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LT. Fitness Step Safety rules study guide

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LT. Fitness Step Safety rules study guide Powered By Docstoc
					STEP
      AEROBICS

Step training is a great exercise to burn fat and improve the condition of the heart and
lungs. Two kinds of step training exist, step aerobics and bench stepping. Both are
aerobic activities that require continuous movement supplied with lots of oxygen.

Step equipment is needed for step aerobics and bench stepping. Safe, sturdy, portable,
and adjustable plastic benches are available for purchase from athletic retail stores as
well as large retail stores. These work best for step aerobics. Be sure there are no
sharp edges on the benches.

Beginners and very unfit individuals should begin with a low bench level of 4 to 6 inches
in height. Advanced steppers may choose to gradually move the step to a final height of
12 inches. No matter what the person's fitness level, the height of the bench should
always be at a comfortable level, not a strenuous one. Never use narrow, hard wood, or
metal benches for step training. These are unsteady, slippery, and unsafe.

Step aerobics is creative, fun, and very challenging. Step routines are performed to
music. Patterns of movement stepping on and off the bench can challenge the feet and
arms, also. These movements are more callisthenic in nature. Step routines are usually
led by a certified leader at a health club or in an exercise video at home. Agility,
coordination, and endurance are all improved when following a step aerobic workout
program.

Bench stepping is simply stepping up and down on a bench. Be sure the bench has
rounded edges. It must be sturdy, wider than the length of your foot, and strong enough
to hold your weight. A rhythmic step pattern is used to step up and down from the same
side of the bench.



Step Safety Rules
Please attend to these important safety rules before doing any step
aerobics:
1.      Place the entire foot on the step. Do not allow your heel to hang off the edge of the
        step.
2.      Step lightly on the step. Avoid pounding your foot on the step.
3.      Step to the center of the step and watch the step periodically.
4.      Extend fully at the hip and knee joints. Avoid grouch positions.
5.      Stay close to the step as you step down (a half foot length). A natural stride.
6.      Adjust the step bench height individually according to participant condition, step
      aerobics experience and choreography difficulty. Be sure the knees do not flex
      beyond 90 degrees when weight bearing.
7.    Check that the bench is steadfast and in right position before and during the
      training. It must have enough moving space to other step benches.
8.    Use a full body lean, don't bend at the waist or hip.
9.    Add arm movements when proficient with footwork.
10.   Allow your heels to come down to the floor, except during propulsion movements.
      No bouncy, ballistic movement.
11.   Don't step with your back to the step. Avoid stepping forward off the step or
      backwards onto it, such as in reverse turn steps. Stepping forward off the step
      creates too much impact for the knee. In a reverse turn step there is an extreme
      degree of rotation to the first leg up. There is potential for torque to the knee and
      stress to the pelvic girdle. This movement also increases risk of falling due to loss
      of balance or lack of depth perception.
12.   Don't step with your back to the step. Avoid stepping forward off the step or
      backwards onto it, such as in reverse turn steps. Stepping forward off the step
      creates too much impact for the knee. In a reverse turn step there is an extreme
      degree of rotation to the first leg up. There is potential for torque to the knee and
      stress to the pelvic girdle. This movement also increases risk of falling due to loss
      of balance or lack of depth perception.
13.   Avoid jumping from step bench to the floor. Jumping onto the bench is harmless.
14.   Music speed should be 118-126 bpm for most participants who can maintain proper
      technique and alignment. 126-130 is the absolute "ceiling of limitation" for step
      aerobics.
15.   Shoulders back and relaxed. Chest lifted and body erect. Abdominals contracted to
      support torso. Neutral spine. Knees relaxed, not locked.
16.   Avoid hyperextension of joints. Avoid twisting or torquing of joints.




      Shrug and Keep Moving - a Good General Rule
            As mentioned earlier, aerobic exercise is intended more for the
             cardiovascular system than for specific muscles. So, if you do one thing while
             the rest of the class is doing another, it won't really matter to your fitness
             level. Just shrug and keep moving.
            Public aerobics is much like public humiliation at first, but nobody else will be
             laughing at you (or, at least, they'd better not be) because they've all been
             there. Besides, it's not as if you're making them look bad. When you screw up,
             just shrug and keep moving.
            Your instructor will screw up during class at least once. As hard as it is to be a
             student, imagine having to do all the manoeuvre and know what's coming next
             and announce it beforehand and not run out of breath. When the instructor
             screws up, just shrug and keep moving.
Step music
           BPM Counter
Warm Up                                       125-135 BPM
Cardio                                        120-130 BPM
Cool Down                                     100-130 BPM
Floor Work                                    80-130 BPM
Stretching                                    50-100 BPM



                                Types of Aerobic Classes
  1. HIGH IMPACT AEROBICS (135-160 bpm): Moves that use large muscles to propel the body into
     the air, with both feet leaving the ground. Examples include jogging, jumping jacks, hops,
     traveling kicks, etc. This type is good for challenging the cardiovascular system

  2. LOW IMPACT AEROBICS (133-148 bpm): Moves that stay low to the ground, with one foot
     remaining on the floor. Examples include walking, marching, lunges, squats, side jacks, heels-up,
     knees-up, step touches, etc. Offers a high intensity with a reduced the risk of injury.

  3. MID-TEMPO AEROBICS (130-140 bpm): Moves similar to low impact aerobics but performed at
     a slower tempo. In addition to low impact aerobic workouts, Mid-Tempo is ideal for slide, aqua or
     pre-natal workouts and age specific groups.

  4. STEP AEROBICS (120-127 bpm): Moves that incorporate up and down movements on a
     platform (step). Step moves include basic steps, lunges, turn steps, V-steps, over-the-top steps,
     L-steps and knee-lifts.

  5. SUPER STEP AEROBICS (126-138 bpm): Similar to step aerobics but using a faster tempo.
     Intended for advanced classes, Super Step aerobics revolves around half-time power moves
     (squats, forward lunges, isolation holds, etc.), as well as the basic step moves.

  6. INTERVAL (Alternating 123-150 bpm): Alternates high and low intensity movements, which
     might alternate, step and aerobic combinations to challenge the cardiovascular system.

  7. CIRCUIT (123-126 bpm): Alternates aerobic activity with resistance activity. The general ratio is
     3 minutes of aerobics to 1.5 minutes of resistance training to improve the cardiovascular system
     and increase muscular strength.

  8. WARM-UP (120-134 bpm): Moderate movements performed to prepare the body for vigorous
     exercise. Warm-up movements typically include simple actions of the large muscle groups,
     starting small and gradually increasing. A warm-up also includes stretching the muscles that will
     be used in the activities to follow. A typical warm-up is approximately 10 minutes long.

  9. CARDIO (bpm varies with the type of class): The portion of the class designed to work the
     cardiovascular system (see 1-7 above). The cardio segment is approximately 35 minutes long.

  10. POST-CARDIO (bpm varies with the type of class): Movements performed after the cardio (i.e.
      aerobics. step etc.) segment of a class. These help the cardiovascular system transition from a
      high intensity workout to normal activity, and bring breathing and heart rate back to normal levels.
      This portion of the class also includes resistance activities such as abdominal work, free weights,
      Resist-A-Balls, etc. This segment of class is typically 10 minutes long.
11. COOL DOWN (Use slow relaxing music): Movements designed to lengthen the muscles after
    exercise return to the cardiovascular system to resting levels. A cool down typically combines
    stretching with slow, deep breathing, and slow rhythmic arm movements. A cool down is
    approximately 5 minutes long.

				
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