons...)
             o Ex) nails that are the same length but different colors and different styles and nails that
                 a smaller length but different colors and different styles
       Have students within their groups come up with a dichotomous (or a spider key)/classification
        for the nails
             o It can be a chart or a visual representation that they more easily understand

Evaluate: have the groups present and/or hand in their classification systems

Day 2 of 2-Dichotomous Key – Classification with Rocks
Objectives:
    Students will understand what a dichotomous key/spider key is and how rocks are classified.
    Students will start creating a classification key for rocks based on physical characteristics (color,
        size, type).
    Students will feel a sense of confidence as they work in a positive and constructive environment.

Materials:
    Mixed rocks/collection
           o Loan kits on rocks and fossils are available through the Royal Saskatchewan Museum.
             Please see the RSM website (www.royalsaskmuseum.ca) for further details on the Loan
             Kit Program.

Prior to lesson warm-up (10mins):
Review
     Have students write down all that they remember about classification, dichotomous keys and
         different types of rocks on the board.

Engage:
Classifying Rocks (25mins)
     Split students into groups and give each group a collection of rocks
     Have students classify their rocks according to similarities (they should use a dichotomous or
         spider key)
     Have each group explain how and why they classified their rocks the way they did
Discussion at the end of class (10mins)
     How are rocks classified?
             o According to the way they appear = their formation
     Have students think about the three types of rocks and develop their own definitions, in their
         science journal: (these definitions will be used and adapted within the following lessons)
             o Sedimentary
             o Igneous
             o Metamorphic

Evaluate:
     Observe students as they work and look at their dichotomous keys/classification keys to check
       for understanding




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Lesson 2a: Sedimentary Rocks
      Indicator – a. Model the processes of formation of the three major types of rocks: sedimentary,
       igneous and metamorphic

Attached Resources
     Word Document Lesson 2a
           o Teacher Notes
           o Creating Sedimentary Rock Lab (day 1)
           o Exit Slip (day 2)
     PowerPoint Lesson 2a

Day 1 of 2 - Creating Sedimentary Rocks
Objectives:
    Students will gain understanding of how sedimentary rock is formed and they will know how to
        identify sedimentary rock (characteristics).
    Students will simulate the formation of sedimentary rocks. In this activity, groups will create
        sandstone, coal, and limestone.
    Students will feel enjoyment and confidence as they work in a hands-on, positive learning
        environment.

Materials:
                                     Sand
    Plaster
                                     Soil
    Cement
                                     Water
    Milk Cartons (pint)
                                     Mixing spoon
Warm-up (Engage)(10mins):
    What do you think sediments are and how are they formed?
    Based on your previous definition, answer this: What characteristics might a sedimentary rock
      have?

Explore (35mins):
     In groups, students create one of the following: sandstone, coal, and limestone (sedimentary
        rocks), following the procedures from the online lesson:
        http://www.coaleducation.org/lessons/sme/elem/7.htm
     The rocks need to dry overnight

Day 2 of 2 –Sedimentary Rock
Objectives:
    Students will further their understanding of the formation of sedimentary rocks – formed by the
        cementing together of smaller pieces of rock.
    Students will examine and compare the sedimentary rocks that they created to actual samples
        of sedimentary rock.
    Students will feel confidence and understanding in regards to the formation of sedimentary
        rock.

Materials:
    Lint from the dryer

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       The sedimentary rocks that the students created
       an actual sample of sedimentary rock (from a rock collection)

Warm-up (Engage) (10mins):
    Have students examine dryer lint
    How does the make-up of this lint link to the formation of sedimentary rocks?
          o This is an example of how sediments fuse together overtime

Explain (15mins):
     Have students closely examine the characteristics and differences between the three different
        sedimentary rocks that groups formed, draw diagrams and write explanation for how each type
        of sedimentary rock was formed
     Have students adapt/add to the definitions that they created in their science journals (from
        lesson 1 day 2)

Expand (15mins):
     Using samples of sedimentary rock (limestone, coal, sandstone) from a rock sample kit, have
        students examine and compare these rocks to the three types of sedimentary rocks that they
        created

Evaluate (5mins):
     Exit slip


Lesson 3a: Fossils – Rock’s Timekeepers
       Indicator- b. Explain how geologists use the fossil record to provide evidence of geological
        history.

Attached Resources:
     Word Document Lesson 3a
           o Teacher Notes
           o Fossil Handout
           o Fossil Crossword
     PowerPoint Lesson 3a

Day 1 of 1- Fossils
Objectives:
    Students will know how fossils are formed and their relevance to geological history.
    Students will complete an individual reading and response assignment.
    Students will feel confidence within this material.

Materials:
    If available, fossil samples

Warm-up (Engage) (5mins):
    Give students different rock samples with fossils to examine
                    Or


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       Show students a series of pictures of fossils (PowerPoint slide 3)
       Ask the students: Can you identify what you are looking at?
                       Do you know how the fossils were formed?
                       Have you ever seen a fossil?
                                Ex) museum – dinosaur bones

Explore (25mins):
     Read the fossil handout (individually or as a class) and complete the crossword puzzle (Explain
        and Evaluate)

Expand (15mins):
    Closing discussion
          o Questions on PowerPoint Lesson 3



Lesson 4a: Igneous Rock
       Indicator – a. Model the processes of formation of the three major types of ricks: sedimentary,
        igneous and metamorphic

Attached Resources:
     Lesson 4a Word Document
           o Teacher Notes
           o Igneous Rock Lab
     PowerPoint Lesson 4a

Day 1 of 2- Creating Igneous Rock
Objectives:
     As students create igneous rock, they will know how igneous rock is formed and they will be
        able to determine the characteristics of igneous rock.
     Students will begin to classify and create igneous rock.
     Students will feel confidence and enjoyment as they work in a collaborative learning
        environment.

Materials:
    Small candle                              2 glass slides
    Heat source to light candle               Eye dropper
    Small dish                                Granite rock sample
    Epsom salt water solution                 Basalt or obsidian rock
                                                sample
Prior to Lesson warm-up (10mins):
     The word “igneous” comes from the Latin word, ignis, meaning “fire.”
             o Write, in your science journal, what you think the word ignite means.
             o Compare your definition with a classmate
             o Compare your definition to a dictionary definition

Explore (25mins):


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       In groups, students will simulate the formation of igneous rock by melting candle wax and
        letting it cool and solidify. Instructions attached and found at:
        http://pti.lsu.edu/Activities/A04%20Igenous_Rocks.pdf
       Students observe how quick solidification forms small crystals in intrusive igneous rocks, and
        slow solidification forms large crystals in extrusive igneous rocks

Explain and Evaluate (10mins):
     Students describe their observations on sheets provided

Day 2 of 2 – Igneous Rock
Objectives:
    Students will know what igneous rock is and have definitions for magma, intrusive rock, lava,
        and extrusive rock.
    Students will delve deeper into their understanding of igneous rocks.
    Students will feel confidence within this subject area.

Materials:
    Baking soda
    Vinegar
    Pop bottle
    Igneous rock sample

Prior to lesson warm-up (5mins):
     Baking soda and vinegar volcano
             o This is a fun way to demonstrate to students how magma (baking soda and vinegar) is
                pushed through Earth’s surface through a volcanic eruption and forms igneous rock
     This is a time to review the terms that students were introduced to on day 1
             o could show PowerPoint Lesson 4a during this time

Explore (20mins):
     Students will finish igneous rock lab by observing crystals left overnight
     Students will share their analyses and conclusions from the lab reports and discuss the results

Expand (15mins):
    Have students record characteristics of igneous rocks (show them a real rock sample to compare
       to), draw diagrams and write an explanation of how igneous rock is formed (15mins)
            o Could also chow PowerPoint Lesson 4 within this time

Evaluation:
     Student responses to the worksheet can be used for evaluation



Lesson 5a – Metamorphic Rock
       Indicator – a. Model the processes of formation of the three major types of rocks: sedimentary,
        igneous and metamorphic



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Attached Resources:
     PowerPoint – Lesson 5a
     Word Document Lesson 5a
           o Teacher Notes
           o Metamorphic Rock Lab
           o Comic Life Rubric

Day 1 of 4 - Creating Metamorphic Rock
Objectives:
    Students will know what metamorphic rock is and how it is formed.
    In groups, students will create metamorphic rock.
    Students will feel enjoyment and confidence as they work collaboratively through this lesson.

Materials:
    4-6 slices of bread (per group)
    Wax paper
    Heavy books or blocks
    Microwave (optional)
    Metamorphic rock sample

Prior to Lesson Warm-Up (10mins):
Think:
     Do you have any transformer toys?
     What are they?
             o They change shape/form ex) man/robot to a car
     The word morph means to change form
     Keeping these two things in mind, what do you think metamorphic means?

Explain (5mins):
     What is metamorphic rock?
           o PowerPoint-Lesson 3

Explore (25mins):
     Creating metamorphic rock inquiry based lab
               -Modeled from lab found at: http://www.coaleducation.org/lessons/sme/elem/9.htm

Expand (5mins):
    Using samples of metamorphic rock from a rock sample kit, have students examine and
       compare these rocks to the metamorphic rock that they created


Day 2 of 4 – ComicLIfe
Objectives:
    Students will know characteristics of a metamorphic rock and how it is formed.
    Students will apply their knowledge of metamorphic rock, accumulated through the lab, into a
        ComicLife representation of their inquiry lab.
    Students will feel enjoyment as they work with their lab groups to achieve this task.

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Evaluation:
     ComicLIfe (Explain 45 mins)
            o Using the photos that students took during their metamorphic rock investigations,
              students will demonstrate what they did, how they did it, where they went wrong and
              what that they did to try and change/adapt it.
                   Rubric attached (Lesson 4 document)

Day 3 of 4
Objectives:
    Students will have a great understanding of the characteristics and formation of metamorphic,
        sedimentary and igneous rock.
    Students will finish their ComicLIfe assignments and adapt their rock classification charts
        according to the information they know now.
    Students will feel as if they confidently understand the characteristics and formation of
        metamorphic, sedimentary, and igneous rock.

Materials:
    Rock samples

Explain:
     Students may need time to finish up their ComicLIfe assignments (15mins)
     Have students adapt/add to the metamorphic rock definitions that they created in their science
        journals (from lesson 1 day 2) (5mins)

Expand (25mins):
    You now know specific characteristics and formation of sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic
       rock
           o Sedimentary rock – made of small particles compacted or cemented together
           o Igneous rock – have small crystals of minerals visible
           o Metamorphic rock – created under a great deal of pressure so, they have thin, flat layers
       Return to the classification system of rocks that you created on day 2. Adapt, specify and change
       the classification according to the information that you know now.
    Give students samples of rocks to classify on using their classification systems

Day 4 of 4
Evaluate (self-evaluation/review): Overview of Sedimentary, Igneous, and Metamorphic Rock
     Students will go to this website http://www.learner.org/interactives/rockcycle/types.html
            o They will complete only the Introduction and Type of Rocks sections
            o They will do this until they get 100% on the mini quiz at the end

Lesson 6a – Erosion
       Indicators - e. Describe examples of mechanical and chemical weathering of rocks.
                      f. Differentiate between weathering and erosion, and explain the role of water in
                      each process.

Attached Resources:

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       PowerPoint – Lesson 6a
       Word Document Lesson 6a
           o Teacher Notes
           o Engage Activity - Mechanical Weathering of Rocks (day 1)
           o Demo (Day 2)
           o Understanding concepts assignment

Day 1 of 2 – Examples of mechanical weathering of rocks
Objectives:
    Students will know how to identify mechanical weathering of rocks.
    Students will explore mechanical wreathing of rocks and work in groups to further research and
        explain to the class.
    Students will feel enjoyment as they work in groups.

Materials:
    Sand
    Shallow pan
    Ice cube
    Rock chips (sandstone, limestone, shale)
    water

Prior to Lesson Warm-Up:
Demo (Engage – 5mins): Erosion from Running Water – Mechanical Weathering
     Directions found within Word Document Lesson 6a

Demo (Engage – 5mins): Rock Erosion
    Directions found within Word Document Lesson 6a

Expand (5 to 10mins):
    Show PowerPoint lesson 4 and further discuss mechanical weathering as a class

Explain:
     Youtube video (5mins): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EAPj_h46WdM
                Question at the end (good to measure understanding and have students explain their
                answers, in their science journals, in their own words):
            o What is mechanical weathering?
            o Name some causes of mechanical weathering?
     Place students in groups assign each group with a different type of mechanical weathering
        process (ex ) gravity, temperature, wind, water, ice, glaciers). Have them research, on a
        computer or using textbooks, what this type of mechanical weathering is and determine an
        example of where they may find mechanical weathering in Saskatchewan. (25mins)
            o Have students depict their definition and example on a poster board or clip-chart paper
                and share their findings with the class (Evaluation).

Day 2 of 2 – Examples of chemical and biological weathering of rocks
Objectives:



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      Students will know what chemical and biological weathering of rocks is and they will know how
       to identify examples of each.
      Students will watch and observe a demo, participate in a discussion (SLASH) PowerPoint, and
       further apply their understanding of erosion through an individual assignment.
      By distributing information to students slowly in a step-by-step manner and by offering students
       an array of instructional approaches, students will feel like confident learners.

Materials:
    Eye dropper
    Chalk
    Vinegar solution
    Pan to set the chalk in and to catch the vinegar

Warm-up (10mins):
Demo (Explore) - Rocks that Fizz
    This demo depicts how the affects of acid rain on limestone
    Discuss what happens and why this happens.
          o Introduce chemical weathering

Explain (10mins):
     PowerPoint lesson 6a
           o Chemical weathering
           o Biological weathering

Expand (25mins): Understanding Concepts Assignment (Evaluate)
    Info attached in Word Document Lesson 6a
_____________________________________________________________________________________
Lesson 7a: The Rock Cycle
    Indicator – c. Construct a visual representation of the rock cycle

Attached Resources:
     Word document lesson 7a
           o Teacher Notes
           o Rock Cycle Fudge
           o The Rock Cycle – assignment sheet

Day 1 of 3 – Review of erosion and introduction to the Rock Cycle
Objectives:
    Students will know how to apply the information that they have learned thus far into
        understanding the rock cycle.
    Students will listen to a rock cycle rap and complete the next two sections on the interactive
        website.
    Students will feel engagement and enjoyment as they work in a different learning environment.

Materials:
    computers


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Warm-up (Engage) (15mins):
    Listen to this Rap: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rkGVE6wNAzo
          o What are the main components of The Rock Cycle?
          o What do you already know about the Rock Cycle?
          o Quickly sketch what you think a model of the rock cycle might look like.

Explore (30mins):
     Website review on erosion and introduction to the Rock Cycle
           o Students will go to this website
               http://www.learner.org/interactives/rockcycle/types.html
                    Complete sections: How Rocks Change and The Rock Cycle Diagram

Day 2 of 3-Rock Cycle Fudge
Objectives:
    Students will further understand the rock cycle.
    Students will simulate the rock cycle.
    Students will feel excitement as they participate in a fun learning environment.

Materials:                                    Evaporated milk
    Microwave                                Sugar
    Large microwave-safe bowl                Margarine
    Large spoon                              Mini-marshmallows
    Measuring cups                           Smarties
    Measuring spoons                         Semi-sweet chocolate chips
                                              Vanilla extract
Explore (25mins): Rock Cycle Fudge
     Instructions in Word document Lesson 7a
           o Activity by Shannon Watson

Explain and Evaluate (20mins): Rock Cycle Diagram
     In your lab groups, create a representation of the rock cycle
           o Assignment description attached

Day 3 of 3 - Rock Cycle work period
Warm-up (Expand)(10mins):
    Eat the fudge!

Explain and Evaluate (35mins): Rock Cycle Diagram
     Give students time to finish their representations of the rock cycle and share with the class



Lesson 8a – Soil
       Indicators – i. Collect, with permission, and examine samples of local soils to determine their
        physical properties

Attached Resources:
     Lesson 8a PowerPoint

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       Lesson 8a Word document
            o Teacher Notes
            o Explore: Observing different kinds of materials in school ground soil

Objectives:
    Students will know what kinds of materials are in the school ground soil (organic matter, clay,
        silt, sand).
    In groups, students will collect a soil sample and participate in an investigation to determine
        what the school ground soil is composed of.
    Students will feel enjoyment as they participate in this lesson.

Day 1 of 2 – Exploring the materials in soil
Materials:
    Trowel
    Zip-lock bag
    Vial with a lid (1 inch wide and 3 inches high)
    Alum
    Soil sample
    Water
    ruler

Warm-up (Engage) (10mins):
    (5mins) Send the students, in groups, into the school yard to collect a small sample of soil (in a
      zip-lock bag)
    (5mins) In groups recall, record and share:
           o What do you know about soil?
           o What is in soil?
           o How can we find out?

Explore (20mins): Observing different kinds of materials in school ground soil
     Directions in Lesson 8a Word document
     Investigation from, Activities for Teaching Science as Inquiry 7th Edition
     As students are waiting for the soil to settle, show them PowerPoint lesson 8a

Explain (15mins):
     Ask: From the results of your investigation, what do you conclude is in soil? Which particles do
        you think are larger: sand, clay, or silt? Why do you think so?

Day 2 of 2 – exploring the materials of soil cont.
Materials:
-Vials with soil from the previous lesson

Expand (15mins):
    Ask: How could you find out how much of each kind of material is in the soil?

Evaluate (30mins):
     Draw, color and label a pictorial representation of what you observed during this investigation

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       Share your representation with the class



Lesson 9a: Classifying Soil Samples
       J. Classify soil samples according to their characteristics (e.g., sand, loam, and clay composition)
        and research ways to enrich soils for specific uses (e.g., vegetable garden, road building, dam
        construction, waste management, and sports field).

Attached Resources:
     Word Document Lesson 9a
           o How are soils classified?

Day 1 of 4- Classifying Soil Samples
Objectives:
    Students will know how to classify soil as composed of mostly sand, silt or clay.
    Students will classify soil samples.
    Students will feel at ease working together with the class to come to a conclusion.

Materials:
*these soil samples can be prepared using base soils obtained from a local greenhouse or garden shop
     Sandy soil
                                   Bottle
     Silty soil
                                   Scissors
     Clay soil
     Magnifying glass             Cheesecloth
     Gloves                       Elastic band
     Water                        Dish (to catch the water)
                                   stopwatch
Warm-up (Engage 5mins):
     Write soil composition on the board
     Have students make a web/concept map regarding all that they know about soil
             o Ex) too much sand in soil – good because it allows air and water in
                                          - Bad because it doesn’t hold nutrients

Explore (40mins): How are soils classified? (lab sheet attached Explain)
     Students know, from pervious lessons that soils are composed of different amounts of sand, silt
        and clay.
     Students will test the water-holding capacity of these soils by using an inverted clear plastic
        bottle to see how quickly a measured amount of water soaks through the soil.
     Students will also classify a soil sample by adding water to it and seeing if the wet soil will roll
        into a cigar shape and if so, will it hold this shape when dry.

Day 2 of 4
Warm-up (10mins):
    Examine the rolled soil samples from the previous day
           o What samples held shape when dry? Why?

Expand and Evaluate:

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      Group research and present project: What soils are best for what uses?
          o Have students pick a topic and research ways to enrich soils for specific uses
                   Ex) vegetable garden, road building, dam construction, waste management,
                      sports field, farmers crop
      Students may present their findings however they want
           o Ex) PowerPoint, poster, skit, write-up, story
Day 3 and 4 of 4

Evaluate:
     Students will finish their research projects and present findings to the class.
          o Can be both class and peer evaluate
          o Community of learners – determine a rubric or marking system as a class



Lesson 10a – Design Challenge - farming
      Indicator – i. assess environmental and economic impacts of past and current land use practices
       in Saskatchewan

Attached Resources:
     PowerPoint lesson 10a
     Word Document lesson 10a
           o Teacher notes
           o Design Challenge
           o Assessment

Day 1 of 5– review of soils and introduction to assignment
Objectives:
    Students will know, through application of previous knowledge and a brief review, how to
        create a model of an erosion proof field.
    Students will create a model of an erosion proof field.
    Students will feel enjoyment as they explore, in pairs, how to create an erosion proof field.

Materials:
    Poster paper
    Various materials for the design challenge assignment (determine with the students what they
       might need)

Warm-up (engage)(15mins):
    Students are split into groups and given a poster board they brainstorm the following:
          o What are the components of good soil?
          o What do you know about:
                  Sand particles
                  Clay particles
                  Silt particles


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Expand (25mins):
    PowerPoint lesson 10a for further understanding
    Give the design challenge assignment (Evaluate)
          o Description and assessment attached
    Start brainstorming and researching assignment

Day 2, 3, 4, and, 5
Explain:
     Research, construction and presentation of design assignment




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