Licensing- Follow-up January 22, by Cyk8exCb

VIEWS: 8 PAGES: 6

									                            Licensing- Follow-up January 22

   1. Lapu-Lapu, Mandaue, Cebu: procedure 9. step 4: I noticed in the LGUs step-
      by-step procedure the following comment: “While awaiting approval from the
      Fire Marshall, the applicant goes from desk to desk to have the plans evaluated
      and approved.” Can you please follow-up to check what procedures this refers to
      and in particular which agents/windows does the applicant have to go to process
      the application, their time and cost?

In Metro Manila cities, with the exception of Parañaque, the applicant only submits the
complete set of plans to the receiving section of the Office of the Building Official. The
staff will route the plans to the Line and Grade, Architectural, Civil/Structural, Electrical,
Sanitary, Plumbing, and Mechanical sections for evaluation and approval. In the case of
Visayas cities, upon submitting all the required documents, the applicant himself goes to
these sections to have the plans evaluated and approved. This process has no cost and it is
difficult to breakdown the time spent to each section. Respondents can only provide the
total number of days to get the building permit, which includes this desk-to-desk process
and fire marshall approval.

   2. For Cebu, procedure 9. step 4. Reference is made to the liaison officer, “The
      Building Official will endorse one (1) set of plans to the Fire Department through
      their liaison officer. As per National Building Code, the Fire Marshall shall give
      his/her recommendation within 5 working days from date of referral. Failure to
      act within said period shall mean that the plans and specifications conform to all
      the requirements of the Fire Code of the Philippines. While awaiting approval
      from the Fire Marshall, the applicant goes from desk to desk to have the plans
      evaluated and approved.” Does this mean that the applicant does not have to visit
      the Fire Bureau at this step and that the process of the fire safety approval is done
      internally at the OBO through the liaison officer? (Please correct me if the
      following is wrong: My understanding from looking at most surveys so far is that
      in some cities, at the stage for obtaining building permit, the applicant is required
      to go to the Fire Bureau to submit the plans for evaluation and approval for fire
      and safety regulations. In other cities, like Marikina, the applicant does not need
      to personally visit the Fire Bureau because this will be done by the liaison
      officer.)

Yes, while in some cities, at the stage for obtaining building permit, the applicant is
required to go to the Fire Bureau to submit the plans for evaluation and approval for fire
and safety regulations. In Cebu City like Marikina, the applicant does not need to
personally visit the Fire Bureau because this will be done by the liaison officer.

   3. Procedure 16. Fire Safety Inspection and Certificate: In your latest follow up
      from the Visayas you mentioned that the applicant visits the Fire Bureau for a
      second time to secure this certificate and also an inspection takes place. Can you
      also verify the step at which the applicant requests the inspection and certificate?
      In particular, is the inspection requested by visiting the Fire Bureau after the
       applicant obtains the building permit but before the Certificate of Occupancy? Or
       is the applicant given an inspection date the first time he visits the Fire Bureau to
       submit his plans for fire safety approval while processing the building permit?
       Does the applicant need to go back to the Fire Bureau for a third time to obtain
       the Fire Safety Inspection Clearance or is it given to the applicant immediately
       after the inspection?

Upon completion of the building, the applicant will now go to the OBO to apply for
Certificate of Occupancy. In the OBO, the applicant is given endorsement to the fire
bureau to conduct final inspection with regards to fire safety. The applicant goes to the
fire bureau with the endorsement to inform about the fire safety inspection and certificate.
The fire bureau will then advise the applicant of the inspection schedule. After
inspection, the applicant will have to go back to the Fire Bureau to obtain the certificate
and submit this document to OBO in order to process the Certificate of Occupancy.

   4. Procedures 15&17: Certificate of Electrical Inspection and Certificate of
      Occupancy: I noticed that the respondents in the Visayas and in Las Pinas have
      the same time for these procedures. Does this mean that the two procedures take
      the same amount of time or is it that the respondents have double counted here
      and have provided a time frame that includes both procedures but did so when
      asked in each procedure (since they have commented that they are done
      simultaneously)?

Once the applicant applied for Certificate of Occupancy, application for Certificate of
Electrical Inspection is already included since it is a set of forms given to the applicant. A
team of inspectors (architectural, structural, electrical, mechanical, and sanitary) will
conduct the inspection and once completed and processed, Certificate of Occupancy is
released together with the Certificate of Electrical Inspection.

   5. Procedure 15. Obtain Electricity Inspection Certificate: How is the inspection
      requested? Does the applicant personally visit the Electricity Division to request
      the Inspection? Is it correct to assume that the time frame provided by the
      applicants in their responses includes the time between request, receipt of the
      inspection and obtaining the clearance?

For cities that process CEI and Occupancy simultaneously, please refer to my answer in
question # 4. For other cities that requires one before the other, the applicant personally
visits the Electricity Division to request inspection. The time frame provided by the
respondents includes the time between request, receipt of the inspection and obtaining the
clearance.

   6. Procedure 17. Obtain Certificate of Occupancy and receive Inspection: How
      is the inspection requested? Does the applicant personally visit the OBO to
      request the Inspection? Is it correct to assume that the time frame provided by the
      applicants in their responses includes the time between request, receipt of the
      inspection and obtaining the clearance? I noticed that there are differences in the
         formulas for this calculation and in the cost. Is the Occupancy inspection and
         clearance cost and formulas regulated by the LGUs? [( a. For Caloocan PHP
         20,000.00 (PHP 1,000 per one million of the project value); b. for Las Pinas, the
         formula is is PHP 1,600.00 basic fee + PHP 700 filing fee; c. for Makati PHP
         1,600 basic fee + PHP 100 inspection fee; d. for Malabon the cost is PHP
         11,000.00 (formula=Floor area x 10, 000/1.2 Million, result is multiplied by PHP
         1,000) e. for Mandaluyong PHP 20,000 (PHP 1,000 per million); f. Marikina cost
         is based on construction cost i.e. construction cost more than PHP 850,000 – PHP
         1,200,000 = PHP 1,000; Every million or portion thereof in excess of PHP
         1,200,000 = PHP 1,000.]

 The applicant personally visits the OBO to apply for Occupancy Certificate and the time
 for inspection will be scheduled. The time frame provided by the respondents includes
 the time between request, receipt of the inspection and obtaining the clearance.

 Costs of building permit including ancillary fees and Certificate of Occupancy are
 regulated at the national level. These fees are provided in the National Building Code.
 Based on the New Schedule of Fees and Other Charges of the National Building Code,
 the table below shows the schedule of fees for Certificate of Occupancy for building use
 under the stated divisions. Our warehouse falls under Division G.

2. Regardless of the type of construction, the cost of construction of any building/structure for the
 purpose of assessing the corresponding fees shall be based on the following table:

 Table II.G.1. On Fixed Cost Of Construction Per Sq. Meter

       LOCATION            GROUP
       All  Cities     and A, B, C, D, E, G, H, I    F                        J
        Municipalities     P10, 000                  P8, 000                  P6, 000

 10. Certificates of Use or Occupancy (Table II.G.1. for fixed costing)

   a. Division A-1 and A-2 Buildings:

        i.    Costing up to P150,000.00 ……..……..………………………………                            P
                                                                                        100.00
        ii    Costing more than P150,000.00
        .     up to P400,000.00 ……………………..…………………………………
                                                                                        200.00
        iii   Costing more than P400,000.00 up
              to P850,000.00……………………………..……………………………..                                  P
                                                                                        400.00
        i     Costing more than P850,000.00 up to
        v     P1,200,000.00.……………….……………………………………………
        .                                                                               800.00
        v     Every million or portion thereof in excess
        .     of P1,200,000.00………………………….……………….……………..
                                                                                        800.00

 b. Divisions B-1/E-1, 2, 3/F-1/G-1, 2, 3, 4, 5/H-1, 2, 3, 4/and I-1 Buildings:
     i.    Costing up to P150,000.00…..……..………………………………                        P    200.00
     ii.   Costing more than P150,000.00
           up to P400,000.00 ……………………..……………………………                                  400.00
     Iii   Costing more than P400,000.00 up
           to P850,000.00……………………………..………………                                        800.00
     iv. Costing more than P850,000.00 up to
         P1,200,000.00 ……………….………………………………………                                      1,000.00
     v. Every million or portion thereof in excess
           of P1,200,000.00………………………….…………….…                                      1,000.00

According to Malabon LGU respondent, they based their computation taking into account
Table II G.1. This was also how they were taught by DPWH during the seminar for the
new schedule of fees. As to other cities, they are using row V of Table 10-b to compute
for the cost of occupancy certificate. In particular, they used the clause every million is
PHP 1,000. I asked LGU respondents, why there are differences in the computation and
whether this is monitored by DPWH. They said that DPWH does not monitor the
computation and even whether the new schedule of fees is being implemented fully in the
LGUs.

I asked Makati LGU respondent why they are still using the old fees. She said that there
is a Temporary Restraining Order in the implementation of the Revised IRR of the
National Building Code. The Philippine Institute of Civil Engineers contested the revised
IRR since 2005. I have downloaded the powerpoint presentation from PICE website for
reference. The following url is also helpful: http://www.pice.org.ph/irr-nbc-ad.htm.

As to Las Piñas, upon clarification with the staff in-charge of fees, I found out that the
computation they provided was based on residential rates (table 10-a). Moreover, they
have a different way of computing it. Instead of the per million computation, they are
using the portion thereof in excess of P1,200,000. Their computation during the survey is
as follows:

First PHP 1,200,000 = PHP 800
Excess of 1,200,000 = PHP 800
Total                 PHP 1,600

But since the category of the warehouse is Division G (commercial), the rate in Table 10-
b should be used i.e. PHP 1,000. Hence the cost of occupancy should be PHP 2,000 +
PHP 700 filing fee, which is equal to PHP 2,700.

   7. Mandaue: This new procedure that is required in Mandaue pursuant to Executive
      Order No. 10 S-2006, namely the Mayor’s clearance in order to obtain the
      building permit, is it applied in other cities or is it a local regulation? How recent
      is the implementation of this Executive Order, is it applied in practice? From your
      interviews, were other LGUs in other cities aware of this procedure?
This Mayor’s clearance is a local regulation. This has been implemented since April 2006
and the OBO of Mandaue sees to it that applicants, whenever applicable, secure the said
clearance. Other LGUs are not aware of this regulation.

   8. Malabon: Procedure 3. Obtain Tax Clearance: The LGU says that it is not
      required but the respondents have provided time and cost. Can you verify whether
      in Malabon the applicant has to obtain a Tax Clearance or whether a photocopy of
      the latest tax receipt is enough?

According to the LGU, they accept photocopy of latest tax receipt.

   9. Malabon: Procedure 10. Notarize building permit: Does Malabon City require
      notarization of the building permit? The LGU and one respondent say it is needed
      (time 1 day cost PHP 50) but the third private respondent says it is not needed.
      Can you please verify with the City or ask Architect Mr. Andres why he did not
      include this procedure?

The Building permit application should be notarized according to the LGU. Arch.
Andres, upon validation, also said that it is notarized and the time = 1, cost = PHP 100.

   10. Malabon/ Architect Mr. Andres: Procedure 16. Receive Fire Inspection and
       Certificate: Architect Mr. Andres says it takes 30 days for this procedure? This is
       high compared to the LGU and the other respondent. Can you please check with
       him what happens during the 30 days? Is this the time between request and receipt
       of the inspection? Is the clearance obtained at a later date?

Arch. Andres said that based on his experience it took him 30 days to obtain the
certificate (request and receipt of inspection already included). He said it might be due to
heavy workload on the part of fire department at that time of his application. But asking
him if the workload is normal, he said that it could be accomplished in 12 calendar days.

   11. Malabon/ Architect Mr. Andres: Procedure 15. Certificate of Electrical
       Inspection: What costs did Architect Mr. Andres include in reaching the PHP
       6,000.00 figure? The LGU has said “The certificate has no charge. However, the
       inspection costs PHP 50 as per Malabon City Revenue Code” and the other
       respondent said PHP 300.00.

There has been a double counting. The cost of CEI is already included in the building
permit fees. However, he is not aware of the PHP 50 inspection cost mentioned by the
LGU.

   12. Mandaluyong. Procedure 11. Obtain Permit for Temporary Utilities from OBO:
       For this procedure the cost of PHP 11,000.00 seems too high compared to the
       other cities (average PHP 500.00). Is this the cost or maybe the respondents have
       double counted this cost with the costs to obtain temporary utilities in the
       subsequent procedures, procedures 12-14?
Yes, they have double counted the cost of this procedure with the costs to obtain
temporary utilities. After clarification, both private respondents said that the procedure
costs PHP 3,000.

   13. Mandaluyong. Procedure 10. Notarize building permit: Does Mandaluyong City
       require notarization of the building permit? The LGU and one respondent say it is
       not needed but the second private respondents provides time and cost (time 1 day
       cost PHP 100.) Can you please clarify if notarization is required?

Notarization is not needed in Mandaluyong City. Mr. Villasanta had confused himself of
thinking that it is Mandaluyong requiring notarization when in fact it is Muntinlupa. He
both provided answer for the two cities.

								
To top