Cued Articulation by VP8177

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									     Cued Articulation

What is it…      How can it assist us…




         August, 2010
Cued Articulation

 A method of visually representing how to
  produce speech sounds using simple hand
  signs.
 It represents sounds visually to compliment
  auditory information
 Teaches how to make sounds NOT letters.
  e.g
  • Hand sign is the same for kite, cat, chemist
Distinctive Features of Cued
Articulation
 Place-
  • Where in our mouth we make a sound
       Shown in the shape and placement of the hand
 Manner-
  • How the sound is made
       Shown in the movement of the hand
 Voicing-
  • Is it voiced or voiceless
       Shown by the number of fingers
 Places of
 Articulation
1.   Lips
2.   Teeth                                    5       6
                                    4
3.   Alveolar Ridge     1       3                            7
4-5. Hard Palate            2             front
                                                      back
6.   Soft Palate                    tip           9
                        1                                        8
7.   Uvula
8.   Throat (Pharynx)
8.   Tongue
Manner of Articulation
 Plosive; explosion of air from mouth
 Fricative; constant airflow
 Affricate; combination of plosive then fricative
  sounds produced in the same place in mouth
 Nasal; resonates in nasal cavity
 Lateral; air flows along side of tongue
 Semi-vowels; tongue is not an articulator
  used for producing sound
/p/ and /b/
  As the lips separate to release the air, the index
   finger separates from the thumb
/t/ and /d/
 As the tongue releases the air to produce the sound, the
  index finger/s is/are jerked forward
/k/ and /g/
  As the air is released from the back of the
   mouth the crooked finger/s is/are jerked
   downwards and forward
/m/ and /n/
 Please note: Both these sounds are voiced
 /m/ - The fingers and thumb are placed on the side of
  the nose and do not move when producing the sound
 /n/ - The fingers are placed on the side of the nose and
  do not move when producing the sound
/h/
 The hand is held up beside the mouth and
  moved forward gently as the sound is produced
/f/ and /v/
 Finger/s start at the chin and is/are moved forwards
  and downwards as the sound is produced
/s/ and /z/
 /s/ - As the sound is produced the shape of the hand
  remains the same but moves forward like an S written
  on its side
 /z/ - As the sound is produced the shape of the hand
  remains the same but moves forward like a Z written on
  its side
/l/ and /r/
 /l/ - As the tongue flicks to produce the sound the
  fingers also flick outwards to describe the tongue
  action
 /r/ - As the sound is produced the crooked fingers
  move slightly forwards and downwards by wrist action
sh
 Finger and thumb represent the lip shape and move
  forward as the sound is produced
th
 th is both a voiceless (as
  in thimble) and voiced
  (as in them) sound
 Finger/s move straight
  forward from the mouth
  as the sound is produced



                               “them”
ch and j
 ch – sign /t/ then immediately drop the index finger
  and thumb down and move hand forward
 j – sign /d/ then immediately drop the two fingers and
  thumb down and move hand forward
/w/ and y
 Please note: Both sounds are voiced
 w – fingers start bunched beside the mouth and
  separate as the sound is produced
 y – fingers sit flat beside the mouth and separate as the
  sound is produced
When would we use the cues?
 When a child has difficulty articulating a
   sound:
     •   Cue to prompt the child to assist production
     •   Cue to aide intelligibility
 To assist with phonological awareness
   development:
     •   The ability to attend to and manipulate the sounds
         within words has been shown to be the most
         powerful predictor of success in the acquisition of
         both spelling and reading.
 To prompt those with a hearing impairment
   as to what sound is being produced
 Singing Alphabet



 This is one way to introduce Cued Articulation signs
  in the classroom

 REMEMBER: Always explain to the children why
  you are using the signs e.g. “Because they help us
  to see what our mouth should be doing when
  making sounds.”
Where to learn more..
 Speech Pathologists
 Many classroom teachers
 ACER Press
  www.acer.edu.au for online shop and catalogues
      • Published all Jane Passy’s publications, including books, wall
         charts and videos.
 Caroline Bowen websites and articles e.g
   www.members.tripod.com/Caroline_Bowen/acquisition.html
for information on typical speech development
 Vermont South Special School DVD “Let’s make a Start”-
   Introduction to Makaton, P.E.C.S, COMPIC, Cued Articulation and
   Phonemic Awareness, Letterland and Practical Math's Activities.
   www.vermont-south-ss.vic.edu.au/dvdinfo.htm

								
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