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ASHRAE WINTER MEETING TECHNICAL PROGRAM – ANAHEIM by wuyunyi

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									ASHRAE WINTER MEETING TECHNICAL PROGRAM – ANAHEIM
NOTE: THIS PROGRAM IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE.

UPDATED AS OF DECEMBER 15, 2003
NOTE: Seminar 17 and Seminar 34 have switched positions in the schedule.

Seminar 34 is now “Building Performance and Post Occupancy Evaluation: Experience in the UK
and Opportunities for ASHRAE,” Monday, January 26 at 10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

Seminar 17 is now “Refrigeration Applications,” Sunday, January 25 at 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

SUNDAY, 1/258 A.M. TO 10 A.M.
Symposium AN-04-01

Room: 213A
Air-to-Carbon Dioxide Heat Exchangers
Sunday, January 25, 2004        8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 08.04 Air-to-Refrigerant Heat Transfer Equipment
APC Liaison: Kirk T. Mescher, P.E., CM Engineering, Columbia, MO
Chair: John W. Coleman, Ph.D., Associate, Brazeway Inc., Adrian, MI
Paul Krause, P.E., Associate, Brazeway Inc., Adrian, MI
    With growing concerns over the impact of HFCs on the environment, the interest in the use of carbon dioxide to
replace HFCs in HVAC&R equipment also is growing. This symposium focuses on the heat transfer and pressure drop
characteristics of carbon dioxide in a gas cooler and in an evaporator manifold.
1. Experimental Study of Supercritical CO2 Gas Cooling in a Microchannel Gas Cooler
Yuan Zhao, Ph.D., ATEC Inc., Fairfax, VA; Michael M. Ohadi, Ph.D., University of Maryland, College Park, MD
2. Flow Distribution Issues in Parallel Flow Heat Exchangers
Pega Hrnjak, Ph.D., Member, University of Illinois, Urbana/Champaign, IL
3. Two-Phase Refrigerant Distribution in Round Tube Manifolds
Sivert Vist, Ph.D., Norwegian University of Science, Trondheim, Norway

Symposium AN-04-02

Room: 208B
Testing of Seismic Restraints and HVAC Equipment to Meet Seismic Requirements of the
International Building Code
Sunday, January 25, 2004        8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 02.07 Seismic and Wind Restraint Design
APC Liaison: Spencer Morasch, Jersey Central Power & Light, Allenhurst, NJ
Chair: E. Douglas Fitts, P.E., Member, St. Louis County Government, St. Louis, MO
    The new International Building Code requires HVAC equipment needed for life safety or continual building operation
for essential buildings to be able to survive a seismic event. This program explains the theory behind seismic forces, how
shake table testing of equipment is performed and how seismic restraints are tested.
1. Vibration Isolation: Harmonic and Seismic Forcing Using the Wilson Theta Method
James A. Carlson, Associate Member, NED, Springfield, NE; Joseph Turner, Ph.D., University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE
2. Static Testing of Seismic Restraint Devices
Paul W. Meisel, P.E., Member, Kinetics Noise Control, Dublin, OH
3. Shake Table Testing
William Staehlin, P.E., Member, State of California, Sacramento, CA; James A. Carlson, Associate Member, NED,
Springfield, NE

Seminar 1
Room: 303 C/D
California Pier Program: Energy Efficiency Innovations
Sunday, January 25, 2004          8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 07.06 Systems Energy Utilization
APC Liaison: Michael R. Brambley, Ph.D., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA
Chair: Hashem Akbari, Ph.D., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA
Chair: Nancy Jenkins, P.E., California Energy Commission, Sacramento, CA
    The Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program supports energy research and development to help improve the
quality of life in California by bringing environmentally safe, affordable and reliable energy services and products to the
marketplace. This seminar focuses on PIER’s advances through its residential and non-residential buildings end-use
energy building program.
1. Parallel Use of Evaporative Cooling and Air Conditioning in Homes
Taghi Alereza, P.E., Member, ADM Associates Inc, Sacramento, CA
2. Development of an Advanced Two-Stage Evaporative Cooler
Dick Bourne, P.E., Member, Davis Energy Group, Davis, CA
3. Attic Heat Recovery for Domestic Water Heating
Mugimin Lukito, ADM Associates Inc., Sacramento, CA
4. Cool Roof Colored Materials
Hashem Akbari, Ph.D., Member, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA
5. A Sticky Situation: Durability of Duct Sealants
Iain Walker, Ph.D., Member, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA
6. Specifying Data Logger Functionality in EMCSs
Charles Culp, Ph.D., Member, Texas A&M University System, College Station, TX

Seminar 2

Room: 209A
CNG Systems and Facilities for Indoor and Outdoor
Sunday, January 25, 2004         8 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 05.09 Enclosed Vehicular Facilities; TC 05.06 Control of Fire and Smoke
APC Liaison: Joy Altwies, Farnsworth Group Inc., Madison, WI
Chair: Sudhir K. Agrawal, Member, P. Eng, Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transit Authority, Arcadia, CA
    Use of compressed natural gas (CNG) in enclosed vehicular facilities, transportation-fueling facilities, parking garages
ventilation and clean air quality discharge is a growing field. CNG provides high fuel value and high storage potential in a
smaller volume. Operational safety of the equipment and occupants due to high pressure is addressed by providing gas
sensors in the enclosed maintenance facilities parking structures. Reliability, risk factors and life cycles issues are being
reviewed by the industry. CNG characteristics, modification of the existing facilities to perform dual pressure system
application and reliability are presented in this seminar.
1. CNG Characteristics and Its Application in the Industry
Sudhir K. Agrawal, P.E., Member, Los Angeles Metropolitan Transit Authority, Arcadia, CA
2. Ventilation Requirement for Dual Application of the CNG Facility
John M. Simon, Member, Booz Allen Hamilton, Los Angeles, CA
3. Safety and Reliability Considerations in CNG Fueling and Vehicle Systems
Satish Almaula, Member, Exponent Inc., Menlo Park, CA
4. Risk Management for CNG Bus Transit Facilities
Subodh Medhekar, Ph.D., Member, Exponent Inc., Irvine, CA

Seminar 3

Room: 208A
Deep Water Cooling System
Sunday, January 25, 2004      8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 06.02 District Energy
APC Liaison: John Nix, Florida Power and Light Utility Co., Miami, FL
Chair: Alex H. Sleiman, Life Member, District Energy St. Paul Inc., St. Paul, MN
    Over the past 10 years, there have been few installations of deep water cooling for district chilled water distribution
systems. Cornell University uses lake source deep water supplying over 18,000 tons of cooling for its campus. The city of
Stockholm uses the Baltic Sea to supply over 70,000 tons of cooling to its district heating customers. The city of Toronto is
in the process of implementing an extension to its district cooling system to supply deep water cooling from Lake Ontario.
This seminar reviews energy usage reduction and environmental benefits of deep-water usage.
1. Lake Source Cooling Project: Cornell University
W.S. (Lanny) Joyce and Tim Peer, P.E., Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
2. Operating Deep Water Cooling Systems Using Ocean, Lakes and Aquifers
Bryan Kleist, FVB ENERGY INC., Minneapolis, MN
3. Deep Lake Water Cooling Solution Overview
Vladan M. Veljovic, Member, Enwave District Energy Ltd., Toronto, ON, Canada
4. Seawater Air Conditioning (SWAC): Prospects in the Hawaiian Islands
John S. Andrepont, Member, The Cool Solutions Co., Lisle, IL




Seminar 4

Room: 210C/D
Issues Regarding the Use of R-410A in A/C and Heat Pump Systems
Sunday, January 25, 2004      8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 08.11 Unitary and Room Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps
APC Liaison: Arthur P. Garbarino, Air Service Inc., West Palm Beach, FL
Chair: Mark W. Spatz, P.E., Member, Honeywell International, Buffalo, NY
    With the pending phaseout of R-22 in new equipment in the U.S. in 2010 and earlier phaseout in other regions such as
Europe, more air-conditioning and heat pump equipment is being produced with R-410A. This seminar covers equipment
and system issues related to the use and application of R-410A, an HFC alternative to R-22.
1. System Design and Dynamic Performance of R-410A Split System A/C
Man-Hoe Kim, Ph.D., Member, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, Korea
2. Design of R-410A Systems: Theoretical and Practical Considerations
Samuel F. Yana Motta, Ph.D., Member, Honeywell International, Buffalo, NY
3. Evaluation and Modeling of AC Split System and Component Performance at Extreme Ambients with R-410A vs. R-22
C. Keith Rice, Ph.D., Member, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN
4. Overcoming Objections to R-410A in Geothermal Heat Pumps
Sean Smith, P.E., Member, WaterFurnace International, Fort Wayne, IN
5. High Ambient Performance of an R22 and an R410A Air Conditioner
Wm. Vance Payne, II, Ph.D., National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD


Seminar 5

Room: 211 A/B
Modeling the Dispersion of Chemical or Biological Contaminants, Part 1
Sunday, January 25, 2004       8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 04.10 Indoor Environmental Modeling
APC Liaison: Don C. Hardin, Enviromatic Systems, Ft. Worth, TX
Chair: Duncan A. Phillips, Ph.D., P.E., Associate, Rowan Williams Davies & Irwin, Guelph, ON, Canada
    Since Sept. 11 and the subsequent anthrax attacks, there has been greater awareness of the threat that chemical and
biological agents pose. Since then, greater emphasis has been placed on the modeling of potential impacts of a release,
accidental or otherwise, of chemical, biological or nuclear materials. This seminar presents results from recent state-of-
the-art modeling techniques. Presenters show how modeling (CFD, multi-zone, zonal and lumped parameter) assists in
the understanding of the level of impact, the design of safety systems, threat assessments and mitigation procedures
when these agents are released. This modeling is of both indoor and outdoor environments with potential impact on
occupied regions.
1. Multizone Modeling of Bioterrorism Attacks on Commercial Office Buildings
Wladyslaw J. Kowalski, Ph.D., P.E., The Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA
2. Experiment-Based Evaluation of Modeling Capabilities in Prediction of Contaminant Propagation Inside an Office
Building
Kelly Knight, Ph.D., Bechtel National Inc, Idaho Falls, ID
3. Determining Ventilation Strategy Under Two Kinds of Terrorist Attacks by Accessibility and Equivalent Concentration
Xianting Li, Ph.D., Associate, Tsinghua University, Beijing, PR China
4. Prediction and Control of Chemical and Biological Agent Dispersion in Buildings
Qingyan (Yan) Chen, Ph.D., Member, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

Seminar 6

Room: 212 A/B
Test Methods 101: System Chemistry and Contaminants
Sunday, January 25, 2004      8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 03.03 Refrigerant Contaminant Control
APC Liaison: M. Ginger Scoggins, P.E., Engineered Designs, Inc. Raleigh, NC
Chair: Glen L. Steinkoenig, Associate Member, Emerson Climate Tec hnologies Flow Controls, St. Louis, MO
   Test methods used to ensure refrigerant system chemistry health are presented. The test methods study refrigerant,
lubricant and system protection devices to determine the overall health of the refrigerating system. The results of these
tests provide the means for a service technician or project engineer to make wise choices during maintenance or design
of a new system.
1. Testing Systems for the Effects of Contaminants
Rob Yost, Member, National Refrigerants Inc., Bridgeton, NJ
2. Desiccant Testing 101: Molecular Sieve Beads
Alan P. Cohen, Member, UOP, Des Plaines, IL
3. Using ASHRAE 97
Jay Field, Ph.D., Member, The Trane Co., Tyler, TX
4. Standard 35: Revision Update
Glen L. Steinkoenig, Associate Member, Emerson Climate Technologies Flow Controls, St. Louis, MO

Seminar 7

Room: 213 D
The Hows and Whys of Residential Ventilation
Sunday, January 25, 2004        8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 05.12 Ventilation Requirements and Infiltration
APC Liaison: Frank H. Schambach, Total Building Concepts, Metaire, LA
Chair: Dianne Griffiths, Associate, Steven Winter Associates Inc., Norwalk, CT
    This session addresses residential ventilation with an emphasis on climate-specific needs and solutions. An
introduction to ventilation through the perspective of ASHRAE’s residential IAQ standard, 62.2, is given, followed by an
analytical comparison with Canadian code requirements. Presenters discuss the benefits and limitations posed by
climate-specific ventilation systems and provide strategies for taking advantage of regional characteristics. Strategies
include sizing, basic configurations and control issues. Presenters also discuss the impacts of moisture.
1. The Hows and Whys of Residential Ventilation
Max Sherman, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA
2. Canadian Approaches to Residential Ventilation
Anil Parekh, P.E., CANMET Energy Technology Centre, Ottawa, ON, Canada
3. Residential Ventilation for Production Homebuilders
Armin Rudd, Building Science Corp., Westford, MA
4. Residential Ventilation Strategies for Cold Climates
Patrick Huelman, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN
5. Ventilation in Hot-Humid Climates: Between a Rock and a Hard Place?
Neil Moyer, Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL

Seminar 8

Room: 210 A/B
Underfloor Ventilation and Air Conditioning for Low Energy Buildings
Sunday, January 25, 2004         8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 09.08 Large Building Air-Conditioning Applications; TC 2.8 Building Environmental Impacts and
Sustainability
APC Liaison: Peter Simmonds, IBE Consulting Engineers, Van Nuys, CA
Chair: Richard Rooley, ASHRAE President, Fellow, FREng., Rooley Consultants, Stokes Poges, Bucks, England, UK
    New initiatives in the application of underfloor ventilation and air-conditioning systems are leading toward lower energy
usage and lower running costs, combined with cost benefits, better air quality and occupant satisfaction. This seminar
describes how these advances have been applied in various buildings from fully air conditioned to hybrid, both naturally
ventilated and air conditioned, and passive design naturally ventilated offices. The seminar addresses a range of topics
from design concepts through to onsite practical issues such as building element leakage that could affect success.
1. Real and Hidden Cost Benefits of Underfloor Air -Conditioning Systems
Glan Blake Thomas, Member, Advanced Ergonomic Technologies Ltd, East Grinstead, West Sussex, UK
2. Application of Underfloor Ventilation in Low Energy Buildings
Frank A. Mills, Member, Frank Mills Associates, Leyland, Lancashire, UK
3. Case Study of Low Energy Underfloor Ventilation: The NCHT HQ Offices in Manchester, England
Ian Smallwood, Member, Environmental Design Consultants Ltd, Leyland, Lancashire, UK
4. Getting Underfloor Ventilation to Work: The Reality of the Site
Gaylon Richardson, Fellow, Engineered Air Balance Co. Inc., Houston, TX
5. Criteria and Procedures for Evaluating the Performance of Underfloor Air Distribution Systems
James E. Woods, Ph.D., P.E., Fellow, The Building Diagnostics Research Institute Inc., Chevy Chase, MD

Forum 1                      8 a.m. to 8:50 p.m.

Room: 213B
Can Absorption Help Alleviate Utility Volatility/Supply Interruption?
Sunday, January 25, 2004       8 a.m. to 8:50 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 08.03 Absorption and Heat Operated Machines
APC Liaison: James K. Willson, P.E., Willson Performance Engineering LLC, Carmel, INModerator: Laura A. Schaefer,
Ph.D., Associate, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
    The deregulation of utilities such as electricity and natural gas has resulted in fluc tuating price structures and supply
interruptions. The use of absorption technology, either as a stand-alone system or in conjunction with more traditional
equipment, may allow building managers to better meet the heating/cooling/economic needs for their f acilities. This forum
addresses the role that absorption can play in this field.

Forum 2                      8 a.m. to 8:50 p.m.

Room: 213 C
Post 9/11 Impact on HVAC
Sunday, January 25, 2004        8:00 a.m. to 8:50 a.m.
Sponsor: TRG 2 Blast, Chemical and Biological Remediation; TC 02.03 Gaseous Air Contaminants and Gas Contaminant
Removal Equipment
APC Liaison: Frederick W. Betz, P.E., A M Kinney, Cincinnati, OH
Moderator: Dean T. Tompkins, Ph.D., P.E., Member, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI
   The terrorist activities in the U.S. on Sept. 11, 2001, as well as others, strongly suggest that buildings and their
occupants are vulnerable to such low -probability, high-impact events. This forum provides the opportunity to express
issues associated with how a building, and in particular its HVAC system, can respond to terrorist activities. A building’s
response can be in the form of detection, mitigation and/or decontamination. This discussion may generate information
that will be used in ASHRAE publications.

Forum 3                      9 a.m. to 9:50 p.m.

Room: 213 C
Filtration/IAQ Needs for Hotels
Sunday, January 25, 2004      9 a.m. to 9 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 02.03 Gaseous Air Contaminants and Gas Contaminant
APC Liaison: James K. Willson, P.E., Willson Performance Engineering LLC, Carmel, IN
Moderator: Marilyn Listvan, Ph.D., Member, Listvan & Assoc., Consulting, Normandale CC, Minneapolis, MN
    Concern about the exposure of hotel guests and workers to poor air quality and its potential health impact are
increasing. In other words, how musty can a meeting room be? In this forum, air contaminant levels are discussed in the
context of hotel environments. Besides molds/mildews, what are other contaminant or comfort concerns? What can be
done from design and operational perspectives to optimize IAQ while remaining cost effective? Are there new strategies
for identifying problem areas quickly? This forum serves as a springboard for future programs or practical research
projects.

Forum 4                      9 a.m. to 9:50 p.m.

Room: 213 B
What Research Do You Need for Heat Pumps and Heat Recovery Systems?
Sunday, January 25, 2004        9 a.m. to 9:50 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 09.04 Applied Heat Pump/Heat Recovery Systems; TC 06.08 Geothermal Energy Utilization
APC Liaison: Frederick W. Betz, P.E., A M Kinney, Cincinnati, OH
Moderator: Gustav Foster, P.E., Member, Gustav Foster Consulting, LLC, Vineland, NJ
   This forum solicits suggestions and comments for new research in the area of applied heat pump/heat recovery
systems. TC 9.4 has identified five areas for needed research, including design of heat recovery heat pumps to condition
ventilation air; meeting noise limits for water-to-water heat pumps in classrooms; water-to-water heat pumps for domestic
hot water loop systems in cooling climates; working fluids for high temperature heating applications (replacement for R-
114); and sizing hot water storage tanks for water source heat pumps in heating climates.

SUNDAY, 1/2510:15 A.M. TO 12:15 P.M.
Symposium AN-04-03

Room: 213 A
Applications and Knowledge-Based Tools for Enhanced Building Energy Simulation
Sunday, January 25, 2004      10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 04.07 Energy Calculations
Chair: Vernon A. Smith, P.E., Associate, Architectural Energy Corp., Boulder, CO
    This symposium covers a range of topics related to building energy simulations, including fan modeling, diversity
factors and schedules for energy and cooling load calculations, and a knowledge-based expert system for conceptual
design of HVAC&R systems.
1. Development and Testing of the Characteristic Curve Fan Model
Jeff R. Stein, P.E., Member and Mark Hydeman, P.E., Member, Taylor Engineering, LLC, Alameda, CA
2. Total Energy Consumption Model of Fan Subsystem Suitable for Automated Continuous Building Commissioning
Fulin Wang, Kyoto University, Harunori Yoshida, Ph.D., Member and Masato Miyata, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
3. Electricity Diversity Profiles for Energy Simulation of Office Buildings (RP-1093)
David E. Claridge, Ph.D., P.E., Member, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX; Bass Abushakra, Ph.D., Member,
Milwaukee School of Engineering, Milwaukee, WI; Jeff Haberl, Ph.D., P.E., Member and Atch Sreshthaputra, Student
Member, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX
4. Development and Implementation of HVAC-KBCD: A Knowledge Based Expert System for Conceptual Design of
HVAC&R Systems — Part 1: General Framework (4691)
Itzhak Maor, Ph.D., P.E., PWI- Energy, Philadelphia, PA; T. Agami Reddy, Ph.D., P.E., Drexel University, Philadelphia,
PA
5. Development and Implementation of HVAC-KBCD: A Knowledge Based Expert System f or Conceptual Design of
HVAC&R Systems - Part 2: Case Study Application to Office Buildings (4692)
Itzhak Maor, Ph.D., P.E., Member, PWI-Energy, Philadelphia, PA; T. Agami Reddy, Ph.D., P.E., Member, Drexel
University, Philadelphia, PA

Symposium AN-04-04

Room: 303 C/D
Topics in Energy Recovery Ventilation
Sunday, January 25, 2004      10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 05.05 Air-to-Air Energy Recovery
APC Liaison: Peter Simmonds, IBE Consulting Engineers, Van Nuys, CA
Chair: Peter K. Grinbergs, Associate, Nutech Energy Systems Inc, London, ON, Canada
    This session examines energy recovery ventilation, including details in the construction of energy recovery wheels,
selection of components and lifetime operating assessments. It is intended to give engineers an overall look at energy
recovery ventilation technology.
1. Wheel Selection for Heat and Energy Recovery in Simple HVAC Ventilation Design Problems
Yaw Asiedu, Ph.D., Department of National Defense, Ottawa, ON, Canada; Robert W. Besant, P.E., Fellow and Carey
Simonson, Ph.D., Associate Member, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada
2. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of Air Handling Units With and Without Air-to-Air Energy Exchangers
Carey J. Simonson, Ph.D., P.E., Associate, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada; Mikko Nyman, VTT
Building and Transport, Espoo, Finland
3. Measurement of Pore Size Variation and Its Effect on Energy Wheel Performance
Wei Shang, Ph.D. and Robert W. Besant, P.E., Fellow, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada

Seminar 9

Room: 210 C/D
The ASHRAE Green Guide, Green Buildings and LEED
Sunday, January 25, 2004       10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 02.08 Building Environmental Impacts and Sustainability
APC Liaison: Joy Altwies, Farnsworth Group Inc., Madi son, WI
Chair: Thomas E. Cappellin, P.E., Member, Hammel, Green & Abrahamson Inc., Milwaukee, WI
    ASHRAE’s newly published Green Guide addresses matters of interest to those involved in green or sustainable
design of buildings. Does the guide agree with and complement concepts and practices promoted by the U.S. Green
Building Council? This seminar examines how the concepts compare in providing engineered approaches to the design of
new and remodeled buildings for the purpose of reducing or eliminating the detrimental impact on the environment.
1. The ASHRAE Green Guide
David L. Grumman, P.E., Fellow, Grumman/Butkus Associates, Evanston, IL
2. The U.S. Green Building Council
Daniel H. Nall, P.E., Flack + Kurtz Inc., New York, NY
3. The LEED Green Building Rating System
Harry J. Enck, Member, Commissioning & Green Building Services, LLC, Commerce, GA

Seminar 10

Room: 209A
Basic Design of Refrigerated Warehouses
Sunday, January 25, 2004     10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 10.05 Refrigerated Distribution and Storage Facilities
APC Liaison: Frederick W. Betz, P.E., A M Kinney, Cincinnati, OH
Chair: Ajay R. Chatlani, Member, ME Chemical Engineer, Niagara Blower Co., Buffalo, NY
Speakers enlisted from TC 10.5 present basic design concepts necessary to design a refrigerated warehouse. This
includes information on designing loading dock doors, freezer/cooler doors, wall and ceiling construction, underfloor
heating systems, product loads and evaporator placement.
1. Refrigeration System Efficiency
George C. Briley, Member, Technicold Services Inc., San Antonio, TX
2. Defrost Alternatives and Strategies
Douglas T. Reindl, Member, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
3. Remediation Methods for Underfloor Heaving
Daniel Dettmers, Member, IRC-U.W. - Madison, Madison, WI
4. Screw -ups/Insulated Panels/Racking
Garry A. Peakman, Member, Zer-O-Loc Enterprises, Ltd., Richmond, BC, Canada

Seminar 11

Room: 210 A/B
California Thermal Energy Storage Systems
Sunday, January 25, 2004       10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 06.09 Thermal Storage
APC Liaison: Spencer Morasch, Jersey Central Power & Light, Allenhurst, NJ
Chair: William P. Bahnfleth, Ph.D., P.E., Member, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
    California is home to numerous cool thermal energy storage (TES) systems. Many of these systems have been in
operation for 10 years or more and have demonstrated their value and reliability over time. This seminar addresses the
planning, design, construction and operation of a cross-section of California TES systems, including sensible and phase
change systems, for a range of applications including corporate offices, universities, medical institutions and district
cooling. Economic and operation benefits of these installations, as well as lessons learned, are summarized.
1. Stratified Thermal Energy Storage in California
John S. Andrepont, Member, The Cool Solutions Co., Lisle, IL
2. Corporate Headquarters Renovation with Ice Storage
Dale Au, P.E., Member, Graycon Inc., City of Industry, CA
3. Two TES Technologies in One Central Plant—You Must Be Kidding!
Klaus J. Schiess, P.E., Member, KS Engineers, La Jolla, CA
4. Chilled Water Storage Experiences at a Northern California University
Verle A. Williams, P.E., Fellow, Utility Services Unlimited Inc., San Diego, CA

Seminar 12

Room: 212 A/B
Commercial Application of Desiccant Dehumidification Technology
Sunday, January 25, 2004       10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 08.12 Desiccant and Sorption Technology
APC Liaison: Frank H. Schambach, Total Building Concepts, Metaire, LA
Chair: Edward A. Vineyard, P.E., Member, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN
    This seminar reviews commercial applications applying desiccant dehumidification technology. For many years,
industrial manufacturers have used desiccants to maintain low space humidity in production and lab areas. The use of
desiccants for humidity control in commercial buildings and other non-industrial applications is still developing and not
understood by many building designers and operators. This seminar reviews the basics of desiccant dehumidification and
demonstrates approaches resulting in significant energy savings while maintaining a healthier indoor environment.
1. Desiccant Dehumidification Basics
Stanley Slabinski, Member, Bry-Air, Monroe Township, NJ
2. Hybrid Desiccant/Rooftop System in a Hotel Application
James R. Sand, Ph.D., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN and John C. Fischer, Semco, Inc Columbia, MO
3. Applying a Microturbine/Desiccant Based Makeup Air CHP System to a Supermarket
Richard S. Sweetser, Member, Exergy Partners, Herndon, VA
4. Application of Desiccant Technology to Water Damage Restoration
Stephen C. Brickley, Member, Munters Corp., Amesbury, MA
5. Exploring the Concept of Integrated/Seasonal Efficiency for Dessicant Systems
Ali A. Jalalzadeh-Azar, Ph.D., P.E., Member, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO

Seminar 13

Room: 208 B
Commissioning Is More than Functional Performance Testing
Sunday, January 25, 2004       10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 07.09 Building Commissioning
APC Liaison: Jeff J. Traylor, PWI Consulting Engineers, Durham, NC
Chair: Richard M. Rose, Member, Mechanical Technology Inc., Billings, MT
    While successful commissioning requires many steps, there is an industry misconception that the only step necessary
for a successfully commissioned project is to perform the functional performance test (FPT). In reality, there are additional
prior critical steps. This seminar addresses these forgotten steps and their significance.
1. Commissioning for Project Value
Tim Corbett, Member, Social Security Administration, Baltimore, MD
2. FPT: The Big Easy
William J. McCartney, Member, Isotherm Engineering Ltd, Mississauga, ON, Canada
3. Functional Performance Testing Starts With Owner’s Project Requirements
Gerald J. Kettler, P.E., Member, Air Engineering & Testing, Dallas, TX
4. Commissioning Is More Than FPT
Jeff J. Traylor, Member, PWI Consulting Engineering, Durham, NC

Seminar 14

Room: 211 A/B
Energy Use Calculations and Evaluations for Laboratories
Sunday, January 25, 2004        10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 09.10 Laboratory Systems; TC 04.07 Energy Calculations
APC Liaison: James K. Willson, P.E., Willson Performance Engineering LLC, Carmel, IN
Chair: J. Patrick Carpenter, P.E., Member, P. Eng, Kling, Philadelphia, PA
    Estimating or evaluating the energy use of laboratories, which are energy intensive, is required to support energy
conservation strategies and investments and code compliance or LEED certification. Estimating energy use in labs
involves issues not typical of conventional buildings, such as influence of weather on coil loads, variations and diversities
of occupancy, operational dynamics of fume hood use, and space cooling load dynamics that affect airflow or reheat
depending upon the requirements for ventilation and exhaust make-up. This seminar illustrates approaches on predicting,
modeling or evaluating energy use and patterns of operations in laboratories.
1. Evaluating the Impact of Criteria, Concepts and Modeling Assumptions on Energy Calculations for Laboratory Facilities
J. Patrick Carpenter, P.E., Member, Kling, Philadelphia, PA
2. Identifying Energy Efficiency Strategies for Laboratories
Otto Van Geet, P.E., Member, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO
3. Energy Consumption Patterns at a Research University
D. Randall Lacey, P.E., Member, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
4. Optimization by Energy Simulation at Concordia University New Science Building
Roland Charneux, P.E., Member, Pageau Morel & Associates Inc., Montréal, QU, Canada
5. Results from an Energy Benchmarking Database
Dale A. Sartor, P.E., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA

Seminar 15

Room: 208 A
Water Source Heat Pump Issues
Sunday, January 25, 2004        10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 09.04 Applied Heat Pump/Heat Recovery Systems; TC 06.08 Geothermal Energy Utilization
APC Liaison: Don C. Hardin, Enviromatic Systems, Ft. Worth, TX
Chair: Frank J. Pucciano, Member, Stewart & Stevenson, Lilburn, GA
    Design and installation of water source heat pumps are affec ted by several standards as well as design oversights or
errors. Standard ARI/ISO 13256, which became effective Jan. 1, 2000, was the first ARI/ISO collaborative standard in the
HVAC industry. This seminar addresses the standard’s development and integration into water source heat pump
designs. Compressor noises and integration of boilers and cooling towers can make an otherwise good design a disaster.
Also addressed are mistakes and solutions for future designs.
1. An Overview of Performance Standard ARI/ISO 13256 and a Comparison to ARI 320, 325 and 330
Robert R. Brown, Member, ClimateMaster, Markle, IN
2. ISO Standard Development Process and Recognition by the Department of Energy
Joel G. Solis, Member, Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute, Arlington, VA
3. Design, Installation and Service Issues with Liquid Source Heat Pumps in Commercial Applications
Carl F. Huber, P.E., Member, Water Furnace International Inc., Fort Wayne, IN
4. Mechanical Equipment vs. Classroom Acoustics
David E. Anstrand, Manheim Township School District, Lancaster, PA

Forum 5                10:15 a.m. to 11:05 a.m.

Room: 213 B
Beyond Standard 138P, What Is Next?
Sunday, January 25, 2004       10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 06.05 Radiant Space Heating and Cooling; SPC138P
APC Liaison: Kirk T. Mescher, P.E., CM Engineering, Columbia, MO
Moderator: Birol I. Kilkis, Ph.D, Fellow, Watts Radiant, Springfield, MO
    Standard 138P, Method of Testing for Rating Hydronic Radiant Ceiling Panels, has completed its second public
review. More than 70 comments were addressed for this standard, which will serve the sole source for testing and rating
ceiling radiant panels in North America for sensible heating and cooling. This forum establishes a common discussion
platform, whether it is feasible to extend this standard for other types of radiant panels, such floor, wall, hybrid (load
sharing) and electric panels. The second option is to consider different standards for each panel type. This forum also
addresses issues related to unification with European standards.

Forum 6               10:15 a.m. to 11:05 a.m.

Room: 213 C
Field vs. Factory Measurement of Centrifugal Chiller Performance
Sunday, January 25, 2004        10:15 a.m. - 11:05 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 08.02 Centrifugal Machines
APC Liaison: Arthur P. Garbarino, Air Service Inc ., West Palm Beach, FL
Moderator: Tom . Watson, P.E., Member, McQuay International, Staunton, VA
    While centrifugal chillers are usually tested before shipping, they should also be tested after installation to verify
performance. Some of the required measuring instrumentation can be factory mounted and some is installed in the
system in the field. This forum discusses the measurements required for adequate testing and operation and the methods
of obtaining these measurements (field vs. factory instrumentation). This information gathered in the forum will provide
data for future research projects and standards.

Forum 7 10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. TWO HOURS

Room: 213 D
ASHRAE and Homeland Security: Where Have We Been and Where Should We Be Going?
Sunday, January 25, 2004     10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: Presidential Ad Hoc Committee on Homeland Security
APC Liaison: James E. Wolf, American Standard Companies, Arlington, VA
Moderator: Ralph F. Goldman, Ph.D., Life Member, Comfort Technology, Framington, MA
   With ASHRAE members involved in many aspects of critical infrastructure and with the world facing increased
concerns about infrastructure vulnerability, ASHRAE leadership has determined that the Society will take a proactive
approach to minimize risks for building occupants during extraordinary events. Members of the Presidential Ad Hoc
Committee on Homeland Security update attendees on relevant homeland security matters. Available resources, ongoing
research, planned projects and opportunities for participation are addressed. Input into the future direction of this
endeavor is sought.

Forum 8               11:15 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.

Room: 213 B
What Changes Are Needed in Standards 41.1, 41.2 and 41.3?
Sunday, January 25, 2004    11:15 am. to 12:05 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 01.02 Instruments and Measurement
APC Liaison: Kirk T. Mescher, P.E., CM Engineering, Columbia, MO
Moderator: Todd R. Hardwick, Associate, TSI Inc., Shoreview, MN
  ASHRAE standards 41.1, Temperature Measurement, 41.2, Laboratory Air -Flow Measurement, and 41.3, Pressure
Measurement, are being revised. This session seeks feedback on future revision.

Forum 9               11:15 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.

Room: 213 C
What Is the Worldwide Outlook for Combustion Turbine Inlet Air Cooling Applications?
Sunday, January 25, 2004         11:15 am. to 12:05 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 08.07 Combustion Gas Turbine Inlet Air Cooling Systems
APC Liaison: Arthur P. Garbarino, Air Service Inc., West Palm Beach, FL
Moderator: William J. Mc Auliffe, Member, York Int., Houston, TX
   The global use of electric power continues to grow, which drives the need for more generating capacity. This forum
seeks input from what attendees see as the application of turbine inlet air cooling as a technology to increase power
output at times of high peak usage. Guidance on whether information on this technology’s benefits is generally known and
accepted in the industry and what could be done to increase the market knowledge of the availability of this technology
and the benefits it brings also is sought.
SUNDAY, 1/25                  1 P.M. TO 3 P.M.

Technical Session 1

Room: 213 A
APC Liaison: Ronald L. Shelton, P.E., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN


A Study of Geothermal Heat Pump and Standing Column Well Performance (4666) (RP-1119)
Sunday, January 25, 2004          1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 06.08 Geothermal Energy Utilization
Simon J. Rees, Ph.D., Member, Zheng Deng, Student Member and Jeffrey D. Spitler, Ph.D., P.E., Member, Oklahoma
State University, Stillwater, OK; Carl D. Orio, Member, Water Energy Distributors Inc., Atkinson, NH; Carl N. Johns on,
Ph.D., Member, Water Energy Distributors Inc., Stillwater, OK
    Standing column wells can be used as highly efficient ground heat exchangers in geothermal heat pump systems,
where hydrological and geological conditions are suitable. A numerical model of ground-water flow and heat transfer, in
and around standing column wells, was developed and used in a parametric study to identify significant design
parameters and their effect on well performance. Performance is evaluated in terms of minimum and maximum annual
temperatures and design well depth. Energy consumption and annual costs are calculated. Ground water ‘bled’ from the
system is one of the most significant parameters used to improve well performance for a given load.
Considerations in the Design and Application of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Energy Systems in Residential Markets (4667)
Sunday, January 25, 2004          1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Robert Braun, Ph.D., UTC Fuel Cells, South Windsor, CT; Sanford Klein, Ph.D. and Douglas Reindl, Ph.D., P.E.,
University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
    This paper examines aspects of fuel cell system design for application in stationary residential markets. The
development of fuel cell systems for sub-10 kW stationary applications involves consideration of sizing, fuel processing,
operating point selection, fuel cell operating capabilities, system integration and load management strategies. These
considerations are discussed and strategies presented for matching the electrical and thermal energy demands of a
residence with that of a solid oxide fuel cell power system. Efficiency considerations for configuring fuel cell, dc-to-ac
inverter and electrical energy storage components for conditioning of the dc power output generated by the fuel cell stack
are given.
Results of a Residential Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell Demonstration at a Military Facility in New York
(4668)
Sunday, January 25, 2004          1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Franklin H. Holcomb, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Champaign, IL; Brian C. Davenport, Plug
Power Inc., Latham, NY; Nicholas M. Josefik and Michael J. Binder, Ph.D., U.S. Army Engineer Research and
Development Center, Champaign, IL
    Residential proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells are in the pre-commercial stages of development, and limited
field testing and demonstrations have been performed. This paper provides an overview of the Department of Defense
residential PEM fuel cell demonstration program, as well as a study of 10 PEM fuel cells installed at a military facility in
New York as part of this program. The installation, operation, performance and benefits of these units are presented,
along with lessons learned from the demonstration.
Thermal Analysis of Solar Powered Continuous Adsorption Air Conditioning System (4669)
Sunday, January 25, 2004          1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Li Yong and K. Sumathy, Ph.D., University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; N.D. Kaushika, Ph.D., Indian Institute of
Technology, Hauz Khas, New Delhi, India
    A simple lumped parameter model is established to investigate the performance of a solar pow ered adsorption air
conditioning system driven by flat type solar collectors. The influences of some important design and operational
parameters on the performance of the system are studied. The study shows that the adsorbent mass and lumped
capacitance have significant effect on the system performance as well as on the system size. Simulation results indicate
that the effect of overall heat transfer coefficient is not predominant if the cycle duration is longer.

Symposium AN-04-05

Room: 211 A/B
Factors Influencing the Energy Performance of Forced-Air Systems
Sunday, January 25, 2004      1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 06.03 Central Forced Air Heating and Cooling Systems
APC Liaison: Spencer Morasch, Jersey Central Power & Light, Allenhurst, NJ
Chair: Michael R. Lubliner, Member, Washington State University, Olympia, WA
    This symposium focuses on factors that affect heating and cooling system energy efficiency. Single number rating
systems such as AFUE, HSPF and SEER may not adequately address the actual energy efficiency of the system. This
program focuses on related issues and approaches.
1. Energy Saving Opportunities in Residential Air Handler Efficiency
Mark A. Kendall, Gas Appliance Manufacturers Association, Arlington, VA
2. How Much Energy Could Residential HVAC Fans and Motors Save?
Harvey Sachs, Ph.D., Member, ACEEE, Washington, D.C.; Sandy Smith, Ph.D., American Council for an Energy-Efficient
Economy (ACEEE), Washington, D.C.
3. Heat Pump Performance in Northern Climates
Paul W. Francisco, Member, University of Illinois, Champaign, IL; David Baylon, Bob Davis and Larry Palmiter, Ecotope
Inc., Seattle, WA

Symposium AN-04-06

Room: 213 D
Thermal and Solar Heat Gain Characteristics of Venetian Blinds
Sunday, January 25, 2004        1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 04.05 Fenestration
APC Liaison: Don C. Hardin, Enviromatic Systems, Ft. Worth, TX
Chair: P. Marc LaFrance, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C.
    Although the optical and solar heat gain characteristics of most window systems are fairly well understood, we still
have much to learn about the energy performance of windows used in conjunction with fenestration attachments, such as
Venetian blinds. This symposium will host an array of papers.
1. Heat Transfer Analysis of a Between-Panes Venetian Blind Using Effective Longwave Radiative Properties
Darryl S. Yahoda, Student Member, DBM Systems Inc., Cambridge, ON, Canada; John L. Wright, Ph.D., P.E., Member,
University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada
2. Method for Calculating the Effective Longwave Radiative Properties of a Venetian Blind Layer
Darryl S. Yahoda, Student Member, DBM Systems Inc., Cambridge, ON, Canada; John L. Wright, Ph.D., P.E., Member,
University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada
3. Calorimetric Analysis of the Solar and Thermal Performance of Windows and with Internal Louvered Blinds
Michael Collins, Ph.D., Member, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada; Stephen J. Harrison, Ph.D., P.E.,
Member, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada
4. Estimating the Solar Heat and Thermal Gains from a Window with an Interior Venetian Blind
Michael R. Collins, Ph.D., Member, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada; Stephen Harrison, Ph.D., P.E.,
Member, Queen’s University, Kinston, ON, Canada




Seminar 16                 1 p.m. to 1:50 p.m.

Room: 213 B
First Time at an ASHRAE Meeting - This Seminar’s for You!
Sunday, January 25, 2004        1 p.m. to 1:50 p.m.
Sponsor: ASHRAE Program Committee
APC Liaison: James E. Wolf, American Standard Companies, Arlington, VA
Chair: Kelley Cramm, P.E., Member, IDEA Inc., Kansas City, MO
    This seminar introduces new meeting attendees to the events of a Society meeting - how to get involved in a technical
committee, the difference between a symposium and a seminar, and how to become part of the meeting program. The
role of ASHRAE staff in a meeting and the events that surround the AHR Exposition are explained. And if you’re not
having fun yet, the technical tours, guest and “special” events (how to have fun at ASHRAE) are discussed.
1. Membership: How to Get the Most Out of an ASHRAE Meeting and Exposition
Frederick W. Betz, P.E., Member, A. M. Kinney, Cincinnati, OH
2. Standing Committees: What They Do and How Members Are Appointed
M. Ginger Scoggins, P.E., Member, Engineered Designs Inc., Raleigh, NC
3. Technical Committees, Technical Programs
James K. Willson, Member, Willson Performance Engineering LLC., Carmel, IN
4. The Fun Side of ASHRAE Meetings
John H. Nix, Member, Florida Power & Light Utility Co., Miami, FL


Seminar 17

Room: 212 A/B
Refrigeration Applications
Sunday, January 25, 2004     1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 10.09 Refrigeration Application for Foods and Beverages
APC Liaison: Arthur P. Garbarino, Air Service Inc., West Palm Beach, FL
Chair: Brian J. Webb, Member, Envirothermics Inc., Winnipeg, MB, Canada
  State-of-the-art and updated practices and design techniques in the cooling and refrigeration of vegetable and fruit
produce immediately after harvest are examined. The program also includes an overview of unique methods of control.
1. Methods to Calculate Cooling Times and Loads of Fruits and Vegetables Using Hydrocooling
Brian A. Fricke, Ph.D., Member, and Bryan R. Becker, Ph.D., P.E., Member, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO
2. Automated Forced-Air Produce Cooling
Scott Hawkins, P.E., Member, Hawkins Engineering, Salinas, CA
3. Updated Techniques in the Commercial Cooling of Fruits, Vegetables and Flowers
James F. Thompson, P.E., Member, University of California, Davis, CA
4. New Control Strategies for Refrigeration Systems
Gideon Zeidler, Ph.D., P.E., Member, University of California, Riverside, CA

Seminar 18

Room: 210 A/B
California Energy Update: Energy Efficiency Using Innovative Approaches
Sunday, January 25, 2004       1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 02.08 Building Environmental Impacts and Sustainability
APC Liaison: Joy Altwies, Farnsworth Group Inc., Madison, WI
Chair: Tom Lawrence, Ph.D., P.E., University of Georgia, Athens, GA
    California’s energy issues have made national headlines in the recent years. This session provides updates on how
groups within California are responding to the rapidly changing energy marketplace. The presenters provide examples
from a variety of perspectives, including that of a private and public utility, the state regulatory environment, and
residential building design and construction.
1. Demand Response Rates for Designing Control Systems that Respond to an Electricity Shortage
Jim Chace, Pacific Energy Center, San Francisco, CA
2. Title 24 Update
Charles Eley, P.E., Member, Eley & Associates, San Francisco, CA
3. San Francisco’s Renewable Energy Program
Fred Schwartz, San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, San Francisco, CA
4. Zero Energy Housing
Rob Hammon, Ph.D., ConSol, Stockton, CA

Seminar 19

Room: 213 C
Changing the Payback Paradigm: Implementing Projects Using Life Cycle Cost Analysis and
Alternative Financing
Sunday, January 25, 2004        1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 01.08 Mechanical Systems Insulation
APC Liaison: Frank H. Schambach, Total Building Concepts, Metaire, LA
Chair: John A. Shonder, Member, Oak Ridge National Lab oratory, Oak Ridge, TN
    Implementation of capital-intensive projects at a facility often requires organizations to look beyond simple payback
criteria and consider using life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) to identify appropriate projects. Additionally, creative financing
approaches serve to fund large projects that would otherwise be tabled. This seminar begins with a primer on
fundamentals and typical applications of alternative financing. The second presentation focuses on cost factors from non-
energy benefits including maintenance and productivity improvements, and how to use these benefits to justify
implementation. The third addresses a methodology for evaluating chiller projects using LCCA. Finally, examples of
creative financing approaches are discussed.
1. Fundamentals of Alternative Financing: Mechanisms and Appropriate Applications
David J. Clamage, Saulsbury Hill Financial, Denver, CO
2. Examples of Life Cycle Costing Analysis Using More than Energy Costs
Matthew E. Mullen, P.E., Member, EMCOR Services - New England Mechanical, Vernon, CT
3. Examples of Creative Financing Approaches
David J. Clamage, Saulsbury Hill Financial, Denver, CO

Seminar 20

Room: 210 C/D
Cleanroom Standards: What ASHRAE Members Need to Know
Sunday, January 25, 2004       1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 09.11 Clean Spaces
APC Liaison: Michael R. Brambley, Ph.D., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA
Chair: Peter B. Gardner, P.E., Member, Torcon Inc., Westfield, NJ
   New developments in cleanroom classification, testing, design and construction are addressed. Federal Standard
209E has been discontinued, so those who design cleanrooms should follow the ISO/ANSI/IEST cleanroom standards in
series 14644. This seminar examines the requirements of these new standards and how they can be applied. It covers the
approved classification standard, test and metrology standards, and the design and construction standard.
1. How to Classify Your Clean Space
Phil Winters, Member, Filtration Group, Joliet, IL
2. Metrology vs. Meteorology
Susan Morrison, Member, Paratek, Baltimore, MD
3. Design and Construction Standards for Cleanrooms
Peter B. Gardner, P.E., Member, Torcon Inc., Westfield, NJ

Seminar 21

Room: 303 C/D
Commissioning 20 Years Later
Sunday, January 25, 2004       1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Sponsor: Standards Committee GPC-1
APC Liaison: Jeff J. Traylor, PWI Consulting Engineers, Durham, NC
Chair: Carl N. Lawson, Member, PWI Engineering, Durham, NC
    The ASHRAE commissioning process started in 1984 addressing only HVAC systems. Over time, the process has
expanded into the total building and other systems. Future use may include commissioning with special tools and
electronic processes. This seminar looks at the process’ past and future applications.
1. Commissioning the Beginning
Carl N. Lawson, Member, PWI Engineering, Durham, NC
2. How 20 Years of Commissioning Affected Systems Operation and Maintenance
T. David Underwood, Member, Isotherm Engineering, LTD, Mississauga, ON, Canada
3. The Tools and Electronics for Future Commissioning
Chad Grindle, Member, Farnsworth Group Inc., Madison, WI
4. Why Electrical Systems Commissioning
Jeff Traylor, Member, PWI Engineering, Durham, NC
5. Total Building Commissioning
Paul Tseng, P.E., CH2M Hill, Herndon, VA


Forum 10                    2 p.m. to 2:50 p.m.

Room: 213 B
ASHRAE Research 2004
and Beyond
Sunday, January 25, 2004      2 p.m. to 2:50 p.m.
Sponsor: Research Advisory Panel
APC Liaison: James E. Wolf, American Standard Companies, Arlington, VA
Moderator: John W. Mitchell, Ph.D., P.E., Fellow, University of Wisconsin, Madison, W I
   ASHRAE is engaged in developing a Research Strategic Plan that will guide and direct the research projects
undertaken by the Society. The Research Advisory Panel (RAP) has been charged with developing this plan and has
formulated a set of themes that will guide the research. In the forum, the status of the planning process is presented for
discussion and input from the participants on the planning process is sought.

MONDAY, 1/26
Symposium AN-04-07

Room: 209A
Absorption/Sorption Heat Pumps and Refrigeration Systems
Monday, January 26, 2004       8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 08.03 Absorption and Heat Operated Machines
APC Liaison: Jeff J. Traylor, PWI Consulting Engineers, Durham, NC
Chair: Laura A. Schaefer, Ph.D., Associate, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
    This symposium focuses on absorption heat pumps and other heat pumps driven primarily by heat. Papers address
theoretical or applied aspects of these heat pumps, including the integration of heat pumps into larger systems.
1. Experimental Verification of an Absorption Chiller for BCHP Applications
Vikas Patnaik, Ph.D., Member, Trane, La Crosse, WI
2. Theoretical and Experimental Study of a New Absorption Refrigeration Cycle
Yongfang Zhong, Student Member, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL and Guangming Chen, Ph.D.
Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China
3. Heat Activated Dual-Function Absorption Cycle
Donald C. Erickson, Member, G. Anand, Ph.D., Member and Icksoo Kyung, Ph.D., Energy Concepts Co., Annapolis, MD
4. Simultaneous Flow Visualization and Heat and Mass Transfer in Microchannel Ammonia-Water Absorbers
Srinivas Garimella, Ph.D., Member and John Mark Meacham, Student Member, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta,
GA

Symposium AN-04-08

Room: 208 B
Pumping, Piping and Water Quality Issues for GSHPs
Monday, January 26, 2004      8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 06.08 Geothermal Energy Utilization
APC Liaison: John Nix, Florida Power and Light Utility Co., Miami, FL
Chair: George C. Penn, P.E., Member, Global Energy Options, Madison, WI
    This symposium provides information on piping, pumping and water quality issues related to the design and operation
of ground source heat pumps (GSHP). Papers address a bin analysis tool for looking at piping system designs for closed
loop GSHPs; pumping options available to closed-loop GSHP system designs; and water chemistry issues that are
important to designers and operators of open loop GSHP systems.
1. A Bin Method Energy Analysis for Ground-Coupled Heat Pumps
Stephen P. Kavanaugh, Ph.D.,, Fellow and Steve Lambert, P.E., Student Member, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL
2. Operational Performance of Ground Coupled (Closed Loop) Ground-Source Heat Pump System Pumping Alternatives
RP# 1217-TRP
Steven Lambert, P.E., Student Member and Stephen P. Kavanaugh, Ph.D., Fellow, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa,
AL
3. Water Chemistry Issues in Geothermal Heat Pump Systems
Kevin Rafferty, P.E., Member, Oregon Institute of Technology, Klamath Falls, OR

Seminar 22

Room: 210 C/D
Achieving Design Quality: A Business and Management Program for Designers, Part 1
Monday, January 26, 2004       8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 01.07 Business, Management & General Legal Education
APC Liaison: James E. Wolf, American Standard Companies, Arlington, VA
Chair: Maralynne Flehner, Esq., Member, King of Prussia, PA
    This seminar in two parts addresses one of the most important issues faced by HVAC&R designers and their firms:
how to achieve design quality through each phase of the design and construction process. The program focuses on the
steps designers should take to reduce potential for error throughout the production process; conceptualizing a design;
system selection; checking assumptions, calculations and conformance to owners’ criteria and to applicable laws and
standards; reviewing design documents; responding to client demands for unreasonably quick feedback and/or cost
cutting measures that will negatively impact design or performance; load calculations; construction specifications; and
responding to requests for information.
1. The Pre-Design Phase
Kent W. Peterson, P.E., Member, P2S Engineering Inc., Long Beach, CA
2. The Schematic Design Phase
Mick Schwedler, P.E., Member, Trane Company, La Crosse, WI
3. The Preliminary Design Phase
Richard H. Rooley, FREng., ASHRAE President, Fellow, Rooley Consultants, Bucks, Stoke Poges, UK

Seminar 23

Room: 212 A/B
Commercial Kitchen Ventilation:
A Rooftop Perspective
Monday, January 26, 2004       8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 05.10 Kitchen Ventilation
APC Liaison: James K. Willson, P.E., Willson Performance Engineering LLC, Carmel, IN
Chair: Donald R. Fisher, Associate, P. Eng, Fisher-Nickel Inc., San Ramon, CA
    Commercial kitchen ventilation system design centers on the specification of an appropriate exhaust hood. Industry
experience and recent research highlights the importance of selecting an effective makeup air delivery strategy. However,
the array of issues associated with discharging grease laden cooking effluent on the rooftop and its complementary
introduction of makeup air often are worthy of more attention by the designer. This seminar takes a rooftop view of system
design, discussing fundamentals of exhaust fan application, new fan technologies, grease loading and its mitigation,
effluent/odor control through high-velocity discharge, and the application of energy -efficient makeup air heating and
cooling equipment.
1. CKV Exhaust Fan Application and Selection Considerations
Darrin R. Earhart, Member, Loren Cook Co., Springfield, MO
2 . Up, Up and Away: CKV Discharge Strategy
John A. Clark, P.E., Fellow, Hammel Green & Abrahamson Inc., Minneapolis, MN
3. Grease Loading of Exhaust Fans: What’s the Solution?
Robert L. Utech, Greenheck Fan Corp., Schofield, WI
4. Replacement Air Cooling Options for CKV Systems
Stephen L. Brown, Member, LC Systems, Columbus, OH
5. Application of Direct- Fired Makeup Air Units
Douglas J. Horton, D. J. Horton and Associates Inc., Batavia, IL

Seminar 24

Room: 211 A/B
Compressors in Transcritical CO2 Systems
Monday, January 26, 2004         8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 08.01 Positive Displacement Compressors
APC Liaison: Arthur P. Garbarino, Air Service Inc., West Palm Beach, FL
Chair: Dan Manole, Ph.D., Member, Tecumseh Products Co., Tecumseh, MI
    CO2 is a natural refrigerant that has capabilities in replacing HFCs in heat pumps and water heater applications.
Commercial refrigeration and air conditioning systems with a special system configuration also can use CO2. A
transcritical CO2 system operates at high pressures. The cooling capacity control is different than for HFC systems. This
seminar presents experimental results on the design and performance differences between a system operating with
transcritical CO2 and a traditional subcritical system with emphasis on the compressor.
1. Measurement of Performance of Carbon Dioxide Compressors
Eckhard A. Groll, Ph.D., Member, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
2. Thoughts on CO2 Compressor Testing and Rating
Reinhard Radermacher, Ph.D., Member, University of Maryland, College Park, MD
3. CO2 Compressors in Military Cooling Systems
John A. Manzione, P.E., Member, US Army RDECOM, Fort Belvoir, VA
4. Carbon Dioxide Compressor Rating Conditions
Doug Collings and Zerkai Yap, Tecumseh Products Co., Tecumseh, MI
5. A Small Compressor for Transcritical CO2 Applications
Jürgen Süss, Ph.D., Member, Danfoss A/S, Nordborg, Denmark
6. Introduction of Rolling Piston Type 2 Stage Compressor for CO2 and Application for Refrigeration Cycle
Gaku Shimada, Member, Sanyo SSC, Bensenville, IL

Seminar 25

Room: 208 A
Exhaust and Intake Design Issues
Monday, January 26, 2004       8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 05.12 Ventilation Requirements and Infiltration; TC 09.10 Laboratory Systems; TC 05.06 Control of Fire and
Smoke
APC Liaison: Spencer Morasch, Jersey Central Power & Light, Allenhurst, NJ
Chair: Ronald L. Petersen, Ph.D., Member, Cermak Peterka Petersen Inc., Fort Collins, CO
    The seminar addresses the latest issues in exhaust and intake design. New design procedures in ANSI/AIHA Z9.5 are
discussed as well more sophisticated design techniques that include numerical and wind tunnel modeling. Rules of thumb
for sighting exhausts and intakes are provided. The relationship between the air quality design criteria, fan size/type
specification and annual energy costs is discussed. Examples from recent projects are presented, showing how initial fan
size specifications could be reduced to save energy costs while also maintaining acceptable air quality.
1. The Effect of Rooftop Aerodynamics on Exhaust and Intake Placement
Glenn Schuyler, Member, RWDI, Guelph, ON, Canada
2. Development of a Lab Hood Exhaust Stack Selection Method and ANSI Z9.5-2000
Victor Neuman, P.E., Member, Tek -Air Systems Inc., San Diego, CA
3. Specifying Exhaust Systems to Minimize Energy Costs while Maintaining Acceptable Air Quality
John J. Carter, Member, Cermak Peterka Petersen Inc., Fort Collins, CO


Seminar 26

Room: 303 C/D
Silver Lining Found in Poor Operation and Maintenance Procedures
Monday, January 26, 2004    8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 07.03 Operation and Maintenanc e Management
APC Liaison: Michael R. Brambley, Ph.D., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA
Chair: T. David Underwood, Member, P.Eng., Isotherm Engineering Ltd., Mississauga, ON, Canada
    This seminar discusses a variety of facility types having problems with IAQ, excess energy consumption and occupant
complaints due to improper or poor operation and maintenance procedures. The papers presented address solutions that
improved the operation of the facilities and their performance after completion of retrofits.
1. How Not to Ventilate a Hot/Humid Climate (Zoo)
T. David Underwood, Member, Isotherm Engineering Ltd., Mississauga, ON, Canada
2. Gold Lining Found in Improved O&M Procedures
Wayne Webster, Member, Princess Towers Inc., Ottawa, ON, Canada
3. Silver Lining Found in Poor Operation and Maintenance Procedures
Cedric S. Trueman, Member, Trueman Engineering Services, Victoria, BC, Canada
4. Faulty Operation and Maintenance Procedures in School Facilities
Davidge Warfield, Member, M.D., Environmental Inc., Wilmington, DE




Seminar 27                8 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

Room: 210 A/B
TEGA Issues Update, HVAC Excellence in Federal Buildings
Monday, January 26, 2004        8 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. – 4 hour seminar
Sponsor: Technical, Energy and Government Activities Committee
APC Liaison: Kelley P. Cramm, P.E., IDEA, 2529 Jefferson St. Kansas City, MO
Chair: Thomas E. Werkema, Member, ATOFINA Chemicals Inc., Philadelphia, PA
    In 2001, ASHRAE signed a partnering agreement with the General Services Administration (GSA), the nation’s largest
landlord managing approximately 500 million square feet. GSA has published the HVAC excellence initiative, enhancing
design and integration of building systems. This seminar addresses that initiative, GSA HVAC criteria, mold-moisture
control, energy budgets and the new Energy Bill, closing with a video, Achieving HVAC Excellence in Federal Buildings.
1. Keynote Speaker
 Paul Chistolini, General Services Administration, Washington, D.C.
2. Overview of HVAC Excellence Initiative
Vijay Gupta, P.E., Fellow, GSA, Washington, D.C.
3. ASHRAE and GSA Partnering Agreement
William J. Coad, P.E., Presidential Member, Fellow, Coad Engineering Consulting, St. Louis, MO
4. HVAC from the Perspective of the Owners, Developers and Managers
Thomas B. McChesney, P.E., Grubb-Ellis, V.P., Pittsburgh, PA
5. GSA HVAC Criteria
Boggarm Setty, P.E., Fellow, Setty and Associates, Fairfax, VA
6. Mold and Moisture Control Criteria in Federal Buildings
Lew Harriman, Member, Mason Grant Consulting, Portsmouth, NH
7. Energy Budget Design Targets: Methodology and Modeling Processes
Ron Mineo, P.E., Member, Joseph Loring and Associates, New York, NY
8. Central Air Handling Unit Size Selection and Optimization
David Callan, P.E., Member, Syska Hennessy Group Inc., Fairfax, VA




Seminar 28

Room: 213 D
Toward More Efficient Refrigerated Display Cases and Vending Equipment
Monday, January 26, 2004        8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 10.07 Commercial Food and Beverage Cooling Display and Storage
APC Liaison: Frederick W. Betz, P.E., A M Kinney, Cincinnati, OH
Chair: David Hinde, Member, Hill Phoenix, Covington, GA
    Supermarket operators face pressure to lower energy consumption and costs in a historically low -margin industry. The
energy required to cool display cases and other refrigerated equipment accounts for a major source of this energy use.
This session evaluates four efforts to understand the sources of energy inefficiencies in refrigerated supermarket
equipment. Various methods are applied to model and optimize designs and improve system performance and efficiency
in both refrigerated display cases and vending equipment.
1. Analysis of Energy Enhancing Measures in Supermarket Display Cases
Ramin Faramarzi, P.E., Member, Southern California Edison, Irwindale, CA
2. Evaporator Design Tradeoffs in Supermarket Display Cases
Clark Bullard, Ph.D., Fellow, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL
3. Exploring Methods to Optimize Performance of Air Curtains in Open Vertical Display Cases
Homayun Navaz, Ph.D., Kettering University, Flint, MI
4. Testing the Impact of Ambient Conditions on Performance of Refrigerated Vending Machines
Ramin Faramarzi, P.E., Member, Southern California Edison, Irwindale, CA

Forum 11                    8 a.m. to 8:50 a.m.

Room: 213 B
What Advances in Leak Tight Design and Construction Are Required for R and A/C Equipment?
Monday, January 26, 2004     8 a.m. to 8:50 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 03.08 Refrigerant Contaminant
APC Liaison: M. Ginger Scoggins, P.E., Engineered Designs, Inc. Raleigh, NC
Moderator: Warren Beeton, Member, Copeland Corp., Sydney, OH
  In order to meet the EPA requirements for leak tight systems, manufacturers, installers and maintenance personnel
must be able to understand and apply specific tools. Some of these tools do not lend themselves for use in the field.

Forum 12                    8 a.m. to 8:50 a.m.

Room: 213 C
What Do Contractors and End-Users Feel Is Missing from the Handbook for Residential and
Small Building Applications?
Monday, January 26, 2004       8 a.m. to 8:50 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 09.05 Residential and Small Building Applications; TC 06.03 Central Forced Air Heating and Cooling
Systems
APC Liaison: Peter Simmonds, IBE Consulting Engineers, Van Nuys, CA
Moderator: Stephen Kowalski, Member, Trane Residential Systems, Tyler, TX
   The ASHRAE Handbook contains chapters on the application of HVAC in residences, retail facilities, and commercial
and public buildings. TC 9.5, Residential and Small Building Applications, seeks input to determine a direction that it can
take in contributing to the Handbook. The committee is interested in the needs of contractors and end-users.

Forum 13                    9 a.m. to 9:50 a.m.

Room: 213 C
What Is Needed to Make the Handbooks More Designer Friendly?
Sponsor: TC 05.12 Ventilation Requirements and Infiltration; Technical Activities Committe, Handbook Committee
APC Liaison: Peter Simmonds, IBE Consulting Engineers, Van Nuys, CA
Moderator: Craig P. Wray, Member, P. Eng, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA
   The ASHRAE Handbook series provides a broad range of engineering information, which is continuously updated by
ASHRAE technical committees. Updates are intended to provide new information, clarify existing information, delete
obsolete material, and reorganize chapters to make the Handbook more understandable and easier to use. This forum
seeks input from attendees to help guide and focus these improvements. Issues to discuss include characterizing the
types of users (designers, contractors and students), specifying their information needs (procedure checklists, design
data, industry practice summaries and example calculations) and identifying appropriate information presentation formats
(paper versus electronic).




Forum 14                    9 a.m. to 9:50 a.m.

Room: 213 B
Refrigerant Leaks and EPA Compliance
Monday, January 26, 2004     9 a.m. to 9:50 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 03.08 Refrigerant Contaminant
APC Liaison: M. Ginger Scoggins, P.E., Engineered Designs, Inc. Raleigh, NC
Moderator: Julius Banks, Member, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C.
   Federal leak rate requirements apply to systems that contain 50 pounds or more of refrigerant. Manufacturers and
service personnel are required to meet these requirements. This forum reviews those regulations and educate users in
applying them.

MONDAY, 1/26                 10:15 A.M. TO 12:15 P.M.
Seminar 27 (continued)

Room: 210 A/B
TEGA Issues Update, HVAC Excellence in Federal Buildings
Monday, January 26, 2004 8 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. – 4 hour seminar
Sponsor: Technical, Energy and Government Activities Committee

Seminar 29

Room: 210 C/D
Achieving Design Quality: A Business and Management Program for Designers, Part 2
Monday, January 26, 2004       10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 01.07 Business, Management & General Legal Education
APC Liaison: James E. Wolf, American Standard Companies, Arlington, VA
Chair: Maralynne Flehner, Esq., Member, King of Prussia, PA
    This seminar in two parts addresses one of the most important issues faced by HVAC&R designers and their firms:
how to achieve design quality through each phase of the design and construction process. The program focuses on the
steps designers should take to reduce potential for error throughout the production process; conceptualizing a design;
system selection; checking assumptions, calculations and conformance to owners’ criteria and to applicable laws and
standards; reviewing design documents; responding to client demands for unreasonably quick feedback and/or cost
cutting measures that will negatively impact design or performance; load calculations; construction specifications; and
responding to requests for information.
1. The Final Design Phase
Michael R. Bilderbeck, P.E., Member, The Pickering Firm Inc., Memphis, TN
2. The Construction Phase
David S. Butler, P.E., Presidential Member, Fellow, Engineering Resource Group Inc., Jackson, MS
3. Minimizing Exposure to Risk through Good Documentation
Maralynne Flehner, Esq., Member, King of Prussia, PA

Seminar 30

Room: 212 A/B
Chiller System-Life Cycle Costing/ Procurement
Monday, January 26, 2004         10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 08.02 Centrifugal Machines
APC Liaison: Arthur P. Garbarino, Air Service Inc., West Palm Beach, FL
Chair: Vin P. Gupta, P.E., Member, P. Eng, 3M Co., St Paul, MN
    Life cycle costing is becoming a factor in selecting most equipment and systems for chilled water operation. Often, first
cost influences selection. It is important to first do an analysis that includes first cost and operating cost, including energy
and maintenance costs and other operating considerations, over the life of its operation before selecting. This seminar
highlights the life cycle cost methodology for designing, procuring and purchasing chilled water systems.
1. Life Cycle Costing and Procurement: Chilled Water System
Tom Hartman, P.E., Member, The Hartman Co., Georgetown,TX
2. Life Cycle Cost: Terms and Definitions-Users View
Earl M. Clark, P.E., Fellow, Dupont Engineering Technology, Houston, TX
3. Life Cycle Cost of Selecting a Chiller Equipment: Manufacturer’s View Point
Julian de Bullet, Member, McQuay International, Potomac Falls, VA
4. Life Cycle Costing: Case Study for an Arena, Owner’s perspective - What Was Promised vs. What We Got
John I. Vucci, Member, University of Maryland, Jessup, MD




Seminar 31

Room: 208 A
Fan System Assessment Tool and Qualified Specialist Training: Model for Increasing Industrial
Fan System Efficiency
Monday, January 26, 2004     10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 05.01 Fans; TC 05.09 Enclosed Vehicular Facilities
APC Liaison: Ronald L. Shelton, P.E., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN
Chair: Asesh Raychaudhuri, P.E., Member, CDM Inc, Cambridge, MA
  To help end users of industrial fan systems realize energy savings opportunities, DOE and AMCA are developing a fan
system assessment tool (FSAT) and qualified FSAT specialist training program. The basic features and functions of the
FSAT as well as the expected outcomes for the qualified FSAT specialist training are discussed.
1. FSAT Software and Training Program Overview and Development
Anthony Radspieler Jr., Member, Berkeley Lab, Washington D.C.
2. Fan Industry Perspec tive and Role in FSAT Software Development and Training
Joseph A. Brooks, P.E., Member, AMCA, Arlington Heights, IL
3. FSAT Software Demonstration of Functions and Capabilities
Daryl F. Cox, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Knoxville, TN

Seminar 32

Room: 213 D
Hydraulic Shock and Its Destructive Effect on Refrigeration Systems
Monday, January 26, 2004       10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 10.03 Refrigerant Piping
APC Liaison: Jeff J. Traylor, PWI Consulting Engineers, Durham, NC
Chair: George C. Briley, P.E., Fellow, Life, P. Eng, Technicold Services Inc, San Antonio, TX
    Hydraulic shock in refrigeration systems resembles water hammer in steam systems. Improper piping designs and
improper defrost systems piping and controls may initiate hydraulic shock. This seminar alerts engineers to hydraulic
shock causes and effects in both ammonia and R-22 systems.
1. What is Hydraulic Shock?
C. Samuel Martin, Ph.D., P.E., Member, South Dennis, MA
2. What Is a Liquid Overfeed System and How Was It Simulated in a Test Apparatus?
Rex Brown, P.E., Member, ALTA Refrigeration Inc, Peachtree, GA
3. Realworld Ammonia Incidents
L. Lane Loyko, P.E., Member, PLA Corp., Carmel, CA
4. Realworld CFC/HCFC Incidents
Ronald A. Cole, P.E., Fellow, R.A. Cole and Associates, Seattle, WA

Seminar 33

Room: 213 A
Modeling the Dispersion of Chemical or Biological Contaminants, Part 2
Monday, January 26, 2004       10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 04.10 Indoor Environmental Modeling
APC Liaison: Peter Simmonds, IBE Consulting Engineers, Van Nuys, CA
Chair: Duncan A. Phillips, Ph.D., P.E., Associate, Rowan Williams Davies & Irwin (RWDI) Inc., Guelph, ON, Canada
    Since the events of September 11th and the anthrax attacks that followed, the world has become more aware of the
threat that chemical and biological agents pose. Since then, there has been a greater emphasis on the modeling of
potential impacts of a release, accidental or otherwise, of chemical, biological or nuclear materials. The purpose of this
seminar is to present results from recent state of the art modeling techniques. The presenters will show how modeling
(CFD, multi-zone, zonal and lumped parameter) is assisting in the understanding of the level of impact, the design of
safety systems, threat assessments and mitigation procedures when these agents are released. This modeling is of both
indoor and outdoor environments with potential impact on occupied regions. This is Group 2 of 2 groups of presenters.
1. The Relationship Between Airtightness and the Effectiveness of Filtration for Building Protection
Andrew Persily, Ph.D., Member, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD
2. Applications of Wind Tunnel Modeling for Accidental or Intentional Toxic Gas Releases
Ronald L. Petersen, Ph.D., Member, Cermak Peterka Petersen Inc. (CPP), Fort Collins, CO
3. A Rapid Assessment of Whole Building Contaminant Dispersion under Realistic Partially Mixed Indoor Air Conditions
Jelena Srebric, Ph.D., Member, The Penn State University, University Park, PA
4. Comparison of Wind Tunnel and CFD Modeling Results for Prediction of Contaminant Penetration into Buildings
Duncan Phillips, Ph.D., P.E., Associate, Rowan Williams Davies & Irwin (RWDI) Inc., Guelph, ON, Canada




Seminar 34

Room: 303 C/D
Building Performance and Post Occupancy Evaluation: Experience in the UK and Opportunities
for ASHRAE
Monday, January 26, 2004      10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 07.06 Systems Energy Utilization
APC Liaison: Michael R. Brambley, Ph.D., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA

Chair: Adam Hinge, P.E., Member, Sustainable Energy Partnerships, Tarrytown, NY
    Over the past four decades, there have been worldwide efforts to measure the performance of buildings and the
satisfaction of building users. In the UK, CIBSE has actively led post occupancy review of buildings and their engineering,
attempting to demonstrate the value of effective and well-communicated results of post occupancy evaluation of recently
completed buildings to engineers and building owners and managers. This seminar reviews the experience in the UK and
discusses potential areas where ASHRAE could lead activities in North America.
1. History of the PROBE Project and Other UK POE Activities
William Bordass, Ph.D., William Bordass Associates, London, England
2. Case Study of a PROBE Building: The Barclaycard Headquarters Building
David Arnold, P.E., Member, Troup Bywaters & Anders, Reading, England
3. Evolution of POE and Building Performance Feedback in the UK
William Bordass, Ph.D., William Bordass Associates, London, England
4. What’s in It for ASHRAE, and Future Directions Related to Feedback and POE
Larry Spielvogel, P.E., Fellow, L.G. Spielvogel Inc., King of Prussia, PA

Seminar 35

Room: 208 B
Refrigeration Load Calculations
Monday, January 26, 2004       10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 10.08 Refrigeration Load Calculations
APC Liaison: Don C. Hardin, Enviromatic Systems, Ft. Worth, TX
Chair: Todd B. Jekel, Ph.D., P.E., Associate, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, and Robert S. Burdick, P.E.,
Member, BRET, Green Bay, WI
    Load calculations are important to proper design of refrigeration systems and successful maintenance of the required
space conditions. This seminar highlights load calculations considerations for unique or complicated refrigerated spaces.
Topics include refrigerated warehouse docks highlighting the determination of infiltration loads, processing areas requiring
ventilation and proper pressure relationships, and unique product requirements and their impact on refrigeration loads.
1. Load Calculation Considerations for Correct Parmesan Cheese Drying/Curing Rooms
Robert S. Burdick, P.E., Member, BRET, Green Bay, WI
2. Refrigeration Loads in Food Processing Areas
Bruce A. Paulson, Member, Evapco, Owatonna, MN
3. Cranberries, A Refrigeration Load that Keeps on Giving
John R. Hendrickson, Member, Gartner Refrigeration, Plymouth, MN
4. Load Calculations in Refrigerated Warehouse Docks
Ted Kohlenberger, Member, Kohlenberger KACE Energy, Fullerton, CA

Seminar 36

Room: 209 A
Using Air-to-Air Energy Recovery to Comply with 90.1 and Score with LEED
Monday, January 26, 2004        10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 05.05 Air-to-Air Energy Recovery
APC Liaison: M. Ginger Scoggins, P.E., Engineered Designs, Inc. Raleigh, NC
Chair: James L. Newman, Life, Thermal -Netics Inc., Berkley, MI
    Proper use of air-to-air energy recovery can contribute to both the energy efficiency and indoor air quality of a building.
This seminar introduces techniques to meet requirements of ASHRAE Standards 62 and 90.1, the International Energy
Conservation Code and the International Building Code while also gaining credits for LEED and Energy Star certification.
1. 90.1 and LEED Requirements Explained
Carol Marriott, Associate, McQuay Int., Staunton, VA
2. Advantages of Indirect Evaporative Cooling Used with Air-to-Air Energy Recovery
Klas C. Haglid, P.E., Member, Haglid Engineering & Associates Inc., Wyckoff, NJ
3. Using ARI-1060 Certified Performance to Specify Capacity and Efficiency for LEED Compliance
Douglas Steege, RenewAire, LLC, Madison, WI
4. LEED the Way Through Air-to-Air Energy Recovery: A Case Study Shows How
Leon E. Shapiro, J.D., Member, ADA Systems, Carol Stream, IL

Forum 15               10:15 a.m. to 11:05 a.m.

Room: 213 C
Fabric Ductwork: What Information Does an Engineer Need to Design a Fabric Air Distribution
Device Application?
Monday, January 26, 2004        10:15 a.m. to 11:05 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 05.02 Duct Design
APC Liaison: Spencer Morasch, Jersey Central Power & Light, Allenhurst, NJ
Moderator: Kevin J. Gebke, Member, DuctSox Corp., Dubuque, IA
   What is a fabric air dispersion device, you may ask? If you have not yet been exposed to this up-and-coming
ventilation system component, you will soon. Fabric ductwork is being used as a preferred alternative to grilles, registers
and diffusers mounted in exposed metal ductwork. This forum explores the needs of engineers to design a successful
application using fabric air distribution devices. Written comments before and after the forum are welcome. Comments
should be sent to moderator Kevin Gebke at KGebke@DuctSox.com.

Forum 16              10:15 a.m. to 11:05 a.m.

Room: 213 A/B
Is IAQ in Commercial Kitchens an Issue?
Monday, January 26, 2004        10:15 a.m. to 11:05 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 05.10 Kitchen Ventilation; TC 05.12 Ventilation Requirements and Infiltration
APC Liaison: Frank H. Schambach, Total Building Concepts, Metaire, LA
Moderator: Rick A. Bagwell, Associate, Halton Company, Scottsville, KY
    There has been little research done on IAQ in commercial kitchens. Integration of supply and exhaust systems are
critical to achieve capture and containment of cooking effluent, and to produce thermally comfortable environments where
productivity levels can be maintained at higher levels. It would be good to measure the interest levels from the industry
and give the TC an idea if this topic is viable for research.

Forum 17              10:15 a.m. to 11:05 a.m.

Room: 211 A/B
What Do Engineers and Contractors Want from Residential Load Calculations?
Monday, January 26, 2004     10:15 a.m. to 11:05 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 04.01 Load Calculation Data and Procedures
APC Liaison: John Nix, Florida Power and Light Utility Co., Miami, FL
Moderator: Charles Barnaby, Member, Wrightsoft, Lexington, MA
   ASHRAE Research Project 1199, Updating the ASHRAE/ACCA Residential Heating and Cooling Load Calculation
Procedures and Data, is working toward strengthening residential sizing methods. In Kansas City, a forum on this topic
was well attended and produced a lively discussion. This repeat forum seeks additional comment and ideas to help 1199-
RP meet the needs of the industry.

Forum 18              11:15 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.

Room: 211 A/B
Residential Filter Pressure Drop Issues
Monday, January 26, 2004      11:15 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 02.04 Particulate Air Contaminants and Particulate
APC Liaison: Spencer Morasch, Jersey Central Power & Light, Allenhurst, NJ
Moderator: Alan C. Veeck, Member, National Air Filtration Association, Virginia Beach, VA
    With the increased use of higher efficiency (MERV) air filters in residential and light commercial applications comes
increased problems with higher system pressure. Equipment malfunction and premature failure, increase energy
consumption and poor indoor air quality all caused by lower flow rates is discussed along with the potential need for an
ASHRAE standard or guideline.

Forum 19              11:15 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.

Room: 213 C
What’s Needed in the 2007 Applications Handbook Volume?
Monday, January 26, 2004       11:15 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.
Sponsor: Technical Activities Committee, Handbook Committee
APC Liaison: Frank H. Schambach, Total Building Concepts, Metaire, LA
Moderator: Brian C. Krafthefer, P.E., Member, Honeywell, International, Minneapolis, MN
Moderator: Brian Rock, Ph.D., P.E., Member, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
Moderator: Craig Wray, P.Eng., Member, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA
    The increase in technical information and analysis capability in the ASHRAE Handbook, HVAC Applications, and the
constraint of reduced design time requires rapid design and analysis capability in the Handbook. At issue are the types of
tools in the Handbook, using these tools in the two existing Handbook formats (paper and electronic) and performing
timely updates of these tools. This forum seeks input from users to determine what estimation tools can be incorporated,
how to insert these into chapters in a timely manner, and what format these tools should take to best assist users
Forum 20              11:15 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.

Room: 213 B
What Are Humidity Control Requirements for Cleanrooms?
Monday, January 26, 2004         11:15 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 08.07 Combustion Gas Turbine Inlet Air Cooling Systems
APC Liaison: John Nix, Florida Power and Light Utility Co., Miami, FL
Moderator: Larry J. Hughes, P.E., Member, Alpha Engineering Inc., Bear, DE
    Cleanrooms, whether for electronics, pharmaceutical, aerospace or medical devices, have special environmental
requirements. Often humidity control is given casual consideration or is overlooked entirely. What do the various
industries need for limits and tolerances? What drivers dictate the requirements? Humidity control is considered a
science, but too often it is practiced like an art. How should the Handbook treat this matter?

MONDAY, 1/26                   3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Public Session

Room: 303 C/D
Improving Residential HVAC Energy Efficiency
Monday, January 26, 2004        3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Sponsor: ASHRAE Program Committee and TC 09.05 Residential and Small Building Applications; TC 06.03 Central
Forced Air Heating and Cooling Systems
Chair: Charles Culp, Ph.D., P.E., Member, TX A&M University, College Station, TX
    Speakers will focus on the major areas of achieving energy efficiency in residential construction for both new and
existing housing. Nationwide, communities are adopting energy efficient codes. This session will provide balanced,
accurate, cost-effective energy efficiency opportunities. There will be 5 speakers covering 4 areas: Residential and Light
Commercial Tune-Ups, High Efficiency Air-Conditioners, Impact of House Envelope Changes, and Impact of Duct
Leakage.
1. Residential and Light Commercial Tune-Ups
John Proctor, P.E., Proctor Engineering Group, Ltd., San Rafael, CA
2. High Efficiency Air -Conditioners
Roy Crawford, Ph.D., P.E., Trane, Tyler, TX; Jim Mullen, Member, Lennox Industries, Carrollton, TX
3. Impact of House Envelope Changes
Glenn Hourahan, P.E., Member, Air Conditioning Contractor of America (ACCA), Arlington, VA
4. Impact of Duct Leakage
Mark Modera, Ph.D., P.E., Member, Carrier – Aeroseal, Piedmont, CA

TUESDAY, 1/27                 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.

Symposium AN-04-09

Room: 213 D
High Density Electronic Equipment Facility Cooling
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 09.09 Mission Critical Facilities, Technology Spaces and Electronic Equipment
APC Liaison: James K. Willson, P.E., Willson Performance Engineering LLC, Carmel, IN
Chair: Donald L. Beaty, P.E., Member, DLB Associates Consulting Engineers, Ocean, NJ
    This symposium introduces attendees to the thermal guidelines that have evolved from TC 9.9, Mission Critical
Facilities, Technology Spaces and Electronic Equipment. The committee’s work deals with the cooling of facilities
designed to house electronic equipment, such as data centers and telecommunications central offices. The power density
of equipment in these facilities continues to increase, often exceeding 100 watts per square foot of floor space.
1. Evolution of Data Center Environmental Guidelines
Roger R. Schmidt, Ph.D., Member, IBM Corp., Poughkeepsie, NY; Christian Belady, Associate Member, Hewlett Packard,
Richardson, TX; Alan Classen, IBM Corp, San Jose, CA.; Tom Davidson, Member, DLB Associates Ocean, NJ; Magnus
Herrlin, Member, ANCIS Professional Services, San Francisco, CA; Shiomo Novotny, Sun Microsystems, Burlington, MA;
Rebecca Perry, Sun Microsystems, San Diego, CA
2. The Thermal Bus System:
An Integrated Thermal Architecture for Thermal Management of High Power Electronics
Michael J. Wilson, Ph.D., Associate and Wattelet, Ph.D., Modine Manufacturing Co., Racine, WI; Kevin Wert, Ph.D.,
Thermacore International Inc., Lancaster, PA
3. Cooling of High Density Rooms:
Today and in the Future
Lennart Ståhl, Member, Liebert Corp., Richardson, TX
4. Efficient Thermal Management of Data Centers - Immediate and Long-Term Research Needs (HVAC&R Research
Journal April 2003)
Cullen E. Bash, Associate Member, Chandrakant D. Patel , Member, and Ratnesh K. Sharma, Hewlett-Packard
Laboratories, Palo Alto, CA

Seminar 37

Room: 212 A/B
A Taste of IIAR
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 10.01 Custom Engineered Refrigeration Systems
APC Liaison: James E. Wolf, American Standard Companies, Arlington, VA
Chair: Bruce L. Griffith, Associate, York Refrigeration - Frick, Waynesboro, PA
    This seminar focuses on recent technical papers presented at the annual International Institute of Ammonia
Refrigeration conference. Topics include low charge systems, thermosiphon system design, and safety relief valve
requirements for the industrial refrigeration industry. Authors discuss current technology, new developments and
applications within the industry today.
1. Low -Charge Ammonia Plants:
Recent Developments
Andy Pearson, Star Refrigeration Ltd., Glasgow, Scotland, UK
2. Comparing R-134a Chillers vs. Packaged Ammonia Chillers for Air-Conditioning
John Ansbro, York Refrigeration - Frick, Waynesboro, PA
3. Thermosiphon System Design
Jeff Welch, P.E., Associate, Freeze - Pro Inc., Orange Park, FL
4. What the Heck Do I Do with My Relief Valves?
Daniel R. Kuespert, Ph.D., Member, Snowy Owl LLC, Columbia, MD

Seminar 38

Room: 211 A/B
Atria Design Considerations for Tall Buildings
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 8 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 09.12 Tall Buildings; TC 05.06 Control of Fire and Smoke
APC Liaison: Peter Simmonds, IBE Consulting Engineers, Van Nuys, CA
Chair: William A. Webb, P.E., Fellow, Performance Technology Consulting, Ltd., Lake Bluff, IL
    Tall buildings, those greater than 300 feet, need special treatment for most building systems. Tall buildings containing
atria require even greater care in designing the systems. The presentations describe experiences in coping with the
special design challenges posed by tall buildings containing atria. It also explains how those challenges were met.
1. Controlling the Design of a 430 ft. Tall Atrium in a Modern Los Angeles Building
Peter Simmonds, Ph.D., P.E., Member, IBE Consulting Engineers, Van Nuys, CA
2. HVAC and Fire Engineering in a Tall Atrium Design in China
Benjamin Sun, P.E., Member, Flack + Kurtz Inc., San Francisco, CA; and Dean McGrail, WSP Fire, Hong Kong, China
3. Using CFD as a Basis for Smoke Control Calculations in Two High-Rise Buildings: Case Studies
James R. Quiter, P.E., Arup Fire, San Francisco, CA
4. Atria Smoke Control: Old and New Approaches
John F. Hennessy III, P.E., Member, Syska Hennessy Group, New York, NY

Seminar 39

Room: 213 B
Biodiesel and Other Liquid Biofuels: Green Fuels for the Environment
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 06.10 Fuels and Combustion
APC Liaison: John Nix, Florida Power and Light Utility Co., Miami, FL
Chair: Raymond Albrecht, P.E., Member, NYSERDA, Albany, NY
   Biodiesel is gaining market interest for use in residential and commercial heating equipment. In this session,
combustion studies and field demonstrations that have increased the awareness of the benefits of biodiesel are reviewed.
These benefits include reduced air pollutant emissions, reduced spill issues and economic development resulting from the
domestic production of a renewable energy source. This fuel is miscible with heating oil over a wide range and
commercial activities have included fuels ranging from 2 to 100 percent biofuel.
1. Liquid Renewable Fuels for Stationary Applications
Gerry Downing, Archer Daniels Midland Co., Decatur, IL
2. Biofuels in Space Heating
C.R. Krishna, Ph.D., Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY
3. Combustion Performance of B-20 in a Wide Range of Residential Heating Units
John Batey, P.E., Energy Research Center, Easton, CT
4. Combustion Trials of Soybean Methyl Ester Blends and Their PM2.5 Emission
S.Win Lee, Ph.D., Member, Canmet Energy Technology Center, Nepean, ON, Canada
5. Improving Oxidative Stability and Cold Flow Properties of Biodiesel
Robert O. Dunn, Ph.D., U.S. Department of Agriculture, Peoria, IL

Seminar 40

Room: 303 C/D
Improved Operations for California Buildings: Part 1
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 07.04 Building Operation Dynamics; TC 07.05 Smart Building Systems
APC Liaison: Don C. Hardin, Enviromatic Systems, Ft. Worth, TX
Chair: J. Carlos Haiad, P.E., Associate, Southern California Edison, Irwindale, CA
    There is a growing interest of automated fault detection, diagnostic and performance optimization methods for the
mechanical systems providing space conditioning in commercial buildings. In the first of this two-part seminar, authors
present recent research and design techniques funded by the California PIER buildings energy efficiency program
addressing automated fault detection and performance optimization methods for air handling systems. The second part
addresses automated fault detection and diagnostics at the whole building level.
1. PIER Buildings Energy Efficiency Program Overview
Chris Scruton, P.E., California Energy Commission, Sacramento, CA
2. VAV Systems: How They Fail and How to Design Them for Optimal Performance
Mark M. Hydeman, P.E., Member, Taylor Engineering, LLC, Alameda, CA
3. Tools for Fan System Diagnostics
Tom Webster, P.E., Member, University of California, Berkeley, CA
4. Air Handling Unit Fault Detection Tools
Jeffrey Schein, Associate, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD
5. A Software Toolbox for HVAC Fault Detection
Peng Xu, Ph.D., P.E., Member, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA

Seminar 41

Room: 213 A
Recent Developments in Household Refrigerators
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 8.9 Residential Refrigerators and Food Freezers
APC Liaison: Arthur P. Garbarino, Air Service Inc., West Palm Beach, FL
Chair: Paul V. Sikir, Member, BSME, Sub Zero Freezer Co., Madison, WI
    A focus on advances in refrigeration technology, including new refrigerants, refrigeration cycles and
compressor/component technologies.
1. Developments in Magnetic Refrigeration
Michael B. Pate, Ph.D., Associate, Iowa State University, Ames, IA
2. Nanofluids for Refrigeration Applications
Michael B. Pate, Ph.D., Associate, Iowa State University, Ames, IA
3. Energy Efficiency and Pulldown Improvements using Pulsed Flow Refrigerant Expansion
Kaveh Khalili, Associate, Rocky Research, Boulder City, NV
4. Application of a Variable Speed Compressor to a Residential No-Frost Freezer
John Dieckmann, Member, TIAX, Cambridge, MA

Seminar 42

Room: 213 C

Recent Trends in Correctional Facility Design
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 09.08 Large Building Air-Conditioning Applications
APC Liaison: Jeff J . Traylor, PWI Consulting Engineers, Durham, NC
Chair: E. Douglas Fitts, P.E., Member, St. Louis County Government, St. Louis, MO
    This seminar provides guidance to help HVAC design professionals stay current with the recent design trends for
correctional facilities as they change based on requirements of federal, state, and/or local agencies that operate and
maintain them in order to keep the residents and correctional staff safe and healthy.
1. Addressing Detention Cell Criteria in Building Renovations
John L. Harrod, P.E., Member, C.H. Guernsey & Company, Oklahoma City, OK
2. Design Considerations for Special Air Systems in Prisons
Jeff J. Traylor, Member, PWI Consulting Engineering, Durham, NC
3. Commissioning Correctional Facilities for Safety and Security
Carl N. Lawson, Member, PWI Consulting Engineers, Durham, NC




Seminar 43

Room: 210 A/B
Ventilation and Air Cleaning for Bars, Restaurants and Casinos
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 02.03 Gaseous Air Contaminants and Gas Contaminant
APC Liaison: Frederick W. Betz, P.E., A M Kinney, Cincinnati, OH
Chair: Paul R. Nelson, Ph.D., Member, R J Reynolds Tobacco Co., Winston-Salem, NC
Christopher O. Muller, Member, Purafil Inc., Doraville, GA
    The hospitality industry has unique ventilation requirements based on high occupant densities, the need to control
odors and the likely presence of secondhand tobacco smoke. Patron satisfaction is of paramount concern in these
industries. Ventilation and filtration strategies to address the special needs of bars, restaurants and casinos are described
and practical applications presented.
1. Ventilation Design for Bars and Restaurants: Smoker Accommodation
Paul R. Nelson, Ph.D., Member, R J Reynolds Tobacco Co., Winston-Salem, NC
2. ETS: Can Filtration Provide a Workable Solution?
W. Brad M. Stanley, Member, Purafil Inc., Doraville, GA
3. ETS Control / Filtration in Designated Smoking Areas
Brian Monk, P.E., Member, Circul -Aire Division of Dectron International, Montreal, QC, Canada
4. Application of Air Cleaning and Ventilation for a Bar and a Restaurant
Robert Hendry, Member, Georgia Tech Research Institute, Atlanta, GA
5. Successful Strategies Employed to Improve IAQ in Las Vegas Casinos
Donald G. Koch, P.E., Member, JBA Consulting Engineers, Las Vegas, NV

TUESDAY, 1/27
POSTER SESSION

Room: 210 C/D
APC Liaisons: Kirk T. Mescher, P.E., CM Engineering, Columbia, MO;
Spencer Morasch, Jersey Central Power & Light, Allenhurst, NJ;
and Frank H. Schambach, Total Building Concepts, Metaire, LA


A Comparative Study of Shell-Side Condensation on Integral-Fin Tubes With R-114 and R-236ea (4670)
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Wade Huebsch, Ph.D., West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV; Michael B. Pate, Ph.D., Member, Iowa State
University, Ames, IA
   A test facility was constructed to perform shell-side condensation testing and test results are presented for CFC-114
and HFC-236ea using a plain, 1024 fpm, and a 1575 fpm tube surface. Condensation coefficient data are presented for
both saturated and superheated refrigerant vapor on a single test-tube. Results show that the two refrigerants produced
similar performance characteristics in shell-side condensation on integral-fin tubes.

A Comparative Study of the Airside Performance of Winglet Vortex Generator and Wavy Fin-and-Tube Heat
Exchangers (4671)
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Chi-Chuan Wang, Ph.D., Energy and Resources Lab., Y.J. Chang and B.C. Yang, Energy & Resources Lab., ITRI,
Hsinchu, Taiwan
   This study presents airside performance of the deltar winglet vortex generator (VG) vs. wavy fin surface in both dry
and wet conditions. The fin pitch of the test samples are 1.7 mm and the number of tube row are 2 and 4, respectively.
For the airside performance tested in dry condition, the heat transfer coefficient for wavy fin surface is only 6 percent
higher than that of the winglet VG at N = 2, but the pressure drop is about 15 percent higher.

A Modified Model to Predict Air Infiltration into Refrigerated Facilities Through Doorways (4672)
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Donald J. Cleland, Ph.D., Member, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand; Ping Chen, Massey University,
Palmerston North, New Zealand; Simon J. Lovatt, Ph.D., AgResearch, Hamilton, New Zealand; Mark R. Bassett, Building
Research Association of New Zealand, Porirua, New Zealand
    This paper describes a modification to the model in the ASHRAE Handbook to predict the rate of air infiltration through
doors into refrigerated facilities. The model sums the contributions of air-tightness, air infiltration due to door openings and
the additional air exchange caused by forklift traffic through the doors. The modified model was developed based on
measured air infiltration rates through rapid-roll and sliding doors (with and without strip-curtain protection) into seven
refrigerated warehouses operating at a range of temperatures for a range of forklift movement rates.

A Switched Reluctance Motor in a Variable Speed Pumping Application (4673)
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Horacio Vasquez, Ph.D., University of TX - Pan America, Edinburg, TX; Joey K. Parker, Ph.D., and Timothy A. Haskew,
Ph.D., University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL
    A variable-speed pumping system based on a switched reluctance motor (SRM) and a centrifugal pump was
developed and intended to be used in heat pump or similar applications. A ground-source heat pump (GSHP) uses a
centrifugal pump to circulate water in an underground loop using water as a means to transfer heat from the ground to
room air inside a building. SRMs are used as alternative actuators because of simple construction, reliability, and low
manufacturing and maintenance costs. This project focused on application of a SRM to drive a centrifugal pump required
to operate efficiently at all speeds.

An Algorithm of Stereocsopic Particle Image Velocimetry for Full-Scale Room Airflow Studies (4674)
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Yigang Sun, Ph.D., University of Illinois, Urbana, IL; Yuanhui Zhang, Ph.D., P.E., Member, University of Illinois, Urbana,
IL; Lingying Zhao, Ph.D., Associate Member, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Xinlei Wang, Ph.D., Member,
University of Illinois, Urbana, IL
    One challenge in indoor air quality studies is the measurement of three-dimensional (3-D) air velocity profiles in an
airspace so that the nature of airflow can be better understood and appropriate ventilation systems can be designed.
There is much dispute over a variety of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models, primarily due to lack of credible data
to validate those models. This study aimed to develop a stereoscopic particle imaging velocimetry (SPIV) system suitable
for measurement of full-scale room 3-D airflow. The SPIV method is based on the principle of parallax to extract a third (z-
direction) velocity component using two cameras.

Average Modified Stanton Number for Evaluating of the Ice-Melting Characteristics of Ice Harvested from a
Thermal Storage Tank (4675)
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Akiyoshi Ohira, Ph.D.,and Michio Yanadori, Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., Tsuchiura,
Ibaraki, Japan; Yoshitaka Sakano, Hitachi Industries Co., Ltd., Tsuchiura, Ibaraki, Japan; Miyuki Miki, The Kansai Electric
Power Co. Inc., Amagasaki, Hyogo, Japan
    Before constructing ice-thermal-storage systems for air conditioning in buildings and works, the ice-melting
characteristics in the storage tank must be better understood. This study evaluated ice-melting characteristics of
harvested ice from an ice-thermal-storage system. That is, the effects of the inlet-water release position in the tanks, the
inlet-water spraying method, and the water-replacement time on the temperature of the outlet water from the system were
                                t
determined. It was found hat the average modified Stanton number can be used to evaluate the ice-melting
characteristics effectively in an actual-size tank.

Comparison of Diffusion Characteristics of Aerosol Particles in Different Ventilated Rooms by Numerical Method
(4676)
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Bin Zhao, Ph.D., Zhao Zhang, Xianting Li, Ph.D., Member and Dongtao Huang, Ph.D., Tsinghua University, Beijing, P.R.
China
    Particle diffusion with gravitational sedimentation in displacement and mixing ventilation rooms are investigated
numerically. The drift flux model, which considers the settling of particles under the effect of gravitational sedimentation, is
adopted to simulate particle diffusion, while the simplified model for solving the continuous fluid flow is combined. Since
the PM 2.5 and PM 10 particles are mostly concerned in indoor environment, passive contaminant and 2.5-20 micron
particles were investigated. Results show that in mixing ventilation room, the distribution of non-passive particles does not
differ much from that of passive contaminant when the particle diameter is less than 20 micron.

Consumptive Water Use for U.S. Power Production (4677)
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Paul A. Torcellini, Member, Nicholas L. Long, Associate Memb er and Ron Judkoff, National Renewable Energy
Laboratory, Golden, CO
    Evaporative cooling systems have been criticized for their water use and acclaimed for their low energy consumption,
especially when compared to typical cooling systems. In order to determine the overall effectiveness of cooling systems,
both water and energy need to be considered. However, data is needed to compare the amount of energy used at the site
to the amount of water used at the power plant. A study of power plants and their water consumption was completed to
effectively analyze evaporative cooling systems.

Convective Evaporation on Plan Tube and Low-fin Tube Banks Using R-123 and R-134a (4678)
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Lian-Han Chien, Ph.D., National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan; J.S. Wu, Chang-Gun University,
Taoyuan, Taiwan
   This experimental study investigates the convective evaporation heat transfer in a tube bundle. The data were
compared with correlations using superposition and asymptotic models. The superposition-type correlation provided better
prediction than the asymptotic model.

Dynamic Modeling and Control of Multi-Evaporator Air-Conditioning Systems (4679)
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Rajat Shah, Andrew G. Alleyne, Ph.D. and Clark W. Bullard, Ph.D., Fellow, University of Illinois - Urbana Champaign,
Urbana, IL
    This paper presents a new methodology for the dynamic modeling of multi-evaporator air-conditioning cycles. The
resulting model is suitable for designing advanced closed loop controllers for these systems. A generalized modeling
approach is developed, which is applicable to commercially available units with any number of evaporators. Model
validation against data from an experimental dual evaporator system for step inputs to compressor speed and expansion
valve opening is also presented and the results show good prediction accuracy. The open loop behavior observed in
these simulation studies clearly indicates the effect of cross-coupling between dynamic variables of different evaporators.


Energy Savings Potential of Energy Recovery Ventilation in an Animal Housing Facility (4680)
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Sebastian Freund, Student Member, Sanford A. Klein, Ph.D., Member, and Douglas T. Reindl , Ph.D., Member, University
of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
   Efforts to identify economically-viable strategies to reduce energy use while improving IAQ for a zoo housing primates
and large cats are summarized. Energy conservation strategies centered on use of air-to-air energy recovery devices.
Computer simulations were used to estimate energy savings for alternative energy conservation strategies. Some 80
percent of heating energy and 45% of cooling energy was saved by implementing air-to-air energy recovery equipment
coupled with alternative temperature control settings. Findings also suggest that up to 73 tons of CO2 emissions can be
saved annually by using equipment and operating strategies identified in this study.



Exhaust Contamination of Hidden vs. Visible Air Intakes (4681) (RP-1168)
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 05.12 Ventilation Requirements and Infiltration
 Ronald L. Petersen, Ph.D., Member, and John J. Carter, Member, Cermak Peterka Petersen Inc., Fort Collins, CO; John
W. LeCompte, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO
    A wind-tunnel dispersion modeling study was conducted to investigate exhaust contamination of hidden vs. visible air
intakes. The study shows that placing air intakes on building sidewalls is beneficial when stacks are on the roof.
Significant reductions occur when air intakes are placed below the building roof edge on the building sidewall. The farther
down the building sidewall the air intake is placed, the larger the reduction.

Heat Transfer Augmentation by Segmented Tape Inserts During Condensation of R-22 Inside a Horizontal Tube
(4682)
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Kailash Nath Agrawal, Ph.D. and Ravi Kumar, Ph.D., Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee, India; Sachida
Nand Lal, Ph.D., Bhagalpur Engineering College, Bhagalpur, India; Kari Krishna Varma, Ph.D., Ideal Institute of
Technology, Govindpuram, Ghaziabad, India
   The augmentation in heat transfer, by twisted tape inserts, was studied for the forced convection condensation of R-22
vapor inside a tube. The study found that all the twisted tape inserts are more effective at low refrigerant flow rates.
However, the full-length twisted tape insert remains effective even at the higher refrigerant flow rate as well.

Impact of Modeling Accuracy on Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Storage Inventory
(4683)
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Simeng Liu, University of Nebraska, Omaha, NE; Gregor P. Henze, Ph.D., P.E., Member, University of Nebraska, Omaha,
NE
   This paper evaluates the impact of modeling accuracy on the model-based closed-loop predictive optimal control of
both passive building thermal capacitance and active thermal energy storage systems to minimize utility cost.

(4684) Withdrawn

Overview of Literature on Diversity Factors and Schedules for Energy and Cooling Load Calculations (4685) (RP-
1093)
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 04.07 Energy Calculations
Bass Abushakra, Ph.D., Member, Milwaukee School of Engineering, Milwaukee, WI; Jeff Haberl, Ph.D., P.E. and David
Claridge, Ph.D., P.E., Member, TX A&M University, College Station, TX
   This paper provides an overview of reported methods used in generating typical load shapes required for the
simulation of energy use and peak cooling loads in commercial buildings. It also includes a survey of available databases
of monitored commercial end-use electricity data, and a review of classification schemes of the commercial building stock.
This study was conducted as part of ASHRAE 1093-RP whose objective was to identify and utilize the most appropriate
methods for developing diversity factors on relevant monitored sets of lighting and equipment data.

Sensitivity Study of Slab-on-Grade Transient Heat Transfer Model Parameters (4686)
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Brian A. Rock, Ph.D., P.E., Member, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
    Heat transfer between a building and its surrounding soil is complex. Due to the unknowns and long time scales
involved, predictions of the heat transfer rates via their ground-contact tend to be inaccurate. Experiments give insight into
long-term thermal characteristics, but due to variations in building operation and weather conditions long-term predictions
vary from the actual heat transfer rates. For buildings yet to be constructed, modeling of the ground-coupled heat transfer
can give reasonable time-averaged first-order predictions if the input data are sufficiently accurate. This paper presents
the results of a sensitivity study on some of these variables.

Tests of Stairwell Pressurization Systems for Smoke Control in a High-Rise Building (4687)
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Yanling Wang and Fusheng Gao, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang Provinc e, China
   Field tests of mechanical pressurization systems in stairwell and vestibule were conducted for a 32-story
comprehensive high-rise building. Pressure differences and average air velocity were tested under various conditions.
Tested results indicate that indirect pressurization through stairwell is feasible. Coactuated pressurization system and
smoke exhaust system in corridor is advantageous to prevent smoke moving to the escape routes. Tests demonstrate
that unsuitable pressurization systems in stairwell and vestibule of high-rise buildings far from ensuring people safely
escape, but probably cause serious security hidden trouble.

Thermal Mixing of Outdoor and Return Air Flows in Typical Air-Handling Units (4688) (RP-1045)
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 01.04 Control Theory and Application
Milind Mainkar, Fathi A. Finaish, Ph.D. and Hank Sauer, Ph.D., P.E., Fellow, Life Member, University of Missouri-Rolla,
Rolla, MO; Robert Van Becelaere, Member, Ruskin Dampers and Louvres, Kansas City, MT
    This paper examines thermal mixing of outdoor and return air streams in typical air-handling units equipped with
parallel blade dampers. The mixing of the two airstreams in rectangular and square mixing chambers is studied for eight
different dampers and blade orientations. Values of range mixing effectiveness increase significantly with increase in the
return air velocity. However, this conclusion is not applicable to configurations with minimum outside air in which cold
spots downstream in the mixing box can occur. Retesting of configurations producing the least stratification at 50 percent
total supply airflow show that thermal mixing is degraded.

Thermodynamic Modeling and Experimental Validation of Screw Liquid Chillers (4689)
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Tzong-Shing Lee, Ph.D., P.E., Member, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan
   This study presents an empirically based model, involving the first and the second laws of thermodynamics, and the
NTU-e method of heat exchanger, to predict the coefficient of performance (COP) of screw liquid chillers under various
operating conditions, especially for capacity control by return chilled water sensing. The results of this work should be
applied for the purposes of performance prediction, energy -efficiency improvements evaluation, fault detection and other
diagnoses of screw liquid chillers.



Uncertainty-Based Quantitative Model for Assessing Risks in Existing Buildings (4690)
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
T. Agami Reddy, Ph.D., P.E., Member, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA; Jason Fierko, Student Member, Ewing Cole
Cherry Brott, Philadelphia, PA
    Risk analysis involves three inter-related aspects - risk assessment, risk management or mitigation, and risk
communication to the general public and concerned agencies. This paper proposes a conceptual quantitative model for
risk assessment in existing buildings, which while being consistent with current financial practice, would allow
determination of expected annual monetary cost to recover from various risks. The methodology would provide guidance
on identifying the specific risks that need to be managed most critically. The proposed methodology allows for the
perceived importance with which different stakeholders view the interaction between vulnerable risk targets and building
elements that are affected by different hazard categories.

Analysis of the Impact of CO2-Based Demand Controlled Ventilation Strategies on Energy Consumption (4693)
Moncef Krarti, Ph.D., P.E., Member, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO
Mohsen Al -Alawi, Ph.D., University of Bahrain, Bahrain
   This paper presents an integrated IAQ/HVAC simulation environment that can model the impact of three contaminant-
based demand controlled ventilation (DCV) strategies on both indoor air quality and HVAC system energy use for multi-
zone buildings: one conventional control using fixed-position for outside air damper and two DCV strategies including
on/off control and proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control.




TUESDAY, 1/27 10:15 a.m. to 12:15 P.M.
Symposium AN-04-10

Room: 213 A
Renewable Energy Sources, Energy Efficiency and BPS for Sustainable Local and Regional
Development
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 06.07 Solar Energy Utilization; TC 02.08 Building Environmental Impacts and Sustainability
APC Liaison: John Nix, Florida Power and Light Utility Co., Miami, FL
Chair: Marija Todorovic, Ph.D., Member, M. D., University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia
    Symposia encompasses technical advances in sustainable building’s RES (renewable energy sources – solar PV and
thermal, wind, geothermal, biomass, solid wastes,…) integrated and distributed energy systems development. In addition
it discusses importance of BPS - Building Performance Simulation (particularly new generation of buildings simulations
tools focusing on: increased cost effectiveness and reliability of systems performance prediction) for wider solar and other
RES implementation in both urban and rural context, in commercial, residential and industrial buildings, leading to
sustainable local and regional development.
1. Local Energy Plans: A Way to Improve the Energy Balance and the Environmental Impact of the Cities - Case Study of
Barcelona
Aleksandar Ivancic, Ph.D., and Jose Lao, Barcelona Regional, S.A., Barcelona, Spain; Jaume Salom, Ph.D., and Jordi
Pascual, AIGUASOL Enginyeria, Barcelona, Spain
2. Decision Support Software for Sustainable Building Refurbishment
C. A. Balaras, Ph.D., Member, E. Dascalaki, Ph.D. and S. Kontoyiannidis, National Observatory of Athens, Athens,
Greece
3. Renewable Energy for Sustainable Buildings in New Jersey: Discussion of PV, Wind Power and Biogas and New
Jersey’s Programs
Nick Stecky, Member, First Energy Group, Denville, NJ

Seminar 44

Room: 213 D
Business, Technical and Legal Issues Relating to Commissioning
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 01.07 Business, Management & General Legal Education
APC Liaison: Joy Altwies, Farnsworth Group Inc., Madison, WI
Chair: Michael C. Connor, P.E., Member, P. Eng, Connor Engineering Solutions, Alpharetta, GA
    This seminar offers information about commissioning, including marketing, attracting clients, negotiating contracts,
meeting client expectations, and identifying common pitfalls and avoidance strategies. It focuses on what commissioning
authorities believe should be incorporated in design-intent documents and identifies common technical disagreements
between designers, contractors and commissioning authorities as well as suggestions to resolve them. It also addresses
the legal risks and liabilities of commissioning authorities and people who deal with them and offers tips on how parties
involved in the commissioning process can protect thems elves.
1. Business Issues Relating to the Commissioning Process
Carl N. Lawson, Member, PWI Consulting Engineers Inc., Durham, NC
2. Management Issues Relating to the Commissioning Process
Michael C. Connor, P.E., Member, Connor Engineering Solutions, Alpharetta, GA
3. Technical Issues Relating to Commissioning
W. David Bevirt, P.E., Fellow, National Environmental Balancing Bureau, Tuscon, AZ
4. Legal Issues Relating to Commissioning: Relationships, Risks and Potential Liabilities
William G. Frey, Wolf Block Schorr & Solis-Cohen, L.L.P., Philadelphia, PA

Seminar 45

Room: 303 C/D
Improved Operations for California Buildings, Part 2
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 07.05 Smart Building Systems; TC 07.04 Building Operation Dynamics
APC Liaison: Michael R. Brambley, Ph.D., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA
Chair: Martha Brook, P.E., Member, California Energy Commission, Sacramento, CA
    There is a growing interest of automated fault detection, diagnostic and performance optimization methods for the
mechanical systems providing space conditioning in commercial buildings. In the second of this two-part seminar, authors
present recent research and techniques addressing automated fault detection and performance optimization methods at
the whole building level.
1. Fault Detection at the Whole Building Level
Mingsheng Liu, Ph.D., P.E., Associate, University of Nebraska, Omaha, NE
2. Whole Building Diagnostician: Validation and Demonstration
Srinivas Katipamula, Ph.D., Member, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA
3. Use of Calibrated Simulation to Improve Building Operations
David E. Claridge, Ph.D., P.E., Member, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX
4. Automated Fault Detection and Diagnosis Applied to Rooftop Air Conditioners
James E. Braun, Ph.D., P.E., Member, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
5. Automated Diagnostics Based on Visual Pattern Recognition: Boilers, Chillers, Cooling Towers and Pumps
Michael R. Brambley, Ph.D., Member, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA

Seminar 46

Room: 212 A/B
Science Update and Vulnerability of HFCs
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 02.05 Global Climate Change
APC Liaison: Arthur P. Garbarino, Air Service Inc., West Palm Beach, FL
Chair: James M. Calm, P.E., Fellow, Engineering Consultant, Great Falls, VA
    This seminar provides an update on the transition to alternative refrigerants and the need for responsible use
measures. It outlines scientific advances to improve understanding of the underlying environmental concerns and
presents findings of atmospheric studies to gauge the build up of such new alternatives. Presenters summarize regulatory
actions to implement or exceed control measures of the Montreal and Kyoto Protocols; describe research and
development for automobile air conditioners to explore alternatives to R-134a; and describe modeling efforts to examine
and project emission levels from air-conditioning and refrigeration.
1. Science Update: Stratospheric Ozone Depletion and Global Warming
Mack McFarland, Ph.D., Member, DuPont Fluoroproducts, Wilmington, DE
2. Atmospheric Measurements of Emitted HFCs
Stephen A. Montzka, Ph.D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO
3. National Regulations of HFCs
Thomas E. Werkema, Member, ATOFINA Chemicals Inc., Philadelphia, PA
4. Enhancements with R-134a and a Perspective on Alternatives for MACs
Fred Sciance, General Motors Corp., Detroit, MI
5. Emissions by Application
Marian Martin Van Pelt, ICF Consulti ng, Washington, D.C.

Seminar 47

Room: 210 A/B
Standard 62’s Comfort-Only Approach to Smoking Spaces
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: SSPC 62.1; TC 05.12 Ventilation Requirements and Infiltration
APC Liaison: Don C. Hardin, Enviromatic Systems, Ft. Worth, TX
Chair: Lawrence J. Schoen, P.E., Member, Schoen Engineering Inc, Columbia, MD
    ASHRAE and ANSI recently approved addendum 62o to Standard 62, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality.
Addendum 62o contains an informative appendix that describes a method, the intention of which is to achieve comfort, but
not any health goals in smoking spaces. This seminar explores the limitations of the new method in reaching this comfort
goal and the remaining health risks that are expected when the addendum is used. ASHRAE’s response to the dilemma
posed by the unavoidable health risks vs. the desire to get good information out to the engineering community and public
is addressed.
1. Can a System with ETS Comply with Standard 62-2001?
Dennis A. Stanke, Member, Trane, La Crosse, WI
2. Comfort Ventilation For Secondhand Smoke: A Health Hazard
James L. Repace, Repace Associates Inc., Bowie, MD
3. Implications of ASHRAE’s Guidelines for Ventilation in Smoking Permitted Areas
Stanton A. Glantz, Ph.D., University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
4. ASHRAE Must Provide Guidance to the Design Community
William J. Coad, P.E., Presidential Member, Fellow, Coad Engineering Enterprises, St. Louis, MO

Seminar 48

Room: 211 A/B
State of the Art Issues for DDC Systems
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 01.04 Control Theory and Application; TC 07.05 Smart Building Systems
APC Liaison: Frederick W. Betz, P.E., A M Kinney, Cincinnati, OH
Chair: Gaylen V. Atkinson, Member, Atkinson Electronics, Inc, Salt Lake City, UT
   As direct digital control technology evolves forward many different issues surface. This seminar brings together
presenters of different “cutting” edge DDC technologies. With a DDC system in place, measurement and verification of
mechanical system performance can be compared instantaneously with system energy supplied by a utility. This
verification ability aids in commissioning the entire system as mechanical system components connected to the DDC
system can have performance evaluated in “real-time.” Techniques for controlling VAV box performance are constantly
being improved. RF and wireless control applications are bringing new issues to the surface. Thermal displacement
systems have unique control challenges.
1. Control Challenges with Thermal Displacement Ventilation Systems
William Turner, P.E., The H.L. Turner Group Inc., Harrison, ME
2. Using DDC Systems for Measurement and Verification
Larry J. Fisher, Member, ECT Building Services, Louisville, KY
3. Improving VAV Comfort and Efficiency: Cooling Effect VAV Control
Tom Hartman, P.E., Member, The Hartman Company, Georgetown, TX
4. Eliminating Wire from the Building Controls Network Equation
Robert Poor, Ph.D., P.E., Ember Corp., Boston, MA
5. Diagnostics for DDC Systems, Using the BAS System
Jay Santos, P.E., Member, Facility Dynamics, Columbia, MO
6. DDC Wireless Micro Sensors
Kris Pister, Dust Inc., Berkeley, CA




Forum 21               10:15 a.m. to 11:05 a.m.

Room 213 C
How Should 9/11 Change Smoke Control Design for Tall Buildings?
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 10:15 a.m. to 11:05 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 09.12 Tall Buildings; TC 05.06 Control of Fire and Smoke
APC Liaison: M. Ginger Scoggins, P.E., Engineered Designs, Inc. Raleigh, NC
Moderator: Harvey Brickman, P.E., Fellow, Tishman Construction, New York, NY
Moderator: William A. Webb, P.E., Fellow, Performance Technology Consulting, Ltd., Lake Bluff, IL
    The events of Sept. 11, 2001, placed tall building design under greater scrutiny. Much of the concern has focused on
structural, egress construction and bioterrorism considerations. Another significant feature of tall building safety is the
smoke control system. Little attention has been given to what, if any, changes in these systems are warranted. For
example, should naturally ventilated smokeproof towers be planned instead of pressurized stairs for new construction?
Should dedicated refuge floors be planned? Are dedicated firefighter elevators needed? The forum addresses these
issues.

Forum 22               10:15 a.m. to 11:05 a.m.

Room 213 B
Remediation of Hazardous Materials for Nuclear and Industrial Facilities
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 10:15 a.m. to 11:05 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 09.02 Industrial Air Conditioning
APC Liaison: James E. Wolf, American Standard Companies, Arlington, VA
Moderator: Ronald L. Davis, P.E., Member, American Electric Power, Gahanna, OH
   An accidental chemical or other hazardous material release in or adjacent to a nuclear or industrial facility is of major
concern to the safety of plant personnel and operations. The ventilation, filtration and contamination control systems for
decommissioning, refueling, and other planned but temporary applications are also of importance for plant safety. What
do you believe should be added to our ASHRAE Handbook, Applications, chapters on nuclear and industrial facilities to
assure the safety of people and system operations?

Forum 23              11:15 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.

Room 213 C
Mission Critical Data Center Design and Applications: What Are Today’s Real-World Problems
and How Do You Deal with Them?
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 11:15 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 09.09 Mission Critical Facilities, Technology Spaces and Electronic Equipment
APC Liaison: M. Ginger Scoggins, P.E., Engineered Designs, Inc. Raleigh, NC
Moderator: Donald L. Beaty, P.E., Member, DLB Associates Consulting Engineers, Ocean, NJ
   Power densities in facilities supporting technology equipment have been increasing and are often one to two orders of
magnitude above typical facility design loads. Equipment footprints are decreasing. Room cooling strategies of the past
are reaching their limits in cooling these environments. This forum allows building owners, end-users, engineers,
contractors and researchers to discuss the issues involved in data center design and provide direction to TC 9.9 for future
research and programs. Discussion items include raised vs. slab floors, high-density equipment cabinets, hot spots,
maintenance/service, temperature and humidity conditions, contamination, liquid cooling, and monitoring and controls.

Forum 24              11:15 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.

Room: 213 B
Testing and Balancing: Obtaining Quality in the Field
Tuesday, January 27, 2004 11:15 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 09.04 Applied Heat Pump/Heat Recovery System
APC Liaison: James E. Wolf, American Standard Companies, Arlington, VA
Moderator: Gerald J. Kettler, P.E., Member, AIR Engineering and Testing Inc., Dallas, TX
   One of the important products of test and balance is the documentation of quality test results. To be useful, these
results need to be accurate and truthful representations of actual field testing and balancing operations. Unfortunately
quality results are sometimes not obtained. This forum discusses the problem of TAB field operations and deficient report
quality and seeks methods to improve the quality performance for testing and balancing.

WEDNESDAY, 1/28                             8 a.m. to 10 a.m.

Seminar 49

Room: 212 A/B
A New Classroom Acoustics Standard... But What about Portable Classrooms?
Wednesday, January 28, 2004              8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 02.06 Sound and Vibration Control
APC Liaison: Jeff J. Traylor, PWI Consulting Engineers, Durham, NC
Chair: Lily M. Wang, Ph.D., Member, University of Nebraska - Lincoln, Omaha, NE
    This session discusses issues concerning the acoustics of portable classrooms. A classroom acoustics standard,
ANSI S12.60-2002, recently was approved but there is concern about applying it to portable classrooms, which are
growing in number across the United States. Speakers review the standard, typical HVAC equipment in portable
classrooms, acoustic measurement procedures and case studies.
1. Can Portable Classrooms Meet ANSI S12.60-2002 Acoustical Requirements?
David Lubman, David Lubman & Associates, Westminster, CA; and Louis C. Sutherland, Consultant, Rancho Palas, CA
2. Acoustic Measurements and HVAC/IEQ Implications from the California Portable Classrooms Study
Thomas J. Phillips and Peggy L. Jenkins, California Air Resources Board, Sacramento, CA
3. Portable Classroom Acoustics: Review of Industry Sound Power Standards for Commonly Used Classroom HVAC
Systems
Patrick C. Marks, P.E., Member, Intertek, Cortland, NY
4. The Noise of Wallbangers in Portable Classrooms
Mark Schaffer, P.E., Member, Schaffer Acoustics Inc., Pacific Palisades, CA
5. Practical Study of the Cost of Implementing ANSI S12.60 in Portable Classrooms
Daren Jorgensen, Associate, JE Compliance Services Inc., Rancho Cucamonga, CA

Seminar 50

Room: 213 D
Advances in “Cool” Roofing
Wednesday, January 28, 2004               8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 04.04 Building Materials and Building Envelope Performance
APC Liaison: Don C. Hardin, Enviromatic Systems, Ft. Worth, TX
Chair: Andre O. Desjarlais, Member, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN
    “Cool” or highly reflective roofing has changed the way roofing systems are manufactured and marketed in North
America. Concerns about energy efficiency, peak energy demand, urban heat islands and air quality have the industry
rethinking the need for light colored or highly reflective roofing surfaces. This seminar describes how color impacts roof
performance, reviews new pigment technologies, describes products and tools that are available to estimate energy
efficiency, and looks at proposed code impacts.
1. How Color Pigments Can Save Energy
Kenneth T. Loye, Ferro Performance Pigments, Cleveland, OH
2. Advances in Infrared Blocking Pigment Technologies
Jeffrey D. Nixon, The Shepherd Color Co., Cincinnati, OH
3. Simplified Tools to Estimate Energy Savings of Roofing Systems
Andre O. Desjarlais, Member, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN
4. Energy Efficiency, Durability, and Sustainability of Metal Roofs
Scott Kriner, Metal Construction Association, Macungie, PA
5. Implications of California’s New Energy Code on the Use of Cool Roofing
Peter Turnbull, Member, Pacific Gas and Electric, San Francisco, CA

Seminar 51

Room: 213 A
Atrium Smoke Management Case Studies
Wednesday, January 28, 2004              8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 05.06 Control of Fire and Smoke; TC 05.09 Enclosed Vehicular Facilities
APC Liaison: Spencer Morasch, Jersey Central Power & Light, Allenhurst, NJ
Chair: Ray Sinclair, Ph.D., Member, RWDI, Guelph, ON, Canada
    The design of smoke management systems for large spaces like building atria requires integration of architectural,
mechanical and fire protection features that must meet needs of owner and authority-having-jurisdiction. This seminar
includes presentations that highlight the issues and concerns by various parties and illustrate lessons learned with real
world case studies.
1. Some Issues Concerning the CFD Simulation of Natural Ventilation of Smoke from Atria
David Banks, Ph.D., P.Eng., CPP Wind Engineering Consultants, Fort Collins, CO
2. Combination of Active and Passive Systems and Atrium Smoke Control Design
Dan Gemeny, P.E., Rolf Jensen & Associates Inc., Brea, CA
3. Performance-Based Smoke Control Design for Small Atria
Flora Chen, Member, Rolf Jensen & Associates Inc., Brea, CA
4. Mechanical Smoke Control Systems: An Architect’s Perspective
Gary Dempster, Altoon & Porter Architects, Los Angeles, CA
5. Mechanical Smoke Control Systems:
A Fire Official’s Perspective
Jeff Lutz, Anaheim Fire Department, Anaheim, CA
Seminar 52

Room: 210 A/B
Basics of Load Calculations
Wednesday, January 28, 2004             8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 04.01 Load Calculation Data and Procedures
APC Liaison: Kirk T. Mescher, P.E., CM Engineering, Columbia, MO
Chair: Glenn Friedman, P.E., Member, Taylor Engineering, Alameda, CA
    This seminar addresses fundamentals of current load calculation technology starting with the latest residential
procedural developments; covers the commercial heat balance and radiant time series methods; and discusses load
calculation procedures sensitivities.
1. Preview of the Updated ASHRAE/ACCA Residential Load Calculation Procedure
Charles Barnaby, Member, Wrightsoft, Lexington, MA
2. Radiant Time Series Case Study
Steven Bruning, P.E., Fellow, Newcomb & Boyd, Atlanta, GA
3. Heat Balance
Curt Pedersen, Ph.D., Fellow, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL
4. Load Calculation Sensitivity
Doug Hittle, Ph.D., Fellow, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO

Seminar 53

Room: 208 B
Experiences and Lessons Learned from Recent Radiant Cooling Projects
Wednesday, January 28, 2004              8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 06.05 Radiant Space Heating and Cooling; TC 6.04 In Space Convection Heating
APC Liaison: Peter Simmonds, IBE Consulting Engineers, Van Nuys, CA
Chair: Michael O’Rourke, P.E., Member, Mestek, Westfield, MA
    While gaining in popularity in European markets, radiant cooling combined with convective systems have had limited
application in the United States. This program features recent U.S. applications of the technology from the standpoint of
designers and installers.
1. Experiences with Condensation Control in a Building with Operable Sashes
Stanley Mumma, Ph.D., P.E., Fellow, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
2. Applied Radiant Cooling
Peter Simmonds, Ph.D., Member, IBE Consulting Engineers, Van Nuys, CA
3. Radiant Technology in the Built Environment
Sean Timmons, P.E., Timmons Design Engineers and Peter Alspach, ARUP, San Francisco, CA

Seminar 54

Room: 211 A/B
Experiences in Commissioning Thermal Energy Storage Systems
Wednesday, January 28, 2004                8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 06.09 Thermal Storage
APC Liaison: M. Ginger Scoggins, P.E., Engineered Designs, Inc. Raleigh, NC
Chair: Charles S. Hanskat, P.E., Member, D/N Thermal Energy Systems, El Cajon, CA
    Thermal energy storage (TES) systems provide significant cost savings and operational flexibility in cooling systems in
today’s evolving energy marketplace. However, successful implementation of a TES system requires proper design,
quality installation and thorough commissioning. This session provides real-world examples of the benefits of
commissioning in bringing TES installations into service with optimum performance. Systems include ice storage systems
and naturally-stratified chilled water storage systems.
1. Commissioning a New TES Tank for the Dallas-Fort Worth Airport
Glin W. Jay, Sebesta Blomberg & Bourassa Inc., Irving, TX
2. Commissioning Chilled Water TES Systems
Lucas B. Hyman, P.E., Member, Goss Engineering Inc., Corona, CA
3. What Happens When You Don’t Properly Commission Your TES System
Charles E. Dorgan, Ph.D., P.E., Fellow, Life Member, Farnsworth Group, Madison, WI
4. Commissioning TES for Large University Installation
Alan J. Wilson, P.E., Member, Bechard Long & Associates Inc., San Diego, CA

Seminar 55

Room: 303 C/D
Pressure Diagnostics in Commercial Buildings, Hospitals and Laboratories
Wednesday, January 28, 2004               8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 01.02 Instruments and Measurement; TC 07.07 Testing and Balancing
APC Liaison: Arthur P. Garbarino, Air Service Inc., West Palm Beach, FL
Chair: Frank Spevak, Associate, The Energy Conservatory, Minneapolis, MN
    When a commercial building is balanced, it usually means that the ventilation system of supply and exhaust has been
balanced. In today’s buildings, the internal dynamics of pressure differences between various rooms and floors has
become more important. This seminar discusses how pressure balancing is performed in commercial buildings, hospitals
and laboratories. It also explores how leakage of the room or building envelope affects proper pressure balancing.
1. Pressure Diagnostics in Commercial Buildings
James Cummings, Member, Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL
2. Pressure Diagnostics in Hospitals
Andrew Streiffel, Member, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
3. Pressure Diagnostics in Laboratories
Thomas Smith, Member, Exposure Control Technologies, Cary, NC
4. Leakage Locations and Concerns
Gaylon Richardson, Fellow, Engineered Air Balance, Houston, TX

Seminar 56

Room: 209A
Sustainable Design for All: The Tools on Your Desktop
Wednesday, January 28, 2004                 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Sponsor: TC 01.05 Computer Applications; TC 02.08 Building Environmental Impacts and Sustainability
APC Liaison: Joy Altwies, Farnsworth Group Inc., Madison, WI
Chair: Tim Dwyer, Member, Eur Ing, CEng, London South Bank University, London, UK
     Sustainable design is increasingly promoted as the way for forward thinking designers. However, there is uncertainty
among real world practicing designers as to how they can develop appropriately “sustainable” buildings. This seminar
illustrates the use of readily available tools to evaluate “building sustainability.” It aims to show that “sustainable design” is
not something that “someone else does” and that the tools are readily available for all.
1. Desktop Tools for Sustainable Design
Krishnan Gowri, Ph.D., Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA
2. Sustainable Design on My Laptop
Frank Mills, Member, Environmental Design Consultants Ltd, Leyland, Lancashire, UK
3. The Role of Feasibility Assessment Tools in Sustainable Design
Carpenter Stephen, Enermodal Engineering Limited, Kichener, ON, Canada
4. Sharing Your Experiences
on Building Design and Performance:
A Web-Based Tool
Paul Torcellini, Ph.D., Member, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO

WEDNESDAY, 1/2810:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Symposium AN-04-11

Room: 213 A
Fire and Smoke Control Practice and Researc h: IBC and NFPA
Wednesday, January 28, 2004 10:15 a.m - 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 05.06 Control of Fire and Smoke; TC 05.09 Enclosed Vehicular Facilities
APC Liaison: John Nix, Florida Power and Light Utility Co., Miami, FL
Chair: Roger Lichtenwald, Member, Air Balance Inc., Holland, OH
    Papers in this symposium summarize smoke control provisions of Section 909 of the 2000 International Building Code;
examine a study of the consequences of improperly propped open stairwell doors on tenability conditions in buildings;
describe the smoke control aspects of naturally ventilated high-rise office buildings in a moderate climate; and discusses
the ASHRAE and the National Research Council Canada research that evaluates the effect of fires involving
communication cables installed in air-handling plenums.
1. Tenability and Open Doors in Pressurized Stairwells (RP-1203)
John H. Klote, P.E., Fellow, Fire & Smoke Consulting, Leesburg, VA
2. Smoke Control and the International Building Code
John H. Klote, P.E., Fellow, Fire and Smoke Consulting, Leesburg, VA; Douglas H. Evans, P.E., Clark County Building
Department, Las Vegas, NV
3. Smoke Control and High Rise Office Buildings with Operable Windows
Jeffrey A. Maddox, Rolf Jensen & Associates, Walnut Creek, CA
4. Full Scale Fire Tests for Cables in Plenums (RP-1108)
Gary D. Lougheed, Ph.D., Member, Cam McCartney, and Malgosia Kanabus -Kaminska, Ph.D., National Research
Council, Ottawa, ON, Canada
Seminar 57

Room: 209 A
A Practical Approach to Achieving Water Conservation
Wednesday, January 28, 2004 10:15 a.m - 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 03.06 Water Treatment
APC Liaison: M. Ginger Scoggins, P.E., Engineered Designs, Inc. Raleigh, NC
Chair: Andrew J. Cooper, Ph.D., Member, Ondeo Nalco Company, Naperville, IL
    Water conservation is an essential goal for cooling water systems. Sound water use practices help reduce
environmental impact, by limiting water withdrawals and by decreasing wastewater discharges. Using less water can also
enable flexibility during times of water shortage. This seminar presents practical approaches to water conservation for
cooling systems, including information on water source quality, treatment program optimization and the impact of
treatment programs on discharge.
1. Dealing with Water Sources of Various Qualities
Kerry Zimmerman, Member, Ecolab, Warrington, PA
2. Strategies for Water Treatment Optimization
Howard J. Benisvy, Member, Ondeo Nalco Co., Naperville, IL
3. Discharge Restrictions and Environmental Impact from Water Treatment Optimization
Mark Hodgson, Member, Clayton Group Services, Edison, NJ

Seminar 58

Room: 212 A/B
Automated Commissioning Tools
Wednesday, January 28, 2004         10:15 a.m - 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 07.05 Smart Building Systems; TC 07.03 Operations and Maintenance Management
APC Liaison: Michael R. Brambley, Ph.D., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA
Chair: Maria Corsi, Associate Member, Iowa Energy Center, Ankeny, IA
    Building commissioning is a labor intensive and costly process that requires specialized expertise. Tools that automate
parts of the commissioning process, such as verification of design, functional testing of HVAC systems, data analysis and
reporting, have the potential to reduce initial commissioning costs and ensure persistence of proper operation throughout
the life of the building. This seminar describes international efforts to develop and implement automated commissioning
tools. Tools that use the energy management and control system to assist in commissioning HVAC systems are described
and examples of their application in real buildings are presented.
1. Commissioning HVAC Systems for Improved Energy Performance: An International Research and Development
Project
Hossein Vaezi Nejad, Ph.D., Centre Scientifique et Technique du Bâtiment, Marne la Vallée, France
2. Using the Building Control System in Commissioning: Needs and Examples from Japan
Harunori Yoshida, Ph.D., Member, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
3. Commissioning Constant Volume Air Handling Units using Automated Tools
Natascha S. Cas tro, Member, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD
4. EMCS Assisted Commissioning Tool for Variable Air Volume Systems
Daniel Choinière, P.E., Associate, Natural Resources Canada, Varennes, QC, Canada

Seminar 59

Room: 303 C/D
Building Envelope Moisture Intrusion Issues and Corrective Actions
Wednesday, January 28,          10:15 a.m - 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 04.04 Building Materials and Building Envelope Performance
APC Liaison: Joy Altwies, Farnsworth Group Inc., Madison, WI
Chair: David L. Roodvoets, Member, DLR Consultants, Westerville, OH
    Moisture intrusion through the building envelope has become a significant issue due to concerns with buildings
developing mold and rot. This seminar explores basic and applied science of preventing and correcting moisture intrusion
into buildings. Issues addressed are moisture through walls windows and other areas of the envelope. Case studies and
basic science are presented.
1. Window Flashing
Theresa A. Weston, Ph.D., Member, Dupont, Richmond, VA
2. Rainwater Management
Joseph A. Lstiburek, Ph.D., Member, Building Science Inc., Westford, CN
3. Selecting Weather Barriers
Garth D. Hall, Member, Raths, Raths & Johnson Inc, Willowbrook, IL
4. Building Moisture Issues
William C. Brown, P.Eng. Member, Morrison Hershfield Ltd, Ottawa, ON, Canada
5. Building Moisture Intrusion Problems: Their Consequences and Corrective Actions
Mikael H. Salonvaara, Member, Vtt Building Technology Building Physics, Vtt, Finland
6.Moisture Behavior of Exposed Stucco Walls
Hartwig Kunzel, Ph.D., Member, Fraunhofer Institut Bauphysik, Holzkirchen, Germany




Seminar 60

Room: 208 B
Emerging Web Applications for HVAC and Energy Industries
Wednesday, January 28, 2004                10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 01.05 Computer Applications
APC Liaison: James E. Wolf, American Standard Companies, Arlington, VA
Chair: Robert J. Hitchcock, Ph.D., Member, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Washington, D.C.
    A major transformation is taking place in the manner in which software tools are developed and deployed to end-users.
This transformation is a migration from desktop tools that are installed and run on each end-user’s computer, to Web-
based tools that can run on any computer connected to the Internet and can be accessed by any other connected
computer using a Web browser. This seminar presents several Web-based applications developed for the HVAC and
energy industries, including systems for downloading engineering data from equipment manufacturers and accessing real-
time facility information for remote monitoring and control.
1. Downloading Engineering Content from Component Manufacturers
Paul McRoberts, Autodesk, Inc., Waltham, MA
2. Developing a Web-Based Facilities Information System
Mark Levi, Associate, U.S. General Services Administration, San Francisco, CA
3. Web-Based Energy Information and Control Systems for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response
Mary Ann Piette, Member, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA
4. Away From Your Desk? Emerging Web Tools to Help You Manage Your Buildings From Anywhere
Nancy L. Stein, Siemens Building Technologies, Buffalo Grove, IL

Seminar 61

Room: 210 A/B
Next Generation Packaged CHP Systems
Wednesday, January 28, 2004               10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 01.10 Cogeneration System
APC Liaison: Ronald L. Shelton, P.E., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN
Chair: Ronald Fiskum, Member, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C.
    Cooling, heating and power (CHP) systems are recognized in the federal energy plan as an important element in a
portfolio of solutions required for economic and environmental prosperity in the future. One essential technological hurdle
that must be overcome is the complexity and cost of system integration. Several system integrators have developed
engineered, packaged and/or modular solutions to applying CHP systems. This seminar presents the development and
application of four “next generation” CHP systems.
1. Packaged Integration of a 70 kW Microturbine with an Air-Cooled Single-Effect Absorption Chiller
James Watts, Member, Ingersoll-Rand, Portsmouth, NH
2. Applying an 80 kW Microturbine
and Single-Effect Absorption Chiller
to a Supermarket for Electric Demand Reduction and Liquid Refrigerant
Sub-Cooling
Richard Sweetser, Member, EXERGY Partners Corp., Herndon, VA
3. Development of Modular Microturbine/Exhaust-Gas Fired Double-Effect Absorption Chiller CHP System
Tim Wagner, Ph.D., Member, United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT
4. Cogeneration and Absorption Cooling in an Anaheim Amusement Park
Wayne Dobberpuhl, P.E., Ernst and Young, Phoenix, AZ

Seminar 62

Room: 211 A/B
System Performance of Variable-Speed Fans, Pumps
and Compressors
Wednesday, January 28, 2004          10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 08.11 Unitary and Room Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps
APC Liaison: Frank H. Schambach, Total Building Concepts, Metaire, LA
Chair: Thomas F. Lowery, Member, Rockwell Automation, Mayfield Heights, OH
                                                                                                          f
    This seminar investigates the effects of applying variable speed drive technology to several types o applications.
Comparisons are drawn between traditional methods of control and the addition of a variable speed drive. The seminar
explores both residential and commercial/institutional applications of compressors and the impact on residential air flow
modulation. Since there are differences in monitoring and metering power consumption when using these devices, this
seminar addresses a specific application of variable speed drive technology on centrifugal and screw compressors.
1. Variable Capacity Systems with Standard AC Single Phase Compressors
Andrea Bianchi, MagneTek, Bracciolini, Italy
2. Residential Airflow Modulation Methods and Performance Comparison
Robert Helt, Member, The Trane Co, Tyler, TX
3. A New Compressor Design with Wide Range Inverter Operated Capacity Controls
Wolfgang Sandkotter, Bitzer Kuhlmaschinenbau, Sindelfingen, Germany
4. Metering Differences on Chillers with Starters and Variable Speed Drives
Timothy P. Murphy, Rockwell Automation, Mayfield Heights, OH

Seminar 63

Room: 213 D
UV Light Efficacy on Biological Particles: Does It Work?
Wednesday, January 28, 2004                10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Sponsor: TC 02.04 Particulate Air Contaminants and Particulate Contaminant Removal Equipment
APC Liaison: James K. Willson, P.E., Willson Performance Engineering LLC, Carmel, IN
Chair: Karin K. Foarde, Member, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC
    Ultraviolet light at the germicidal wavelength of 254 nm is known to be effective against some microorganisms. How
effective and against what organisms differ based on the lamps, configuration, environmental conditions and organisms
susceptibility. This seminar addresses specific HVAC applications of UVC.
1. Using UV light to Kill Microbial Aerosols in Ducts: Physical Design Factors
Douglas W. VanOsdell, Ph.D., Member, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC
2. Experimental Measurement of Bioaerosol Inactivation by In-Duct UVC Lamps
Karin Foarde, Member, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC
3. HVAC, IAQ, and UVC Source Control
Robert Sc heir, Ph.D., Steril-Aire, Cerritos, CA
4. UVGI in HVAC Systems -Mathematical Modeling Provides Practical Engineering Based Solutions to Applying the
Science
David Witham, UVDI, Valencia, CA
5. Disinfection of Aircraft Cabin Air Using UV Lamps
Stephen F. Yates, Ph.D., Brian C. Krafthefer, Member, and F. Stephen Lupton, Ph.D., Honeywell International, Des
Plaines, IL

								
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