CG2010 STECH MSC IT and MSC ITIE by 91K4n7

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									   Course Guide 2010/11




MSc Information Technology
MSc Information Technology
    (Data Engineering)




            1
COURSE GUIDE

Section 1: Course Specific Information

About this guide                                             1
Welcome                                                      2
About Your Course                                            3
Course Structure                                             4
PG Academic Regulations                                      6
Module Descriptions                                          7
Course Management                                           15
Staff Involved with the Course                              16
Timetable                                                   17
Employability & Your Personal Development Portfolio (PDP)   19
Career Opportunities and Future Study                       20
Academic Regulations                                        20

Section 2: School Specific Information

School Charter for Students                                 22
Where to get help with your course                          24
Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL)                       26
Learning, Teaching & Assessment                             27
Further Information                                         33




                                          2
                       Section 1: Course Specific Information
About this guide

This Course Guide will help you plan your MSc Information Technology and Information
Technology (Data Engineering) course. It tells you which modules you must study and pass, and
lists the optional ones which contribute to your award. The Guide also offers you brief descriptions
of each module, including general information about assessment tasks, and an overview of how
the Course can be used for future career choices.

You should read this Course Guide in conjunction with the University’s Principles and Regulations.
Together these documents should provide you with all the basic information that we think you will
need for your period of study with the University of Wolverhampton.

You are encouraged to read this Guide through now. It will be a considerable advantage to you to
be familiar from the outset with the various aspects of your studies that are described. It may be
that the relevance of some of the sections will not be immediately obvious. Keep it somewhere
accessible, so that you can refer to it as needed. The answers to many of the questions that you
will want to ask are contained in it.

Obviously even in a document like this we have not covered every query and problem that you
might have about the course. If you find that there is something you need to know, please do not
hesitate to approach the MSc Course Leader or Student Support Officer. You can also consult the
University’s Student Support and Guidance Services as appropriate. We are pleased to hear your
views and welcome suggestions for ways of improving the operation of the Course.

                                             Simon Rose
        Student Support Officer              MI127, MI Building, City Campus South,
                                             01902 518532
        Please enter the contact details
        for your Personal Tutor for your
        future reference:

        Your local Academic School           MI55 Building City Campus South,
        Office is:                           01902 321402


        Your Student Office is:               MI024, MI Building City Campus South


Please note that in order to develop and improve the Course, it may be necessary on occasions to
amend or revise the details given in this Course Guide.




                                                3
Welcome

On behalf of the Course Management Team I should like to extend to you a very warm welcome
and we would like to take this opportunity to wish you every success in your studies at the
University of Wolverhampton, and trust that your time at the University of Wolverhampton will
prove to be enjoyable, stimulating and rewarding.

MSc Information Technology and Information Technology (Data Engineering) are run by the
School of Technology (STech) formally the School of Computing and Information Technology
(SCIT) which has itself established an excellent reputation for the quality of its courses, for an
innovative approach to teaching and learning, and for the friendliness of its staff.

We believe it is important that you are encouraged to make your own contribution to the effective
operation and development of your chosen course. We are, therefore, keen to hear your views
and would welcome any suggestions that you may have about ways of improving any aspect of
your course and/or the student experience here at the University. In practice, you will have the
opportunity to do this through our student voice processes.

Remember that the outcome of your studies could affect the whole of your future career and
therefore study should certainly be your first priority. In resolving to work hard however, do not
forget to have time for recreation and social activities. Do take full advantage of the University
facilities at your disposal.

Mary Garvey, Course Leader
MSc Computer Science, MSc Computer Science (Internet Engineering), MSc Information
Technology and MSc Information Technology (Data Engineering)
m.garvey@wlv.ac.uk




                                               4
About Your Course

MSc Information Technology and Information Technology (Data Engineering) are specialist
courses. The courses are open to students with a first degree in any subject. Students without
previous knowledge of a particular area will be registered onto one or more special modules that
have been designed to provide underpinning knowledge at a postgraduate level.

All students admitted to the course will have a counselling session with a course tutor to design a
suitable programme of study.

Students with a good honours degree or equivalent may register for a Master’s course on
admission. Students with a third class honours or equivalent may register for a Postgraduate
Certificate and if successful, may then transfer to a higher award.

Each course is made of a number of core and core option modules, which are detailed in the next
section. Typically each MSc course is made of up of core modules, core option modules and the
dissertation modules.

Each MSc course has specific educational aims, which are detailed below:

MSc Information Technology
      Develop a general knowledge of information technology

      Independently synthesise information/ideas in chosen areas of information technology

      Promote a professional attitude in students wishing to enter employment in the field of
       information technology

      Enhance the career prospects of all students

Delivery Mode
The course will be delivered in sequential mode. Each semester is split into four three-week blocks
and a student will take one module per block. This means a student will take one module at a time
over a three week period. A full-time student will take 4 modules in sequence per semester,
whereas a part-time student will take 2 modules, normally attending alternate blocks. See the
timetable section for sample programmes.

Assessment Regime
All modules will be assessed directly against the learning outcomes using an evidentiary portfolio.
Each module will contain a diet of formative assessment and the normal practice will be for
students to submit the culmination of this formative work for summation, one week after the end of
the module. The process of portfolio building will be linked to personal tutorials, where your
personal tutor is required to validate all work submitted. It is vital therefore that you keep in regular
contact with your personal tutor.
Dissertation
The course includes two variants of the dissertation module. The traditional dissertation will be a
research based project, carried out over 10 weeks for full-time students, or longer for part-time
students. Alternatively, a work-based dissertation will centre on an employment based project and
will have a longer duration, normally a year. This will be available to part-time students, or full-time
students with an appropriate work placement.




                                                  5
Course Structure for the MSc Information Technology Degree

The MSc Information Technology course consists of the following modules:
                                           Core Modules
   Semester        Module Code                        Module Title                            Credits
 Cust              CP4063              Research Methods and Study Skills                      15
 Cust              CP4037              Project & Programme Management                         15
 Cust              CP4056              Usability                                              15

                                   Core – Dissertation Modules
   Semester        Module Code                         Module Title                           Credits
 Cust              CP4064              Dissertation Proposal                                  15
 Cust              CP4065              Dissertation Presentation and Dissemination            15
 Plus one only of the following:
 Cust              CP4028              Computing and IT Dissertation                          30
 Cust              CP4457              Work Based Dissertation                                30

                                        Core Options (CO)
 Sem      Module      Module Title                                         Cred CO       CO
          Code                                                             its  Gro      Group
                                                                                up       Rule
                                                                                         (Min.
                                                                                         credits)
 Cust     CP4061      Object Oriented Design and Development               15        A   Up to 15
 Cust     CP4053      Collaborative Software Development                   15        A   credits of
 Cust     CP4459      Database Techniques and Administration               15        A   electives,
 Cust     CP4059      Interactive Digital Media                            15        A   the
 Cust     CP4458      The Transitional Web                                 15        A   remainder
 Cust     CP4058      Internet and WWW Based Research Topics               15        A   from core
 Cust     CP4454      Games Technologies for Simulation, Training and      15        A   options
                      Visualisation                                                      with a
 Cust     CP4009      Data Systems                                         15        A   maximum
 Cust     CP4010      Programming for Application Development              15        A   of 30
 Cust     CP4062      Information Systems Analysis                         15        A   credits
                                                                                         from group
 Cust     CP4054      Pervasive Computing                                  15        A
                                                                                         B.
 Cust     CP4055      Modern Computing Environments                        15        A
 Cust     CP4004      Work Based Learning (15 credit)                      15        B
 Cust     CP4005      Work Based Learning (30 credit)                      30        B

Up to 15 credits can be taken from the elective modules:
                                              Electives
 Sem       Module       Module Title                                                     Credits
           Code
 Cust      CP4455       IS/IT Management                                                 15
 Cust      CP4456       Systems Acquisition Management                                   15
 Cust      CP4030       The Strategic Role of IS and IT                                  15
 Cust      CP4034       Business Analysis and Consultancy Skills                         15
 Cust      CP4036       Business Process Improvement                                     15
 1, 2      EGnnnn       English as a Foreign Language                                    15
These modules are described in the Module Description section of this guide.
Exceptionally, students may choose up to 30 credits from the level 3 Computing modules by
approval of the Award team.




                                                 6
Course Structure for the MSc Information Technology (Data Engineering) Degree

The MSc Information Technology (Data Engineering) course consists of the following modules:

                                           Core Modules
   Semester        Module Code                        Module Title                            Credits
 Cust              CP4063              Research Methods and Study Skills                      15
 Cust              CP4037              Project & Programme Management                         15
 Cust              CP4056              Usability                                              15
 Cust              CP4459              Database Techniques and Administration                 15
 Cust              CP4458              The Transitional Web                                   15

                                   Core – Dissertation Modules
   Semester        Module Code                         Module Title                           Credits
 Cust              CP4064              Dissertation Proposal                                  15
 Cust              CP4065              Dissertation Presentation and Dissemination            15
 Plus one only of the following:
 Cust              CP4028              Computing and IT Dissertation                          30
 Cust              CP4457              Work Based Dissertation                                30
The dissertation topic must be in the area of data engineering.
                                        Core Options (CO)
 Sem      Module      Module Title                                        Cred CO        CO
          Code                                                            its  Gro       Group
                                                                               up        Rule
                                                                                         (Min.
                                                                                         credits)
 Cust     CP4061      Object Oriented Design and Development              15         A   Up to 15
 Cust     CP4056      Usability                                           15         A   credits of
 Cust     CP4058      Internet and WWW Based Research Topics              15         A   electives,
 Cust     CP4059      Interactive Digital Media                           15         A   the
 Cust     CP4454      Games Technologies for Simulation, Training and     15         A   remainder
                      Visualisation                                                      from core
 Cust     CP4009      Data Systems                                        15         A   options
 Cust     CP4010      Programming for Application Development             15         A   with a
 Cust     CP4062      Information Systems Analysis                        15         A   maximum
 Cust     CP4055      Modern Computing Environments                       15         A   of 30
 Cust     CP4004      Work Based Learning (15 credit)                     15         B   credits
                                                                                         from group
 Cust     CP4005      Work Based Learning (30 credit)                     30         B
                                                                                         B.

Up to 15 credits can be taken from the elective modules:
                                              Electives
 Sem       Module       Module Title                                                     Credits
           Code
 Cust      CP4455       IS/IT Management                                                 15
 Cust      CP4456       Systems Acquisition Management                                   15
 Cust      CP4030       The Strategic Role of IS and IT                                  15
 Cust      CP4034       Business Analysis and Consultancy Skills                         15
 Cust      CP4036       Business Process Improvement                                     15
 1, 2      EG3nnn       English as a Foreign Language                                    15
These modules are described in the Module Description section of this guide.
Exceptionally, students may choose up to 30 credits from the level 3 Computing modules by
approval of the Award team.




                                                 7
PG Academic Regulations

Students studying Postgraduate Pathways will study:
 60 credits for the award of Postgraduate Certificate
 120 credits for the award of Postgraduate Diploma
 180 credits for a Masters degree
 The majority of credits for a Masters degree are awarded at level 4, but it is possible to
   include one 15 credit level 3 module for a PgCert and two 15 credit or one 30 credit level
   3 module for PgDip/Masters if there is an academic rationale for their inclusion.

The following table shows what is required for each award. Normally if you are registered for a
MSc, you will not be awarded the interim awards (Postgraduate Certificate and Postgraduate
Diploma), unless you decide to leave the MSc course without completing the full masters
programme.

         Award                    Core/core option modules                Elective modules
Postgraduate              CP4063 Research Methods and Study
Certificate in            Skills
Computing                 plus
                          a further 75 credits of Computing level four
                          modules
Postgraduate              Any two of:
Certificate Information   CP4037 Project & Programme
Technology                Management
                          CP4056 Usability
                          CP4459 Database Techniques and
                          Administration
                          CP4009 Data Systems
                          CP4062 Information Systems Analysis

                       Plus
                       A further 30credits of core or core option
                       modules
Postgraduate Diploma   CP4063 Research Methods and Study                 Up to 15 credits
in Computing           Skills
                       plus
                       a further 90 credits of Computing level four
                       modules
Postgraduate Diploma   CP4037 Project & Programme                        Up to 15 credits
Information Technology Management
                       CP4063 Research Methods and Study
                       Skills
                       CP4056 Usability

                          Plus a further 60 credits of core options
Masters degree            All core modules                               Up to 15 credits
                          Plus 45 credits of core option




                                                8
Module Descriptions

Core and Core Option Modules
    Module Code CP4004 Work Based Learning (15 credit)
     Credit value            15
     Pre-requisites          None
     Prohibited              CP4005 Work Based Learning (30 credit)
     combinations
    Module description
     The module aims to:
     Enable students to demonstrate the development and acquisition of strategic IT management skills
     and competencies in the work place. This will be achieved by students providing evidence of the
     application of core programme material within appropriate strategic management contexts,
     including contexts other than the participants current work area.
    Assessment
         Description                                                        Weighting or Pass/Fail
         1               Portfolio                                              100%


    Module Code CP4005 Work Based Learning (30 credit)
     Credit value            30
     Pre-requisites          None
     Prohibited              CP4004 Work Based Learning (15 credit)
     combinations
    Module description
     The module aims to:
     Enable students to demonstrate the development and acquisition of strategic IT management skills
     and competencies in the work place. This will be achieved by students providing evidence of the
     application of core programme material within appropriate strategic management contexts,
     including contexts other than the participants current work area.
     In addition, for 30 credit module, students will undertake a consultancy assignment within their
     current workplace.
    Assessment
         Description                                                        Weighting or Pass/Fail
         1               Portfolio                                              100%


    Module Code CP4009 Data Systems
     Credit value             15
     Pre-requisites           None
     Prohibited               None
     combinations
    Module description
     Data and data management systems are an integral part of modern computer systems, so an
     awareness of the techniques to handle and manipulate data is essential. This module provides an
     introduction of how to design and use structured and semi-structured data, investigating XML and
     the relational model in particular. The objectives and principles of database systems will be
     covered, coupled with practical of using XML and a relational system.
    Assessment
         Description                                                        Weighting or Pass/Fail
         1               Portfolio                                              100%




                                                 9
Module Code CP4010 Programming for Application Development
 Credit value             15
 Pre-requisites           None
 Prohibited               None
 combinations
Module description
 This module provides the professional level skills necessary to design and programme interactive
 software applications. The module delivers transferable program design and coding skills. It is
 available to non-programmers, the fundamental concepts of imperative programming being
 covered along with the essentials of functional and object oriented programming. Most of the
 module will be delivered via a single, widely-used programming language. However, students will
 also learn to apply the conceptual work they have covered to new application programming
 interfaces (APIs) and languages.
Assessment
     Description                                                            Weighting or Pass/Fail
     1                Portfolio                                                 100%


Module Code CP4028 Dissertation
 Credit value              30
 Pre-requisites            CP4064 Dissertation Proposal
 Prohibited                CP4457 Work Based Dissertation
 combinations
Module description
 This module aims to develop skills in students to :
      Develop deep knowledge and understanding of a relevant IT / computer science topic
      Carry out in-depth research: analyse information and ideas and create informed responses
        to complex problems defined within the project area
      Demonstrate ability to critically evaluate
      Enhance career prospects
      Promote professional attitude to undertaking a Computer Science / IT project
Assessment
     Description                                                            Weighting or Pass/Fail
     1                Portfolio                                                 100%


Module Code CP4053 Collaborative Software Development
 Credit value              15
 Pre-requisites            Knowledge of programming, data storage solutions, analysis
                           techniques and problem-solving
 Prohibited                None
 combinations
Module description
 This module aims to develop the learner’s knowledge and experience of project management and
 the building of quality software, through team-based activities and the completion of a “live” internal
 software development exercise. As a member of a project team, the learner is expected to
 contribute to its success in areas such as the use and application of one or more key tools,
 techniques, and methods.
Assessment
     Description                                                            Weighting or Pass/Fail
     1                Portfolio                                                 100%




                                                10
Module Code CP4054 Pervasive Computing
 Credit value              15
 Pre-requisites            Programming. Computer Architecture and Networks
 Prohibited                None
 combinations
Module description
 This module provides students with the skills necessary to design and implement systems using
 pervasive computing technology. It has a strong practical content, and includes work with examples
 of pervasive computing devices (e.g. intelligent sensors, mobile computing devices, product based
 computing).
Assessment
     Description                                                          Weighting or Pass/Fail
     1                Portfolio                                               100%

Module Code CP4055 Modern Computing Environments
 Credit value             15
 Pre-requisites           None
 Prohibited               None
 combinations
Module description
 To gain an understanding of how modern applications use and interact with modern technologies
 used in computing and the internet. You will learn, using supplied basic software frameworks, how
 an application communicates with the devices that make up a modern network and how they
 contribute to the internet. You will investigate how routers, switches, WiFi, Protocols etc are used
 and interact with the application running on your PC.
Assessment
     Description                                                          Weighting or Pass/Fail
     1                Portfolio                                               100%


Module Code CP4056 Usability
 Credit value               15
 Pre-requisites             None
 Prohibited                 None
 combinations
Module description
 This module aims to produce students who are aware of the importance of usability, the tools and
 techniques that can be applied to produce usable artefacts, and the issues currently bring
 researched to ensure continued usability of future systems.
Assessment
     Description                                                          Weighting or Pass/Fail
     1                Portfolio                                               100%

Module Code CP4058 Internet and Web Research Topics
 Credit value               15
 Pre-requisites             Knowledge of a programming language, ideally Java or Ruby.
 Prohibited
 combinations
Module description
 This module develops an understanding of a range of current computing research topics related to
 the Internet and the Web. Students will learn how to find out about and analyse current Internet and
 Web developments, particularly those emerging from an academic context. Students will also learn
 how to present and discuss current Internet Web research. The specific topics covered vary from
 year to year, depending upon what is emerging as interesting at the time.
Assessment
     Description                                                          Weighting or Pass/Fail
     1                Portfolio                                               100%

                                               11
Module Code CP4059 Interactive Digital Media
 Credit value               15
 Pre-requisites             CP4010 Programming for Application Development
 Prohibited                 None
 combinations
Module description
 Interactive Digital Media includes both 2D and 3D digital multi-media elements such as text,
 graphics, audio, video, and 3D graphics. These new media types can be combined into higher-
 order elements via an interactive framework for use in various applications and are delivered via
 computers, digital television, and mobile devices. Higher-order elements can include Blogs,
 Podcasts, Vodcasts, Static and DB-drive websites, Rich-Internet Applications, Social-Networking
 Services, Networked Virtual Worlds such as Second Life, 2D/3D Web-Games, and etc. The
 creation of Interactive Digital Media is an important venture for companies who provide services to
 a wide variety of companies and consumers, namely media broadcasters, web-based service
 providers, product-websites, entertainment portals, and product-specific users. The course focuses
 on the developments of higher-order elements based on the understanding of how basic media
 types work by introducing the technical aspects of digital media authoring such as content
 generation and the development of interactive applications. Students will be taught algorithms and
 the use of authoring tools to create digital media.
Assessment
     Description                                                          Weighting or Pass/Fail
     1               Coursework                                               100%


Module Code CP4061 Object Oriented Design and Development
 Credit value              15
 Pre-requisites            Programming (in any language)
 Prohibited                None
 combinations

Module description
 This module develops skills in designing and developing software systems using object oriented
 methods and tools.
Assessment
     Description                                                          Weighting or Pass/Fail
     1               Portfolio                                                100%


Module Code CP4062 Information Systems Analysis
 Credit value              15
 Pre-requisites            None
 Prohibited                None
 combinations

Module description
 This module aims to introduce students to the identification and specification of requirements for an
 information system. UML Use Case modelling is employed in the process of developing
 information systems analysis leading to the production of a requirements specification document.
Assessment
     Description                                                          Weighting or Pass/Fail
     1               Portfolio                                                100%




                                               12
Module Code CP4063 Research Methods and Study Skills
 Credit value             15
 Pre-requisites           None
 Prohibited               None
 combinations
Module description
 The primary aim of this module is to develop knowledge and experience of research methods and
 techniques in the field of computing and information systems. In particular, to develop
 professionalism in the acquisition and deployment of appropriate research skills in areas such as
 ethics, data collection, documentation, and presentation.
Assessment
     Description                                                          Weighting or Pass/Fail
     1               Portfolio                                                100%


Module Code CP4064 Dissertation Proposal
 Credit value              15
 Pre-requisites            Completion of requirements for PG Diploma in associated pathway.
 Prohibited                None
 combinations
Module description
 To provide a secure basis for the undertaking of a dissertation. This module will include problem
 definition and feasibility study.
Assessment
     Description                                                          Weighting or Pass/Fail
     1               Portfolio                                                100%


Module Code CP4065 Dissertation Presentation and Dissemination
 Credit value              15
 Pre-requisites            CP4028 Dissertation or CP4457 Work Based Dissertation
 Co-requisites
 Prohibited                None
 combinations
Module description
 Development of the profession skills involved in describing and communication work in a variety of
 genre, appropriate to professional practice.
Assessment
     Description                                                          Weighting or Pass/Fail
     1               Portfolio                                                100%

Module Code CP4459 Database Techniques and Administration
 Credit value             15
 Pre-requisites           Knowledge equivalent to CP4009 Data Systems
 Prohibited               None
 combinations
Module description
 The module aims to:
 Equip students with the skills necessary to:
     Design and build appropriate database systems to support a range of applications
     Assess developments in database technology in terms of concurrency control, query
         optimisation, and the maintenance of data integrity and availability
Assessment
     Description                                                          Weighting or Pass/Fail
     1               Portfolio                                                100%



                                              13
Module Code CP4458 The Transitional Web
 Credit value             15
 Pre-requisites           CP4055 Modern Computing Environments or basic experience of
                          building static or simple web sites
 Prohibited               None
 combinations
Module description
 This module is designed to give students an understanding, and practical experience of current and
 emerging web technologies including (but not limited to) XML, Web Services, and the Semantic
 Web amongst others. It situates the technologies within the fast moving on-line environment and
 relates them to terms such as Web 2.0 and Web 3.0
Assessment
     Description                                                            Weighting or Pass/Fail
     1                Portfolio                                                 100%


Module Code CP4454 Games Technologies for Simulation, Training and Visualisation
 Credit value            15
 Pre-requisites          Programming experience at least of C style scripting language e.g.
                         Python or C.
 Prohibited              None
 combinations
Module description
 The module aims to give the student an insight into the use of games technologies such as game
 engines, for uses outside of the traditional route of recreational gaming. It is feasible that a student
 could develop a game using the material delivered in the lecture, but uses such as health and
 safety simulations, realisation of A.I. techniques such as path planning or 3D visualisation of
 scenes would be the primary focus.
 The module involves the research of applications of these areas, but leans heavily on the usage of
 scripting to develop a range of prototypes and applications that can realise the student’s area of
 interest.
 The module will build upon skills gained in the introductory programming module or equivalent, and
 can lead to final projects that can focus more fully on the students preferred research area.
Assessment
     Description                                                            Weighting or Pass/Fail
     1                Portfolio                                                 100%

Module Code CP4457 Work Based Dissertation
 Credit value             15
 Pre-requisites           CP4064 Dissertation Proposal, employment suitable for undertaking
                          dissertation study
 Prohibited               CP4028 Dissertation
 combinations
Module description
 This module provides evidence of the student’s ability to undertake a major, self motivated piece of
 work in an employment context. The module aims to develop skills in students to :
      Develop deep knowledge and understanding of a relevant IT / computer science topic
      Carry out in-depth research: analyse information and ideas and create informed responses
         to complex problems defined within the project area
      Demonstrate ability to critically evaluate
      Enhance career prospects
      Promote professional attitude to undertaking a Computer Science / IT project
Assessment
     Description                                                            Weighting or Pass/Fail
     1                Portfolio (including dissertation)                        100%




                                                14
Elective Modules
    Module Code CP4030 Strategic Role of IS/IT
     Credit value              15
     Pre-requisites            Requires minimum of two years relevant commercial IT/IS
                               experience
     Prohibited                None
     combinations
    Module description
     Enable the student to conduct a strategic analysis of an organisation and to critically evaluate
     concepts of strategic fit, congruence and impact analysis in relation to Information Systems and
     Information Technology within that organisation. Develop an awareness of business strategy
     theory and practice.
    Assessment
         Description                                                         Weighting or Pass/Fail
         1               Portfolio                                               100%

    Module Code CP4034 Business Analysis and Consultancy Skills
     Credit value             15
     Pre-requisites           None
     Prohibited               None
     combinations
    Module description
     This module aims to provide an introduction to working in a ‘change agent’ role within a business,
     including elements of business analysis and ‘business literacy’, together with practical skills in
     communication and other aspects of consultancy.
    Assessment
         Description                                                         Weighting or Pass/Fail
         1               Portfolio                                               100%


    Module Code CP4036 Business Process Improvement
     Credit value             15
     Pre-requisites
     Prohibited               None
     combinations
    Module description
     Efficient and effective business processes are fundamental to business success. IT is a strategic
     enabler for improvement in business process. This module examines methods and techniques
     available for analysis of current processes and the design of IT-enabled new processes. The
     module will also therefore investigate the contribution that current and emerging IS/IT can make in
     transforming a business and assess how innovative use of technology may be applied in improving
     business processes.
    Assessment
         Description                                                         Weighting or Pass/Fail
         1               Portfolio                                               100%




                                                  15
Module Code CP4037 Project and Programme Management
 Credit value              15
 Pre-requisites            None
 Prohibited                None
 combinations
Module description
 The module aims to enable students to manage a complex programme of IS/IT projects,
 developing appropriate operational approaches to planning and control.
Assessment
     Description                                                        Weighting or Pass/Fail
     1               Portfolio                                              100%


Module Code CP4455 IS/IT Management
 Credit value              15
 Pre-requisites            None
 Prohibited                None
 combinations
Module description
 This module aims to provide students with critical awareness of, and skills in, financial and
 operational management of IS/IT as a strategic resource.
Assessment
     Description                                                        Weighting or Pass/Fail
     1               Portfolio                                              100%


Module Code CP4456 Systems Acquisition Management
 Credit value             15
 Pre-requisites           None
 Prohibited               None
 combinations
Module description
 This module aims to provide students with a critical awareness and understanding of current
 models for systems development and acquisition. Students will also consider approaches to
 system development process improvement.
Assessment
     Description                                                        Weighting or Pass/Fail
     1               Portfolio                                              100%




                                             16
Course Management

Postgraduate Scheme
MSc Computer Science, MSc Information Technology

 Chair                              Bob Newman
 Course Leader                      Mary Garvey
 Associate Course Leader            Rupert Simpson
 Personal Tutor                     Mary Garvey
 Personal Tutor                     Rupert Simpson
 Personal Tutor                     Carl Dudley
 Personal Tutor                     Qas Mehdi
 Personal Tutor                     Eugene Ch’ng
 Personal Tutor                     Jas Uppal

The involvement of students in the assessment of course quality is an established part of the
University's procedures. The Students' Union and your Course Leader will be able to tell you about
the representative roles available to students and the communication processes in the School.
These are important roles that benefit you and other students. Further information about student
representation and the Student Voice is available at the Students' Union website:
www.wolvesunion.org/main/studentvoice

You can contact your student representative via the email addresses below
 Information Technology courses           Full-time     SCITMScCS-FT@wlv.ac.uk
 Information Technology courses           Part-time     SCITMScCS-PT@wlv.ac.uk

Other Support:
All students will be allocated a Personal Tutor who will provide academic counselling.

Special Needs                               Ruth Fairclough, Tel: 01902 321429
                                            Email: R.Fairclough@wlv.ac.uk

Programme Advice                            Simon Rose, Student Support Officer
                                            MI127, MI Building City Campus South
                                            Tel: 01902 518532

Placement Advice                            Employability & Placements Office
                                            MI128, MI Building City Campus South
                                            Tel: 01902 321457, Email: IPU_SCIT@wlv.ac.uk

MSc Information Technology Course Website             www.scit.wlv.ac.uk/msc




                                                17
                                                                                  MSc Computer Science / IT Schedule for 2010/2011

 Semester 1      Monday/Thursday      Wed                                        Tuesday/Friday               Semester 2        Monday/Thursday    Wed                                       Tuesday/Friday

 Weeks 1-4       CP4063 Research                                                 CP4056 Usability             Weeks 1-4         CP4056 Usability                                             CP4063
 w/b 20/09/10    Methods and Study                                                                            w/b 31/01/11                                                                   Research
                                                                                 Core - IT                                      Core - IT
 Uni wks 4-7     Skills                                                                                       Uni wks 23-26                                                                  Methods and
                 Core - all                                                                                   (SEM2 Wk2)                                                                     Study Skills




                                                                                                                                                   International Language and Study Skills
                                       International Language and Study Skills
                                                                                                                                                                                             Core - all

 Weeks 5-8       CP4055 Modern                                                   CP4058 Internet              Weeks 5-8         CP4054 Pervasive                                             CP4009 Data
 w/b18/10/10     Computing                                                       and Web based                w/b 28/02/11      Computing Core -                                             Systems
 Uni wks 8-11    Environments                                                    Research topics              Uni wks 27-30     CS
                                                                                 Core – CS (IE)
                                                       EG4002




                                                                                                                                                                   EG4002
 Weeks 9-12      CP4010                                                          CP4053                       Weeks 9-12        CP4458 The                                                   CP4062
 w/b 15/11/10    Programming for                                                 Collaborative                w/b 28/03/11      Transitional Web                                             Information
 Uni wks 12-15   Application                                                     Software                     Uni wks 31-36                                                                  Systems Analysis
                                                                                                                                Core – IT (DE) +
                 Development                                                     Development                  (incl Easter)
                                                                                                                                CS (IE)
                                                                                 Core - CS

 Weeks 13-16     CP4037 Project                                                  CP4454 Games                 Weeks 13-16       CP4053                                                       CP4459
 w/b13/12/10     and Programme                                                   Technologies (Alt            w/b 09/05/11      Collaborative                                                Database
 Uni wks 16-22   Management                                                      years)                       Uni wks 37-40     Software                                                     Techniques and
 (incl Xmas)                                                                                                                    Development                                                  Administration
                 Core – IT
                                                                                                                                Core - CS

Key:
Recommended route for MSc CS                                                       Core for both awards – Semester 1 starters
Recommended route for MSc IT                                                       Core for both awards – Semester 2 starters

See additional timetable for the Dissertation requirements
International students are advised to take EG4002
All modules are assessed by portfolio. The submission date for each portfolio will be one week after the end of the block.

The latest version of the timetable will be given out in Welcome Week.



                                                                                                                18
Recommended Programmes
September start

IT (non-computing graduates)
CP4063   Research Methods and Study Skills             A   1
CP4010   Programming for Application Development       A   2
CP4059   Interactive Digital Media                     B   3
CP4037   Project & Programme Management                B   4
CP4056   Usability                                     A   5
CP4009   Data Systems                                  B   6
CP4062   Information Systems Analysis                  B   7
CP4459   Database Techniques and Administration        B   8
CP4064   Dissertation Proposal                         A   9
CP4028   Dissertation                                  A   10
CP4065   Dissertation Presentation and Dissemination   C   1

IT (Computing graduates)
CP4063   Research Methods and Study Skills             A   1
CP4058   Internet and WWW Based Research Topics        B   2
CP4059   Interactive Digital Media                     B   3
CP4037   Project & Programme Management                B   4
CP4056   Usability                                     A   5
CP4458   The Transitional Web                          A   6
CP4054   Pervasive Computing                           A   7
CP4459   Database Techniques and Administration        B   8
CP4064   Dissertation Proposal                         A   9
CP4028   Dissertation                                  A   10
CP4065   Dissertation Presentation and Dissemination   C   1

February start
IT (non-computing graduates)
CP4063   Research Methods and Study Skills             B   5
CP4009   Data Systems                                  B   6
CP4062   Information Systems Analysis                  B   7
CP4459   Database Techniques and Administration        B   8
CP4056   Usability                                     B   1
CP4010   Programming for Application Development       A   2
CP4059   Interactive Digital Media                     B   3
CP4037   Project & Programme Management                B   4
CP4064   Dissertation Proposal                         C   5
CP4028   Dissertation                                  C   6
CP4065   Dissertation Presentation and Dissemination   B   10

IT (Computing graduates)
CP4063   Research Methods and Study Skills             B   5
CP4458   The Transitional Web                          A   6
CP4054   Pervasive Computing                           A   7
CP4459   Database Techniques and Administration        B   8
CP4056   Usability                                     B   1
CP4058   Internet and WWW Based Research Topics        B   2
CP4059   Interactive Digital Media                     B   3
CP4037   Project & Programme Management                B   4
CP4064   Dissertation Proposal                         C   5
CP4028   Dissertation                                  C   6
CP4065   Dissertation Presentation and Dissemination   B   10




                                               1
Employability & Your Personal Development Portfolio (PDP)

What is ‘Employability’?
‘Employability’ is concerned with the development of skills aimed at enhancing your employment
prospects throughout your time here at the University of Wolverhampton. Developing specialist
subject and academic knowledge is important for employers but they also want to employ
individuals who are able to:
    Communicate effectively,
    Work in a team and have good interpersonal skills.
    Solve problems
    Work on their own using their own initiative and are able to adapt to changing situations
    Be self-confident

How Will You Develop Your Employment Skills?
At the School of Technology (STech) we aim to provide you with the opportunity to develop these
through the modules you will be studying. The assessments you do for your modules are
designed to help you develop Subject specific skills through the research you undertake for the
assignments. In addition, they are also designed to help you develop other key skills such as your
written communication skills. Where you have formal presentations, this will build your self-
confidence in addition to helping you develop your skills of verbal communication. Working as part
of a team will develop vital group-work skills. Attending your classes regularly will further ensure
that you have the opportunity to develop other skills.

Throughout your time at the University, you will develop and be able to demonstrate a number of
skills, some of which are listed below:

    Working as part of a group
    Demonstrating teamwork skills and leadership skills
    Effective communication
    Written (via reports etc.)
    Oral (through formal presentations)
    Problem-solving
    IT skills (which include use of basic packages for word processing, spreadsheets, use of
     email etc.)
    Time management
    Attending classes on time
    Handing in your assignments by the deadline date

You may also be working part-time. The experience you gain within a work environment is a very
worthwhile one and also helps you to develop key skills. This is another good way of developing
skills which are valued by employers.




                                                2
Career opportunities and Future Study

With the explosion of interest in the Internet and multimedia, the future for people with the
appropriate qualifications and skills in software design, networking and client/server technology is
extremely bright, with opportunities in business, finance, manufacturing or the media.

Computing is a very broad subject and consists of a number of overlapping areas. These include
software engineering, information systems, Internet and the World Wide Web, database systems,
computer systems architecture, networks, human computer interaction, artificial intelligence,
graphics and visualisation, multimedia technology and professional skills.

The awards offered by the School of Technology (STech) can lead to a wide range of careers in
the field of computing and information technology and your choice of options and core options may
make particular positions more appealing or accessible. In addition our awards will equip you with
skills on which you can build to pursue research and training in related professional areas.

Detailed below are some of the possible roles, which these courses prepare you for:
       Programmers
       Analysts
       Trainers and education
       Research
       Local authorities
       Public utilities
       Various computing roles in business, commerce and industry



Academic Regulations

This course adheres to the University’s academic regulations for students undertaking a
postgraduate degree, commencing after October 2002. A full version of these regulations can be
found on the University web site: http://www.wlv.ac.uk, look under Current Students, then
Academic regulations. Regulations govern your course and will be binding on you. It is, therefore,
important that you read and become familiar with them.




                                                 3
British Computer Society (BCS)

When planning a postgraduate degree programmes, students might like to bear in mind a future
career in Computing. If this is a student's intention then they may wish to consider membership of
the British Computer Society.

Although membership of the BCS is not necessary to practise as a computer professional, BCS
Professional Membership is an industry benchmark. It denotes excellence and integrity and may
lead to enhanced career prospects. Standard Membership grades begin with Student and
Associate, graduates with an accredited degree can become a Professional Member. Then after a
period of industrial experience, graduates can move to the Chartered Professional grades with
Member and finally Fellow for highly qualified and experienced practitioners. Postgraduates can
become involved in the local branch of the society, new recruits are always welcome.

Such registration costs a modest fee (often with full course discounts) and comes with some
attractive advantages:
      Access to the BCS library and discounted access to the ACM digital library and CSS Online
      Free copies of computer bulletin (bimonthly)
      Free copies of Computing
      Publication discounts with leading publishers
      Discounts on training courses
      Lifetime email address
      Continual Professional Development (CPD) scheme
      Peer-to-peer networking
      Free attendance at meetings of the local Wolverhampton Branch.

For more information regarding the British Computer Society or to make an application please
contact Mary Garvey, m.garvey@wlv.ac.uk or Sheri Sankey, sankeys@wlv.ac.uk




                                                4
School of Technology (STech)

Charter for Students
Students who come to the School of Technology (STech) at the University of
Wolverhampton are entitled to have high expectations. Studying at the University
can offer the chance for a new beginning, the development of new skills, and can
give you greater opportunities for future employment.

In order to help you to achieve your objectives with us, we will strive to provide:

      Effective impartial advice and guidance to help you choose the right course.
      An effective introduction to the University, to the School and to your course.
      A welcoming environment with quiet places to study.
      Qualified, experienced and professional tutors and lecturers.
      Friendly, helpful staff.
      Stimulating and well-planned learning opportunities.
      Dedicated Technology Centre to support academic excellence.
      Up-to-date resources including books and online journals.
      Well-defined and appropriate programmes of study.
      Opportunities to plan and review progress.
      Access to learning support.
      Access to confidential counselling, careers advice, and financial advice.

We will aim to ensure that:

      Feedback will be provided on all assessments within 3 working weeks.
      You have a personal tutor. There is also a Student Support Officer as the first point of
       contact with clearly advertised surgery times.
      Your tutor’s availability will be clearly advertised.
      There are opportunities for you to comment on and influence your University experience,
       e.g. via Student-Staff liaison meetings, module questionnaires and School/University
       Quality Committees.
      You will have access to the information you need to progress on the course, e.g. each
       module will issue a module guide; each course will issue a course guide.
      You will be informed of electronic resources available for each module via the module
       guide.
      You will find information about all of the above in your “Guide to your Course” Handbook,
       available on the Current Students page of the University website

We expect you to:

      Have read and abide by the code on using University IT resources.
      Attend classes regularly and punctually.
      Show courtesy and respect to staff and other students.
      Ensure you understand the requirements of your course
      Ensure you understand the requirements of each module you are studying (sessions to
       attend, assessment procedures, exam procedures)
      Respect and abide by the University Regulations, e.g. Equal Opportunities Policy, ID
       Cards, quiet areas.
      Bring all necessary equipment to classes/workshops and tests.
      Submit assessments on time (or they will not be marked) and keep copies of all
       assessments submitted.
      Switch off mobile electronic devices before entering learning environments.

                                                5
         Behave considerately in lectures, tutorials, workshops and other classes, listen attentively
          and participate in class activities.
         Not record teaching sessions, either by audio, video or photographically, without permission
          from the lecturer and authorisation from the Student Enabling Centre
         Respect the quiet areas and make as little noise as possible in all areas.
         Note that no food or drink (other than water) is allowed into teaching areas and especially
          laboratories.
         Keep the Student Support Officer informed if you have personal problems that affect your
          work; if these problems make it necessary to seek extensions, to do so before the deadline.
         Use the advertised times (or make an appointment by email or through the School Office)
          to seek advice from your tutors/lecturers.
         Confirm your programme of study when asked to do so.
         Seek approval for and record any change of programme within the deadlines.
         Inform the Student Office (Here to Help) and Finance if your address or other contact
          details change.
         Check E-Vision frequently to keep informed of University communications.
         Check the SCIT Students and SEBE Student Noticeboard WOLF topics frequently.
         Attend student support surgeries when requested to do so by personal tutors.

Email Charter

1.       Students can normally expect a response to a query from staff within 3 working days.
         However, staff may have other commitments including being on business which takes them
         outside of the University. Students are advised to contact the School Administrative staff in
         the event of failing to receive a response from a member of academic staff.
2.       Students are expected to observe an ethical and professional approach to the use of email
         and therefore students are expected to observe the normal requirements of courtesy and
         professionalism expected of all students in their dealings with staff and fellow students.
3.       Any inappropriate use of email to staff or fellow students, for example by sending illegal,
         discriminatory, defamatory, obscene, abusive or threatening material, will be treated as a
         disciplinary matter by the University.
4.       Originating or knowingly distributing any virus, worm or any chain mail or junk mail is
         prohibited.
5.       Students should note that information concerning grades for their summative assessments
         will not normally be given by email.
6.       The email system cannot guarantee privacy in respect of email messages sent to staff.
         Students are advised that any confidential matters are discussed using other means of
         communication.
7.       In using the University computer facilities for email, students must not attempt to disable,
         defeat or circumvent any security facilities.
8.       Staff and students should always use the official University email account. No response can
         be guaranteed to emails from non-University accounts.




                                                   6
    .Where to get help with your course

Help with Study

Use WOLF (Wolverhampton Online Learning Framework) to find study-related information such as
course notes and support materials through the University’s computer network. You can also use
it to communicate with staff and fellow students via email and forums: www.wlv.ac.uk-Current
Students–Hot Links\WOLF. Subscribe to module topic.

You can email your Module Tutor/Module Leader with specific module queries.

You can contact your assigned Personal Tutor by email.

Programme advice

There is a Student Support Officer available to help postgraduate students with their programme of
study. Tel: 01902 518532, or please contact the SCIT Enquiries on 01902 321402.

University forms

For Leave of Absence, Mitigating Circumstances, Transferrals, Extensions Forms, you can
download them from e-Vision, (www.wlv.ac.uk/evision) also you can obtain them from your
Schools Registry. These need to be signed by the Student Support Officer.

Personal issues

If you have any personal problems and need some guidance you can talk to your Personal Tutor.
Alternatively you can email your Student Rep – to find out who they are subscribe to WOLF topic
SCIT Student Representatives.

Students with additional support needs

Within the School of Technology (STech) there are staff that can provide you with confidential
support for a wide range of needs.

    Ruth Fairclough – Special Needs Tutor
          email: r.fairclough@wlv.ac.uk, tel: 01902 321429

    Derek Beardsmore – Special Needs Tutor,
          email: d.beardsmore@wlv.ac.uk, tel: 01902 321479

    Lynne Pennells – General queries and administration
          email: l.pennells@wlv.ac.uk, tel: 01902 321408

Getting involved

Have your say!
Do you have questions about your course? Want to chat to the Course Leader about what is
working or not working for you?

Each Semester the School of Technology holds feedback meetings which any student may attend
– check out WOLF/SCIT Students or your School Office for your next meeting. There are many
other activities you can get involved in:
     Become a student representative
     Help out at Open Days
     Help out with School activities


                                               7
Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL)

Definitions

APL (Accreditation of Prior Learning) is a process for recognising and assessing students’ prior
learning. This recognition may give the learning a credit-value in a credit-based structure and
enable it to be counted towards the completion of a programme of study and the award(s) or
qualifications associated with it. APL includes experiential learning or prior certificated learning, as
follows:

APEL (Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning) is a process by which a student’s learning
through experience is assessed and, as appropriate, recognised for academic purposes. This will
normally be learning for which the student does not have a formal certificate from a recognised
body.

APCL (Accreditation of Prior Certified Learning) is a process through which previously
assessed and certificated learning is considered and, as appropriate, recognised for academic
purposes.

Introduction

All our courses in the School of Computing and Information Technology, and in the University as a
whole, are based on the principle of accumulating sufficient “credits” at appropriate levels.

In order to obtain the required credits for your targeted award you need to study (and pass) a set of
modules. Each of our named awards specifies the modules (the “core” or “core option” modules)
which must be studied as part of this set of modules. A single module is normally worth 15 credits.

However it is not uncommon for applicants/students to have gained the knowledge and skills
developed in some of our modules through previous study at another institution, by virtue of their
normal work experience or via some other interest or activity. Clearly, where this is the case, it
would not be sensible or desirable for you to repeat this learning experience during your study for
one of our awards. Where we can clearly substantiate a student claim to already have the relevant
knowledge and skills to have satisfied the Learning Outcomes for one of our modules, it is possible
to accredit that achievement and thereby possibly shorten the period of study required for the
target award.

This process of accreditation can be performed for any level of module, including masters
modules.

Note, you can not apply for accreditation on modules that you have already been granted an award
on.

If you feel you can apply for APL, then please discuss your experience with the Course Leader to
see if you are eligible.




                                                  8
Learning, Teaching & Assessment: What Can You Expect?
The School of Technology Student Charter at the beginning of section 2 documents a two-way
agreement between you and the School. It explains what you can expect from the School, but also
makes clear what is expected of you. The School will strive to provide the best possible learning
experience for you, and in return asks you to adhere to school rules and help maintain a positive
learning and teaching environment.

Learning & Teaching Resources

There is a wide range of resources available for your learning, including on-line materials for each
module (on WOLF), web-based information and, importantly, the online resources provided by the
Learning Centres. Module information will direct you to specific information sources, but there is
an expectation, especially at Level 4, that you will research your own sources in order to enhance
your achievement of the learning outcomes for the programme.

In order to locate resources relevant to Computing and Mathematics directly, visit the Learning
Centres homepage at www.wlv.ac.uk/lib. Select ‘Computing & IT’ from the drop-down menu on the
right of the screen, choose your subject area and use the links on the left to navigate through e-
books, e-journals, databases and information on the web. If you require further subject-specific
help with resources, contact our Librarian, Helen Curtis, on (01902) 323562 or via email at Helen
H.Curtis@wlv.ac.uk.

Communications

E-mail
This will be done via the e-mail address allocated to you, by the University, at the start of your
course. You may communicate with members of the course team via their e-mail address.

e:Vision
The University is constantly improving its online facilities and will be using the web and a system
known as e:Vision as its principle means of official communication with students.

You will be able to find information such as module results within the online eVision system.
Students should check their e:Vision accounts regularly for messages. It is important that you
check your records regularly, if there is any information we are holding about your that is incorrect,
please notify Registry.

WOLF
The University uses an Online Learning Environment known as WOLF. Information relating to
modules and your programme will be available via the internet through this system.

To access this follow the link from the University home page (www.wlv.ac.uk)

You should “Subscribe to Topic” for each module you are taking and for general Computing and IT
Student information, please Subscribe to the Topic “SCIT Students”.

Useful Web Addresses

Wolverhampton Online Learning Facility (WOLF)         www.wlv.ac.uk/wolf
Learning Centres                                      www.wlv.ac.uk/lib
Student Union                                         www.wolvesunion.org
The Student Enabling Centre (SEC):                    www.wlv.ac.uk/sec
Personal Counselling                                  www.wlv.ac.uk/counsellingservices




                                                  9
Assessment

Computing is a vocational subject with a diverse range of industrial and commercial applications.
Consequently, some modules will involve practical work. Students must expect to work on
computers and computer terminals throughout their studies.
The continuous assessment within the scheme is designed to assess students on other
competencies in addition to practical technical skills. Indicatively, students can expect to be
assessed on any of the following:
      Design skills
      Self-assessment of quality
      Performance in oral presentations such as seminars
      The quality of written work in essays, reports and documentation of practical work
      Performance in group work and meeting skills
      The ability to source and reference ideas from books and other publications
      The ability to discuss and critically evaluate advanced topic areas
      Research skills
These skills are complementary to the practical technical skills that are sought by employers of
graduates, and are developed throughout the scheme. Experience has indicated that some
students find their progress inhibited by the lack of some basic skills; this is particularly the case for
written English. Students who have difficulty with this will be counselled to do some remedial work
to enable them to gain maximum benefit from their studies.

Types of assessment
The tutor, as part of the introduction to the module, will outline the assessment tasks. A more
detailed briefing for each assignment will be available via the WOLF topic that supports the
module. There is a wide range of assessment including:

      Written assignments
      Reports
      Time Constrained Assignments
      Examinations (open book or closed book)

Marking of Assessments

The marking and grading of your work, be it for example an assignment or an exam is a
comprehensive exercise involving first-marking by tutors, moderation by the tutors in the module
team and the submission of assessments to independent external examiners who monitor and
advise, thereby ensuring quality and standards.

The normal return period for feedback on your marked (summative) work is three weeks after the
date of submission. You will receive a grade achieved and comments on whether and how you
have achieved the learning outcomes.

Postgraduate Grading System
The University of Wolverhampton uses a six point grade scheme for its postgraduate courses. The
grades used in the scheme are as follows:

      The A grade is equivalent to a Distinction grade
      B, C and D reflect grades of performance within the overall Pass grade
      E is a Retrievable Fail (students will be reassessed)
      F is a Fail grade (students will be required to retake the module – normally with
       attendance).

Work that narrowly fails to achieve the learning outcomes will receive an E grade. On resubmission
and following reassessment, the maximum grade available will be D.

                                                   10
A student who obtains an E grade will have to resit, at the next available resit opportunity, part or
all of the module. A student who obtains an F grade will have to retake all of the module.

Where a student fails to pass part of the required assessment for a module at the first attempt but
succeeds in another part (e.g. passes the coursework but fails the examination), he or she will not
normally be required to repeat the part already passed.

A student who has failed a module after one attempt may be allowed to retake the module. This
means that the student must register for the module again and must take again all the
assessments for the module. Alternatively, if the module is not part of the core, the student may
take a replacement module which meets the requirements of the pathway.

A student who has failed the module after two attempts must retake the module, or take a
replacement module, another resit attempt is not normally allowed.

What Should You Avoid? What Should You Seek to Achieve?
      Remember that you are writing for another reader or readers. Do not assume that the
       reader will fill the gaps in your work.
      Use the introduction to establish what you are doing in your assignment.
      Use examples to support your analysis.
      Be objective and aim for reasoned argument. Phrases such as ‘in my opinion’ or ‘in my
       view’ are of little value because they are subjective. Do not use them. You should aim to
       support your points with evidence and reasoned analysis.
      Always acknowledge the use of someone else’s work, using the appropriate system of
       referencing. Also, it is a very serious offence to use someone else’s work, especially word-
       for-word or paraphrased contents of other’s work. This is called “plagiarism” and will be
       covered throughout the programme to ensure that you are aware of how to avoid it.
      Always keep copies of the sources or keep a note of each source as you use it, so that you
       can reference it in your bibliography at the end of your assignment.
      Plan your work in advance so as to meet the hand-in (submission) date. Writing up your
       research is often more time-consuming than you expect.
      Get help from tutors and mentors if you are unsure.
      Above all, do not ‘suffer in silence’; the Course Leader, Student Advisor and tutors will be
       able to provide guidance so please use them.

Why are ethical considerations important when researching for assignments?
Research is an essential and vital part of teaching and learning. Much is literature-based, using
books, journals, periodicals and web-based material. However, some research may involve
interaction with organisations and people. You should ensure that you do NOT conduct research
that could be intrusive or sensitive or could cause psychological harm or suffering to others.

For all modules excepting the dissertation, formal approval is not normally required for research
that brings you into contact with organisations and people. However, where such contact does
occur, it is imperative that you are fully aware of and rigorously and consistently apply the Ethical
Guidelines as contained in the MSc Project Guidelines. Where individuals or organisations have
agreed to provide information to you, you may be required to produce evidence that permission
has been given for access or contact.

What Feedback Can You Expect?
       What can you expect from your tutors whilst you are preparing your work?
                  Normally tutors will advise you, as a group, on the assessment at or near the
                   start of the module.
                  Thereafter, you may consult your tutors by emailing them.


                                                  11
       What should you not expect from your tutors?
                  It is not the role of a tutor to read drafts of your work and correct them with a
                   view to your obtaining a ‘good mark’. An assignment should reflect your effort
                   and input, and the role of the tutor is to guide and advise. It is then your
                   responsibility to assess this advice and guidance and use it accordingly. Tutors
                   provide this in good faith, but its use - or lack of it - by you is not an automatic
                   route to a good or a poor grade. Other factors, particularly those pertaining to
                   your skills and efforts, will play a vital role in your achievement.
       After completion of the assignment
                  The main feedback is through a copy (to you) of the assessment feedback sheet by
                   email from tutors/administrative support staff.
                  In some modules, additional feedback may be available through distribution of
                   an “outline answer”, highlighting key points for guidance.

How You Can Comment on Learning & Teaching and Assessment
We greatly value your feedback; students’ views are collectively influential in how we deliver L&T
and are gathered through staff-student meetings and via questionnaires, particularly the Module
Evaluation Proformas (MEPs) that you are asked to complete towards the end of a module. Such
feedback is analysed for annual monitoring of modules, subjects and courses.

Extensions and Extenuating Circumstances
If you experience an illness or other serious personal difficulty, which prevents you from completing
an assignment, you may request an extension to the submission deadline. A maximum of seven
days extension will be granted if your Course Leader, Course Tutor or Postgraduate Advisor (or
their nominee) considers your claim valid. To apply for an extension you must complete a POG33
form, which is available from the Registry. Any application must be submitted one week prior to
the submission deadline.

Where your illness or personal difficulty is so serious that you consider your performance in a
module (or more than one module) has been affected or you are unable to attend a formal
examination, you should complete and submit an POG34, available from the Registry. The
information contained within this form will be considered by a group called the SCIT Extenuating
Circumstances Board. If the Board accepts your claim you will normally be offered the opportunity
to take assessment as if for the first time, with no grade penalty. These Boards will not consider
retrospective applications.

Late Submission of Work
In the case of work submitted late, including any missed extended deadline agreed by a Course
Administrator, the assignment will be received but recorded as a zero grade (F)

Assessment Criteria
Each assessment will include criteria that describe what is you are expected to produce in order to
achieve the learning outcomes of the module, and against wich your work will be assessed. It will
also include descriptions (known as performance descriptors) of what you need to achieve in order
to meet of the requirements for each grade available (A, B, C, D, E and F). This will be
communicated to you in module guides and/or assignment briefings that you receive.

In order that you have an understanding of the performance standards required to achieve a
particular grade, a set of generic performance descriptors and the characteristics of work attracting
each grade are provided below.

Typically, A grade work:
          Will frequently be characterised by a degree of originality.

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          Should demonstrate a thorough understanding of key concepts within the subject.
          Will, where appropriate, be characterised by the application of theoretical concepts to
           empirical issues with appropriate reflection.
          Requires that all of the elements of the question set will have been addressed.
          Will usually show evidence of reading beyond that specified by the tutor/examiner,
           reflecting a broad literature review.
          Will show an ability to approach reading with a critical understanding.
          Will show evidence, where required, of an ability to evaluate contrasting viewpoints and
           draw conclusions.
          Will demonstrate a degree of independence of thought, rather than relying simply on the
           ideas of others, perhaps as contained in the prescribed reading for the course.
          Will demonstrate an ability to analyse and synthesise information.
          Will always be written in a clear and concise manner, will be well constructed and the
           argument of the work will flow smoothly.
          Will include an appropriate range of references using the Harvard Referencing System.
          Will normally be presented to a high standard.

Typically, B Grade work:
          Will address the key elements of the question set.
          Should show evidence of reading beyond that specified by the tutor/examiner.
          Will provide evidence of a good grasp of prescribed literature.
          Will show evidence, where required, of an ability to evaluate contrasting viewpoints and
           draw conclusions.
          Will normally demonstrate some evidence of independent thought.
          Will generally be written in a clear and concise manner with a good structure and a
           logically developed argument.
          Will normally be well presented.
          Will include references using the Harvard Referencing System.
Typically C Grade work:
          Will demonstrate a familiarity with, and understanding of, the prescribed course
           literature.
          Should demonstrate an understanding of the existence of alternative viewpoints, where
           these exist or where required by the question.
          May incorporate only limited evidence of independent thought.
          Will be generally coherent, though some weaknesses in structure or clarity may be
           evident.
          Will be presented to a satisfactory standard.
          Will include references using the Harvard Referencing System.
Typically, D Grade work:
          May demonstrate little or no attempt to integrate theory and practice, though it will show
           some understanding of both.
          Will demonstrate some familiarity with prescribed literature.
          May demonstrate some evidence of independent thought.
          Will be coherent, with an adequate structural framework and sufficient clarity to make a
           case.
          Will be presented to a satisfactory standard.


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          Will include references using the Harvard Referencing System.
Recoverable Fail (Resubmission Allowed): E Grades
Typically, E Grade work:
          Probably demonstrates little or no attempt to integrate theory and practice.
          May show limited understanding of relevant theory or computer science practice.
          Will make reference to literature but this may be unduly narrow, out of date or not
           wholly appropriate.
          Is unlikely to show any originality of thought.
          Will be coherent enough for the tutor to be able to satisfy her/himself that the candidate
           has a basic grasp of key ideas, even where it suffers from poor construction and
           inadequate referencing.
          Will be presented to at least a minimum satisfactory standard.
          May be unduly descriptive rather than analytical in approach.
Fail (Retake of Module Required): F Grades
Work of insufficient quality to achieve an E grade standard.
Typically, F Grade work may suffer from some or all of the following defects:
          Fails to address the question set.
          No attempt to integrate theory and practice.
          Little or no understanding of computer science practice.
          Little or no reference to appropriate literature.
          Little or no evidence of independent thought.
          Little or no evidence that the candidate has grasped key ideas.
          Is incoherent or has severe faults in its construction.
          Fails to cite works consulted.
          Makes unsubstantiated statements or assertions.
          Is unduly descriptive and/or lacks analysis.
          Is badly presented.
          Is unduly derivative of the work of others, for example, quoting large tracts from or
           largely précising published works.




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Further Information

Discipline
In order for all students to get full benefit from their classes, we would ask you to observe the
following guidelines:
GUIDELINES CONCERNING DISCIPLINE ISSUES IN CLASS

      Problem                                              Guidelines
      Mobile phones             Going off in class         At the start of a class (and TCAs
                                                           and exams) students will be
                                                           asked to switch off mobiles
                                Going off in class         Students who leave the class to
                                                           answer phone may find they are
                                                           not allowed to return
                                Use in inappropriate       Students should only use phones
                                places - e.g. labs,        in the social area in MI block
                                corridors                  (around the vending machines)
      Eating/drinking in                                   Drinks and sandwiches not
      class                                                allowed. Labs and classes have
                                                           notices up. Please observe these
                                                           notices
      Talking during lecture Relatively mild               This is disruptive for other
                                                           students who cannot hear the
                                                           lecture. Staff taking the lecture
                                                           will ask the student(s) to be quiet.
                                                           Students who talk persistently will
                                                           be asked to leave
      Talking and other         More serious cases         A student or group of students will
      disruptive behaviour                                 be excluded from the class.
      in class, active use of   Very serious - or they     A student in this situation will be
      mobile phones             were previously excluded   reported to the Dean who may
                                                           take disciplinary action.




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