Table Service by 4DSkbV

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									Table Service




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Welcome
Welcome to your workbook on table service. This workbook is designed to give you an
understanding of the areas of table service.
This workbook contains a mixture of information including exercises to make sure you
understand key points. The workbook is easy to use and totally flexible. Used in
conjunction with your organisations training the workbook can give you the knowledge
and confidence to work in this area.

Introduction
This workbook gives a general overview of table service.
This workbook is divided into three main sections:

Preparing Service Areas
Preparing Dining Areas
Clearing Areas

Before you start work on this book, you should familiarise yourself with health and
safety legislation and food safety legislation. You should also find out the procedures
used in your workplace regarding food service.
Preparation prior to service is the essential ingredient in any successful catering unit.
Good preparation is also controlled by legislation and therefore must be carried out
systematically. Many have compared the job of a waiter to an actor on the stage.
Before the play, the stage must be set!

Pre-requisites
To enable you to complete this book the following booklets may be useful;
    Highfields Hygiene Sense Hygiene Awareness
    Highfields Health and Safety for Caterers




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KEY WORDS
You may come across some new words. Here is a list of them. Add any others you
come across and give the definition.
Aboyeur                                Chef in charge of hot plate
Abrasive                               A scratching substance
Accompaniment                          Sauces etc offered separately to enhance
                                       a dish
Bain marie                             Warm water bath to keep sauces etc
CO2 gas                                Carbon dioxide gas
Condiments                             Salt and pepper
Cutlery                                Knives, forks and spoons
Damp dust                              Warm water, neutral detergent and
                                       sponge cloth
Duty rota                              List of duties to be done and who should
                                       do them
Flambé                                 To cook food at the table
Flatware                               Spoons and forks
Holloware                              Silver items for example, teapots, milk
                                       jugs
Mise-en-place                          Everything in place
Room service                           Service of food/drink in hotel bedrooms
Salver                                 Small silver or wooden tray
Station                                Sideboard from which service is carried
                                       out
Table d'hote                           Fixed menu, fixed price




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       PREPARE SERVICE AREAS AND EQUIPMENT FOR
TABLE SERVICE
Customers dine out in order to enjoy themselves, they will have certain preset
expectations and we must do our best to help fulfil these expectations and satisfy their
demands. The restaurant must be organised, clean, safe and comfortable. Comfort is
affected by a number of variables; lighting, heating, ventilation and music as well as
the fixtures, fittings and of course the staff themselves. All these points must be
covered to create the right atmosphere. The routine restaurant tasks of preparation are
cleaning and maintenance, which staff may find tedious but are key factors for
business success.

SERVICE AREAS
Preparation for service is largely carried out away from the dining area. The service
area is usually situated between the restaurant and kitchen and can be divided into
five sections:

1     Stillroom

2     Wash-up

3     Hot plate/hot cupboards

4     Silver/plate room

5     Linen room

Remember that during service times service areas are very busy and all aspects of
health and safety must be adhered to in order to prevent accidents.

Hygiene is a major priority and service areas must be hygienic, clean and free from
damage in order to:
    prevent any transfer of food poisoning
    comply with health and safety requirements
    maintain a high standard of cleanliness
    control the risk of accidents or fire
    prevent a build-up of waste or unpleasant odours which would attract pest
      infestation

THE STILLROOM
The stillroom provides items of food and beverages required for service which other
main departments, such as the kitchen, do not supply. As well as storing food items,
some light preparation is carried out in this area, sandwiches or toasted items are
good examples. The range of these food items requires a considerable amount of
equipment to ensure
Correct storage, preparation and presentation. Essential equipment may include:
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Water boilers
Coffee machines
Coffee grinders
Toasters
Bread slicing machine
Refrigerator
Salamander
Hot cupboard
Sinks
Microwave
Hot water boiler
Storage space/cupboards

Activity 1
1. Describe what a salamander is and list a number of its uses.




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2. At your place of work, make a list of stillroom equipment including uses and the
cleaning method.
           Equipment Name         Uses                    Cleaning Method




STILLROOM PROVISIONS
Consumables prepared in the stillroom may include the following:

•     Beverages       –     coffee, tea, chocolate, fruit juices, milk shakes

•     Butter –        pre-portioned, curled or portioned through butter pat machine

•     Rolls, broche, croissant

•     Gristicks, melba toast, toast, biscuits

•     Scones, tea cakes, crumpets

•     Sandwiches

•     Gateaux or pastries

•     Milk or cream

•     Preserves (marmalade, honey, fruit jams etc)


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•      Breakfast cereals

Can you think of any additional provisions prepared in the stillroom to add to the list?




Hot and Cold Drinks
There are many types of drinks available and a wide range of equipment is used to
prepare them. A few are briefly summarised below.




             HOT DRINKS
DRINKS             TYPE OF EQUIPMENT PREPARATION
Pots of tea Instant Water Boilers             Check water supply. Switch
coffee Malted                                 on.
drinks                                        Check teapots for staining.
Filter coffee      Coffee machines            Check water supply. Insert
Expresso coffee                               coffee/bag/filter
                                              (225 g per 4.5 litres of water).
Large scale        Tea Urns                   Check water supply.
provision of tea                              Insert teabags/tea leaves.
TEA AND COFFEE SHOULD NOT BE MADE UNTIL REQUIRED AS THEY TASTE
BETTER FRESH.




           COLD DRINKS
DRINKS             TYPE OF DRINK              PREPARATION
Concentrates       Chilled water mixed with Check concentrates. Re-
premix             flavouring before service stock cups.
                   (e.g. fruit juices)       Report any leaks or damage.
Concentrates       Water & concentrates       As above.
premix             mixed at point of service. Check CO gas cylinder.
                   Fizzy drinks have CO       2
                   2 added
Pre-packed cans, Soft drinks                  Restock. Check for damage.
cartons          Alcoholic drinks             Place in chiller


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ALL EQUIPMENT MUST BE KEPT CLEAN. NEVER TOUCH THE RIMS OF CUPS,
USE THE HANDLES OR HOLD THEM AT THE BASE.




             WASH-UP
The wash-up is an important area which needs to be sited correctly to ensure smooth
work-flow and avoids the risks to safety. The wash-up area is situated close to the food
service area, to enable the waiter to deposit dirty crockery and cutlery in stacks or
containers, debris being cleared into a bin or bowl and paper items placed separately
in a bin. There are normally two methods of washing used.

Tank Method Items are placed into a tank of hot water containing detergent. After
washing, the items are dipped into a second sterilising tank containing clean hot water
at a temperature of 75°C. After two minutes the items are removed and left to drain. As
the temperature is so high the items will air dry, making this method hygienic as no
cloths are needed. Crockery may then be stacked and put away as required.

Machine Method      Operates as an automated tank method and is therefore labour
saving. Machine instructions regarding detergent and rinse additive must be followed
closely.

HOT PLATE AND HOT CUPBOARDS
The hotplate is where waiters bring their orders to be passed on to the kitchen. Co-
operation and understanding is essential for quick, efficient service. Most quality
restaurants have an 'aboyeur' in charge of the hotplate. Part of their job is to 'call away'
orders to the different sections in the kitchen.

Hot cupboards are used for either food or plates. The temperature must be controlled
so that the plates do not become too hot to handle or food damaged by excessive
heat. Equally important is that it must be switched on pre-service so that the correct
temperature is reached prior to service commencing.

The unit is made to allow easy access to contents, sliding doors topped by a heated
serving surface. The top may also house containers acting as dry or wet heated bain
maries.

The hotplate or hot cupboard needs to be stocked with all china and crockery needed
for service.

CHILL CABINETS
Chill cabinets are used to keep food at a cool temperature to avoid contamination.
Items stored may include salads, sandwiches, cakes and cold beverages. They can be
mobile or static; some have a motorised rotating display. Other refrigerated units such
as a standard refrigerator may be used to store milk, cream and butter, ready for
service.

Hot cupboards and chill cabinets must always be checked for cleanliness.



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PLATE WARMERS
These are designed exclusively to keep plates warm. Before filling check each
individual plate to ensure it is clean and free from cracks, then they are loaded into the
top of the plate warmer and the machine is turned on.

Plate warmers should be kept at a temperature of 65°C (150°F).

Activity 2

1      How many grams of dry tea will 5 litres of water require?


2      Can you list five points to follow when preparing a coffee machine for service?




3      Find out the suitable temperature for:

Chill Cabinets °C

Hot Cupboards°C

THE SILVER OR PLATE ROOM
In large establishments the silver and the plate room may be two separate units but in
most units they are combined.

The silver room holds the stock of silver required for meal service. The various types of
silver are kept here on labelled shelves, with all flats on one side stacked together.
Cutlery, flatware, holloware and other smaller items are usually stored in drawers lined
with baize to reduce scratching and noise. Silver used for banquets is usually of a
different design to identify it and keep the two sets apart.




         SILVERWARE
Soup spoons
Fish knives and forks
Large knives and forks (joint)
Dessert or sweet spoons
Small silver fruit knives and forks
Small knives (side)
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Teaspoons
Coffee spoons (demi tasse)
Service spoons and forks

SILVER FOR FOOD SERVICE
Soup tureens
Soup bowls
Sauce boats/liners
Oval flats and covers
Oval or round vegetable dishes and covers
Oval or round entrée dishes
Round flats and covers

SILVER FOR DRINK SERVICE
Salver for serving, 12 inch diameter (round)
Salver for clearing, 20 inch diameter (round)
Ice tongs for all iced drinks
Ice buckets

OTHER SILVER ITEMS
Coffee pots
Hot milk jugs
Tea pots
Cold milk jugs
Cream jugs
Toast racks
Egg cups




           CROCKERY AND CUTLERY
These will have been cleaned and stored after use, but will have to be polished before
service to remove water marks. Crockery can be buffed with a clean dry cloth and
cutlery is polished by dipping it in hot water and buffing with a clean dry cloth.

REMEMBER
DO NOT USE DAMP, DIRTY CLOTHS AS THIS CAN CAUSE THE SPREAD OF
BACTERIA AND ALWAYS STACK CROCKERY NEATLY TO AVOID ACCIDENTS.

All items of crockery must be checked before service for cracks, chips and dirty marks
and adequate supplies placed in the hot cupboard or at the side of the chill unit ready
for service.

CARE OF METALS
In most food service areas you will come across metals such as:

Stainless steel Silver Brass/Copper



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All metals should be washed as normal after use, but extra care must be taken not to
use harsh abrasives as they will scratch.

Silver, brass and copper (unless they are already treated with a lacquer) will tarnish
and will need special treatment.

There are several ways of removing tarnish.
TYPE                 ADVANTAGES             DISADVANTAGES
Silver Dip              Quick                Must be well rinsed.
Dip into chemicals                           Can damage silver with
                                             continued use.
Burnishing Machine      Quick, easy
Friction of stainless
steel balls in water
Silver Polish                                Very slow, time consuming,
Rubbed on and wiped                          must be washed off before
off                                          use.
Brass Polish                                 Very slow, time consuming,
Rubbed on and wiped                          must be washed off before
off                                          use.

Activity 3
1. SPECIAL SERVICE EQUIPMENT
Special service equipment may include the following. As you become familiar with
each item tick them off.
Sugar tongs
Asparagus tongs
Grape scissors
Ice cream coupes
Nut crackers
Pepper mills
Snail dishes
Snail tongs
Pastry forks
Sauce ladles
Oyster forks
Gateau slices
Lobster picks
Oil and vinegar sets
Lobster crackers
Duck press
Corn on the cob holders
Ashtrays
2. Why does clean cutlery need polishing?




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3. What is Polivit Plate?




4. Can you list some items found in a restaurant made from the above metals?




         LINEN ROOM
Linen refers to tablecloths, napkins and any other cloth or textile items used in the
preparation of tables whether made of linen or not.

Most table linen today is made of cotton and white tablecloths and napkins are most
commonly used although the choice of colour is wide.

Laundering can be expensive, so some establishments have their own stock and
launder it themselves, others hire companies to launder it for them.

Sufficient table linen must be ready for service, as accidents may happen and linen will
need to be changed during service.

Table linen can be made from:
                     ADVANTAGES              DISADVANTAGES
Paper                   Disposable, needs    Does not look impressive
                        no laundering
Linen                   Looks smart          Expensive, needs laundering,
                                             needs starching, creases
                                             easily
Cotton                  Not as expensive     Needs laundering
                        Looks smart
NAPKINS CAN BE PRE-FOLDED BEFORE SERVICE TO SAVE TIME.
SIMPLE NAPKIN FOLDS ARE MORE HYGIENIC THAN COMPLICATED FOLDS.

LINEN STORAGE
Cloths should be stored in a warm dry area, neatly stacked in size order on lined
shelves. Laundry items are usually issued when dirty cloths are returned on a one for
one basis to avoid loss.

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TABLE CLOTH SIZES
Standard sizes of cloths are:
Square Tablecoths
    137 x 137 cm
    183 x 183 cm
    285 x 285 cm
Square cloths are used on round top tables.
Rectangular Tablecloths
    137 x 183 cm
    137 x 274 cm
    183 x 244 cm

Buffet Cloths
    2 x 4 m (minimum size)

Napkins from 30 cm square

Slip cloths
Over cloths which are easily changed in case of spillage, and if used can be of
different colour giving extra depth to environment.
     1 m square (minimum size)

SIDEBOARDS
Before service the sideboard should be equipped with all required items including:

Bread baskets
Hand held terminal (where required)
Butter dishes
Linen
Condiments, sauces etc
Liners
Menus (clean and current)
Salver/service plates
Checkpad/pen/matches
Service cloth
Coffee saucers/liners
Side plates Cruet sets
Trays
Cutlery
Water jug
Doyleys

Store cutlery carefully into drawers placing the handles in the same direction, and the
same distance from the edge of the drawer. This will make handling safer and more
hygienic. Sideboard shelves may be lined with clean cloths.

NEVER PUT FOOD ITEMS ON THE BOTTOM SHELF AS
THEY ARE TOO CLOSE TO THE FLOOR AREA.




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SERVICE EQUIPMENT
This term is used to describe spoons, ladles, slices, trays and salvers.

In self-service areas the food service staff must make sure that there are enough
service items on the counter before service. There should be a clean utensil for each
dish.

For table service, equipment should be stored at the sideboard or station.

ACCOMPANIMENTS
The types of accompaniments offered depends on the range of dishes on the menu
and the standard of service offered.

Standard accompaniments include:

Bread, bread rolls and butter
Mayonnaise and salad dressings
Sauces
Condiments (including pepper mills)
Milk/cream

Accompaniments can either be portioned by staff before service or bought already
portioned. Items commonly found pre-portioned include:

Tomato/brown/tartar sauces
Salad cream Mustard
 Butter/margarine
Milk/cream
Vinegar
Jams and marmalades

If accompaniments are prepared at work you must make sure that:

      All containers are clean.

      Part used sauces etc are stored in a fridge in a covered container
      or thrown away.

      Accompaniments are not left lying around for long periods.

      Hot sauces should be freshly portioned with every order.

      Cold sauces are kept in a chill cabinet.

      Old or partly used accompaniments are never added to new stock.




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          GLASSWARE
Sufficient freshly machine washed glasses of the correct type should always be
available. Each glass should be inspected for cracks or chips and polished with a
clean dry glass cloth without touching it with your hands.

Always carry glasses to the table using a tray or by holding the base of the glass in the
hand.

TRAYS
Trays are rectangular and flat with an edge to act as a safety lip. Trays are normally:

•      strong, but lightweight

•      heat resistant

•      non-slip

•      stackable

•      easily cleaned

Large trays are used to transfer food from kitchen hotplate to sideboards, while smaller
trays are used to deliver food directly to the table.

Salvers (round metal trays) are used for drink service – both serving and clearing –
and are easily balanced on the left hand. They are covered
with a cloth, to reduce slipping and lessen noise.

TRAYS AND SALVERS MUST BE SPOTLESS TO CONVEY FOOD ITEMS TO
AVOID CROSS-CONTAMINATION.

Activity 4
1. Disposable items are often used in catering units to cover tables, list some
advantages and disadvantages of using disposables.

ADVANTAGES                         DISADVANTAGES




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2. List three items of table linen.




3. How does service equipment help portion control?




4. List four different napkin folds and briefly describe or draw a diagram of how to fold
one of them.




5. On the diagram below identify the areas where your establishment places their
items of equipment.

STANDARD SIDEBOARD/DUMBWAITER SET UP




1

2

3

4

5


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6

7

8

9

10

11

6. Can you think of four advantages to buying in preportioned accompaniments?




LEGAL REQUIREMENTS
It is the responsibility of all service staff to comply with health, safety and hygiene
regulations within their area of responsibility.

When preparing areas for service always remember the following hygiene and safety
points.

HYGIENE POINTS
Personal hygiene. Cleanliness is vital. Prevent food contamination in preparation and
service areas by not smoking, coughing or sneezing, and always wash your hands
after toilet use

All foodstuff must be covered to avoid contamination during restaurant preparation

Refrigerate cold commodities until required

Clean up spillages immediately

Hold cutlery by the handles, crockery by the rim and glasses by the stem

SAFETY POINTS
Always comply with company procedures

Keep work areas clean and in a safe condition. Remove waste and dirty equipment on
a regular basis to discourage vermin

Report hazards/faulty equipment immediately to your supervisor

Report all incidents and accidents to your supervisor
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ACCIDENT PREVENTION
Be alert for potential hazards – don't ignore potential dangers

Keep floors clean and dry

Walk never run

Wear correct protective uniform and footwear

Clear broken crockery/glassware straight away, wrap in paper and place in breakage
bin

Switch off and unplug electrical equipment when not in use

UNEXPECTED SITUATIONS
Limiting accidents and incidents is important but they can never be totally eliminated
so it is wise to be prepared for unavoidable situations.

Learn basic first aid procedures

Identify your establishment's first aider and their location

Ensure you are familiar with fire procedure: fire exits, extinguishers, alarms and
assembly points

Be aware of your establishment's procedures for dealing with accidents and incidents
and how to record this information

PREPARE CUSTOMER'S DINING AREAS FOR TABLE
SERVICE



              PREPARATION OF DINING AREAS
It is just as important to keep the dining area clean as it is to keep the kitchen area
clean, because:

Food could become contaminated in an unclean dining area
Customers will not eat in a dining area that looks dirty or untidy

Some items in a dining area will be cleaned every day and some cleaned weekly.

Daily cleaning includes:

1      Wiping tables, chairs and sideboards.
2      Damp dusting ledges, radiators and pipes.
3      Vacuuming the carpet.


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The carpet is always vacuumed last, to clean up the dust transferred to the floor by
cleaning and dusting.

Weekly cleaning includes:

1       Polishing brasses/silver.
2       Vacuum soft furnishings.
3       Window cleaning.
4       Washing paintwork.

ORDER OF CLEANING
Cleaning should always be done in the same order.

1       Ventilate the room – open windows or put extractors on.

2       Remove all rubbish (bins, ashtrays etc) if not done at the end of the last shift.

3       Damp dust all flat surfaces – working from top to bottom.

4       Polish any wood furniture.

5    Vacuum carpet.
WASTE SHOULD ALWAYS BE REMOVED AS SOON AS POSSIBLE
TO AVOID SMELLS ATTRACTING PESTS. IT ALSO LOOKS UNSIGHTLY.

LAYOUT OF DINING AREAS
Now the dining area has been cleaned the next task is to arrange the furniture. It might
be fixed to the floor so it is already in place, but if it is moveable then time must be
taken to make sure that:

       there is enough room between tables to allow staff to serve and clear safely

       tables and chairs look neat and tidy

       customers are not going to be too cramped

       the dining area is prepared for the style of service (see below)

       maximum use is made of space by accommodating as many customers in as
        possible, without them being too squashed

STYLES OF SERVICE
Buffet/self-service/fast food        Needs little space, customers sometimes stand to
eat.

Waitress/waiter service      Space is needed to allow service and clearing safely.

High class service Space must be left to allow service (eg flambé at table) tables to
be moved around the dining area.



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Banquet/function service Customers are all served together and may all sit in long
rows, sometimes with a top table (weddings etc).




             MENUS
All food service outlets will provide the customers with a list, description and cost of the
dishes available. This is the menu

A menu should be placed outside the entrance to the dining area and on each table
and its accuracy is very important.

The menu must be checked for accuracy as it is a legal requirement, and customers
will be put off if the menu isn't accurate or if you do not know about each dish offered.
Menus must be checked every day for cleanliness and signs of damage. You should
be told about any alteration to the menu such as dishes taken off or added.

You must find out before service what the dishes of the day are. For example if the
menu has 'Soup of the Day' – then you must find out what flavour it is.

Activity 5
1. Can you list eight items to be cleaned in a dining area?




2. Fill in the missing words:
When damp dusting you should use
______________water and a ________________detergent.




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3. The following two floor plans are of a function room measuring 15 x 40 metres.
Using the size allowance given draw in plans for:
a. a normal silver service dining area




b. a wedding function with top table




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4. Put the following in the correct order of cleaning:

Polishing sideboards

Vacuum carpet

Dust tables

Wash paintwork

5. List the items to be cleaned around your station and the order of cleaning?




6. What has to be taken into consideration when planning a room layout?




7. When a dish is added to a menu, staff will need to be told three things about it. Do
you know what these three things are?




8. Why do menus need to be accurate?




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PREPARING THE TABLES
TABLE LINEN
Place a tablecloth on a table so it is hanging evenly all the way round with taking great
care to avoid creasing it.

A slip cloth can be put on top of the main cloth, then if food or drink is spilt the slipcloth
can be easily changed.

Napkins can be folded and placed at each setting either on the side plate, centrally on
the setting or in the water/wine glass.

PLACE SETTING
A table will be laid with a number of place settings – to provide each customer with
cutlery/crockery where they sit. Each of these place settings is known as a cover.

A cover can be used to describe the cutlery/crockery laid on the table.

"We have 24 covers tonight" – We are expecting 24 guests.

A cover can also be used to describe a customer.

"Will you lay 6 covers at that table" – Will you set out 6 sets of crockery/cutlery.

Some food service outlets provide no cutlery/crockery (fast food use only disposables).

The amount of cutlery provided depends on:
the type of restaurant
the style of service provided
the menu

If the meal is a set menu with no choice such as at a function then all the cutlery can
be put on the table before service.

This setting is called a Table D'Hôte setting.




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 If there is a choice of dishes then the setting will be basic, the cutlery will be laid when
the customer has ordered.

This is called an A La Carte setting.




Whichever setting is used you must make sure that:

      All crockery and cutlery is clean

      Cutlery is neatly arranged and evenly spaced

      Cutlery must be 10 mm ( ½ " ) from the table edge, to prevent it being knocked
       from the table

      Cruets are clean and full




            PREPARING FOR TRAY SERVICE
Trays are used in most food service operations to transport food from the service area
to where it is to be eaten and can be used by either staff or customers. Tray service is
used in:

fast food outlets cafeteria/self-service restaurants
airline catering room service hospital catering

Airline catering, room service and hospital catering are all transported by staff to the
customers.

All trays must be checked for cleanliness and washed with detergent and hot water
daily (on both sides).

Cutlery, crockery and table linen is prepared exactly as for table service, with the
exception that the cutlery can be wrapped in a paper napkin ready for use.
Tea trays and breakfast trays for room service in hotels can be pre-set and left on tray
racks to save time during service.

CUPS SHOULD BE STORED UPSIDE DOWN TO PREVENT DUST SETTLING IN
THEM.


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Activity 6
1. Give two definitions of a cover.




2. In the space below draw a place setting for a customer who has chosen the
following dishes.
Customer 1 - Smoked Mackerel Vegetable Soup Deep Fried Plaice




Customer 2 Cream of Mushroom Soup Scampi Roast leg of Lamb




ALWAYS CARRY CUTLERY ON A SALVER AND PLACE IT ON THE TABLE BY THE
HANDLES.
3. Can you describe an a la carte/table d'hôte cover?




4. Describe how to lay a table.




26d07ac5-95ff-4045-bd88-492e843d6f1a.doc                                8/9/2012 MG
5. Draw an a la carte setting.




6. Draw a table d'hôte setting.




7. Breakfast trays will include:




8. List the areas where tray service can be found.




9. Describe how to set a tray.




26d07ac5-95ff-4045-bd88-492e843d6f1a.doc             8/9/2012 MG
ENVIRONMENT SYSTEMS
Setting the right atmosphere for your restaurant is vital for customer satisfaction.
Music, lighting, ventilation and heating are important factors which must always be
considered.

LIGHTING
Bright lighting is usually associated with fast-food, quick service restaurants. Lower
lighting (dimmer switches) or coloured light bulbs are normally used to add
atmosphere to restaurants where the customers have more time to enjoy their meal.
Always check that lighting equipment is in working order, for instance bulbs and
switches. Renew candles/oil lamps and clean holders if used.

MUSIC
Much research has been done on customer reaction to various music forms in
restaurants. It is often said that vocal music can be distracting, but consideration must
be made for the type, age and taste of the customer and not a restaurants personal
preference.

VENTILATION
The restaurant will soon become filled with smells, from the kitchen, smoke, drink and
personnel. It is important to keep the area well ventilated whether by the use of
extractor fans, keeping a window open or by using air conditioning systems.

HEATING
Keeping the dining areas at the correct temperature is vital, too cold or too hot and the
customers will be unable to eat and complain. The ideal temperature is 18°C. Setting a
timer or thermostat is a good way of regulating temperature, but remember that
temperature will fluctuate with customer numbers and will increase during service
times.

Activity 7
In your own workplace identify the following:

1. The type of lighting used, for example subdued, bright, coloured, candles etc.




2. The heating system used and how this operates.




26d07ac5-95ff-4045-bd88-492e843d6f1a.doc                                     8/9/2012 MG
3. The type of music played.




4. The type of ventilation system.




        CLEAR DINING AND SERVICE AREAS AFTER
TABLE SERVICE
WHY IS CLEARING IMPORTANT?
Each of us has a legal and moral responsibility to work in a safe and hygienic way to
those we work with and visiting customers. We must all work to prevent outbreaks of
food poisoning. This can be achieved byte following.

•     Comply with safe food handling procedures

•     Remove food debris on which bacteria can grow

•     Remove food which could attract pests

•     Clear and store items correctly

•     Follow establishment minimum standards

At the end of the service period the food service area must be cleaned down, all waste
removed, soiled linen packed for laundry and unused food items correctly stored.

We will deal with each of these areas in turn.

REMOVAL OF WASTE
Before any cleaning is done rubbish must be removed including:
wastepaper
bins
waste
food bins
leftover accompaniments
26d07ac5-95ff-4045-bd88-492e843d6f1a.doc                                   8/9/2012 MG
IF WASTE IS NOT REMOVED AFTER SERVICE IT CAN BECOME A BREEDING
GROUND FOR BACTERIA AND CAN ATTRACT PESTS.

All food waste must be placed in sealed containers to stop pests being attracted.
Polythene bags must be tightly sealed and care taken not to overfill and burst them.
Waste bins, both indoors and outdoors, must have tight fitting lids. Lids will prevent
foul smells and deter pests.

A waste disposal unit is used to reduce the amount of food waste which has to be
disposed of. These can only be used for food waste, and are usually placed in the
wash up area so that waste food is scraped from plates etc into the waste disposal unit
which grinds it up and flushes it down the waste water system. The plates etc are then
stacked ready for washing.
SAFETY
NEVER PUT YOUR HANDS INTO A WASTE DISPOSAL UNIT –ALWAYS USE THE
SCRAPER PROVIDED.

CLEARING
After servicing, the dining/serving areas will need to be cleared ready for cleaning.

1      All table items are removed to be washed or stored for the next service.

2     Flowers are removed and stored in the cold room (away from food items) to
prolong freshness.

3     Hot plates are switched off, emptied and when cool washed down with
detergent and hot water, rinsed and dried.

4     Chill display cabinets are switched off, food covered, labelled and refrigerated,
then cabinets are washed with a mild solution of bicarbonate of soda.

5      All service equipment is stacked for cleaning.

6      Tea/Coffee machines are emptied and cleaned.

7      Sideboards tidied and items used removed for cleaning.

DIRTY LINEN
All dirty linen must be counted and put into laundry bags at the end of each service.

DIRTY LINEN CAN BE A HEALTH RISK IF IT IS LEFT LYING AROUND.

When laundry goes to be washed you will only get back the amount you counted – so
make sure you are correct!

Laundry may be cleaned on-site but most is collected and laundered by an outside
company, daily or weekly depending on need.

When the dirty linen is collected, clean linen is delivered so you should never run out.



26d07ac5-95ff-4045-bd88-492e843d6f1a.doc                                     8/9/2012 MG
UNUSED FOOD ITEMS
All pre-packed items (butter/margarine portions, milk/cream pots etc) should be stored
in the cold room or a refrigerator. Jams/preserves/sauce sachets can be stored in the
dry store.
All open sauces, butter curls, milk in jugs etc should be thrown away. If they have been
left uncovered in the food service area they may be contaminated.

HEATING, LIGHTING, VENTILATION AND MUSIC
At the end of service check timers on electrical systems to ensure accurate switch off
times. Switch off and unplug music and lighting equipment to prevent electrical fires.

USE ANTI-BACTERIAL CLEANER WHEN WASHING OR WIPING DOWN.
ALLOW HEATED EQUIPMENT TO COOL DOWN AND ENSURE IT IS SWITCHED
OFF BEFORE CLEANING.
WASH YOUR HANDS AFTER REMOVING WASTE BINS. CHECK ALL AREAS
BEFORE FINISHING SESSION.

Activity 8
1. Why is it necessary to clear after service?




2. How can waste be removed?




3. How should dirty linen be removed?




26d07ac5-95ff-4045-bd88-492e843d6f1a.doc                                   8/9/2012 MG
4. Study preparation and clearing methods at your place of work. Can any
improvements be made to the existing system? If so make a note of them here.




ORGANISATION
It is essential that food service staff work efficiently and as team members.

1      Plan your time effectively.
2      Identify the task.
3      Follow laid down procedures.
4      Collect equipment before commencing task.
5      Work as a team.
6      Prioritise work – follow the duty rota and perform tasks as appropriate
List below how your organisation works as a team




26d07ac5-95ff-4045-bd88-492e843d6f1a.doc                                        8/9/2012 MG

								
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