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					           121 W. Tabernacle        Phone 435-673-3553
           St. George, Utah 84770   Fax 435-673-3216




Pandemic Influenza
Response Plan
Table of Contents

Introduction .......................................................................................................... 3

Background ......................................................................................................... 4

Plan Organization ............................................................................................... 8

WCSD Phases of Pandemic ............................................................................10

School Response Flow Chart ..........................................................................11

Surveillance and Reporting ..............................................................................12

Definition of Surveillance Reporting.................................................................13

Process for Periodic Plan Update ....................................................................14

Phase 1—Before Pandemic.............................................................................16

Appendix A—Before Pandemic .......................................................................20

Phase 2—During Pandemic.............................................................................30

Appendix B—During Pandemic .......................................................................38

Phase 3—After Pandemic ................................................................................47

Appendix C—After Pandemic ..........................................................................50

Communication Resources ..............................................................................54

Educational Resources.....................................................................................64

Important Contact Information .........................................................................65




                                                                                         2
Introduction
Pandemic Influenza Response Plan
An influenza pandemic is a worldwide outbreak or epidemic caused by a strain of influenza
virus to which few if any humans have immunity developed by prior exposure. Influenza
pandemics occur predictably but at unpredictable intervals; three occurred during the 20th
century. The most serious pandemic on record, the “Spanish flu” of 1918-1919 caused an
estimated 20-100 million deaths worldwide and over 500,000 deaths in the United States.

Many pandemics are believed to occur when a strain of influenza circulating among birds
(avian influenza), acquires the ability to cause serious illness and to spread effectively among
people. Beginning in 1997 and continuing through 2005, a widespread outbreak of avian
influenza (H5N1) has affected birds in multiple Asian countries. That strain has demonstrated
the ability to cause lethal disease among humans and created concern that it might evolve into
a strain of virus capable of causing a pandemic. It is not known whether that will occur, but it
is certain that another influenza pandemic will afflict humans at some point in the future.

An influenza pandemic of the severity of the 1918 pandemic could cause over a million
Utahans to become ill and result in over 500,000 outpatient doctor visits, 15,000
hospitalizations, and 4,000 deaths over the course of a year. Critical assumptions used in
developing this plan included: 1) outbreaks would probably occur widely across the state and
nation, limiting the ability to share resources among jurisdictions; 2) vaccine would not be
available until several months had elapsed; 3) shortages of critical medicines and other
supplies would occur, including antiviral medications; 4) schools could be closed and the
educational process could be threatened.

The goals of this plan are, first, to protect the students, and second, educate the students. The
plan is intended to coordinate with global and national plans developed by the World Health
Organization (WHO), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), and the State
of Utah and Southwest Utah Public Health Department.

Since 1997, the World Health Organization and many national health agencies have been
monitoring the incidence of a particularly deadly form of avian flu known as H5N1. This
form of influenza is currently spreading across the world’s bird population, while this flu has
not had widespread human impact; it has killed more than half of those humans who have
been infected. It is important to plan for the possibility that this form of influenza will become
a more widespread human problem. Nationwide, states, communities, organizations, schools
and individuals have been urged to plan responses to a possible worldwide “pandemic flu.”
This plan outlines the steps and procedures that Washington County School District will take
in response to the emergence of a pandemic flu.




                                                      3
 Background
“The Flu”
Influenza, or “flu”, in humans is a highly contagious disease that is usually spread through
droplets of moisture caused by coughing or sneezing. Flu is caused by various forms of virus.
As the virus attacks our bodies, it causes any of a variety of symptoms, the most usual of
which include:

●Fever                           ●Headache                     ●Runny Nose

●Body Aches                      ●Cough                        ●Sore Throat

●Extreme Fatigue                 ●Stomach and Intestinal Discomfort

“Flu” season comes every year, usually in the winter. Normally, approximately 10% of the
population is affected by flu symptoms. For most people, it is unpleasant, but not life-
threatening. However, approximately 35,000 people die each year in the United States from
symptoms or complications of the flu.

Influenza Virus A or “Avian Flu”, or “Bird Flu”
“Influenza Virus A,” one class of viruses, is known as “avian flu”, or “bird flu” because it is
hosted by wild birds—the reservoir in nature for all subtypes of Influenza Virus A. The flu
does not, generally, cause major symptoms of illness in infected birds. Some human flu
epidemics are caused when humans working with birds become infected by a form of flu that
can be easily transmitted from human to human. This is a source of the seasonal or annual
spread of human flu that we have come to expect.

        All Influenza Virus A flu is “bird flu”

        However, not all bird flu attacks humans,

        Not all bird flu that attacks humans becomes easily transmitted between humans

        Not all bird flu transmitted to humans will cause deadly epidemic or pandemic

Scientists distinguish and name varieties of Influenza A viruses by combining the names and
numbers used to describe two surface proteins that are part of the biological make-up of the
virus: An “H” number that tells which form of the protein hem agglutinin is present, and an
“N” number to tell which form of the protein neuraminidase is present. There are 16 known
H-forms and 9 known N-forms. A particular variant of influenza A is labeled, for example,
H2N2 or H23.



                                                     4
H5N1: The Flu Strain That’s Raising Concern Today
The Influenza A variant of most current concern is “H5N1”. In 1997, a human in South East
Asia was identified as having died of this strain of flu, transmitted from a bird. According to
the World Health Organization, through July 2006, 230 cases of human infection by H5N1
have been identified. More than half (132) of those persons have died. To date, the strain has
not been passed between humans—only from bird to human. The incidence among humans
remains very low. However, the H5N1 strain has been identified as being widespread in bird
populations, now reaching across all of Asia, most of Europe, and into Africa. Wild bird
migration patterns make it likely that H5N1 will spread to wild bird populations throughout
the world, perhaps within a year or so. The current concern is that this flu might mutate into a
variety that remains deadly to humans and is transmittable from human to human.

What Makes “Flu” a “Pandemic Flu”?
We speak of a “pandemic” flu when a brand new strain of flu virus appears for which there is
low human immunity and high human-to-human contagiousness. Normally, forms of flu
change only a little from year to year—minor mutations of the previous year’s variety of flu
virus. Humans infected during a recent flu season retain an immunity, because their immune
systems “recognize” the slightly changed new flu strain and attack invading viruses, killing
them.

Influenza Virus A sometimes recombines (or mutates through a process called antigen shift)
into a form that is a sudden, large change of form. If a human population has not recently
experienced a similar form, its immune systems do not recognize the virus, do not attack, and
the virus enters the body successfully and begins its spread. When immunity is low within a
population, the disease spreads rapidly. If it spreads over a wide portion of the globe, we call
this episode of flu a “pandemic flu”.

In the last century, there have been notable pandemic flu episodes—in 1918, 1957, and 1968.
The 1918 flu—“The Great Influenza” (as a recent book titles it), an H5N1 Influenza Virus
A—erupted during the last year of World War 1. It caused especially strong symptoms and
extremely high mortality rates. This pandemic caused over 500,000 deaths in the U.S. and 20-
100 million deaths worldwide. It is this episode which gives us our “worst case” images of
what a pandemic flu could be.

What Is Our Purpose in Pandemic Flu Planning?
The World Health Organization (WHO) has identified six Phases to a Pandemic Alert System
(see Exhibit 1). The world is currently in “phase three” of this alert system. “Phase Three”
means that humans have been infected by a new subtype virus that is spreading through an
animal population (H5N1, in the current case), but that there is no (or only rare instances of)
human-to-human spread (none have been reported to date for H5N1).




                                                     5
                                                                              Exhibit 1


During Phase 3 of a Pandemic Alert, it is important to: minimize transmission to humans,
establish early detection, notification and response systems, and to prepare to contain and
control possible human-to-human populations within isolated communities.

Pandemic influenza is not currently present. The WCSD’s goal is two-fold:

   1. to plan for and implement ‘prevention’ processes—simple awareness and infection
      control practices and habits;

   2. to prepare for possible onset of pandemic influenza and the need for immediate
      responses.

Pandemic influenza preparedness is a process, not an isolated event. To be “prepared,” we
must develop specific capabilities in school staff, in students and their families, and in a
collaborative community system of school and health emergency response agencies.

The Washington County School District Pandemic Influenza Response Plan is intended to
guide our development of appropriate procedures, prepare staff, and establish a state of
readiness, in case a pandemic flu occurs.

What Planning Assumptions Do We Make In Preparing?
The U.S. Center for Disease Control makes the following assumptions and projections for
pandemic flu planning:

      Typical incubation period of two days.

      Persons who become infected may transmit for a full day prior to the onset of
       symptoms.

      On average, two secondary infections occur as a result of transmission from someone
       who is ill.

      In a community, a pandemic “wave” will last approximately 6-8 weeks.


                                                   6
      Absenteeism from school and work may reach 40% at the peak of the pandemic wave.

      At least two pandemic waves are likely to occur.

Experience during the “Great Influenza” of 1918 demonstrates that it is possible during a
pandemic that:

      The health care system will be swamped by sick people seeking assistance.

      The undertaking/funeral industry, too, can be overwhelmed.

      State and national emergency delivery systems may be overwhelmed and unable to
       address local needs in a timely manner.

      Fear may run rampant within a community under pandemic siege. Community
       assistance and neighborly support may break down nearly completely.

This pandemic plan recognizes these past experiences and future possibilities.             Our
assumptions, drawn from the above, include:

      Absenteeism of students and staff could be in the 30-40% range.

      Students and staff may be absent due to family care needs.

      Students and staff may simply not report due to fear of becoming infected.

      We may experience the loss of suppliers (utilities, garbage removal, food distribution,
       etc.)

      Government proclamations and fuel shortages may create transportation restrictions.

      Schools may close.

Finally, the pandemic, unlike many other emergency events, could last for many weeks, if not
months. The Southwest Utah Public Health Department and State of Utah Health Department
have asked schools to prepare for school closures that may last up to 2 months.

Schools tend to be affected by outbreaks more than other settings because their occupants--
primarily children—easily transmit illnesses to one another as a result of their close proximity
and their inefficiency at containing the droplets issued by their coughs and sneezes. High
susceptibility of students and staff to exposure to a mutated virus as result of proximity and a
longer duration of the outbreak due to lack of immunity and vaccines could result in lengthy
and widespread absenteeism. In worse-case scenario, the pandemic could force schools to
close, potentially prompting administration to extend the academic year and expend additional
resources for staff sick leave and substitute teachers.




                                                     7
 Plan Organization
Our plan of action is organized within categories drawn from a matrix that combines a
nationally-recommended categorization of phases of management of emergency responses—
the “National Incident Management System (NIMS)”. We introduce these phases and
functions briefly, then include a copy of the resulting matrix and summary of key planning
and response tasks within each phase and function. Detailed actions are delineated at the end
of this plan document.

Three Phases of WCSD Emergency Response
Before Pandemic (Mitigation/Prevention) – What we should be “doing always.” The actions
listed below are things that we can and should be doing to minimize the likelihood of the
targeted hazard or condition from becoming an emergency.

Before Pandemic (Preparedness) – What we should be “doing now.” The actions listed below
are things that we can and should be doing to prepared in case of the emergency condition
coming into being. These are actions for which there is not likely to be adequate time or
resources to complete after the emergency situation begins to occur.

During Pandemic (Response) – What we should be “doing when the emergency occurs.”
These are actions that we should be ready to take, and should take, beginning as soon as we
are aware of the emergency conditions for which we have planned. The indicators for various
levels of emergency response to pandemic flu are detailed below.

After Pandemic (Recovery) – What we should be “doing after the emergency conditions
pass.” These are actions that we should be ready to take, and should take, when the
emergency “response” period is over. In the case of pandemic flu, this does not necessarily
mean that there will be further cases of flu, but the high incidence and continuing spread will
have subsided.




                                                    8
Six Components of Pandemic Influenza Planning
Awareness/Education – actions to assure that all parties are informed and understand what is
occurring and how they can contribute to making the situation better.

Infection Control – actions taken to prevent or lessen the spread of influenza virus. These
actions will of course, also improve control of other related infections.

Surveillance – actions taken within the school system to participate in the identification and
reporting of potential or actual cases of flu during a pandemic. These actions will be taken in
coordination with public health officials.

Health Concerns – actions taken by school staff that are involved in the direct provision of
health care or taken in coordination with community health providers.

Continuity of Operations (COOP) – actions taken to assure that critical school system
functions will continue during periods of high absence or school closings.

Collaboration/Communication – actions taken to link the school system with other community
agencies involved in the local/regional pandemic flu planning and response activities.




                                                    9
WCSD Phases of Pandemic




                                  B
                                  e
                                  f
                      Phase 3     o
                   After Pandemic r
                         Recovery e




                     Phase 2
                  During Pandemic
                         Response




                         Phase 1
                    Before Pandemic
                      Mitigation and Prevention
                            Preparedness




       Phases of Response to Health-Related Incidents




                                     10
School Response Flow Chart

                Flu                No           Standard
               Cases?                          Surveillance
                                                Reporting


                     Yes
                                              Letter # 1
          Begin Heightened                        to
        Surveillance Reporting                 Parents


                                          Letter # 2
           Local Outbreak                     to
                                           Parents
                     Yes
                                                   Letter # 3
                Are
                             Fewer than 10%            to
              Students
                                                    Parents
                 Ill?


                     Yes                           Letter # 4
           Begin Intensive                             to
        Surveillance Reporting                      Parents       District
                                                                   Press
                                                                 Release A


                                                                      Health Officer
              Increase in    More than 30%                              may issue
              Ill Students               Contact                       declaration    Close
                                         WCSD                        closing schools Schools
                                                                                   Parent Letter
                     Less than 30%                                                     #5        District
        Continue Heightened                        Decrease     No                               Press
                                                     in Flu                Schools             Release B
            Surveillance
                                                    Cases?               Remain Closed

                                                          Yes          Health Officer may
                                                                       issue re-opening of
                                                                             schools
                                                                                         Re-Open
  Yes           New                No                Resume Standard                      Schools
               Cases?                              Surveillance Reporting               Parent Letter
                                                                                            #6
                                                                                                District
                                                                                                 Press
                                                                                               Release C




                                                   11
 Surveillance and Reporting
During all stages of a pandemic flu outbreak, it will be essential to monitor and document the
number of students and faculty who are absent and meet the definition of influenza-like
illness. Keeping track of these numbers will help health officials determine when and whether
to close schools, whether the epidemic is increasing in scope and whether to declare an
epidemic, making schools eligible to apply for reimbursement of ADA (Average Daily
Attendance) funds during increased absenteeism.

Schools are provided with the following information to monitor the illness rate and potential
epidemic:

    Basic surveillance instructions and definitions of surveillance levels.
    Case definition to assist in determining whether the ill student and/or faculty is
     suffering from an influenza-like illness.
    Reporting form(s) to submit to the Washington County School District Risk
     Management Department.
    Sample Attendance Log to document flu-related absences to document need to apply
     for an ADA Waiver.




                                                    12
Definition of Surveillance Reporting


Standard Surveillance
No flu activity reported in the community (flu season)

      Monitor daily attendance for increased reports of absence due to flu-like illness.

      Do not report absences to the Health Department unless greater than 10%.



Heightened Surveillance
Flu activity reported in the community (less than 10% school absenteeism due to flu-like
illness)

      Monitor daily attendance for flu-like illness/absences.

      Begin morning ‘flu check’ first hour of school—screen those who report positive for
       symptoms.

      Log absences due to flu-like illness.

      Send weekly absence report to the WCSD District Office.



Intensive Surveillance
High number of flu illness reported in the community (10% or greater school absenteeism due
to flu-like illness)

      Monitor daily attendance and log absences on log sheet.

      Continue morning ‘flu check’.

      Send daily absence report to the WCSD District Office.

      Begin preparation for potential school closure.




                                                   13
 Process for Periodic Plan Update
This plan shall be reviewed at least annually by the administration to determine the need to
revise or include updates reflective of significant new information, new collaborative
agreements, or revised actions to be taken within any of the phases or functions delineated in
this plan. The results of this review shall be communicated to the WCSD at the beginning of
each fiscal year, with appropriate action recommended to the Pandemic Emergency Team for
approval.

In order to maintain WCSD readiness prior to or during a pandemic flu episode, the
administration is authorized to make timely additions or revisions to the written plan and, as
necessary, to communicate those changes and initiate training or re-training to appropriate
staff. It is the responsibility of the administration, when such additions or revisions to the plan
are undertaken. Please indicate all revisions and additions made to the Influenza Response
Plan on the Revision Record Log found at the front of this plan.




                                                      14
                ANNUAL REVIEW CERTIFICATION
I hereby certify that I have reviewed the WCSD Pandemic Influenza Response Plan and all necessary
changes have been incorporated into the plan.

              DATE                                          SIGNATURE




                                                     15
 Phase 1—Before Pandemic


Mitigation and Prevention
During the mitigation and Prevention stage educators are to be aware and prepare for a
possible pandemic. During this stage there are no new influenza virus subtypes detected in
humans. However, a circulating animal influenza virus subtype poses substantial risk of
human disease. Strengthen influenza pandemic preparedness at all levels. Closely monitor
human and animal surveillance data. Minimize the risk of transmission of animal influenza
virus to humans; detect and report such transmission rapidly if it occurs.

Although schools have no control over an epidemic, they can take actions to minimize or
mitigate the impact of such incidents. Schools in a pandemic can mitigate the impact of a
possible pandemic by following preventative measures outlines in the pandemic response plan
as follows:

Awareness/Education
       Review Before Pandemic Checklist and document status of preparation.

       Complete the Key Internal Contact Persons list for your specific school building. (see
        appendix A)

       Begin awareness building/education process by identifying school-based individuals
        to educate staff, students and families about pandemic flu, personal hygiene, and local
        plans.

       Educational materials for staff, students         and   families   are available at
        http://emergency.washk12.org

       Each school will have personal training before October 15 of each school year on
        personal hygiene and the Pandemic Influenza Response Plan. All resources are
        available on the emergency website at http://emergency.washk12.org and on the
        attached resources CD.

       All educational material is in English. If material needs to be translated into another
        language and you do not have the resources, please contact the Washington County
        School District for additional resources.

Surveillance
       The Southern Utah Health Department will monitor Doctor’s offices on the number of
        influenza cases. They will determine the extent of the disease.

                                                    16
       Our responsibility will be to keep daily attendance of students and staff and report to
        the Washington County School District when requested, or when unusual patterns of
        absenteeism occur.

       Each school should orient staff regarding symptoms and intended surveillance
        procedures.

Infection Control
       Identify individual(s) to ensure school (each room) has adequate supplies for good
        personal hygiene

       Distribute and display posters, etc. regarding good personal hygiene, etc.

       Conduct instruction on good personal hygiene practices.

Health Concerns
       Identify and assess in-school resources to provide for physical and mental health needs

       Plan for provision of additional resources as needed (in-school and community based)

Continuity of Operations
       Explore alternate scheduling options, etc. for continuity of operations with reduced
        staffing, vendor/supply interruptions, etc.

       Assess potential financial impact

       Determine current policies/procedures that may be impacted

Communication Collaboration
       Develop communication plan (e.g. school closures, schedule changes, bussing, etc.)

       Ensure collaboration with Washington County School District Office

       Establish or review Incident Command structure within the school, including; back-up
        plans/systems/chair command.




                                                     17
Preparedness
Crises have the potential to affect every student and staff member in a school building.
Despite everyone’s best efforts at crisis prevention, it is a certainty that crises will occur in
schools. Good planning will facilitate a rapid, coordinated, effective response when a crisis
occurs. Being well prepared involves an investment of time and resources—but the potential
to reduce injury and save lives is well worth the effort. Please follow the following guidelines
when preparing for a pandemic in our community.

Awareness/Education
       Identify and pre-screen health and grief service providers.

       Develop template letters, forms, etc. (see communication resources)

       Continue to educate staff, students, and families.

Surveillance
       Track the number of staff and students absent daily through regular attendance
        reporting system.

       Report numbers absent to District Office, or when unusual patterns of absenteeism
        occur.

Infection Control
       Review policies and procedures for sending ill students and staff home; modify as
        needed.

       Procedures for sending ill students home are:

               1. Isolate students and staff in a room if spsected of illness. If an isolation room
                  is in use, a precaution sign will be placed on the door.

               2. Give ill persons a mask and send home (complete all required paper-work)

               3. Our responsibility is to get the student home in a guardians care.

Health Concerns
       Identify and assess in-school resources to provide for physical and mental health
        needs.

       Plan for provision of additional resources as needed (in-school and community based).


                                                       18
Continuity of Operations
       Begin Administration monitoring of conditions and educational readiness

       Review Pandemic Influenza Response Plan in anticipation of implementation; revise
        as requested by Pandemic Emergency Response Team.

Communication Collaboration
       Identify/review procedures for communication with staff, students, and families




                                                   19
Appendix A—Before Pandemic

 WCSD Before Pandemic School Checklist

 In Depth “Before Pandemic” School Checklist

 Key Internal Contact Persons: Building




                                                20
                           PHASE ONE (PREVENTION AND PREPARATION)—
                             “BEFORE PANDEMIC” SCHOOL CHECKLIST

Trigger:          Avian flu has been confirmed in birds, with limited bird to human transmission and
                  no/little human to human transmission. Health officials are concerned that the H5N1
                  virus (‘avian flu’) could mutate and cause global/local pandemic.

Goals:            Schools and departments are prepared as well as they can be for a pandemic. The
                  plan fits within the schools emergency management plan. Staff, students and parents
                  are well informed and understand their roles in preventing general influenza spread.

                               PREVENTION—A. AVIAN FLU PRESENT IN OTHER COUNTRIES
                                         BUT NO HUMAN TO HUMAN TRANSMISSION
                                                         Responsibility                                  Status
1        Review the WCSD Pandemic Influenza Response Plan.
2        Appoint and train a CERT trained employee in each school building.
         Train and inform all teachers and staff of WCSD Pandemic Influenza Response Plan and
3
         their responsibility.
         Establish emergency communication system (TCN) to allow for the expedited transmission
4
         and receipt of timely information.
5        Review cleaning policies, practices and supplies.
         Print and display hand washing and influenza screening posters for school and department
6
         use.
         Develop a school wide plan to stockpile hand sanitizer and other hygiene supplies to prevent
7
         sickness. (volunteer projects for PTA, donations, etc.)
         Develop options for alternative instructional delivery and communication that information to
8        staff, students, and families to ensure that students continue to receive instruction and
         academic credit in the event of school closures.
         Identify plan for moving students from one are of a school to another (isolation of sick
9
         students until pick up, etc.)
11       Set up a building personnel contact list and update regularly.
12       Set up and/or update student and parent emergency contact list.
13       Consider work force needs (reduced staff availability).
                           PREPARATION—B. PANDEMIC FLU PRESENT IN THE UNITED STATES
                                                           BUT NOT IN UTAH
                                                           Responsibility                             Status
         Identify the district and school site staff chain of command in case of illness. Establish a
1
         backup chain of command if necessary.
2        Review procedures for communicating with staff, students and families.
3        Keep relevant groups informed.
4        Institute increased disinfectant processes by custodial/cleaning staff.
5        Institute advanced personal hygiene and influenza precautions.
6        Monitor illness and absences of students and staff.
         Identify strategies to provide meals for those children who rely on school meals as their
7
         primary source of daily nutrition.
         Identify individual(s) to ensure (1) each room has adequate supplies of soap/water/paper
8        towels or waterless hand sanitizer for hand washing and receptacles for disposal; and (2)
         basic hygiene supplies are replaced daily and trash is disposed of daily.
         Identify or develop educational materials for families and staff on topics such as how to
9        support their student with recovery from pandemic flu, common symptoms or loss and grief,
         and constructive ways to cope with stress.
           (for an in-depth checklist to complete before a pandemic, please refer to “Resources”
                                   in the Pandemic Influenza Response Plan.)


                                                         21
                           IN DEPTH “BEFORE PANDEMIC” SCHOOL CHECKLIST


                                MITIGATION & PREVENTION ACTIVITIES
                   [THESE ACTIONS SHOULD BE TAKEN IMMEDIATELY AND THEN CONTINUE]

                                     Responsibility                                        Person        Status
                                                                                           Responsible
                                           AWARENESS/EDUCATION
Prepare Staff:
Train staff as role models for students regarding infection prevention habits. (identify
trainers, complete training). (See also “Infection Control” below.)
Inform students and families re: infection control:
Teach infection control, present at PTO/PTA and related parent/family events; send
information regarding healthy infection prevention habits.
Post and distribute infection control and pandemic influenza basic information:
Healthy Habits/Infection Control Information:

Acquire or prepare posters, flyers, and related materials defining “healthy habits” that
support infection control.

Post flyers and reminders of healthy habits – “cover your cough,” “stop the spread of
germs,” and related topics. [Post in each office, classroom and rest room, on web-site,
and other appropriate building sites.]

Acquire/ prepare, post, and distribute such materials in as many home-languages
served by your LEA as is possible.

Post and distribute infection control and pandemic influenza basic information:
Pandemic Influenza Information:

Distribute “Pandemic Influenza” information and “Getting Ready For Pandemic Flu
Checklist (for Families)” to students, families, and staff.

Acquire/ prepare such materials in as many home-languages served by your LEA as is
possible and distribute, as appropriate.

Publish articles in school newsletters, on web pages, and in schools on infection
control.

                                                     INFECTION CONTROL
Establish, promote and evaluate Sanitation and Disinfection Procedures
  a. Routinely inspect health & safety of school facilities
  b. Clean shared work areas at least daily
  c. Maintain good cleanliness and ventilation
  d. Make accessible soap, paper towels & sinks or hand sanitizer
  e. Display hand washing & cough etiquette posters
  f. Maintain adequate extra supplies and develop system for dispersal
  g. Implement procedures for control & disposal of infectious waste
  h. Supply/provide disinfectant
      i. Labeled for activity against bacteria & viruses
      ii. EPA-registered hospital disinfectant
      iii. ¼ cup chlorine bleach with gallon of cool water
  i. Develop policies for transporting ill students



                                                                 22
Train Staff/Faculty : Infection Control
   a. Curriculum for students
                          Resources for Basic Readiness/Pandemic Readiness Activities
                          i. American Red Cross-Family Disaster Plan & Personal
                  Survival
                          ii. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention
                          iii. PA Emergency Preparedness Guide
                    b. Universal Precautions
         i. Blood-borne Pathogen
   c. Social Distancing
   d. Avoid touching eyes, nose & mouth
   e. No sharing utensils or cups, etc
   f. Stay home when sick
   g. Personal Protection Equipment
        i. N-95 Masks (need to be fit-tested for individuals)
        ii. Gloves
   h. Limit spread of germs & prevent infection
        i. Stay home when sick
       ii. Fact Sheet on Influenza Symptoms & what
   i. Flu Vaccine
   j. Identify essential staff-provide with PPE including N-95 respirators
Inform about and offer Flu Shots
a. DOH-Who Should Get a Flu Shot?
b. Promote availability & desirability of flu vaccine for all
c. Offer flu vaccine on-site for staff & students


                                       SURVEILLANCE
Monitor Illness
a. Develop illness monitoring procedures/protocol
b. Determine baseline % of students absent on daily basis
c. Report absences beyond 10% with respiratory symptoms

Monitor Staff, Students & Families
a. Travel www.pandemicflu.gov/travel/
b. Screen visitors for illness
c. Foreign exchange students


                                         HEALTH CONCERNS
Identification of At-Risk Student
a. Develop procedures to identify at-risk students & staff
b. Contribute to trusting environment between school staff & students
c. Keep students “connected” during & after school

Develop Partnerships with Community Agencies


                                    CONTINUITY OF OPERATIONS
Plan for and initiate cross-training (include emergency response functions in this
planning), particularly for roles that require more extensive training

                          COMMUNICATION/COLLABORATION
Develop Partnerships with Community Agencies
a. County EMA Coordinators


                                                                23
b. State/Regional Contacts
   i. Department of Health
   ii. Department of Education
   iii. State Emergency Management Agency

Develop a Variety of Communication Channels
a. State Pandemic Plan-Appendix O-Communication Strategies
b. Health Alert Network (HAN) Public Website- the State Health Alert Network
             c. Phone tree for all staff
             d. Alternate forms of communication: e-mail; media; newsletters
             e. Determine who will keep track of updating communication lists
             f. Rumor control
             g. Keep message simple
             h. Consistent message from everyone
             i. May need to vary message for staff, students & parents




                                                        24
                                            PREPAREDNESS
                      [THESE ACTIONS SHOULD BE TAKEN AT THE POINT THAT THE FIRST
                       CASE OF SUSPECTED PANDEMIC FLU ENTERS THE UNITED STATES]

                        Responsibility                               Person      Status
                                                                   Responsible
                                           AWARENESS/EDUCATION
Re-Distribute “Pandemic Influenza” information and “Getting
Ready For Pandemic Flu Checklist (for Families)” to students,
families, and staff (in appropriate home languages)
Plan and begin to publish articles on signs and symptoms of flu
and infection control in school newsletters, on web pages, and
[other locally appropriate sites].
Send information to staff and share information in staff
meetings and new staff orientation reviewing flu symptoms and
indicators, procedures for sending ill students or staff to Health
office/ staff.

                                              INFECTION CONTROL
Replenish supplies and review Sanitation and Disinfection
Procedures
  a. Routinely inspect health & safety of school facilities
  b. Clean shared work areas at least daily
  c. Maintain good cleanliness and ventilation
  d. Make accessible soap, paper towels & sinks or hand
  sanitizer
  e. Display hand washing & cough etiquette posters
  f. Maintain adequate extra supplies and develop system for
  dispersal
  g. Implement procedures for control & disposal of infectious
  waste
  h. Supply/provide disinfectant
      i. Labeled for activity against bacteria & viruses
      ii. EPA-registered hospital disinfectant
      iii. ¼ cup chlorine bleach with gallon of cool water

Develop written policies and procedures for exclusion of
students and staff due to illness
Stay home when sick

                                                 SURVEILLANCE
Student/Staff Illness
a. Track student & staff absences
   i. School Response to Pandemic Flu Flow Chart
   ii. Absences beyond 10% with respiratory symptoms
   iii. Baseline % of students absent on daily basis
b. Report absences in accord with any interagency agreements
b. Review travel information at www.pandemicflu.gov/travel/
c. Screen visitors for illness
d. Foreign exchange students
Conduct Risk/Vulnerability Assessment (What risks are
unique for your school?)


                                                             25
i. Multiple parents/families traveling to affected countries
ii. Large number of foreign students
iii. Near airport/train station/bus station-parents working there

Develop Disease Confinement Procedures
  a. Procedures for Dealing with Ill Students/Staff
       i. Develop specific pandemic influenza preparedness
             plan for medical response
       ii. When to contact DOH
       iii. Written procedures for exclusion
  b. Quarantine & Isolation
       i. Formulate plan for quarantine of students/staff
       ii. Plan for students who can’t leave school: food,
       blankets, medications, food, etc
        iii. Plan alternate means of educating students
quarantined at home
Keep Abreast of Activity in the Community
               a. HAN State Health Alert Network serves as a
               communication network among state and local
               public health agencies, healthcare providers,
               hospitals and emergency management officials.
               b. Monitor CDC, World Health Organization
               (WHO)
               c. Participate in hazard & risk assessments for
               your area


                                                HEALTH CONCERNS
Identify & assess in-school resources to provide for physical
and mental health needs; Review and compile list of resources
available for mental health and grief counseling services,
including district and school critical incident teams, student
assistance teams, employee assistance services, partnering
community mental health services, etc.
Identify and Address Special Needs
a. Review Health Needs of Students/Staff
     i. Keep a list & assess needs, i.e. supplies & medications
b. Procedures to identify at-risk students
c. Volunteer roster- buddy with special needs student & family
d. No student should be released to an empty house.
e. Plan for students with no adult at home who is well enough to
     care for them

Continue to stock extra gloves, surgical masks, N95 respirator
masks, and appropriate cleaning supplies.

                                       CONTINUITY OF OPERATIONS
Administrative Team Monitoring:
Begin regular [or “timely”] senior staff briefings to monitor
preparedness, identify lessons learned, and make necessary
changes to the preparedness and response plan.
Assess and prepare for identifiable staff risks and needs:               Superintendent,
                                                                         Principal
- Identify staff who, due to health condition or pregnancy, will
not be able to be present at assigned school/office after flu has


                                                                    26
been identified. Provide this information to Human Resources
for consideration when seeking substitutes.

- Review and update staff emergency contact lists.

- Assign staff to identify (and report) someone that can and will
check up on them in case of an illness.
Define critical functions which must be maintained and
minimum staffing needs (numbers and skills)

Plan possible re-assignments under pandemic (3-deep
principle), continue cross-training (include emergency response
functions in this planning)
Define and plan for contractual issues; agree on contract
addenda that will prevail during declared pandemic periods
Project and plan for financial impact
Plan for continuity of payroll functions
Plan alternate dining services to avoid large gatherings during
pandemic - stockpile food
Define alternate means of educating students if classes must be
combined (due to absences unable to be covered by substitutes)
or school is closed for lengthy period.
Develop and adopt liberal leave policies for persons with sick
family members during declared pandemic disease periods
List suppliers the LEA interacts with on routine basis; make
arrangements with alternate supplier(s)
Provide training to “Critical Incident Team” members regarding
the Response and Recovery elements of this plan


                                  COMMUNICATION/COLLABORATION
Collaborate with Community for Resources
              1. Identify Key Stakeholders
     a. Faith-based organizations
      b. Neighboring jurisdictions
      c. Volunteer organizations
      d. Local businesses
      e. Local officials
      f. Fire
      g. Law enforcement
      h. Emergency Management Agency (EMA)-County
      EMA Coordinators
      i. Emergency Management Services (EMS)
      j. Public health
      k. Medical, health & behavior care providers l. Don’t
      forget Parent Teacher Association/Organization
      (PTA/PTO)
              2. Care for Families of Volunteers
      a. Need a plan to care for the families of volunteers
      b. Assess the family needs

Develop Collaborative Links to County Emergency Response
Plan
               1. Be Familiar with the NIMS Model
     a. Establish School Emergency Response Team


                                                                27
                 2. Collaborate with Community EMAs, Police,
                 Fire, etc.
     a. Provide copies of plan to these agencies for review
     b. Be sure to update plan if building renovated
     c. Match school plan to community plan
     d. Plan for multiple waves of illness (estimate 2-3
        months/wave)
     e. Is school designated as Point of Dispensing (POD) or
        evacuation site, etc? (see 3 below)
     f. Designate incident commander for the school
     g. Form Emergency Preparedness Team for
        District/Building
     h. Ask for volunteers & assign responsibilities
     i. Drills, tabletop exercises and other practice activities
3. Plan collaboratively with Emergency Management and
   Public Health agencies for potential use of School Building
   as POD or Evacuation Center, in accord with interagency
   agreements:
     a. All publicly-funded schools shall be made available to
     officials
     b. All bus & transportation vehicles shall be made available
                 4. Communication
     a. Provide information to parents regarding plan
     b. Hold community-wide meetings to address concerns
     c. Plan for alternate means of communication (redundancy)
     d. Determine who will keep track of updating
        communication lists
     e. Plan for rumor control
     f. Designate public information officer (PIO)
     g. Anticipate simple, consistent messages needed for
        targeted audiences, develop template letters and press
        releases in advance
     h. Template letters & press releases in advance
     i. Procedures for student release
     j. Promote use and understanding of common terminology
        across district
     k. Translation into common languages in state
Develop (at least preliminary) “recovery” surveillance, referral,
communication plans with partnering community agencies and
service providers.




                                                               28
                                KEY INTERNAL CONTACT PERSONS: BUILDING

Each school is to complete the name, phone number and other contact information for each
title identified below for each school location.

Building                                    Name:

                                            Phone Number:

School Commander/Building Principal         Name:

                                            Phone Number:

CERT Trained Employee                       Name:

                                            Phone Number:

School Secretary                            Name:

                                            Phone Number:

School Nurse                                Name:

                                            Phone Number:

Building Facilities/Custodian               Name:

                                            Phone Number:

Counseling/Crisis Team                      Name:

                                            Phone Number:

Security Officers                           Name:

                                            Phone Number:




                                                       29
 Phase 2—During Pandemic


Response
The response phase of the plan identifies what educators should be doing when an emergency
occurs. The actions taken during this stage of the pandemic should already be in place and
should be taken as soon as we are aware of the emergency condition. Local, state and national
health officials are and will be keeping constant surveillance on the pandemic situation. Local
health officials will keep community members informed on the current pandemic status in the
community, state and nation.

The Southwest Utah Public Health Department will monitor the pandemic affects on the
community through local health care providers and the school district absenteeism status. The
Governor may declare a civil emergency, or the Commissioner of Public Health may declare a
public health emergency. In an emergency, they could give an order to close schools for a
period of time to reduce the rate of spread of influenza. Regardless of whether an emergency
is declared or schools are closed, the state government will be very closely monitoring the
influenza situation and providing information to the public, including schools, regarding the
severity of the influenza strain, what can be expected, the course of the pandemic, and what
additional steps can be taken to minimize everyone’s chances of developing illness.

The Utah state government will also be receiving antiviral agents and whatever vaccine is
available and making them available to healthcare workers constantly exposed to influenza
and to the most severely affected persons and groups. It is important for key school officials
to know how to access the latest information from the national Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention and the Utah Department of Public Health on the pandemic, vaccine, antivirals
and protective measures, and to be knowledgeable enough to convey it to staff and students.
Latest information and influenza updates can be accessed on the WCSD emergency website at
http://emergency.washk12.org.

There are two stages during the “Response” section of the emergency response plan that
educators and families must be aware of and prepare for. They are; non-school closure and
school closure.

Non-School Closure
This stage is when a flu pandemic is apparent in the community and community members are
ill, but the number of ill persons is below 40%. At this stage the Southwest Utah Public
Health Department believes it is safe to attend school and continue with public gathering.




                                                    30
Awareness/Education
       Review During Pandemic Checklist and document status of response.(see appendix B)

       Initiate communication to families, including in appropriate home languages. (see
        communication resources)

       Keep staff informed on the extent of infection at school and potential changes.

       Health training and educational materials will be available on hygiene and flu
        prevention methods. (see educational resources)

       Infection control posters will be placed at all school entrances and common areas to
        encourage all persons entering school buildings to self-screen.

               o Via posters, school staff will ask persons who have a new cough to wear a
                 surgical mask or use tissues to cover their mouth and nose when coughing,
                 and to use good hand hygiene during the time they need to be in the school
                 building.

               o Schools will advise all persons, including staff, students and visitors, who have
                 a fever and cough to defer attending school or visiting the institution until their
                 illness has resolved.

               o Schools will display hand-washing and cover your cough posters in high-
                 traffic areas and classrooms.

Surveillance
       The Southwest Utah Public Health Department will monitor national, regional and
        local data related to epidemic respiratory infections.

       Southwest Utah Public Health Department will monitor hospital admissions,
        emergency department visits, deaths and, potentially, school and workplace
        absenteeism. It will be important for schools to be able to keep track of daily
        absenteeism among students as a percentage of enrolled students and daily
        absenteeism among staff as a percentage of all staff. This information may be used to
        guide school closings and reopenings as well as to monitor the changing impact of the
        influenza problem (see appendix B—daily census log).

       Absenteeism will be monitored for any trends. School nurses will work with school
        administrators, social workers and attendance clerks to monitor absentee trends.
        Significant trends will be reported to the School Nurse Coordinator who will inform
        the Superintendent and the Southwest Utah Public Health Department.

       Report numbers absent to District Office when requested.


                                                        31
       Administrators will keep daily logs of action taken and ill personnel and number of
        students ill (see appendix B—daily census log).

       The name and phone/number/address of all persons seen with fever and new cough
        will be recorded and reported daily to the WCSD. This information will be shared
        with the Southwest Utah Public Health Department as appropriate (see appendix B—
        daily census log).

       All daily census logs will be documented and reported to the District Office daily.

       Identify who will communicate from your school site with the District Office
        regarding attendance and absenteeism.

       Parents, teachers and staff will continue to report absences through the current
        attendance procedure.

Infection Control
       Implement policies and procedures for sending ill students and staff home.

       Procedures for sending ill students home are:

             1. Isolate students and staff in a room if suspected illness. If an isolation room is
                in use, a precaution sign will be placed on the door.

             2. Give ill persons a mask and send home (complete all required paper-work)

             3. Our responsibility is to get the student home in a guardians care.

       Those allowed into the school buildings will be screened for fever or cough and have
        their temperature taken, and if cleared, given something to indicate that they have been
        cleared to enter the facility (e.g. as sticker, a card, a stamp on the hand).

       Those who are identified to have a fever and/or cough will be instructed to don a
        surgical mask, use hand sanitizer and go to a designated isolation area to be picked up
        by parents and sent home. Adults and students accompanied by adults may also be
        excluded from entry in the institution and instructed to call their health care provider
        for advice and evaluation.

       In this phase, the WCSD School Health Staff have the authority to restrict individuals
        (staff and students) who have fever and a new cough from school or any other group
        gathering. They also have the authority to send any student or staff member home that
        they suspect may have a communicable disease that puts others in the school at risk.

       There may be some degree of suspension of activities, including sporting events, arts
        performances and after school classes as determined by the WCSD superintendent and
        Southwest Utah Public Health Department.


                                                      32
      Schools will maintain adequate supplies at all time of surgical masks, waterless hand
       sanitizer, surface cleaners & disinfectants, and tissues throughout public areas,
       classrooms, and meeting rooms.

      Administrators are encouraged to stockpile N95 surgical masks for all adults in the
       school (see appendix B).

      Surfaces will be cleaned and disinfected regularly using Environmental Protection
       Agency (EPA)—registered disinfectant approved for use by WCSD Facilities
       Department. The WCSD Warehouse will have these products available. Label
       instructions should always be followed when using any disinfectants. All cleaning
       products should be stored where students do not have access to the products and
       should be used when students are not nearby.

      There may be a limiting of larger than class size group gatherings during the school
       day (e.g. assemblies, recess, etc.).

      Busses transporting students on and off campus may be consolidated or suspended.

           1. Bus drivers will be authorized to use a screening process and infection control
              procedures and may request that sick students not board bus at the morning
              pickup or sit in a designated area on the bus and wear a mask.

           2. A bus may be designated for the transporting of sick students home, if
              feasible.

      Continue to educate and elevate the training on proper hygiene and respiratory
       etiquette with posters, video, letters and newsletters.

Health Concerns
      Utilize in-school resources to provide for physical and mental health needs.

      Arrange for provision of additional resources as needed (in-school & community-
       based)

      Recognize signs of influenza

           o Fever 100.4 or higher

           o Aches

           o Vomiting

           o Chills

           o Cough



                                                   33
            o Sore throat

       Identify and have a CERT trained personnel in each school.

Continuity of Operations
       Continue to operate as normal as possible.

       Conduct debriefings re: lessons learned.

       Document critical actions taken (see appendix B—Census Log)

       School closings as needed, directed by the WCSD Superintendent and Southwest
        Public Health Department.

       Identify at least 2 people that can cover each position in case personnel are ill.

       If personnel are ill, continue to request subs through each school office personnel.
        Current sick leave policies still apply. (See District Policy 3.6).

       Educators are to continue to follow state curriculum guidelines and identified
        PowerStandard’s.

       Efforts will be made to assist students unable to attend school through websites,
        newsletters, parent letters and student packets. Students are to do their best to make up
        all missing assignments, as indicated by the teacher.

       Cafeteria activities may be suspended or modified.

            o A plan will be developed for delivering meals to students if cafeteria or group-
              style dining is closed. This may take the form of delivery of bag meals to
              classrooms with the assistance of school staff.

Communication/Collaboration

       WCSD will develop a sustainable and effective plan for communication and
        promotion of messages relating to epidemic respiratory infections to internal and
        external audiences. This included:
            o Staff education—annual infection control measures will be reviewed with staff
                as well as strategy for activities to promote timely information to health
                services providers in the event of an epidemic respiratory infection.
            o Translation Services—contact the WCSD if need additional resources.
            o Newsletters, take-home fliers, messages on school menus where appropriate
            o Use of Web Site—http://emergency.washk12.org
            o Use of local television and radio stations
            o Emergency Communication System (TCN)



                                                      34
       Implement all procedures for pandemic conditions

       Communicate with staff, students and parents about pandemic condition.

       Send letter 3 & 4 home to parents in timely manner (see communication resources).

       Administration to keep daily contact with District Office.

       Administration to keep daily contact with all school personnel.

       Administrators and school personnel will maintain order and minimize panic to the
        best of their ability by following the above procedures and instructions by district
        office during a pandemic.

School Closure
Schools could be closed for either of two reasons:

First, there could be levels of absenteeism among staff and/or students that make it difficult to
achieve the educational mission. The decision to close on this basis is an individual school
decision in conjunction with guidance from the WCSD Superintendent and the Southwest
Utah Public Health Department. Many schools close if absenteeism is in the range of 30% -
40%

Second, schools could close specifically to slow the spread of influenza. Close contact among
many persons in schools make them a center for respiratory disease transmission, including
influenza. If school closing for this purpose it to be effective, it should be done early in an
epidemic before absenteeism rates climb very much, and in concert with all other schools,
many workplaces, and with closing other public gathering places. In addition, to be effective,
students and staff must stay apart from each other when they are not in school. A decision for
closing for this reason will be made by the Governor, Superintendent and Southwest Utah
Public Health Department. Schools could be closed for several weeks to several months.

In the event of a school closure, administrators and educators are to follow the following
guidelines:

This stage will occur when 40% or more of students and employees are ill with influenza. The
Southwest Utah Public Health Department will demand school closures based on the current
community absenteeism and illness status.

At this time, students, faculty and staff will not be permitted on school grounds or in large
social gatherings.

School administrators and educators are to be aware and ready for a pandemic when it occurs.
The following 6 components of pandemic planning identified below should be reviewed and
monitored during a pandemic.



                                                     35
Awareness/Education
       Finalize and initiate communication to families (including in appropriate home
        languages)

       Staff and families are to keep in contact and be aware of local health department
        recommendations and procedures.

       Educational materials and pandemic status information will be updated and posted on
        the WCSD website at http://emergency.washk12.org and through the WCSD and
        individual emergency communication systems.

Surveillance
       No surveillance will be done during this stage.

       Secure premises

Infection Control
       Implement social distancing, isolation, quarantine, etc. as indicated.

       Continue to educate and elevate the training of proper hygiene and respiratory
        etiquette through on-line pamphlets, videos and educational material through the
        WCSD emergency website at http://emergency.washk12.org.

Health Concerns
       Continue learning and caring for family and community members. When the
        pandemic is no longer a threat to our community, local health officials will allow the
        re-opening of schools.

Continuity of Operations
       School closings as needed, directed by authorized personnel

       Administrators, teachers and staff will continue to provide education to our students
        and support to the community where needed through alternative instruction as
        determined by your school.

       Teachers will continue the education process through website, learning packets, TV
        and radio as created and specified in the preparation stage.

       The State of Utah School Board has created a waiver for school districts that are
        ordered to close schools based on an emergency. This waiver will allow schools to
        remain closed until health officials order schools to be opened. This waiver will waive
        any days missed and students and teachers will not need to make up missed days when
        make efforts to continue education.


                                                     36
      Teacher and school personnel are encouraged to continue the education process
       through individual school and teacher plans. Teachers and school personnel will
       continue to be paid during this emergency, as long as state funds are available.

      Continue student education.

           o As stated on February 7, 2007 The Utah State Board of Education ruled …
             “The board may encourage school districts to provide electronic or distance
             learning services to affected students for the period of the pandemic or other
             public health emergency to the extent of personnel and funds available.

           o Administrators are to plan and encourage teachers to provide alternative
             learning through website or learning packets. This may be done on an
             individual, school or district level.

           o The State Board of Education also stated “The school district will comply with
             health department directives, and will continue to provide any services to
             students that are not inconsistent with the directive. The board may encourage
             school districts to provide electronic or distance learning services to
             affected students for the period of the pandemic or other public health
             emergency to the extent of personnel and funds available.”

Communication Collaboration

      Send letter #5 to parents as stated by Washington County School District.

      Program TCN messaging system to contact parents and state

           o “Washington County Health Officials have ordered the closure of schools as a
             result of the pandemic flu outbreak in our county. Schools may be closed for
             an extended period of time, so please check the WCSD website for updates
             and educational materials at http://emergency.washk12.org. We will make
             public announcements through the media, the WCSD website and through this
             emergency response system.”




                                                  37
Appendix B—During Pandemic

   WCSD During Pandemic School Checklist

   In Depth “During Pandemic” School Checklist

   Daily Pandemic Flu Census Log

   Daily Pandemic Flu Census

   Weekly Pandemic Flu Census

   N95 Surgical Mask




                                                  38
                                      PHASE TWO (RESPONSE)—
                                “DURING PANDEMIC” SCHOOL CHECKLIST

Trigger:         Southwest Utah Public Health Department (SUPHD) notifies district contact of confirmed flu
                 case(s) within the area and may mandate school(s) closure.

Goals:           Schools continue to protect and educate students. Schools in affected areas (clusters) activate
                 closure procedures in consultation with SUPHD and superintendent.

                                          RESPONSE—A. PANDEMIC FLU PRESENT
                                                BUT SCHOOLS REMAIN OPEN
                                                          Responsibility                                           Status
           Establish what information needs to be communicated to staff, students, families, and the
    1
           community.
           Provide sufficient and accessible infection control supplies (e.g. hand-hygiene products,
    2
           tissues and receptacles for their disposal) in all school locations.
    3      Continue all infection control procedures among students and staff.
           Provide educational opportunities to home bound students through website and/or learning
    4
           packets and continue the educational process to all students.
    5      Monitor illness and absences of students and staff.
           Follow Incident Command Procedures, including filling of positions when absences are
    6
           cause by illness.
    7      Prepare staff and student contact lists for SUPHD in case of school closure.
    8      Collaborate with local agencies in making school facilities available in local response efforts.
    9      Make preparation for possible school closure.


                                             RESPONSE—B. SCHOOLS CLOSED
                                                   Responsibility                                                  Status
           Send “school closure” letter #5 to families of students and program “school closed”
1
           message in emergency communication system (TCN) for students, staff and families.
2          Provide educational opportunities to students through website and/or learning packets.
3          Continue all infection control procedures among any staff working through “closure”.
           Close school(s) as directed by SUPHD, and WCSD superintendents and
4
           SECURE PREMISES.
           Be prepared for another wave of influenza a few weeks after the first. Initiate procedures as
5
           needed.
6          Make preparations for schools to re-open.

           (for an in-depth checklist to complete during a pandemic, please refer to “Resources”
                                in the Pandemic Influenza Response Plan.)




                                                              39
                           IN DEPTH “DURING PANDEMIC” SCHOOL CHECKLIST


                                    RESPONSE – A. PANDEMIC FLU PRESENT,
                                        BUT SCHOOLS REMAIN OPEN
                           [THESE ACTIONS SHOULD BE TAKEN WHEN THE FIRST CASE(S)
                          OF SUSPECTED PANDEMIC FLU ARE REPORTED IN THE COUNTY]

                                     Responsibility                                            Person      Status
                                                                                             Responsible
                                            AWARENESS/EDUCATION
Send information to staff reviewing flu symptoms and indicators, procedures for
sending ill students or staff to Health office/ staff.
Provide information to parents/families on prevention procedures, and provide
information as to the school status (using adapted templates from Contra Costa plan)
Provide updates to school/ office staff on the extent of infection at the site and
anticipated changes in conditions or associated procedures.

                                          INFECTION CONTROL
Implement Procedures for Prevention of Disease Transmission
  a. Cancel non-essential public gatherings
  b. Avoid crowded social environments
  c. Limit non-essential travel
  d. Maintain 1-yd spatial separation between individuals
  e. Clean especially inanimate objects (phones, keyboards)
  f. Dispose of mask when wet
Implement Disease Confinement Procedures (see also Health Concerns below)
       i. Health room procedures
       ii. Quarantine procedures
       iii. Exclusion/transportation
Implement Student Evacuation, As Necessary
  a. No student should be released to an empty home. For ex., shelter-in-place
       until parent/guardian can pick up
  b. Possibility school may need to be used as make-shift hospital or POD
  c. Plan for shelter for those without family well enough to care for them
Promote Voluntary Quarantine Among Students and Staff
  a. Stay home until fever & coughing have resolved
  b. Voluntary home quarantine if anyone ill in household

                                                 SURVEILLANCE
Monitor illness of students & staff                                                                        Health
a. Monitor those with temperatures above 100.4 & one or more of the following: cough,                      staff
sore throat or shortness or breath & history of contact with domestic poultry or known
or suspected case of H5N1 or in an H5N1 affected country within 10 days of
symptoms.
b. Alert DOH to substantial increases in absenteeism-Process under development-watch
website for updates.
Monitor community/state/country/world situation
a. Monitor situation through CDC, WHO & US Dept. of Health & Human Services
(DHHS) websites
b. Monitor situation through HAN
Monitor effects of cumulative stress on caregivers (office staff, school nurses, teachers,
aides, school counselors, and other crisis team members). Work with Human
Resources/Critical Incident Team] to provide support.



                                                                40
                                                HEALTH CONCERNS
Health Room Procedures and Disease Confinement:
a. Move students suspected of having the flu to alternative location – isolate from other
   students coming to Health Room for normal health concerns, medication distribution,
   etc.
b. Call parents or emergency contact of the student suspected of infection immediately
   to request removal of student from school.
c. Require student to wear N95 mask until picked up and removed from school
   premises.
d. Clean the area or bed that infected student occupied immediately after each use.
Providing for Physical Health Care
a. Essential staff provided with N-95 respirators
b. Provide rest places for those that tire easily or are in recovery
c. Provide physical assessments if needed & make appropriate community health
      referrals
d. Monitor sufficient infection control supplies & replenish as needed
e. Monitor high risk groups (pregnant women; those with compromised immune
      systems, <65 with underlying condition, 65 & older)
Providing for Mental Health Care
a. Anticipate emotional trauma
b. Reunion meeting before leaving school on day of crisis-unstructured time to share
c. Be vigilant about ripple effects on students/staff
d. Reinforce message about post-traumatic stress disorder-how to recognize & prevent
e. Mobilize the Crisis Recovery Team that provides emotional-psychological support
f. Open “Safe Rooms” for counseling to be provided
g. Provide mental health assessments if needed & make appropriate community health
      referrals
h. Monitor effects of cumulative stress on caregivers
i. Modify work roles & responsibilities or add volunteer staff as needed.
j. Contact/ coordinate delivery of grief counseling, emotional counseling support, as
      needed.
Reporting:
a. Record each incident of student or staff exhibiting symptoms of flu or sent home due
   to flu, using forms provided.
b. When absences are phoned in, ask and note those absent due to flu-like symptoms.
c. Report from school sites to central office site [person] daily.
d. Report to public health officials daily/ weekly as instructed by public health system
Continue to stock extra gloves, surgical masks, N95 respirator masks, and appropriate
cleaning supplies.

                                         CONTINUITY OF OPERATIONS
Follow Incident Command emergency chain of command, including filling of
administrative positions when absences are caused by illness.
Modify work roles and responsibilities or add volunteer or support staff, as needed.
Continue senior staff briefings to monitor response status, identify lessons learned,
make necessary changes to the pandemic flu emergency response plan.
Monitor staff absences; initiate contingency operational plans to maintain critical
functions, as needed
Initiate “pandemic procedures” as defined in contractual agreements/ addenda with
bargaining unit staff
Initiate alternate dining services to avoid large gatherings-stockpile food
Maintain payroll distribution in accord with pandemic plan
Implement financial contingency plans, as appropriate
Implement liberal leave policies for persons with sick family members
Initiate “alternate supplier” arrangements, as appropriate


                                                                41
Cooperate with use of School Building as POD or Evacuation Center, in accord with
interagency agreements

                                      COMMUNICATION/COLLABORATION
Follow-up with student referrals made to community agencies.
Implement the Emergency Response Plan
1. Collaborate with Community EMAs, Police, Fire, etc. (as planned)
2. Communication (use NIMS)
    a. Rumor Control
        i. Communication in absence of person-to- person contact
        ii. Prepare statement to be read by all, answering calls. Place on district website
        iii. Clear messages to assuage fear
        iv. Timely, accurate, credible & consistent information tailored to specific
              audiences
        v. Regular debriefings
        vi. Within 4 hours, make public announcement
        vii. Phone tree calls to all staff
        viii. Educational materials available how to support your students with recovery
        ix. Hold meetings for parents
        x. Hold community-wide meetings to address concerns
 b. Media Control
        i. Schedule press briefing
        ii. Set perimeter for press access to school




                                                                 42
                                            RESPONSE – B. SCHOOLS CLOSED

                                     Responsibility                                         Person      Status
                                                                                          Responsible
                                         AWARENESS/EDUCATION
Send “school closed” notice to families of students.

                                           INFECTION CONTROL
Continue all infection control procedures among any staff working through “closure”

                                                SURVEILLANCE
Monitor illness of any staff working through “closure”
a. Monitor those with temperatures above 100.4 & one or more of the following:
cough, sore throat or shortness or breath & history of contact with domestic poultry or
known or suspected case of H5N1 or in an H5N1 affected country within 10 days of
symptoms.
b. Alert DOH to substantial increases in absenteeism-Process under development-
watch website for updates.
Monitor community/state/country/world situation
a. Monitor situation through CDC, WHO & US Dept. of Health & Human Services
(DHHS) websites
b. Monitor situation through HAN

Monitor the effects of cumulative stress on caregivers such as office staff, school
nurses, teachers, aides, school counselors, and other crisis team members.

Work with [Human Resources and the Critical Incident Team] to provide support.

                                             HEALTH CONCERNS
Contact/ coordinate delivery of grief counseling, emotional counseling support, as
needed.

                                      CONTINUITY OF OPERATIONS
Continue senior staff briefings to monitor response status, identify lessons learned,
make necessary changes to the pandemic flu emergency response plan.
Continue to implement COOPs for fiscal, physical plant

                               COMMUNICATION/COLLABORATION
Maintain communications with EMA/public health agencies, per prior collaborative
agreements.
Implement POD plans and roles under direction of public health/EMA officials, as
appropriate




                                                                 43
                                 Daily Pandemic Flu Census Log

 School _______________________ Date ____________________
Once pandemic flu has been confirmed as present in Washington County, use this form (or an
equivalent) to log student absences.

      Student Name            Illness is Influenza?     Absent?               Symptoms




TOTALS


                                                      44
                                        Daily Pandemic Flu Census

Once pandemic flu has been confirmed as present in Washington County, use this form to report daily
to Washington County School District about the number of students absent with flu-like illness.
(Matches the definition: fever of 101.5 degrees Fahrenheit or higher and one of the following: cough,
sore throat, headache, muscle ache)

Name of School ____________________________________                    Today’s Date _______________

Elementary _______           Intermediate ______             Middle _______     High School _______

City __________________________________

Reporting Individual ____________________________________ Phone ____________________



                                                 Students

Number of students absent with flu-like illness today                         ____________________

Total number of students enrolled in your school                              ____________________

ADA (actual daily attendance) for the day                                     ____________________



                                               Staff/Faculty

Number of staff/faculty absent with flu-like illness today                    ____________________

Total number of staff/faculty employed in your school                         ____________________

Assistance Needed/Comments:




                        Gerri D. Rhodes, President/Comments:
         Fax this form daily during the period of Intensive Surveillance
                                  to 435-673-3216
  If you have questions regarding this form or disease reporting please call
                                   435-673-3553



                                                             45
                                      Weekly Pandemic Flu Census

Once pandemic flu has been confirmed as present in Washington County, use this form to report daily
to Washington County School District about the number of students absent with flu-like illness.
(Matches the definition: fever of 101.5 degrees Fahrenheit or higher and one of the following: cough,
sore throat, headache, muscle ache)

Name of School ____________________________________                   Today’s Date _______________

Elementary _______           Intermediate ______            Middle _______     High School _______

City __________________________________

Reporting Individual ____________________________________ Phone ____________________



                                                 Students

Number of students absent with flu-like illness this week                    ____________________

Total number of students enrolled in your school                             ____________________

ADA (actual daily attendance) for the day                                    ____________________



                                               Staff/Faculty

Number of staff/faculty absent with flu-like illness this week               ____________________

Total number of staff/faculty employed in your school                        ____________________

Assistance Needed/Comments:




         Fax this form daily during the period of Intensive Surveillance
                                to 435-673-3216
  If you have questions regarding this form or disease reporting please call
                                  435-673-3553



                                                            46
 Phase 3—After Pandemic


Recovery
The recovery phase of the plan identifies what educators should be doing after an emergency
occurs. The goal of the recovery is to return to learning and restore the infrastructure of the
school and community as quickly as possible. One of the major goals of recovery is to
provide a safe, caring and supportive school environment. There are two stages during the
“Recovery” section of the emergency response plan that educators and families must be aware
of and prepare for. They are; clusters (community) schools, and county-wide (normal)
schools.

Cluster schools may be used when the Southwest Utah Public Health Department and
Superintendent has approved the opening of schools in specific non infected areas of the
community. When ‘clusters schools’ are instigated, all students grade K-12 will register and
attend school at their local elementary school or community building. Additional and specific
information to the organization and implementation of cluster schools will be provided as the
need arises.

County-wide schools will be instigated when no pandemic threat is evident in the community
and schools can resume as normal. All students will register and attend school at their original
pre-pandemic location.

Awareness/Education
       Review After Pandemic Checklist and document status of recovery.

       Provide training for post-trauma support.

       Inform staff regarding extend of pandemic flu in community; activities that may assist
        students; signs & symptoms to observe; safe room function; counseling support
        services available to staff, students, families.

       Provide educational materials to families and staff such as: how to support students’
        recovery from pandemic flu, common symptoms of grief & loss; coping with stree,
        etc.

Surveillance
       Identify families and staff who may be in need of (physical and/or mental health)
        support and develop/arrange school/community resources in response.



                                                    47
Infection Control
        Return to Mitigation/Prevention (before pandemic) procedures and activities.

Health Concerns
        Mobilize crisis intevention team

        Provide physical assessments as needed and/or make appropriate community health
         referrals

        Plan for and provide rest as needed for those in recovery.

        Establish “safe rooms” as location for student and staff counseling and support.

        Provide counseling and student support services.

        Consider school-based mental health services

Continuity of Operations
        Modify work roles and responsibilities or add volunteer support staff as needed

        Follow-up debriefings with crisis intervention team.

        Document lessons learned

Communication Collaboration
        Follow-up with student/staff referrals to community agencies

In Conclusion
1)       School recovery from an influenza pandemic will begin when school and community
         officials determine that normal supplies, resources and response systems can manage
         ongoing school activities.

2)       The WCSD and SUPHD will assess the economic and educational impact of the
         pandemic.

3)       Recovery plans will depend on the severity, duration and affected areas, as well as
         emotional recovery plans.

4)       In consulation with the SUPHD and the State of Utah Health Department will
         recommend specific actions to be taken to return schools and district offices to pre-
         event status including environmental sanitation.




                                                     48
5)   The WCSD will conduct an after-action evaluation of the pandemic response. The
     evaluation will include recommendations for amendments to the Pandemic Influenza
     Response Plan.

6)   The WCSD will have adequate and appropriate counseling services available at all
     schools in the district upon opening of schools.




                                             49
Appendix C—After Pandemic

   WCSD After Pandemic School Checklist

   In Depth “After Pandemic” School Checklist




                                                 50
                                         PHASE THREE (RECOVERY)—
                                    “AFTER PANDEMIC” SCHOOL CHECKLIST

Trigger:          Southwest Utah Public Health Department (SUPHD) notifies district contact that the
                  pandemic has been abated in most parts of the county and schools can be
                  reopened...

Goals:            Schools (clusters) ensure continuing well being of staff and students. Education
                  services are restored, recognizing possible work force reduction impact.



                                              RECOVERY—A. SCHOOLS OPEN
                                     BUT ONLY ON A COMMUNITY LEVEL (CLUSTERS)
                                                 Responsibility                                              Status
    1      Send out notification to community of time and place for new registration.
           Assess capacity of staff and subjects taught to provide basic instruction for the arriving
    2
           students. Provide appropriate staff coverage as necessary.
    3      Register students and form classes.
    4      Cleaning and disinfecting of the school and equipment procedures are followed.
    5      Arrange debriefing of pandemic event for staff and students, if appropriate.
    6      Maintain school until notified.
           Prepare students and staff to begin response “B”: To return to normalcy, county wide
    7
           schools.


                                RECOVERY—B. GETTING BACK TO BUSINESS AS USUAL
                                      ALL SCHOOLS COUNTY WIDE ARE OPEN
           Responsibility                                                                                    Status
           Assess capacity of staff to resume normal school operations; determine staffing needs
1          based on returning student population, prepare re-registration if needed, and provide
           appropriate staff coverage as necessary.
           Cleaning and disinfecting of affected areas including schools, school busses and remote
2
           locations.
3          Arrange debriefing of pandemic event for staff and students, if appropriate.
           Mobilize the Crisis Intervention Team to address mental health needs, including additional
4          recovery material for the provision of emotional support for students, staff, families and safe
           place counseling.
5          Keep relevant groups informed through briefings, emails, newsletters and websites.
6          Evaluate the success of the pandemic plan and make recommendations.


           (for an in-depth checklist to complete after a pandemic, please refer to “Resources”
                               in the Pandemic Influenza Response Plan.)




                                                            51
                         IN DEPTH “AFTER PANDEMIC” SCHOOL CHECKLIST


                                              RECOVERY
                    [THESE ACTIONS SHOULD BE TAKEN WHEN THE “PANDEMIC” HAS ENDED]

                                    Responsibility                                          Person      Status
                                                                                          Responsible
                                          AWARENESS/EDUCATION
Continue to post flyers and reminders of healthy habits.
Continue to publish articles in school newsletters, on web pages, and in schools on
infection control.
Provide information to students, families, and staff on:
- extent of pandemic flu in the community,
- signs and symptoms of stress/ emotional issues arising from impact of flu, loss and
   grief on self, family, friends or community, and
                - counseling services and activities to assist in coping with impact of
                the flu on family, friends, community.

                                           INFECTION CONTROL
Return to Mitigation/Prevention Infection Control Procedures

                                                SURVEILLANCE
Identify students/families, or staff who may need long-term physical and mental
health support or intervention.

                                               HEALTH CONCERNS
Mental Health Concerns
1. Returning to school
   a. Address required comfort needs
   b. Establishment of safe rooms where staff/students can retreat
   c. Establishing routine as soon as possible “new normal.”
   d. Group & individual counseling
   e. Seek out staff/students who may need assistance
   f. Employee Assistance Program (EAP)
   g. Delay tests & projects
   h. Packaged curriculum that provides structure & advice for return to learning
   i. Use On-call substitutes who can fill in quickly, if needed
   j. Provide caregivers with systematic recognition (programs to provide support
         &/or a break from the stress)
2. Long-term Recovery
   a. Stay alert for any continuing changes in behavior over days & months
   b. Employee Assistance Program (EAP)
   c. Prepare for remembering benchmark dates
Continue to conduct appropriate physical assessments and make appropriate
community health referrals or reports, in coordination with LEA and community
health agencies.

                                       CONTINUITY OF OPERATIONS
Continue senior staff briefings to monitor recovery status, identify lessons learned,
revise the response plan.
Plan and implement activities to rebuild community throughout the school system,
including, for example:
a. Appropriate environmental remediation of school facility if school used as health


                                                                 52
care site or if there were sick children in the building
b. Restoration & strengthening of community & social connections
c. Involvement of children & community in planning & rebuilding efforts
d. Strengthen support systems
e. Reach out to other school communities who have dealt with similar crises
Evaluate Efficacy of Disaster Plan: What worked? What didn’t? Revise &/or train, as
appropriate

                                  COMMUNICATION/COLLABORATION
Continue to develop school and community resources to provide needed physical and
mental health support.
Implement surveillance, referral, communication plans with partnering community
agencies and providers.
Communication
  a. Regular debriefing
  b. Keep communication lines open among school, family & community
  c. Community-wide meetings to facilitate addressing how they will cope




                                                             53
Communication Resources




                  54
The following is a statement that should be included in the schools student/parent handbook.

Emergency Procedures

The Washington County School District is committed to providing a safe environment for
students, staff and visitors. The school district conducts annual emergency preparedness
audits of all school facilities in accordance with Utah State Code. The audit process provides
a comprehensive overview of the school security and emergency preparedness.

We work closely with national, state, and local safety officials (e.g., police, fire, emergency,
medical services and public health). Together we have developed a comprehensive
Emergency Response Plan that covers a wide variety of emergencies that serves as a guide to
help staff and our public safety partners respond swiftly should a crisis occur in our school.

During an emergency, it is critical that parents receive important information and direction
from school officials before going to the school or scene of an emergency. You can be
confident that accurate and timely information will be released to parents, the public, and the
media during any school emergency.

Should a school emergency occur you can get information and directions by doing one or all
of the following:
     Check your e-mail, cell phone and home phone (if provided to the school)
     Visit the Washington County School District homepage at: www.washk12.org
            Tune into the local television and radio stations for news alerts.




                                                        55
SAMPLE PARENT LETTER #1 Prevention Letter. Use this letter to help prepare parents for pandemic
flu – before there are human pandemic flu or bird flu cases in the U.S.

Dear Parents,

This letter will help your family prepare for a flu pandemic that could make many people sick.
It is important to know that at this time, there is no pandemic flu of any kind in the United
States. There is also no bird/avian flu in the United States at this time. Public health officials
are worried the avian/bird flu virus may change so that it can infect people and spread easily
from person-to-person. This would case a worldwide flu outbreak, called a pandemic.

Public health officials want people to protect themselves against pandemic flu. Here are some
ways to protect your family:

       Keep children who are sick at home. Don’t send them to school.

       Teach your children to wash hands a lot with soap and water for 20 seconds. Be sure
        to set a good example by doing this yourself.

       Teach your children to cover coughs and sneezes with tissues or by coughing into the
        inside of the elbow. Be sure to set a good example by doing this yourself.

       Teach your children to stay at least three feet away from people who are sick.

       People who are sick should stay home from work or school and avoid other people
        until they are better.

Enclosed with this letter is a checklist to help families get ready for a pandemic flu outbreak.
This information can also help your family get ready for any kind of emergency. If you have
questions, please contact your school administrator or healthcare provider.

You can get more information from Washington County School District: Visit online
http://emergency.washk12.org or the Southwest Utah Public Health Department at
http://www.swuhealth.org/diseaseissues.php. You may also wish to visit the federal
government website with information on planning for individuals and families:
http://www.pandemicflu.gov, or the American Red Cross http://www.redcross.org.

Sincerely,

(SCHOOL ADMINISTRATOR)




                                                     56
Even though the confirmation of a bird infected with avian/bird flu in the U.S. does not signal a pandemic,
there will be confusion and concern.

SAMPLE PARENT LETTER #2 FIRST BIRD CASE: Use this letter to help prepare parents for
pandemic flu after first bird case is found in the U.S.\

Dear Parents,

As expected, birds sick with avian/bird flu virus is now in the United States. It is important to
know that, at this time, there are no known human cases of avian/bird flu in the United States.
Health officials are worried that the avian/bird flu virus may change so that people can get sick
from it. If that happened it could spread from person-to-person. This would cause a
worldwide flu outbreak, called a pandemic.

So even though there is no flu pandemic now, we want to remind you about some ways to
protect your family from getting sick:

       Keep children who are sick at home. Don’t send them to school.

       Teach your children to wash hands a lot with soap and water for 20 seconds. Be sure
        to set a good example by doing this yourself.

       Teach your children to cover coughs and sneezes with tissues or by coughing into the
        inside of the elbow. Be sure to set a good example by doing this yourself.

       Teach your children to stay at least three feet away from people who are sick.

       People who are sick should stay home from work or school and avoid other people
        until they are better.

       Do not touch sick or dead birds.

Enclosed with this letter is a checklist to help families get ready for a pandemic flu outbreak.
This information can also help your family get ready for any kind of emergency. I If you have
questions, please contact your school administrator or healthcare provider.

You can get more information from Washington County School District: Visit online
http://emergency.washk12.org or the Southwest Utah Public Health Department at
http://www.swuhealth.org/diseaseissues.php. You may also wish to visit the federal
government website with information on planning for individuals and families:
http://www.pandemicflu.gov, or the American Red Cross http://www.redcross.org.

Sincerely,



(SCHOOL ADMINISTRATOR)



                                                          57
SAMPLE LETTER TO PARENTS-Initial Pandemic Flu Outbreak #3: Use this letter to let parents know
schools are open

Dear Parents,

This letter will give you information about a flu outbreak in Washington County. Every year,
some people get sick with the flu during the fall and winter months. This year, there is a new
flu virus that is making many people in Washington County sick. So many people are sick in
Washington County and the United States that health officials call it a “pandemic flu.” A lot
of students and teachers in our school are sick with the flu. We hope they will all get better
quickly.

At this time, the county health department tells us that students who are not ill can safely come
to school. The schools will remain open. We will keep you updated with any important
information.

To keep the flu from spreading to more people, we ask you to keep sick children home. Any
children who are sick in school will be sent home. Public health officials want you to protect
yourself and your family against pandemic flu. Here are some ways to stop the spread of
germs and sickness:

       Keep children who are sick at home. Don’t send them to school.

       Teach your children to wash hands with soap and water for 20 seconds. Be sure to set
        a good example by doing this yourself.

       Teach your children to cover coughs and sneezes with tissues or by coughing into the
        inside of the elbow. Be sure to set a good example by doing this yourself.

       Teach your children to stay at least three feet away from people who are sick.

       People who are sick should stay home from work or school and avoid other people
        until they are better.

       Stay away from shopping malls, movie theaters or other places where there are large
        groups of people.

If you have questions, please contact your School Administrator or healthcare provider. You
can get more information from Washington County School District: Visit online
http://emergency.washk12.org . If the pandemic flu continues to spread and more students
become ill, schools may close for days or weeks. The purpose of closing schools will be to
keep children from getting sick. If schools are closed, children should stay at home. Begin
planning now for childcare in your home.

Sincerely,

SCHOOL ADMINISTRATOR



                                                     58
SAMPLE LETTER TO PARENTS #4 EXPANDED OUTBREAK: Use this letter to let
parents know schools are open and urge ill children to stay home.

Dear Parents,

We wrote to you recently to tell you about a pandemic flu outbreak in our community. Here is
some new information. There are now even more students in our school who are ill with this
flu virus. Still the county health department tells us that students who are not ill can continue
to attend school. The schools will remain open. We will keep you updated with any
important information. To keep the flu from spreading to more people, we ask you to keep
sick children home. Any children who are sick in school will be sent home.

Public health officials want you to protect yourself and your family against pandemic flu.
Here are some ways to stop the spread of germs and sickness and take care of your family.

       Keep children who are sick at home. Don’t send them to school.

       If some of the people in your home are sick with the flu, keep them away from the
        people who are not sick.

       If some of the people in your home are sick with the flu and you cannot see a health
        provider, some things you can do to help them are:

             o Have them drink a lot of liquid (juice, water)

             o Keep the ill person as comfortable as possible. Rest is important.

             o For fever, sore throat and muscle aches, in adults, use ibuprofen (Motrin) or
               acetaminophen (Tylenol). Do not use aspirin with children or teenagers; it can
               cause Reye’s syndrome, a life-threatening illness.

             o Keep tissues and trash bags within reach of the sick person.

             o Be sure everyone in your home washes their hands frequently.

             o Contact a healthcare provider for further advice. If the ill person is having
               difficulty breathing or is getting worse, contact the healthcare provider right
               away.

You can get more information from Washington County School District: Visit online
http://emergency.washk12.org. If the pandemic flu continues to spread and more students
become ill, schools may close for days or weeks. The purpose of closing schools will be to
keep children from getting sick. If schools are closed, children should stay at home. Begin
planning now for childcare in your home.

Sincerely,

SCHOOL ADMINISTRATOR


                                                     59
SAMPLE LETTER TO PARENTS School closure #5: Use this letter to inform parents
schools are closed

Dear Parents,

Washington County health officials have ordered all schools in Washington County to close.
This order is because of the pandemic flu situation in Washington County. All schools are
immediately closed until further notice and children should stay home. Schools may be closed
for days or even weeks to reduce contact among children and stop the spread of the flu. We
know that many students and their families are very sick. We know this is a hard time for our
community and our hearts go out to those who are ill.

Because the flue is easily spread from person-to-person, it is not safe for large groups of
people to gather. During this time, both children and adults should stay away from other
people and groups as much as possible. They should not gather in other locations such as
shopping malls, movie theaters or community centers.

We know that it may be hard to get a doctor’s appointment, go to a clinic or even be seen in a
hospital emergency room. Here are some tips for helping those who are sick with the flu:

             o Have them drink a lot of liquid (juice, water)

             o Keep the ill person as comfortable as possible. Rest is important.

             o For fever, sore throat and muscle aches, in adults, use ibuprofen (Motrin) or
               acetaminophen (Tylenol). Do not use aspirin with children or teenagers; it can
               cause Reye’s syndrome, a life-threatening illness.

             o Keep tissues and trash bags within reach of the sick person.

             o Be sure everyone in your home washes their hands frequently.

             o Keep the people who are sick with the flu away from the people who are not
               sick.

For more information, call your healthcare provider or visit Southwest Utah Public Health
Department’s website: http://www.swuhealth.org/ or Washington County School District
online at http://emergency.washk12.org or call: 435-673-3553.

We will contact you as soon as we have information about when school will reopen.

Sincerely,



[SCHOOL ADMINISTRATOR].




                                                    60
SAMPLE LETTER TO PARENTS School Re-Opens #6: Use this letter to inform
parents schools are re-opened.

Dear Parents,

Washington County health officials have declared the pandemic flu is under control. Our
school will open again on __________________________. At this time, students may safely
return to class.

Even though school is opening, there are still some people who are sick from the flu virus.
And health officials say that pandemic flu outbreaks sometimes happen in waves. This means
more people could become sick soon again. If more people get sick, schools may need to
close again. We will continue to give you any important information.

Because the flu can still be spread from person-to-person, please keep children who are sick at
home. Don’t send them to school.

We are looking forward to seeing your children again.

Sincerely,



[SCHOOL ADMINISTRATOR]




                                                    61
SAMPLE KEY MESSAGES FOR SCHOOL OFFICIALS A – OUTBREAK

        We know this is an anxious time for our community and our hearts go out to those
         who are ill. We are working closely with local health officials to deal with the
         situation and will keep parents updated with any important information.

        At this time, under the guidance of the county health department, we believe
         students can safely attend classes and schools will remain open. Our thoughts are
         with all of our families and children who are affected.

        If pandemic flu continues to spread and more students become ill, health officials
         may need to close schools for an extended period of time (for example, up to 6
         weeks).

        The purpose of closing schools will be to decrease contact among children in order
         to decrease their risk of getting sick and to limit the spread of infection. If schools
         are closed, children should stay at home.

        We urge parents to plan now for the possibility of schools closing. Arrange day
         care, and home schooling.

        Parents can help protect their children and prevent the spread of pandemic flu as
         they would colds and other flu by taking the following precautions:

             o Teach your children to wash hands frequently with soap and water for 20
               seconds. Be sure to set a good example by doing this yourself.

             o Teach your children to cover coughs and sneezes with tissues or by
               coughing into the inside of the elbow.

             o Teach your children to stay away from people who are sick and stay home
               form work or school if you are sick.

        Recommendations may change during the course of a flu pandemic. We will
         make public announcements through the media and emergency response system.

        For more information on pandemic flu and prevention, visit Washington County
         School District at http://emergency.washk12.org or the Southwest Utah Public
         Health Department at http://www.swuhealth.org/diseaseissues.php. You may also
         wish to visit the federal government website with information on planning for
         individuals and families: http://www.pandemicflu.gov, or the American Red Cross
         http://www.redcross.org.




                                                   62
SAMPLE KEY MESSAGES FOR SCHOOL OFFICIALS B – SCHOOL CLOSURES

     Washington County health officials have ordered the closure of schools as a result of
      the pandemic flu outbreak in our county.

     Schools may be closed for an extended period of time (for example, up to 6 weeks).

     We know this is a difficult time for our community and our hearts go out to those who
      are ill. We are working closely with health officials to deal with the situation and will
      keep parents updated with any important information.

     Because pandemic flu is easily spread from person-to-person, it is unsafe for large
      groups of people to gather and children should stay home. The purpose of closing
      schools is to decrease contact among children in order to decrease their risk of getting
      sick and to limit the spread of infection.

     During this time, children and adults should stay away from other people and groups,
      as much as possible. Health officials also advise people should not gather in other
      locations such as homes, shopping malls, movie theaters or community centers.

     Parents can help protect their children and prevent the spread of pandemic flu as they
      would colds and other flu by taking the following precautions:

          o Teach your children to wash hands frequently with soap and water for 20
            seconds. Be sure to set a good example by doing this yourself.

          o Teach your children to cover coughs and sneezes with tissues or by coughing
            into the inside of the elbow.

          o Teach your children to stay at least three feet from people who are sick and
            stay home from work or school if you are sick.

     Recommendations may change during the course of a flu pandemic. We will make
      public announcements through the media and parents can contact the school district’s
      hotline at (INSERT NUMBER)

     For more information on pandemic flu and prevention, visit Washington County
      School District at http://emergency.washk12.org




                                                   63
Educational Resources




                    64
                   Important Contact Information

School District:                 Name:           Washington County School District

                                 Phone Number: 435-673-3553



County Public Health Official:   Name:   Southwest Utah Public Health Department

                                 Phone Number:    435-673-3528



Hospital:                        Name:            Dixie Regional Medical Center

                                 Phone Number:    435-251-1000



Ambulance Service:               Phone Number:    9-1-1 (emergency)

                                                  435-634-5000(non-emergency)



Police:                          Name:             Washington County Sheriff

                                 Phone Number:     435-634-5730

                                                   800-624-9447

				
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