American Government and Politics Today

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Chapter
Thirteen:


The
Presidency
             Learning Objectives
                          2


 Explain the formal qualifications for office and
 detail the ways that the informal qualifications
 have changed over time.

 Identify and explain the roles of the President
 (including head of state, chief executive,
 commander in chief, chief diplomat, chief
 legislator, and chief of party).
             Learning Objectives
                          3


 Identify and explain the types of presidential
 powers:
                powers;
  Constitutional

  Statutory powers;

  Express powers; and

  Inherent powers.

 Explain impeachment, differentiate it from
 conviction, and give historical examples of the
 process.
            Learning Objectives
                        4

 Describe the organization of the executive
 branch:

  The Cabinet;
  The Executive Office of the President;
  The White House Office;
  The Office of Management and Budget; and
  The National Security Council.
             Learning Objectives
                         5




 Discuss the evolving role for the vice president
 as an adviser and successor to the president.

 Describe the Twenty-fifth Amendment and
 discuss potential problems associated with it.
       Who Can Become President?
                         6


 Must be a natural born citizen
 Must be at least 35 years old
 Must be a resident within the United States for
 at least 14 years
       Who Can Become President?
                         7




 Process of Becoming President
   Nominated by party
   Win a majority of electoral votes
     The Many Roles of the President
                      8


 Head of State
 Chief Executive
 Commander in Chief of the Armed Forces
 Chief Diplomat
 Chief Legislator
    The Many Roles of the President
                           9


 Head of State—As head of state, the president
 engages in many activities that are largely
 symbolic or ceremonial, such as:

  Decorating war heroes.
  Throwing out the first pitch to open the baseball
   season.
  Dedicating parks and post offices.

  Receiving visiting heads of state at the White House.
    The Many Roles of the President
                        10




 Chief Executive—As chief executive, the
 president is constitutionally bound to enforce
 the acts of Congress, the judgments of federal
 courts, and treaties signed by the United
 States.
  Has powers of appointment and removal
  Has power to grant reprieves and pardons
    The Many Roles of the President
                         11




 Commander in Chief—The President is the
 civilian commander of the U.S. armed forces.

  Wartime   Powers

  War   Powers Resolution
    The Many Roles of the President
                        12


 Chief Diplomat—As chief diplomat, the
 president dominates American foreign policy:

  Recognizes  foreign governments
  Makes treaties

  Executive agreements
    The Many Roles of the President
                        13


 Chief Legislator—Presidents must recommend
 to Congress legislation that they judge
 necessary and expedient.

  State of the Union message
  Getting legislation passed

  Vetoing legislation
The Many Roles of the President
               14
       The President as Party Chief and
               Superpolitician
                        15




 The President as Chief of Party


 Constituencies and Public Approval
  Presidentialconstituencies
  Public approval

  “Going Public” for support
The President as Party Chief and
        Superpolitician
               16
   Special Uses of Presidential Power
                        17


 Emergency Powers
 Executive Orders
 Executive Privilege
Abuses of Executive Power and Impeachment
                            18

 Articles I and II of the Constitution authorize the
 House and Senate to remove the president, vice
 president or other civil offices for committing
 “treason, bribery, or other high crimes and
 misdemeanors.”

  House impeaches (accuses)
  Senate conducts trial
        The Executive Organization
                        19




 Cabinet
 Executive Office of the President
 White House Office
 Office of Management and Budget
 National Security Council
            The Vice Presidency
                       20


 The Vice President’s Job
  Strengthening   the Ticket
   Supporting the President

 Presidential Succession
 The Twenty-fifth Amendment
 When the Vice Presidency Becomes Vacant
The Vice Presidency
         21
                   Web Links
                         22


 The White House: extensive information on
 the White House and the presidency:
 www.whitehouse.gov.


 Bartleby.com: Internet publisher of literature,
 reference, and verse providing unlimited
 access to books and information on American
 presidents:
 www.bartleby.com/124.
What If…There Were No Executive Privilege?
                         23


 When a U.S. president wishes to keep
  information secret, he or she can invoke
  executive privilege.
 If there were no executive privilege, a president
  would have to be aware that all of his or her
  words, documents, and actions could be made
  public.
 There would probably be fewer records of
  administration’s activities.
What If…There Were No Executive Privilege?
                        24




 Without executive privilege, the president might
 experience problems in waging a war on
 terrorism.

 The White House would have a difficult time
 regulating the flow of past presidential records
 into the public forum.
  You Can Make a Difference: Watching the
              White House
                        25

 Citizens should monitor the president’s
 performance and policies.

 You can maintain a connection to the White
 House and keep informed on the president's
 initiatives by logging onto www.whitehouse.gov.

 You can sign up for email from the White House
 or the President's political campaign to receive
 constant updates on policy initiatives or
 appointments.

				
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posted:8/8/2012
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