Mao Zedong and the People's Republic of China

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					By 1911, the Chinese emperor
had lost his political power.
By 1911, China had become
a republic.
Tired of foreign domination,
ineffective emperors, and the
poverty of the peasants, the
Chinese rebelled.
Led by Sun Yixian (Dr. Sun Yat-sen),
Chinese nationalists tried to create
a republican government.
Believing in “The Three Principles
of the People”, Dr. Sun Yixian
advocated nationalism, democracy,
and socialism.
When Dr. Sun
Yixian died in
1925, Chiang
Kai-shek
became the
next leader of
the KMT or
Nationalist
Party.
Unlike Dr. Sun Yixian, Chiang
Kai-shek purged communists
from the Nationalist party.
The Chinese Communists were
forced to retreat on a march
known as The Long March.
Many communists died on
The Long March.
But with the Japanese invasion
of China, the Nationalists and
Communists stopped fighting.
Japanese soldiers committed
terrible atrocities in China and
the Chinese
were united in
their struggle
to oust the
imperialists.
But after the defeat of Japan at
the end of the Second World War,
the Chinese civil war resumed.
The Communists gained the
respect and support of the
peasants.
With the support
of the peasants
and the
corruption of
nationalist
leaders, the
Communists
achieved victory
In 1949.
As leader of the Chinese
Communist Party, Mao Zedong
became the first dictator of
Communist China.
Mao quickly set about to destroy
the old ways. He abolished
private property and nationalized
state industries.
Like Stalin, Mao sought to
quickly industrialize China.
His “Great Leap Forward” (1958-
1959) tried to greatly increase
factory production. However, it
failed to achieve its goals.
Famine occurred as agriculture
was collectivized.
As the years passed, Mao was
worried that the revolutionary
values were not being fully
embraced.
To revive revolutionary ideals,
Mao implemented the Great
Proletarian Cultural Revolution.
Red Guards or students devoted
to Mao violently removed the
“Four Olds”: old ideas, old
culture, old habits, and old
customs.
The Red Guards violently
punished counterrevolutionaries
or people opposed to the
revolution.
Red Guards memorized the
Little Red Book or a collection
of the sayings of Chairman Mao.
By 1976, Mao had died but
China was forever changed.

				
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posted:8/8/2012
language:English
pages:25