EXPRESSING THEME AND CHARACTER IN BRONX MASQUERADE by Z7ny139

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									                         EXPLORING THEME AND CHARACTER IN BRONX MASQUERADE: JIGSAW PROJECTS

Read/review pgs. 123-151 in Bronx Masquerade to complete this jigsaw project on theme and character.

Group 1: Raynard Patterson (using pgs. 123-127)

THEMED BUMPER STICKER AND T-SHIRT

On two different pieces of unlined paper, design a colored bumper sticker and a T-shirt design that expresses two different themes found in your
character’s vignette. The bumper sticker and T-shirt should include the name of your character at the top, a symbolic graphic that represents the
theme of the vignette, and a slogan that captures the vignette’s theme. On the bottom of each page, write a five-sentence caption explaining your
bumper sticker and T-shirt design, slogan, and graphic. Be sure to cite at least two quotes from the vignette that helped you create your bumper
sticker and T-shirt design. Be prepared to present your bumper sticker and T-shirt design; decide who will explain the task, the slogan, the graphic,
and the caption. Write your group-members’ names on the back of both sheets.

Group 2: Tyrone Bittings (using pgs. 7-11, pgs. 128-132, and all other Tyrone vignettes throughout the book)

CHARACTER SILHOUETTE
         On unlined paper, label at the top “TYRONE: CHARACTER SILHOUETTE”; below the title, draw an outline or silhouette of Tyrone’s head.
          Inside the character-silhouette picture, draw or paste pictures/word phrases using the following guidelines:
         One or two objects or possessions your character values or desires.
         A symbol depicting your character’s personality or interests.
         A symbol depicting your character’s fears or potential conflicts.
         A thematic quote or a saying that represents what the reader might learn from this character.
         Two character traits from the IB Learner Profile that the character exhibits; if you’d like to write down character traits that the character
          should exhibit – but he or she does not exhibit these traits, write the character trait inside a circle with a slash through it.

On the bottom or back of your silhouette, write one paragraph explaining why you chose the above pictures, symbols, words, and thematic quotes;
support with text evidence. Write your group-members’ names on the back of the silhouette.

Group 3: Steve Ericson (using pgs. 114-120 and pgs. 128-132)

CHARACTER BAG
Bring in a bag or ask Ms. Reimers for one. Fill the bag with objects and printed words/phrases that represent your character. You may also draw
pictures or use magazine cut-outs or printed clip art. Your bag should be filled with at least 20 objects, pictures, or words that represent your
character. In the below two-column chart, list your objects/words/pictures in one column and their relevance to the character and the theme in
the other column. You should also make a note of who is responsible for bringing or creating each object in the margins (as your plan of action). All
of your group-member names should be written on the paper.

Objects/Words/Phrases (and the Group Member Responsible)                     Relevance to character or theme
First theme found in vignette/poem:


First theme found in vignette/poem:


Object/possession your character values:

Object/possession your character values:

Object/possession your character values:

Symbol of your character’s motivations/personality/interests:

Symbol of your character’s motivations/personality/interests:


Quotes/sayings that represent your character:
Quotes/sayings that represent your character:


Books, magazines , or manga your character would read:


Movies/TV shows your character would watch:


Games your character would play:


CDs your character would listen to:
Symbol of fears/conflicts:




Group 4: Wesley “Bad Boy” Boone (using pgs. 3-6 and pgs. 128-132)
WORDLE
Your group will be creating a technology project. Got to www.wordle.net, and type in words that represent Wesley’s character, as well as themes in
his vignette. Change the fonts, colors, layout, and size of the words/phrases. (Words will be bigger when you use them more often in your word
cloud.) When you are done, be sure to save as a pdf file and to the Wordle gallery – and print your work. Write one paragraph (seven sentences
min.) explaining why you chose the words/phrases that you used, citing text evidence. Also explain why you decided to make some words larger
and others smaller, depending on their importance to the text. Write your group-members’ names on the back of the printed Wordle.


Group 5: Sheila Gamberoni (using pgs. 108-112 and pgs. p. 133-138)

CHARACTER-CHANGE BODY BIOGRAPHY:
          On unlined paper, write the title of your project: “SHEILA: CHARACTER-CHANGE BODY BIOGRAPHY.”
          Draw a picture of Sheila. Draw a vertical line through the middle of the picture from head to toe, dividing the character in half. The left
           side of the body will depict the character before an important event in the novel, and the right side of the body will depict the character
           after an important event that has impacted that character. Label “before” and “after” on the appropriate sides of your illustration.
          Draw at least three symbols on the “before” side of the body, and draw three more symbols for the “after” side of the body. The symbols
           represent significant character traits, desires, goals, and actions for that character before and after a specific event/conflict. Each symbol
           will be placed on the drawing in a meaningful place. For example, you might draw one object close to the character's heart if it
           symbolizes something she loves or feels; around the head if it symbolizes what a character thinks; on the hands if it symbolizes her work
           or actions; etc. Write the theme, or life lesson/message, either as the “spine” of the body along the dividing line or below the body
           picture and label it: (THEME: _____________________________).
          On the back or bottom of your page, write a six-sentence paragraph that identifies each symbol and why you drew it. (Reference specific
           events in the novel.) Focus your discussion on how the symbols demonstrate your character’s changes over time. Also discuss the theme,
           or what the audience can learn, from examining the character’s growth or change over time.
          Be prepared to present. Decide which group member will explain what symbol and which group member will explain how examining the
           changes in the character helped your group come up with the theme. Write your group-members’ names on the back.
     
Group 6: JANELLE (using pgs. 46-49 and pgs. 140-143)

CHARACTER SILHOUETTE: Follow the directions for Group #2 but change the character name to “JANELLE.”

Group 7: LUPE (using pgs. 34-38 and pgs. 146-151)

CHARACTER-CHANGE BODY BIOGRAPHY: Follow the directions for Group #5 but change the character name to “LUPE.”

								
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