STROEBIIBAA final1 by 3Y4E6t

VIEWS: 8 PAGES: 43

									                             Overview Information

Federal Agency Name: Air Force Research Laboratory, Sensors Directorate
(AFRL/RY)

Broad Agency Announcement Title: Sensor Technology Research, Development, Test
& Evaluation Open-Ended Broad Agency Announcement (STROEB) II.

Broad Agency Announcement Type: This is the initial Open-Ended Broad Agency
Announcement.

Broad Agency Announcement Number: 09-01-PKS

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number(s): If a grant or assistance
instrument is awarded, the CFDA number will be 12.800 (AF) or 12.910 (DARPA)

Proposal Due Date and Time: Specified in each call for proposals to this solicitation.
NOTE: Proposal receipt after the due date and time shall be governed by the provisions
of FAR 52.215-1(c)(3).

NOTE: This BAA replaces, in its entirety, its predecessor BAA, STROEB
(BAA # 04-03-SNK). STROEB expires/expired 22 Dec 08. The anticipated
AFRL Sensors Directorate (AFRL/RY) FY09 requirements that were
published under Amendment 34 to STROEB, are repeated here and placed
under their respective Core Technical Competency (CTC).

Any anticipated funding listed reflects estimated program funding only. This
estimate is not a promise of funding. Funding is uncertain and is subject to change.
Changes in availability may occur as a result of the exercise of Government
discretion.

Additional Overview Content:
The Sensors Directorate (AFRL/RY) of the Air Force Research Laboratory, is
announcing to business and academia its intent to solicit proposals under this Broad
Agency Announcement (BAA). This announcement does not request any proposals
at this time. Solicitations (or calls) for proposals will be accomplished via amendments
to this BAA.

The over-arching strategy of the BAA involves the use of this 5-year open-ended BAA
which spans the seven (7) major Core Technical Competencies (CTCs) of:
   1)   Radio Frequency (RF) Sensors
   2)   Electro-Optical (EO) Sensors
   3)   RF Electronic Warfare (EW)
   4)   EO Battlespace Access
   5)   Automatic Target Recognition (ATR)/Performance Driven Sensing
   6)   Enabling Sensor Devices/Components
   7)   Trusted Collaborative Sensing

This strategy will provide AFRL/RY an acquisition tool with the flexibility to solicit
proposals and make awards to develop technologies to meet present and future Air Force
needs as ever-changing technology issues are identified.

The BAA will remain "open" for 5 years; however, proposals will only be solicited and
accepted during calls. Each call will identify solicitation topics and contain a common
cut-off date for proposal submission. Proposal receipt after the specified due date and
time shall be governed by the provisions of FAR 52.215-1(c)(3).

Calls for proposals (made by amendments to this BAA) will occur periodically
throughout the life of this over-arching BAA. Each call will: (1) identify specific
technology development topics within the seven major CTCs; (2) identify any changes to
the standard evaluation criteria or proposal preparation instructions, and; (3) contain
common cutoff dates for proposal submissions.

It is anticipated that solicitations issued under this BAA will be unrestricted. Small
businesses are encouraged to propose on all of the solicitations. The NAICS code, unless
otherwise stated in the BAA amendments, shall be 541712, and the size standard is 500
employees. Proposals submitted shall be in accordance with this BAA and it’s
appropriate amendment(s).

Interested offerors should be alert for any BAA amendments that call for proposals,
permit extensions to the proposal submission dates, or otherwise change the requirements
of this BAA or its subsequent amendments.


On-line Representations and Certifications: Potential offerors are notified that
effective 01 Jan 2005 to be eligible for an award, they must submit annual Electronic
Representations and Certifications, otherwise known as On-line Representations and
Certifications Application (ORCA) via the Business Partner Network (BPN) at
http://www.bpn.gov/orca. These FAR and DFARS level representations and
certifications are required in addition to the representations and certifications specific to
this acquisition. Before submitting the Electronic Representations and Certifications,
contractors must be registered in the Central Contractor Registration (CCR) Database.
On-line registration instructions can be accessed from the DISA CCR home page at
http://www.ccr.gov

Type of Contract/Instrument: It is anticipated that a mix of contract types will be used
throughout the life of this BAA, including cost type contracts in the form of Cost, Cost
Sharing, Cost Plus Fixed Fee (Completion), Cost Plus Incentive/Award Fee, Indefinite
Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (ID/IQ) contracts, and/or Assistance Instruments (i.e.,
Grants, Cooperative Agreements or Other Transactions).

Estimated Program Cost: The estimated value of the subsequent requirements that are
to be advertised under this BAA, over the next 5 years, is $500M.

Anticipated Number of Awards: The total number of awards under this solicitation is
unknown at this time. Future awards are probable based on amendments and/or calls for
proposals issued during the 5-year (FY09-FY14) solicitation period.

Address technical questions to the AFRL/RY CTC Leads:

CTC 1: Alan Kerrick, AFRL/RYR, Bldg. 620, 2241 Avionics Circle, Wright-Patterson
AFB, OH 45433-7304, Phone: 937-904-9330, Email: Alan.Kerrick@wpafb.af.mil

CTC 2: Michael Eismann, AFRL/RYJ, Bldg. 620, 2241 Avionics Circle, Wright-
Patterson AFB, OH 45433-7304, Phone: 937-904-9921, Email:
michael.eismann@wpafb.af.mil

CTC 3: David A. Wilkes, AFRL/RYZW, Bldg. 620, 2241 Avionics Circle, Wright-
Patterson AFB, OH 45433-7304, Phone: 937 904-9915, Email:
david.wilkes@wpafb.af.mil

CTC 4: Bill Taylor, AFRL/RYJW, Bldg 620, 2241 Avionics Circle, Wright-Patterson
AFB, OH 45433-7304, Phone : 937-255-4174 ext. 4004, Email:
william.taylor@wpafb.af.mil

CTC 5: Lori Westerkamp, AFRL/RYA, Bldg 620, 2241 Avionics Circle, Wright-
Patterson AFB, OH 45433-7304, Phone: 937-904-9815, Email:
Lori.Westerkamp@wpafb.af.mil

CTC 6: Chris Bozada, AFRL/RYDD, Bldg 620, 2241 Avionics Circle, Wright-Patterson
AFB, OH 45433-7304, Phone: 937-904-9633, Email: Christopher.Bozada@wpafb.af.mil

CTC 7: John Erickson, AFRL/RYT, Bldg 620, 2241 Avionics Circle, Wright-Patterson
AFB, OH 45433-7304, Phone : 937-320-9068 x 105, Email:
john.erickson@wpafb.af.mil

Note: The technical POC(s) for all requirements advertised under this open-ended
BAA will be specified with each individual call for proposals.
Address contracting questions to:

John Stovall, AFRL/PKSR, Bldg. 167, 2310 8th Street, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH
45433-7304, Phone: 937-255-5306, Email: John.Stovall@wpafb.af.mil;

or

Sarah Chaffe, AFRL/PKSR, Bldg. 167, 2310 8th Street, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH
45433-7304, Phone: 937- 255-4279, Email: Sarah.Chaffe@wpafb.af.mil;

Note: The contracting POC(s) for all requirements advertised under this open-
ended BAA will be specified with each individual call for proposals.
                            Full Text Announcement
I. Program Description:

1. Description of AFRL/RY Core Technical Competencies (CTCs): The Air Force
Research Laboratory Sensors Directorate (AFRL/RY) has defined a set of “Core
Technical Competencies” (CTCs) in order to optimize the strategic investment planning
process. Each CTC, led and represented by subject matter experts of the Sensors
Directorate, is organized to support the development and maintenance of related
technologies by identifying technical thrust areas and challenges, then translating these
challenges to a set of quality technical programs and projects involving internal and
external customers. The end state goal is to develop and sustain world-class core
technical competencies that span the spectrum of future Air Force mission sensor needs
that include diverse Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) capabilities,
while balancing necessary funding constraints.

AFRL/RY CTCs are defined as follows:

   1)   Radio Frequency (RF) Sensors
   2)   Electro-Optical (EO) Sensors
   3)   RF Electronic Warfare (EW)
   4)   EO Battlespace Access
   5)   Automatic Target Recognition (ATR)/ Performance Driven Sensing
   6)   Enabling Sensor Devices/ Components
   7)   Trusted Collaborative Sensing

The CTC operating concept includes broad collaboration across internal and external
government channels, and with industry partners, in order to best assess technology
development options that reduce the time and resources needed to field new warfighting
capabilities. Through implementation of the CTC approach, the Sensors Directorate
leadership anticipates development of supporting technology roadmaps, investment
strategies, and transition opportunities for new warfighting capabilities.


Individual descriptions of each defined Sensors CTC follows.


                                     CTC-1
                             Radio Frequency Sensors
The Radio Frequency (RF) Sensing Core Technical Competency (CTC) supports the
vision of Layered Sensing. The vision of Layered Sensing entails an architecture of
platforms and sensors in space, air, surface, subsurface and cyberspace netted together to
enable fusion of data to form a coherent situational awareness picture. Supplying the RF
sensors for this vision involves a breadth of technical understanding, including precision
navigation and timing, phenomenology, signal processing, sensor designing, and system
engineering. In addition, this CTC also supplies the RF sensors to enable precision
strike.

The RF CTC is organized into six sub-CTC areas:

       1.1 Space-Based Sensing
       1.2 Airborne Sensing
       1.3 Ground Based Sensing
       1.4 Advanced Concepts
       1.5 Phenomenology and Signal Processing
       1.6 Assured Reference

The Space-Based Sensing sub-CTC provides an interface to the Sensors Directorate
Space Office as well as external customers. It works to satisfying the RF sensor needs of
Air Force Space Command, the space sensing community and Space and Missile Center.

The Airborne Sensing sub-CTC works on systems that will go on aircraft. Sensing in
general, and RF sensing in particular, is getting harder. Foreign air defense systems are
effective at greater ranges. Radar jammers are becoming more sophisticated and more
proliferated. At the same time, targets and environments are becoming more challenging.
Small UAVs and civilian vehicles must be detected and tracked in urban and difficult
environments. The spectrum is becoming more crowded. A strong base of enabling
technology and multiple sensing approaches are required to cope with these difficulties of
the 21st century. Scalable, flexible, multi-function sensing options critically enable
Layered Sensing. The attributes of Tailored Performance, Spectrum Dominance and
Control, and Robustness, Agility, and Adaptability are particularly important. This is
exemplified in the SensorCraft vision for next-generation Intelligence, Surveillance, and
Reconnaissance (ISR). This vision drives device work to increase bandwidths and reduce
Size, Weight, and Power (SWAP). It led to the successful completion of the X-band Thin
Radar Aperture (XTRA) Advanced Technology Demonstration (ATD), and is being
continued with the Multi-Intelligence Sensor Technology (MIST) program, which
operates a set of RF sensors as an integrated sensor suite.

The Ground-Based Sensing sub-CTC is in place to support customers on projects such as
Three-Dimensional Expeditionary Long-Range Radar (3DELRR), next generation over-
the-horizon radar, and as a home for the outdoor RF range which will be coming to
WPAFB as part of the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) process

New approaches are investigated within the Advanced Concepts sub-CTC. This sub-CTC
has a particular strength in the detection and location of weak RF emissions using small
sensors which can be deployed in a number of ways, including on a small UAV.

The glue which integrates these sensor concepts into Layered Sensing solutions is
provided by the Phenomenology and Signal Processing sub-CTC and the Assured
Reference sub-CTC.
Phenomenology and Signal Processing began with a core expertise in Space-Time
Adaptive Processing (STAP) and knowledge-aided signal processing, and has broadened
to develop creative solutions across the breadth of evolving sensing challenges. Current
investigations include tomography, multi-input/multi-output radar, and waveform
diversity. In particular, waveform diversity holds promise for alleviating problems of
spectrum crowding, adding processing gain in distributed sensing applications, and as an
EP technique. Also showing promise are distributed sensing strategies including passive
radar and tomography. Passive radar has been developed in partnership with DARPA
under the Symbiotic Communications (SYCO) program. Greater adaptivity of the
passive sensing function to the electromagnetic environment is being developed under the
Passive Multi-Mode Surveillance (PMMS) effort, and a Multi-Static RF Experiment is
planned as follow-on. Tomographic image processing techniques show promise in using
spatial diversity instead of radar bandwidth to provide resolution

The objective of the Assured Reference sub-CTC is to enable the capability to provide
accurate, 24-hour, reliable, secure global positioning, velocity, attitude, and timing “state
vectors” for global operations. Current research thrusts include robust Global Positioning
System (GPS), navigation alternatives, and multi-sensor/vehicle integration, navigation,
and control. Robust GPS involves expanding the operational envelope of GPS use in
interference, dynamics, and plasma/hypersonic flight. Navigation alternatives research
explores inertial drift aiding technologies in GPS denied or obscured environments
including urban canyon and underground. Multi-sensor/vehicle integration, navigation,
and control research involves leveraging the use of multiple sensors/vehicles to
cooperatively solve navigation and targeting challenges. Precision alternative navigation
is especially critical to Layered Sensing since denial of GPS is probable and from a
Layered Sensing architectural standpoint we need to know where the sensors are located
at all times.

Central to the operating philosophy of the CTC is connecting with other organizations.
The Sensors Directorate, and indeed AFRL as a whole, is being driven more and more to
combine dissimilar technology developments into integrated warfighter solutions. RF
Sensing enjoys strong partnerships with other CTCs as exemplified by SWAP reduction
from the Enabling Sensor Devices/Components CTC allowing both the range of sensing
capability on the stand-off platform and the apertures and receivers on the stand-in
sensors. RF Sensing is developing the radar for Gotcha, an initiation in the Automatic
Target Recognition / Performance Driven Sensing CTC. Passive sensing and Electronic
Protection (EP) work is joint with the RF EW CTC. Collaboration extends beyond the
Sensors Directorate. Some highlights of work with other AFRL directorates include
MIST, in collaboration with Air Vehicles, and Ionosphere Mitigation for Space-Based
Foliage Penetrating Radar, with Space Vehicles. Collaboration extends beyond AFRL
organizations. Passive sensing work to identify and locate weak RF emitters supports
multiple external customers. AFRL is supporting Electronic Systems Center in
development of the 3DELRR, which will develop a new Air Force mobile ground-based
radar. Essential to supporting this customer is radar systems expertise, device and
components expertise, and the ability to obtain expertise from other directorates, as
needed. In summary, the RF Sensing CTC partners with other researchers and users to
create the RF sensors for Layered Sensing, and these sensors must function in an
increasingly difficult sensing environment.

FY09 CTC 1 Anticipated Requirements

Enhanced SSA Concept Study

The objective of this effort is to identify, develop, and evaluate concepts to improve
space situational awareness. Improvements are needed in the timeliness and accuracy of
space object identification (SOI), including improved characterization of orbital
parameters and maneuvers, space object shape, attitude, positional and/or rotational
stability, and broad space surveillance capability. Areas of very high interest for
exploration under this effort include space emissions mapping (from both a terrestrial and
on-orbit capability), employment of multi-static sensors, collection and leverage of
telemetry information, analyzing the feasibility of passive sensing distributed to
capitalize on existing illuminators networked to provide enhanced sensitivity and tracking
capability, modification of existing sensors (increased bandwidth, employment of
advanced signal and data processing algorithms and techniques, etc.) and possible
exploitation of other radar sensors used for very different purposes (such as the Air
Traffic Control Radars or Weather Radars).

Program POC: Richard Davis, AFRL/RYRR, 937-255-6427
Anticipated Funding: $4,500,000

Spectrum Dominance for Distributed, Layered Sensing

Every RF sensor is designed to function within a specific frequency band based upon its
mission requirements. Unfortunately, only a finite amount of usable spectrum is
available, and commercial, private and military interests all compete for high-value
pieces of it. Though all of the usable spectrum may be assigned, most of this spectrum is
unused at any given moment in time, with typical occupancies in spectral bands being
less than 6% (0.06). Next-generation radar systems will need the ability to adapt to the
presence of other users in their frequency band of interest. The objective of this program
is to investigate methods to dynamically access unused “holes” in the RF spectrum so
that we may transmit energy in these spectral holes without causing harmful interference
to other users. One of the key goals of this effort would be the development of a core set
of sensor spectrum usage behaviors which would require approval by (and be approvable
by) the U.S. and international regulatory communities. The ability to clearly and
unambiguously demonstrate to regulators that our spectrum usage behaviors would do no
harm to other in-band users is critical to gaining approval to operate. Only those
behaviors requiring regulatory approval should be in the core set.

Program POC: Steve Kiss, AFRL/RY, 937-904-9821
Anticipated Funding: $6,000,000
Navigation Warfare Technology Research MSW&A (NWTRM)

The Sensors Directorate has a long and successful history in developing and transitioning
Global Positioning System (GPS) technologies. The Advanced Concepts Exploration
(ACE) Laboratory is a key Directorate asset for modeling, simulation, wargaming and
analyses (MSW&A) of GPS research. ACE delivers a unique, in-house developed
hardware-in-the-loop simulator with a virtual flight test capability to assess
modernization alternatives for GPS and conduct GPS anti-jam research. The interface of
the Antenna WaveFront Simulator (AWFS) Next Generation (ANG) testbed with the
Vertical-Sensing Effectiveness and CONOPS Tool for Operational Requirements
(VECTOR) provides a realistic flight test simulation environment (e.g. terrain effects and
propagation losses), platform dynamics, and resultant measures of effectiveness (MOEs).
This simulation capability attracts a variety of customers as a cost-effective, repeatable
means of effectively predicting and validating flight test results in a controlled laboratory
environment, without the problematic need to conduct open air jamming. The objective
of this research and development effort is to invent Navigation Warfare (Navwar)
MSW&A simulation technologies to assess the weapon system effectiveness of various
solutions in layered sensing scenarios. The program pursues enabling technologies
required to achieve universal situational awareness for delivery of precision effects for air
and space-based applications. A major aspect of this effort is to perform Navwar
technology research in collaboration with industry and DoD agencies. To maintain
preeminence as a major player in the Navwar MSW&A community, existing simulation
assets will be significantly enhanced to address known system limitations and
performance. This program will encompass Navwar prevention projects, with emphasis
on electronic attack and electronic support.

Program POC: Joung C. Ha, AFRL/RYRN, 937-255-5579 ext. 4183
Anticipated Funding: $25,000,000


                                       CTC-2
                               Electro-Optical Sensors
The Electro-Optical (EO) Sensors CTC is focused on the innovation, development, and
maturation of electro-optical and infrared sensor technology for surveillance,
reconnaissance and targeting missions. A diverse research portfolio has been established
to address hard problems such as defeating camouflage, concealment, and deception
(CC&D); decreasing target search timelines; increasing identification confidence to
support restrictive rules of engagement; improving Air Force capabilities during urban
conflict; achieving persistent surveillance in asymmetric warfare and counter-terrorism
situations; providing unique capabilities for defense against catastrophic chemical,
biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive (CBRNE) threat; enhancing the wideband
network capabilities through laser communications; and developing sensors with
enhanced fidelity to effectively detect and identify fleeting, non-traditional targets.
The EO Sensors CTC is organized in four primary sub-CTC areas. These are:

   2.1 Multi-Sensor Target Detection and Identification
   2.2 Continuous Area Surveillance
   2.3 Close-In Sensing
   2.4 Transformational Communications

The Multi-Sensor Target Detection and Identification sub-CTC is focused on establishing
capabilities to accelerate the kill chain for both traditional and non-traditional targets, as
well as to significantly enhance the identification confidence in both ISR and targeting
situations. This is the largest application area within CTC-2, with a technology portfolio
including research in hyperspectral imaging, polarimetric imaging, direct detection laser
radar, and coherent laser radar, as well as integrated experiments to demonstrate and
quantify the capability improvements in a multi-sensor, Layered Sensing context.

Hyperspectral imaging provides a capability for automated, material-based detection,
classification, and characterization of military objects of interest ranging from CC&D to
CBRNE targets. Research in this area has culminated in the development of a low-cost,
production system for the Civil Air Patrol, as well as a successful Advanced Technology
Demonstration (ATD) system for long range reconnaissance aircraft. In addition to
continuing the maturation and transition of these capabilities, advanced research
continues in expanding the utility to non-traditional employment such as target tracking
in dynamic environments and change detection in highly cluttered urban areas.
Polarimetric sensing provides enhanced target contrast and shape based features that are
being pursued for their potential to provide improved target discrimination in an
automated setting. Research in laser radar is primarily focused on extracting robust
features for high confidence target identification such a 3-D shape and vibration.
Building on the recent successes in maturing direct detection approaches for operational
employment, this research area is increasing emphasis on coherent, synthetic aperture and
other sparse aperture sensing approaches to achieve ground-breaking capabilities for sub-
diffraction-limited resolution at extended ranges.

 The Continuous Area Surveillance sub-CTC is focused on the day/night surveillance of
city-sized areas with adequate spatial and temporal resolution to support the necessary
situational awareness for defeating asymmetric and terrorist threats in urban areas. This
forms the primary component of the Night Stare product and includes research in EO
surveillance for daytime operation, IR surveillance for night capabilities, and spectral-
temporal sensing for rapid detection, identification, and location of energetic battlefield
threats such as mortar and artillery attacks, gun fire, and explosions. The EO surveillance
research builds off the successful deployment of the Angel Fire system to Iraq. It is
developing advanced sensors to dramatically increase area coverage, improve the spatial
resolution to support object identification and determination of intent, and miniaturize the
sensor system for operation from unmanned platforms. The IR surveillance research is
focused on making large advances in IR focal plane array sizes, as well as, resolution
enhancement and rapid field-of-view steering techniques to establish commensurate
nighttime capabilities.
The Close-In Sensing sub-CTC aims to develop low-cost, compact EO/IR payloads that
are suitable for employment on small, unmanned platforms to form the lower level of the
Layered Sensing vision for situations such as heavy foliage and dense urban areas where
standoff sensor systems are inadequate. A moderate level of current research is on-going,
primarily in the form of Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) projects to develop
compact hyperspectral, infrared imaging, and laser radar payloads suitable for small
Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) operation. These innovative concepts will be matured
into air-worthy prototypes and perform small UAV experiments to quantify performance.

The Transformational Communications sub-CTC is oriented primarily to the
establishment of the extremely high data rate (> 10 Gbps), air-to-air and air-to-space
communication channels. This application area is composed of both enabling
technology, such as adaptive apertures capable of rapid beamsteering by non-mechanical
means, and laser communication systems development and demonstration. While
categorized as part of the Transformational Communications area, the aperture
technology is also supportive of the future needs for integrating laser radar and other
directed energy systems on high performance aircraft. An important part of the laser
communications system technology research is the development of hybrid RF/EO
systems whose bandwidth is adaptive to line-of-sight cloud conditions.

In summary, the Electro-Optical (EO) Sensors CTC is focused on the innovation,
development, and maturation of electro-optical and infrared sensor technology for
surveillance, reconnaissance and targeting missions.

FY09 CTC 2 Anticipated Requirements

Infrared Target Discrimination

The goal of this program is to better meld EO/IR sensor hardware and software to
improve images and the visual information that can be derived from them for
operationally relevant systems and situations. Sensor technology, the accompanying
image processing, and target phenomenology are often examined independently of each
other. In addition, software is sometimes required to overcome image flaws due to the
sensor hardware or to the sensor modality, something it may not be capable of
accomplishing within operational constraints. AFRL gained considerable experience in
hyperspectral imaging (HSI) through the SPIRITT ATD and in polarimetric imaging.
These efforts showed that hardware, software, and fundamental phenomenology must be
well integrated to yield significant capably enhancements. Currently, warfighters rely on
a number of infrared imaging systems to acquire information about their battlespace.
Technology is needed to improve their ability to pick targets out of clutter, increasing
their operational capabilities. This effort will yield novel, efficient algorithm
implementations to enable the warfighter to distil more actionable visual information out
of currently available and future imaging sensory modalities, greatly aiding US forces
engaged in the Global War on Terrorism. Major metrics include reduction of image
processing time of 50% and the reduction of false alarm rate of 25% over similar fielded
software. In this effort, we will apply a systems engineering approach, including the
application of appropriate fundamental phenomenology, to optimize the hardware and
software (signal and image processing) of a number of EO/IR sensory modalities
including but not limited to HSI, polarimetric imaging, spectral-temporal imaging, and
modalities employed to achieve infrared persistent surveillance. The limitations of the
available sensor, processor, and data link technology will also be considered. Emphasis
will be placed on operational performance and constraints to facilitate technology
transition to the warfighter.

Program POC: Peter Marasco, AFRL/RYJT, 937-904-9825
Anticipated Funding: $2,050,000

Small Size, Weight and Power Sensor

The objective of this effort is to investigate innovative approaches to develop low cost
active/passive EO sensors, with reduced size, weight, and power requirements suitable
for use on smaller UAV platforms that still retain high performance target sensing
capabilities. Sensors developed under this program will be tower-tested at WPAFB and
then flight-tested under the companion Miniature UAV Flight Experiments Program. For
sensors and architectures that yield capabilities similar to those currently available to the
UAS community, measured metrics include the standard SWAP parameters. For sensors
and architectures that offer advanced capabilities, not currently available, measured
metrics will focus on quantifying the additional operational capability along with
traditional SWAP parameters. Several recent and on-going programs have developed a
wide range of sensor technology that could be applied to DOD airborne missions. The
purpose of this effort is to further develop that technology to directly address those
missions from smaller airborne platforms. Conventional sensor technology and
techniques usually require unacceptably high powers and volumes, or performance has to
be degraded to reduce the size. The thrust of this effort will be to investigate hardware
and signal processing concepts that would lead to the development of inexpensive,
reduced range sensor packages for active/passive multifunction close-in sensing. The
program will pursue novel concepts focused on Predator to Mini/Micro class sensing that
have shorter range requirements, but can still accurately and persistently queue/sense
multi-mode signatures. Modes to consider include but not limited to Passive IR, Multi-
Spectral Imaging, active 2-D, 3-D imaging, polarization and vibration sensing. In this
effort, we will examine the systems engineering trade space to determine which active
and passive EO sensing technologies can be adapted to operate within the restrictions
imposed by small and micro UAS airframes and still yield valuable capabilities for the
warfighter. Once the analysis of alternatives is completed, sensing modes based on the
capabilities of the UAS airframe will be specified.

Program POC: Richard Richmond, AFRL/RYJM, 937-255-9614 ext. 250
Anticipated Funding: $7,250,000
                                      CTC-3
                            RF Electronic Warfare (EW)
The current and future RF threat, both individual RF sensors/radars and as a whole in the
form of an Integrated Air Defense System (IADS), is real and increasing in capability and
complexity. The fundamental problem this CTC addresses is that these threats deny
battlespace access to many military missions. Threat systems (both airborne and ground
based) are difficult to detect/find, highly mobile, and very lethal. An advanced IADS
also provides for increased capabilities by affording target information fusion, advanced
sensors, and innovative architectures. Additionally, recent conflicts have shown non-
traditional threats (defined as “disruptive” and “irregular”) are increasing and have
proven to be formidable. Therefore, advanced RF EW capabilities are needed to directly
combat the ever-increasing and diversifying threat and offer the combatant commanders
and DoD weapon system operators advanced non-kinetic capabilities to access and
survive their mission in the future battlespace. The objective of this CTC is to conduct
the research, discovery, development, demonstration, and transition of next-generational
RF EW concepts, techniques (algorithms), and technologies within the context of both a
stand-alone capability and as part of a network-centric, system of systems environment.

The RF EW CTC is organized in four sub CTCs:

   3.1 Layered Effects
   3.2 Cognitive Electronic Warfare (EW)
   3.3 EW/Information Operations (IO) Synergy
   3.4 RF EW System Experimentation Laboratory (SEL)

Using the USAF Airborne Electronic Attack (AEA) architecture as the foundational
construct, the Layered Effects sub-CTC focus area looks to increase the capabilities
through advanced concepts, techniques, algorithms and technology. The objective is to
spiral in advanced capabilities (technology and techniques) into this context.
Additionally, this focus area is the central development area for the “effects” component
to the Layered Sensing vision. Included in this area are advanced stand-off, escort, and
stand-in (close-in) EW system concepts. Ownship (self) protection and mutual support
Electronic Attack (EA) (A/C survivability) is of primary interest.

Layered Effects address all aspects of the threat kill chain, from long range detection
through threat weapon system engagement. Both EW techniques and advanced
technology development will be required. Anticipated major project areas for this sub
CTC include AEA technology development (arrays, beamformers, amplifiers, exciters,
etc), distributed Electronic Support (ES)/EA (i.e., multi-nodal, network-enabled EW) and
advanced EA techniques development (with a focus on advanced & future threats). Both
traditional EW and non-traditional (irregular warfare) mission areas are of interest.

The Cognitive EW sub-CTC focuses on network-enabled, coordinated ES, EA, and
Electronic Protection (EP) strategies, architectures and waveform research for next-
generational RF EW. The objective of this sub CTC focus area is to harness advance
technology and develop advanced techniques to allow for cognitive (i.e. intelligent or
learning) ES, EA, and EP functions for the USAF warfighter. The goal of this sub CTC
is to provide for a “closed loop” EW function. That is, allowing for real-time EW
feedback and intelligence information on the dynamic threat environment to be used in
order to develop and/or optimize EW effects. An ability to better sense, learn, and
react/adjust to applicable feedback from enemy RF sensors/net is of primary interest. It
is anticipated that systems concepts in this focus area will require the use of current and
future Position, Navigation and Timing (PNT) and data link capabilities. Pro-active EP
approaches, those which employ active means of defending the RF spectrum, are also
included in this sub CTC. Both EW techniques and advanced technology development
will be required. Anticipated major project areas for this sub CTC include Next Gen ES,
EW Battle Management, adaptive EW techniques, and Pro-active EP. Both traditional
EW and non-traditional (irregular warfare) mission areas are of interest.

The Electronic Warfare/Information Operations (EW/IO) Synergy sub CTC will lead the
investigation, discovery, and demonstration of approaches, benefits, and payoffs to the
use of synergistic (integrated) EW and Information Operations (IO) techniques. The goal
is to provide the techniques, algorithms, and associated technologies for “combined
effects” that can be integrated into a network-enabled operation. The objective is to
influence and deceive the sensors and enemy decision makers to allow for improved
battlespace access. A multi-disciplined approach beyond the conventional EW discipline
is required in order to leverage and capture a new capability. Example areas include (but
are not limited to) human factors and computer networking/data processing. The role
(and use) of the cyber domain may also be included. Anticipated major project areas for
this sub CTC include EW/IO synergistic effects development and EW/IO technique and
technology development. Both traditional EW and non-traditional (irregular warfare)
mission areas are of interest.

The central foundation to RF EW and CTC 3 is in the RF EW System Experiments
Laboratory (SEL) sub-CTC. The virtual RY RF EW SEL “laboratory” conducts the
necessary experiments and assessments that support all three of the above sub-CTC areas.
The RF EW SEL is not anticipated to be a single, physical laboratory, but rather
comprised of current facilities, the development of improved capabilities, and the linking
of multiple facilities or laboratories for effective systems-level experimentation and
demonstrations. In order to accomplish the above, the anticipated major focus areas are
increasing the fidelity of modeling, simulation, and assessment via research and
development, and the capability to conduct multi-lab experiments. The RF EW SEL also
has a potential capability to support multi-organizational and Layered Sensing
experiments and demonstrations.

In order to accomplish the above, efforts are required to rapidly develop, demonstrate,
and transition advanced RF EW technologies and techniques for our warfighting
customers. Additionally, efforts are required to perform the detailed investigation and
discovery of new/innovative RF EW concepts, techniques, and technologies for future
capabilities. All efforts will directly provide future non-lethal effects options for
combatant commanders (and would be expected to support or contribute to lethal effects
options). Additionally, efforts in this area will increase the depth and breadth of a
Layered Sensing capability. This will all be accomplished via the following categories or
types of effort/activities:

      Scientific investigations and engineering analysis
      Modeling and simulation efforts in a laboratory or virtual environment
      Laboratory, field, and/or flight experiments & demonstrations
      Technology maturation, development, and experiments/demonstrations
      Technique maturation, development, and experiments/demonstrations
      Hardware/software “breadboarding”, “brassboarding”, or prototype development
      Systems engineering tasks and technology transition risk management/abatement

FY09 CTC 3 Anticipated Requirements

Proactive Electronic Protection (PREP)

Assured global access is a major tenet of current and future USAF operational
capabilities. Adversaries employ a wide variety of techniques and technology to deny
USAF aircraft the ability to successfully carry out their mission. One aspect of these
engagements is the adversary’s use of advanced air-to-air electronic attack (EA) systems.
Their goal is to deny our ability to detect, track, identify, and successfully fire air-to-air
missiles by disrupting our use of the radio frequency (RF) spectrum. Therefore, to assure
global access we must also obtain and maintain spectral dominance and control such that
required mission information is obtain via trusted sensors. Without spectral dominance
our sensors may not have the ability to operate unabated resulting in denied access to
mission objectives. The objective of this effort is to develop proactive electronic
protection (EP) techniques and concepts for the advanced air-to-air electronic attack (EA)
threat. In this context, “proactive” refers to measures taken to actively disrupt an
adversary’s capability to effectively employ EA. These measures may be employed
through operational EW (ALQ-xx), radar (APG-xx), or developmental systems. This
effort will explore the breadth of proactive EP concepts and techniques and determine the
most appropriate trade-space parametrics for further development. This effort will
develop proactive electronic protection techniques and concepts to regain/maintain
spectral dominance in air-to-air engagements. These techniques and concepts will be
focused on operational EW systems for near-term transitions, but also address
developmental EW systems for long-term applicability.

Program POC: Marvin Potts, AFRL/RYRE, 937-904-9079
Anticipated Funding: $1,500,000

Adaptable Electronic Attack Techniques

The USAF has conducted all airborne combat missions with the support of electronic
attack (EA) since Operation Desert Storm. The utility of EA has been repeatedly proven
during this timeframe. However, most missions are conducted with EA capability based
on the latest, and potentially flawed, intelligence and electronic order of battle (EOB)
information. Additionally, lacking EA effectiveness information the aircrews are
required to implicitly trust their EA systems are operating as designed and programmed.
The objective of this effort is to develop EA techniques that incorporate feedback to
optimize their performance and to provide additional situational awareness to aircrew and
mission planners. Adaptable techniques utilize various observable mechanisms to further
train the EA technique to fully optimize their performance. Such optimized EA
techniques assure global access by increasing platform survivability. This effort will
develop closed-loop, adaptable EA techniques that optimize platform survivability. The
challenge lies in detecting and processing robust, quantifiable target system observables.
These observables may include mode/waveform changes, operator communications, data
transfers, and unintentional modulations. Adaptable EA techniques capitalize on these
observables to optimize effectiveness. This effort will leverage recent advances in ultra-
sensitive receivers, close-in sensing, and adaptive signal processing. The Adaptable EA
Techniques project will select a specific set of targeted systems to determine detectable,
quantifiable observables. Baseline EA techniques will be utilized to develop a process
(stochastic, genetic, game theory, etc.) for optimizing performance based on the
appropriate observable.

Program POC: Mike Murray, AFRL/RYRE, 937-904-9181
Anticipated Funding: $1,060,000



                                     CTC-4
                        Electro-Optical Battlespace Access
The Electro-Optical (EO) Battlespace Access core technical competency (CTC) is
responsible for the development of countermeasures against EO threat sensors that are
used to seek, acquire and track USAF, joint and allied air and space platforms. Most of
the activity in this area addresses the protection of aircraft due to the predominance of the
threat capability. Recent events, however, may focus some attention in the future on the
protection of space assets. Threat systems such as EO and infrared (IR) guided missiles
are the predominate threats that drive requirements in this area. IR guided missiles have
been operational since the mid-1950s and have been the predominate aircraft killers since
Vietnam. Advances in seeker guidance, detectors and scanning systems have increased
the capability of these threats significantly through the years. Other threats include
forward looking IR (FLIR), IR search and track (IRST), and imaging IR (IIR) sensors
that are associated with weapon systems. Innovative adversaries routinely use EO and IR
sensors to provide a passive tracking capability for anti-aircraft weapon systems
including radio frequency (RF) guided SAMS. Much of the Electro-Optical (EO)
Battlespace Access CTC activity of this area has been dedicated to understanding the
capability of the threats and their potential susceptibilities to countermeasures. The
Electro-Optical (EO) Battlespace Access CTC also encompasses EO and IR threat
warning technologies that include missile launch and approach warning and laser threat
warning.
The CTC is broken into 4 sub-areas:

       4.1 Missile Warning
       4.2 Laser Threat Warning
       4.3 Reactive Countermeasures
       4.4 Proactive IR Countermeasures (IRCM).

The Missile Warning sub-CTC focuses on passive detection, tracking, and declaration of
tactical missiles fired at DoD and commercial airborne assets by exploiting known EO/IR
plume signatures. This area has relatively low funding so it has pursued adapting mature
device and component technologies to address needs for affordable missile warning and
countermeasures cueing. This sub-CTC has recently devised a new two-channel sensor
system that leverages past work in visible band missile detection. Several tests have
shown high signal to clutter performance in live missile testing. The Missile Warning
sub-CTC is planning to build a wide field of view prototype that potentially could fly
with a laser jamming system to demonstrate the capability. The group has also supported
the transfer of threat detection technology to several other military applications.
Research has begun using the two-channel sensor to detect small arms fire. Initial testing
indicates gun discharge detections at distances that could support persistent surveillance
systems such as AngelFire, cuing the operator to the location of hostile fire. Threat
detection technology has proven very useful in satisfying unmanned aircraft systems
(UAS) Sense and Avoid requirements under two major ATD programs managed out of
the Sensors and Air Vehicles directorates. Several flight tests have been accomplished.
These efforts continue with potential integration of visible band sensors, RADAR, and
LADAR to allow UAS such a Global Hawk, Predator, Reaper and smaller UAS such as
Shadow to fly in the National airspace. In addition, Missile Warning sub-CTC is
collaborating with the Human Effectiveness Directorate to transfer temporal-spatial
detection technology to RYJ to find new Air Force applications of this technology in
support of the BRAC. Missile Warning sub-CTC has been considered for down scoping
but recent success in missile warning testing has prompted efforts to re-emphasize this
area. The Missile Warning sub-CTC operates a missile warning test facility that has the
capability to test and characterize EO and IR missile warning system performance.

The Laser Threat Warning sub-CTC addresses Laser Threat Warning. Laser Threat
Warning is concerned with the detection of lasers associated with weapons systems and
threats to eyes and sensors. Specifically, these systems are designed to detect, identify
and characterize rangefinder, designator, beam rider, optical augmentation, terminal
fusing, optical jammer and eye/sensor blinder threats. Detailed threat parameter hand-
offs are provided for Counter-Measures (CM) cueing and hazard assessment. Recent
laser imaging sensor developments under the Night Agile Laser Protection (NALEP)
ATD augment protection countermeasures to provide “see-through” capability against
laser jammed night vision goggles (NVGs). LASINT technologies such as the
Battlespace Laser Detection System (BLADES) and the Battlespace Laser Telemetry
(BLAST) sensor support Battlespace laser hazard assessments for fixed wing and UAV
platforms.
The Reactive Countermeasures sub-CTC is Reactive Electro-Optical and Infrared
Countermeasures. This area is uniquely threat driven in the development of
countermeasure concept and techniques. The heart of the Reactive Countermeasures sub-
CTC is found in the Dynamic Infrared Missile Evaluation (DIME) facility where threat
seekers and sensors are exploited to determine their susceptibility to countermeasures
techniques. The DIME is also the center for modeling and simulation capability
including hardware in the loop, digital and hybrid digital injection simulations. The
DIME is tied to NASIC as an exploitation agent for air-to-air missile and sensor threats.

The Proactive IR Countermeasures (IRCM) sub-CTC is focused on the revolutionary
concept of Proactive IRCM (PIRCM) laser-based threat detection and engagement. In
this concept, laser energy is scanned around the aircraft to detect staring and scanning
EO/IR threat sensors/seekers during the early acquisition and tracking phase. PIRCM,
when tied with passive missile warning and reactive laser countermeasures, provides a
layered defensive/offensive capability to negate both passive tracking systems as well as
guidance optics in missiles that have not yet been launched. The track function will
locate the optics accurately relative to the aircraft during the threat/aircraft encounter for
a successful application of the countermeasure. The identify function will determine the
characteristics of the observer with sufficient detail so that the appropriate
countermeasure can be successfully implemented and allow targeting of the threat.

                               CTC-5
       Automatic Target Recognition /Performance Driven Sensing

The Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) / Performance Driven Sensing (PDS) Core
Technical Competency (CTC) is responsible for development and maturation of
technologies for automated and semi-automated exploitation of sensor data. Functions
supported include detection, tracking, geolocation, and identification of air, ground, and,
more recently, space objects, as well as sensor management, registration, and other
enabling technologies required for single and multi-sensor systems in these functional
areas. Automated exploitation is supported for a wide variety of mature and emerging
sensors and modes, including passive and active electro-optic sensors and a variety of
low and high frequency radar modes. While traditional “targets” were military vehicles,
objects of interest now include civilian vehicles and dismounts.

The ATR/PDS CTC has a long history of developing Layered Sensing solutions to
challenging problems. As an example, in the CSAF-directed Targets Under Trees (TUT)
program, low frequency radar change detection, which provided very low false alarm
cues with accurate geolocation, was paired with literal EO imagery to provide a robust
target detection and identification capability. Growing analytic support to development
of layered sensing solutions is now being developed as well. Performance Driven
Sensing is the employment and development of sensing technology to meet specific
functional goals. While this is the intent of the entire Sensors Directorate, special
responsibility falls on this CTC to provide empirical data, and in the future analytical
data, to support sensing employment and investment decisions by providing a link
between parametric representations of sensor hardware and quantified functional
performance.

The ATR/PDS CTC is broken into sub-CTC areas:

           5.1   ATR Integration & Demonstration
           5.2   Algorithm Innovations & Prototyping
           5.3   Signature Based Exploitation and Processing
           5.4   Assessment, Data, Models, Communications & Testbeds

The ATR Integration & Demonstration sub-CTC conducts application efforts providing
solutions to Air Force challenges from both platform and capability perspectives.

The Algorithm Innovations & Prototyping sub-CTC investigates new approaches for
emerging – and highly challenging – AF problems such as tracking and identifying
objects in urban environments, and also performs basic research in algorithm approaches,
where it is home to an AFOSR “Star Team.”

The Signature Based Exploitation and Processing sub-CTC is responsible for
phenomenology driven advancements such as target and phenomenology modeling,
signature database technology, MASINT tool development, and the PDS-inspired staring
radar sensing and processing concept known as “Gotcha.”
The Assessment, Data, Models, Communications & Testbeds sub-CTC performs
algorithm and system evaluation, collects, archives, and distributes sensor data required
to develop and characterize algorithms, and has grown to include Corporate efforts in
modeling and simulation of integrated sensing systems and testbeds for sensor system
experimentation.

The ATR Center is a new effort, spanning Sub-CTCs, that focuses research on ATR
theory as a tool for development and employment of ATR. It provides this focus through
sponsored research, capture of progress through the “ATRpedia” and through challenge
problems.

Outstanding facilities allow this CTC to participate in ATR development and maturation
and capture program products, thus enabling the next generation of research. The
Advanced Recognition Capability (ARC) Laboratory provides a dynamic environment
for single and multisensor exploitation experiments. It employs live feed, stored, and
synthetic data, multiple levels of simulation, and human participation in the exploitation
system. The Comprehensive Performance Assessment of Sensor Exploitation
(COMPASE) Center provides independent assessment of exploitation components and
systems as well as developing challenge problems and metrics for community use. The
COMPASE Center public web page is at https://www.compase.vdl.afrl.af.mil/. The
Sensor Data Management System (SDMS) is a 50+ terabyte archive of well-characterized
sensor data from research and operational collections. The SDMS distributes holdings to
programs and other users on both physical media and via internet. The link to its public
web page is https://www.sdms.afrl.af.mil/main.php. The Virtual Distributed Laboratory
(VDL) provides controlled access to file sharing and a variety of program and
collaboration tools. The link to the VDL public web page is https://www.vdl.afrl.af.mil/.
The Layered Sensing Algorithm Innovation & Prototyping Laboratory supports algorithm
development and houses innovative display and interaction tools. The Signature and
Signal Processing Laboratory houses the target model and signature validation activities
and supports signature production for ATR capabilities as well as advanced radar
processing activities. New facilities designed to support Layered Sensing include the
Small Unmanned Systems Laboratory, the Rooftop Facility supporting communications,
and a hangar supporting agile measurement and experimentation.

Most ATR/PDS CTC programs draw from contracted research, use of on-site facilities,
and in-house research. Use of such hybrid approaches achieve program goals, leverage
resources, and add to the facilities and human knowledge that make up the ATR/PDS
CTC.

FY09 CTC 5 Anticipated Requirements

Characterization, Archival, and Distribution of Data for Image Exploitation
Systems (CADDIES)

The goal of modern warfighting is to target and kill time sensitive or time critical targets
in difficult deployment conditions. Targets must be rapidly and consistently identified in
order to destroy enemy assets in a manner that is timely, survivable, and cost effective.
On-going research into the viability of intelligent targeting algorithms using various types
of sensed data has proved the extreme difficulty of the problem space. To truly test the
robustness of innovative algorithms requires comprehensive sets of data and a true
understanding of the phenomenology of the sensor. These, coupled with suitable
development environment architecture, provide the researcher with the proper tools to
develop and/or test algorithms. This effort shall provide a comprehensive set of data and
development architecture in which to develop, evaluate, and/or demonstrate innovative
targeting algorithms to enhance the appropriate components of the Warfighters’ kill
chain. This effort shall further advance all aspects of the current AFRL/RYAA Sensor
Data Management System (SDMS). This effort shall support automatic target
recognition, tracking, and sensor fusion researchers in data collection planning,
execution, data manipulation, processing, archiving and distribution. This effort shall also
advance the current database techniques, develop and acquire new and innovative data
manipulation tools, provide web site enhancements, support distributed web-based data
dissemination, provide parallel data image processing, and integrate SDMS with other
applicable systems enabling ATR and SF technology advancements.

Program POC: Mary Jarratt, AFRL/RYAA, 937-904-9123
Anticipated Funding: $24,354,000
Physics Exploitation, Processing and Prediction for Performance Based Sensing

The objective of this program is to enable performance based sensing by developing
innovative physics-based signature exploitation and modeling methods and innovative
signal processing for feature based recognition and fusion. This program will develop an
integrated radar sensor signature exploitation and signal processing analysis capability for
present and future recognition applications, e.g., staring radar, combat identification,
space situational awareness (SSA), and ISR applications. It will develop innovative and
efficient methods for collecting and processing radar sensor data for recognition.
Innovative methods for salient feature analysis will be developed and used with the
prediction, analysis and processing capability as a function of sensor design parameters
for performance driven sensing. This effort will also develop a loosely coupled
capability for multi-sensor measurement, processing, modeling and analysis methods to
support present and future recognition database development efforts and ISR
applications.

Program POC: Eric Branch, AFRL/RYAS, 937-656-7466
Anticipated Funding: $24,665,000


                                    CTC-6
                      Enabling Sensor Devices/Components
The primary goal of the Enabling Sensor Devices/Components CTC is to enable future
AF sensors and sensor networks through the advancement and maturation of hardware
enabling technologies. Innovative scientific and engineering solutions to emerging
sensing challenges and the assessment and projection of evolutionary and disruptive
hardware developments are accomplished through our highly skilled workforce and
excellent in-house capabilities. These are coupled with large leveraged national
programs. The CTC-6 vision is “to enable the acquisition, manipulation, delivery and
protection of information and signals using the most degrees of freedom (temporal,
spatial, frequency, polarization, etc) through the development and integration of
component hardware.” Electronics is broadly defined to include optoelectronics. The
formal establishment of tech base is critical.

The Enabling Sensor Devices/Components CTC research areas include innovative
materials for electronics, solid state devices and circuits, highly integrated microsystems,
subsystems for RF and EO imaging, sensing, communications, miniature signal
processors, smart subsystems and electronic warfare. This CTC develops and matures
these core technologies for emerging defense critical electronics hardware to support
larger programs within the Sensors Directorate, AFRL and the Air Force. This CTC’s
large and skilled government workforce has a national reputation for their technical
expertise and achievements. Exceptional research facilities – including modern design,
fabrication and assessment facilities – are the crucial infrastructural elements for
maintaining this high level of technical excellence. This workforce and its facilities are
located across the three Sensors Directorate research sites (Hanscom AFB, Rome
Research Site and Wright-Patterson AFB).

The Enabling Sensor Devices/Components CTC portfolio to support systems of systems
architectures is consistent with Layered Sensing, including the establishment of new
programs to address emerging hardware demands as the result of networking sensors and
information layering. These leveraged programs are in addition to the established
portfolio to reduce the cost, size, weight and power consumption of RF and EO sensors
and countermeasures. These programs address issues such as connectivity versus
processing, reconfigurability, accelerated insertion of new technology, and trust. The
overall resource approach is to maximize impact (and funding) through the use of
strategic partnerships with national organizations such as DARPA, other services,
academia and industry. Due to long insertion and maturation times, these technologies
need to be worked today.

Historically, the Enabling Sensor Devices/Components CTC portfolio consisted
primarily of technology push, but the CTC has established an in-house effort called
Transformational Element Level Array (TELA) Test Bed to provide subsystem
engineering analysis and subsystem integration demonstrations providing enabling
hardware inputs into the larger performance driven sensing (systems of systems
engineering) efforts. TELA will be used to define the technology improvement impact
and flow down the hardware requirements from current and future efforts. CTC-6 has
strong ties to RY’s Space Office that has responsibility for providing the technology pull
required for developing responsive space payloads.

The Enabling Sensor Devices/Components CTC Technology Area Interests: Efforts in
fundamental and exploratory research and development; novel materials for electronic
and opto-electronic applications (including metamaterials); electronic and opto-electronic
device concepts; high power devices; amplifiers; sources; low noise and signal control
components; photonic components; high-temperature electronics; signal control and
distribution; signal processing; multi-function monolithic and heterogeneously integrated
circuits; high-speed analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog mixed mode integrated
circuits; reconfigurable electronics; power distribution and conditioning; multi-chip
modules; and high density packaging and interconnect technologies. Activities include
design, development, fabrication, integration, evaluation and demonstration of these
electronic/opto-electronic component technologies. The goal is to demonstrate
significantly improved military sensors of smaller size, lower weight, lower cost, lower
power dissipation, higher reliability, advanced thermal management techniques, and
improved performance. The device and component technology developments are military
unique; they are based on Air Force and other Department of Defense weapon systems
requirements in the areas of imaging, sensing, communications, electronic warfare,
navigation, and smart weapons.
FY09 CTC 6 Anticipated Requirements

Novel IR Beamsteering and Beam Control Devices

The objective of this program is to perform exploratory research for the development of
highly functional beamsteering and beam control architectures. Current methods toward
high power, non-mechanical beamsteering suffer from any number of drawbacks, such as
high insertion loss (and hence low power handling capability), small steering angles, cost
prohibitive integration and packaging requirements, slow steering speeds, among others.
Further, efforts will be made to consider multi-platform and multi-aperture integration
(such as combined RF and EO apertures) for dramatic enhancements to sensor
management on small, unmanned aircraft. Research in this area will attempt to blend a
mix of revolutionary and evolutionary (major improvements to MEMS based beam
steering devices, e.g.) research. Emphasis will be placed upon the ability to integrate such
concepts in nontraditional apertures (e.g. aperture conformal to an airframe).

Program POCs: Sarah Maley, AFRL/RYDP, 937-255-1874 ext. 3518
                Attila Szep, AFRL/RYDP, 937-904-9964
Anticipated Funding: $187,000

Enabling Detector Concepts

Systems for use in wide field of view surveillance applications could be greatly enhanced
in their mission capability if added functionality of spectral filtering and polarimetry
could be included at the pixel level. Currently developed systems utilize optical
components in front of, or registered to the focal plane arrays (FPAs) in question, proving
expensive in terms of integration costs. In addition, these functions are generally limited
to entire scenes in a fixed way. For instance, gratings in front of an FPA allow spectral
filtering across the grating, but in a linear fashion, so that tailoring the response of
individual or groups of pixels in distinct areas of the FPA is not permissible. The overall
objective of this program is to develop focal plane arrays in the various bands of interest
(shot-wave, mid-wave, or long-wave IR) that can integrate these functions in a cost
effective manner. Novel material systems and fabrication techniques will be considered
for selection provided they meet performance requirements for the application.
Incremental upgrades to existing systems are discouraged.

Program POC: John Scheihing, AFRL/RYDP, 937-255-1874 ext. 3366
Anticipated Funding: $230,000

Sub-Component Development for Chip-Scale Agile Waveform Generation (AWG)
and LADAR

Current EO active sensing platforms, such as laser radar (LADAR) and Agile Waveform
Generation schemes (AWG) require high-performance photonic components and
subsystems to generate tailored output emission to aid in discrimination of objects from
the background. These systems could see a dramatic reduction in cost, size, weight and
power requirements if much of this functionality could be integrated at the device or
chip-scale level. This program seeks to utilize novel photonic integrated circuits,
including two- as well multi-section passively mode-locked diode lasers, optically-
injected diode lasers, and gain-lever-gain “building blocks” to demonstrate a viable
solution for such next generation coherent emitters.

Program POC: Nicholas Usechak, AFRL/RYDP, 937-255-1874 ext. 3307
Anticipated Funding: $140,000

Metamaterials for Revolutionary Sensor Application – Phase I

Metamaterials are man-made materials whose properties have been engineered to achieve
new capabilities not found in naturally occurring material systems. Electromagnetic
metamaterials are a subset of metamaterials in which researchers manipulate the
electromagnetic permeability and permittivity to alter the naturally occurring properties
of materials and circuits to achieve dramatic electromagnetic effects. The open literature
touts a number of potential applications at RF and optical frequencies, including:
magnetic ground planes for wideband, low profile, lightweight antenna technology such
as foliage penetrating radar; negative-index-metamaterials (NIM) for wideband radomes;
NIMs achieved by plasmon behavior for infrared optical beam steering; and near-zero-
index-metamaterials which some researchers claim offer RF signature controllability and
cloaking, and RF/EO sensors, components and devices. The objective of this effort will
be to (1) rapidly assessing the feasibility of metamaterials with applications of high value
to the Air Force, (2) initiating six to ten seedling programs in areas believed to have high
potential for near-term prototype technology demonstrations, (3) enhance in-house
expertise and capability and (4) define the development plan for Phase II.


Program POCs: John Albrecht, AFRL/RYDX, 937-904-9265
                John Derov, AFRL/RYHA, 781-377-2638
Anticipated Funding: $5,625,000



                                CTC-7
    Trusted Collaborative Sensing with Spatial-Temporal Awareness
The vision of the Trusted Collaborative Sensing CTC is to perform exploratory and
advanced development in trustworthy sensing system architectures to enable multi-
layered and cyber sensing.

This program consists of three sub-CTCs:

               7.1 Collaborative & Distributed Sensing Architectures
               7.2 Autonomic Secure Sensing
               7.3 Sensor Web Backbone
These efforts are in direct support of the Layered Sensing vision and Universal
Situational Awareness Vector thrust.

The objective of the Collaborative & Distributed Sensing Architectures (C&DSA) sub-
CTC is to develop trusted architectures, methodologies, and strategies for distributed,
heterogeneous sensing systems and to assess trustworthiness in existing architectures.
This research addresses the challenges of developing and deploying sensing systems and
system of systems that rely on untrusted commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components
integrated with government-off-the-shelf (GOTS) components, which form an unstable
and vulnerable infrastructure upon which to conduct emerging and future net-centric,
collaborative operations. To address this challenge, C&DSA research includes the
definition of representative measures of system trustworthiness and trust for current
sensing architectures, development of modeling and simulation tools to measure and
assess trustworthiness of sensing architectures, strategies to develop proof-of-concept
architectures, methods to instill “trust at a distance” in distributed heterogeneous sensing
systems, and the creation of a global “trust picture” for decision makers. The sub-CTC
will provide an “honest broker” function to evaluate and guide architecture development
for other CTCs.

The objective of the Autonomic Secure Sensing sub-CTC is to develop new technologies
to measurably and significantly protect end-node systems from exploitation, reverse
engineering, and intellectual property theft. The ultimate goal is to establish a level of
trust in the end-node system. An end node can be anything from a laptop, to an F-22 to
an air operations center. To accomplish this objective research is performed in protection
technologies, protection assessments, and autonomic protections. Protection technologies
research and develop layered systems of anti-tamper and software based defenses to
protect, detect and react to physical and cyber attacks on war-fighter systems.
AFRL/RYT serves as the DoD Office of Primary Responsibility (OPR) to conduct basic
research, exploratory, and advanced development programs to meet DoD anti-tamper and
software protection technology needs for military systems covering land, sea, air and
space environments. Protection assessments provide quantitative evaluations of system
vulnerabilities and protections. The research in this area focuses on simulating nation-
state class and rogue group threats and developing assessments of COTS and GOTS
security protections as well as assessments of system vulnerabilities. Autonomic
protections provide research and development of autonomic, cognitive detection and
reaction systems and how to apply those technologies to sensing and sensor network
protection.

The objective of the Sensor Web Backbone sub-CTC is to apply communications
technology to support distributed collaborative sensing systems and sensor grids; develop
sensor bus topologies to assure reliable, trusted sensor interactions, and conduct sensor
net experimentation /demonstrations to support ISR sensing exploration and
development. Although the research will emphasize commercial sector technologies that
are becoming the major part of the global grid, COTS will co-exist with GOTS in the
heterogeneous sensor grid of Layered Sensing and cyberspace. The overall goal of
Sensor Web Backbone is to leverage commercial systems and products to reduce the
cycle time (and subsequent cost) of delivering capability to the war-fighter.
Communications are becoming a critical aspect in the success (or failure) of military
operations. The DoD has increased its reliance on commercial wired and wireless
systems however, can we trust these systems to provide a robust backbone to conduct
operations? The answer is yes, given we can trust, or add trustworthiness to these
commercial products. A major theme of this work is Commercial Adaptation for Military
Application (CAMA). That is, via the adaptation of commercial products and systems,
trust can be injected into these systems which can then be used for military operations.


2. Deliverable Items: Potential deliverables include, but are not limited to:


       a. Data Items:     The following CDRLs will generally apply. Addition,
          elimination, or modification of CDRLS may be suggested by the offeror in
          their proposal. Each call for proposals will identify specific deliverables for
          that program.

DATA   DATA ACQ.                                                                             No. of
ITEM   DOC. No.                             TITLE                   FREQUENCY                COPIES

A001   DI-MISC-80711A/T    SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL REPORTS         IDIQ: At Conclusion of   6
                           FINAL REPORT
                                                                    each T.O.
                                                                    CPFF/CR: At contract
                                                                    completion
A002   DI-MISC-80711A/T    SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL REPORTS         MONTHLY                  4
                             CONTRACTOR'S BILLING VOUCHER

A003   DI-FNCL-80331A/T    FUNDS AND MAN-HOUR EXPENDITURE           MONTHLY                  4
                           REPORT

A004   DI-MGMT-81468/T     CONTRACT FUNDS STATUS REPORT             QUARTERLY                4
                           (CFSR)

A005   DI-MGMT-80368A/T    STATUS REPORT                            QUARTERLY                1

A006   DI-NDTI-80566A/T    TEST PLAN                                ASREQ                    2

A007   DI-SESS-81002D/T    DEVELOPMENTAL DESIGN DRAWINGS            ASREQ                    3
                           AND ASSOCIATED LIST

A008   DI-SESS-81001C/T    CONCEPTUAL DESIGN DRAWINGS AND           ASREQ                    3
                           ASSOCIATED LIST

A009   DI-ADMN-81373/T     PRESENTATION MATERIAL                    ASREQ                    3




       b.   Software: Software deliveries may be required. All deliverables should be
            clearly identified in offeror’s proposal. Unlimited rights are desired for
           deliverable software. Software media format will be specified in each call
           for proposals.

      c.   Hardware: Hardware deliveries may be required. All deliverables should be
           clearly identified in offeror’s proposal.

3. Schedule:

      a. Technical Effort: The period of performance for the technical effort for each
          program will vary. Each call for proposals will specify the required time
          period for completion of the technical effort.

      b. Data Items: Data shall be delivered in accordance with the schedule specified
          in the CDRLs identified in Sec. I, 2. of this BAA or as specified in each call.

      c. Software: Software deliveries may be required. If applicable, software shall
          be delivered at completion of technical effort or as specified in each call.

      d.    Hardware: Hardware deliveries may be required. If applicable, hardware
            shall be delivered within thirty (30) days after completion of technical effort
            or as specified in each call.

4. Other Requirements

   a) Classified facility and storage clearance: If classified material is involved, it will
      be stated in the call for proposals for each solicitation topic and a DD254 will be
      issued with the call. If a DD254 is applicable, offerors must verify their
      Cognizant Security Office information is current with Defense Security Service
      (DSS) at www.dss.mil.

   b) TEMPEST: If calls for proposals under this BAA require generation of classified
      material, such generation is authorized only on equipment approved for classified
      processing by Air Force TEMPEST authorities.

   c) Export Control: Information involved in this research effort may be subject to
      Export Control (International Traffic in Arms Regulation (ITAR) 22 CFR 120-
      131 or Export Administration Regulations (EAR) 15 CFR 710-774). If the effort
      is subject to export control then a Certified DD Form 2345, Militarily Critical
      Technical Data Agreement, will be required to be submitted with the proposal.

   d) Type of Research: If the performance of research resulting from future calls for
      proposals is not expected to be fundamental, DFARS 252.204-7008 applies. If
      the performance of research resulting from future calls for proposals is expected
      to be fundamental (and export-controlled items are not expected to be involved),
      DFARS 252.2004-7009 applies.
5. Other Information

      a.   Government Furnished Property (GFP) availability: GFP may be involved. If
            applicable, it will be identified in the call for proposals for each solicitation
            topic.

      b.   Base Support: Base support may be involved. If applicable, it will be
            identified in the call for proposals for each solicitation topic.

      c.    Network Access: Network access to DoD computer networks and systems
            may be involved. If applicable, access requirements will be identified in the
            call for proposals for each solicitation topic.

      d.    Hazardous Material: Specific programs may involve the use of hazardous
            materials. If applicable, offerors will be required to identify hazardous
            materials in their proposal.

      e. Associate Contractor Provision: Specific programs may be subject to inclusion
          of an associate contractor provision. If applicable, it will be stated in the call
          for proposals for each solicitation topic.

      f.   Organizational Conflict of Interest: Specific programs may be subject to
           organizational conflict of interest provisions. If applicable, it will be so
           stated in the call for proposals for each solicitation topic.

II. Award Information
   1. Anticipated Award Date: Award dates will be specified under each call for
      proposals. Awards are probable based on amendments issued during the 5-year
      (FY09-FY14) solicitation period.

   2. Anticipated funding for the program:

           a. Estimated Value: The estimated value of the subsequent requirements that
              are to be advertised under this BAA over the next 5 years is $500M.

      Note: The estimated value is not a promise of assured funding in that
      amount. Funding is uncertain and is subject to change. Changes in
      availability may occur as a result of Government discretion.

           b. The specific funding profile for individual programs will be stated in the
               call for proposals for each solicitation topic.

   3. Type of Contract/Instrument: It is anticipated that a mix of contract types will
      be used throughout the life of this BAA. The specific type of contract will be
       issued in each call for proposals. The Air Force reserves the right to award a
       contract or assistance instrument.

           a. Cost Type contracts including Cost, Cost Sharing, Cost Plus Fixed Fee
              (Completion), and Cost Plus Incentive/Award Fee

           b. Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (ID/IQ) with Cost Plus Fixed Fee
              (Completion) Task Orders. During the course of an ID/IQ contract, and
              depending upon the level of activity under the contract, there is the
              possibility of either an increase of the dollar ceiling up to 100% of the
              initial ceiling, or an extension of the ordering period up to 100% of the
              initial ordering period.

           c. Assistance Instruments (i.e., Grants, Cooperative Agreements or Other
              Transactions).

   4. Number of awards anticipated: The total number of awards under this
      solicitation is unknown at this time. Future awards are probable based on calls or
      amendments issued during the 5-year (FY09-FY14) solicitation period.

   5. Multiple awards: Multiple awards are anticipated under subsequent calls, but the
      government reserves the right to award to one source. Fair opportunity may apply
      for specific programs.


III.   Eligibility Information

  1. Eligible Offerors: Solicitations issued under this BAA will be unrestricted.
Small businesses are encouraged to propose to these solicitations.

   2. Cost Sharing or Matching: Cost Sharing may be required on efforts solicited
under this BAA. If applicable the cost share ratio will be specified under each call for
proposals.

    3. Federally Funded Research and Development Centers: The following
guidance is provided for Federally Funded Research and Development Centers
(FFRDCs) contemplating submitting a proposal, as either a prime or subcontractor,
against this BAA. FAR 35.017-1(c)(4) prohibits an FFRDC from competing with any
non-FFRDC concern in response to a Federal agency request for proposal for other than
the operation of an FFRDC (with exceptions stated in DFARS 235.017-1(c)(4)). There is
no regulation prohibiting an FFRDC from responding to a solicitation. However, the
FFRDC’s sponsoring agency must first make a determination that the effort being
proposed falls within the purpose, mission, general scope of effort, or special competency
of the FFRDC, and that determination must be included in the FFRDC’s proposal. In
addition, the non-sponsoring agency (in this case AFRL) must make a determination that
the work proposed would not place the FFRDC in direct competition with domestic
private industry. Only after these determinations are made would a determination be
made concerning the FFRDC’s eligibility to receive an award.

   4. Other:

   a.    Notice to Foreign-Owned Firms: Such firms are asked to immediately notify the
        Contracting POC cited in each call for proposals issued under this BAA before
        deciding to respond to a all for proposals. Foreign contractors should be aware
        that restrictions might apply which could preclude their participation a program.
        If restrictions apply, it will be stated in the call.

   b.    Offerors may be required to access militarily critical data in support of a
        program. If applicable, it will be stated in the call for proposals for each
        solicitation topic. Only contractors who are registered and certified with the
        Defense Logistics Services Center (DLSC) and have a legitimate business
        purpose may participate in this solicitation. Contact the Defense Logistics
        Services Center, 74 Washington Avenue N., Battle Creek, Michigan 40917-3084
        (1-800-352-3572) for further information on the certification process. You must
        submit a copy of your approved DD Form 2345, Militarily Critical Technical
        Data Agreement, with your proposal.

   c. There are no limits to the number of proposals an offeror may submit.

   d. You may be ineligible for award if all requirements of this solicitation are not met
      on the proposal due date as identified in each call for proposals.

IV. Proposal and Submission Information

The following proposal preparation instructions may apply in total, or in part, to
subsequent individual calls for proposals. Each amendment to this BAA calling for
proposals will detail which proposal preparation instructions apply.

1. Overview: Proposals submitted shall be in accordance with this announcement and
any instructions in the individual call for proposals. Offerors should be alert for any
BAA amendments that may permit extensions to the proposal submission date.

        Please Note: If you intend to submit a grant or assistance instrument, go on to
        Section 2 below which discusses how to find the grant opportunity, prepare the
        cover page, and complete the certification. This section also provides the process
        for electronic submission of proposals for grants and cooperative agreements. If,
        however, you intend to propose a contract, proceed directly to Section 3 below—
        “Content and Form for Proposal Submission.”
2. Proposals for Grants and Cooperative Agreements

      a. Grant Opportunity: Go to http://Grants.Gov to find the grant opportunity.
         The initial screen will provide the synopsis for that specific grant opportunity.
         To view the entire opportunity open the “Full Announcement” box in the upper
         center of the synopsis page and select from the documents available under
         “Announcement Group.” NOTE: http://Grants.Gov has tools and guiding
         documents in the left margin under “Applicant Resources” to help you find
         and apply for grant opportunities. Grants.gov requires Adobe Reader version
         8.13 to open, download, save, and submit an application electronically. Adobe
         Reader version 8.13 is available for free from Grants.gov under “Applicant
         Resources,” “Download Software.”
      b. Proposal Cover Page – SF 424 (R&R) Form: All proposals for grants or
          assistance, whether submitted electronically or in hard copy must include an
          SF 424 (R&R) as the cover page. The SF 424 (R&R) should be downloaded
          from the “Application” box in the upper right hand corner of the synopsis
          page. Click on “download” under the column “Instructions and Application.”
          Select “Download Application Package” and complete the SF 424 (R & R).
      c. Certifications: To access the requisite Certifications, select the “Application”
          box in upper right hand corner of the synopsis page. Click on “Instructions
          and Application” and select “Download Application Instructions” to view the
          Certifications. To complete the Certifications you must check Block 18 of the
          SF 424 (R&R), and by signing it (either by pressing the “submit” button for
          Grants.gov or by hand if submitting it in hard copy), you are certifying that
          you have read and agree to abide by the terms in the Certifications. You do
          not need to submit any additional documentation unless you have lobbying
          activities to disclose on an SF –LLL.
      d. Proposals for Grants or Assistance Instruments: Proposals for grants or
          assistance instruments may be submitted either (1) directly with a hard copy to
          the AFRL/Det 1 contracting POC listed in this announcement or (2)
          electronically through the Grants.gov government-wide electronic portal. You
          must notify your contracting POC before the stated proposal due date
          and time of this notice if you decide to submit your proposal electronically or
          it will not be considered.
      e. For Hard Copy Submission: The original proposal and the number of copies
          specified in this announcement must be delivered directly to the contracting
          POC in AFRL Det 1 at the time and date specified in this announcement.
      f. For Electronic Submission:
          i. Advance Preparation – Electronic proposals must be submitted through
              Grants.gov. There are several one-time actions your organization must
              have completed. Long before the proposal submission deadline, you
              should verify that the persons authorized to submit proposals for your
              organization have completed these actions. If not, it may take them up to
              21 days to complete the actions before they will be able to submit
              proposals.
           ii. Electronic Submission Process: The process your organization must
                complete includes obtaining a Dun and Bradstreet Data Universal
                Numbering System (DUNS) number, registering with the Central Contract
                Registry (CCR), registering with the credential provider, and registering
                with Grants.gov. Designating an E-Business Point of Contact (EBiz POC)
                and obtaining a special password called MPIN are important steps in the
                registration process. Go to www.Grants.gov/GetStarted.
           iii. Your organization’s E-Business POC, identified during CCR Registration,
                must authorize someone to become an Authorized Organization
                Representative (AOR). This safeguards your organization from
                individuals who may attempt to submit proposals without permission.
                Note: In some organizations, a person may serve as both an E-Business
                POC and an AOR.
           iv. The Grants.gov Organization Registration Checklist is located at
                http://www.Grants.gov/section3/OrganizationRegCheck.pdf to guide you
                through the process.
           v. If a proposal is submitted through Grants.gov, Adobe Reader version 8.13
                or later will need to be downloaded. This small, free program will allow
                you to access, complete, and submit applications electronically and
                securely. Reference IV. 2.a. above for instructions on how to obtain a free
                version of the software.
           vi. Should you have questions relating to the registration process, system
                requirements, how an application form works or the submittal process, call
                Grants.gov at 1-800-518-4726 or support@Grants.gov.
       g. Submitting the Electronic Proposal
           i. Application forms and instructions are available at Grants.gov. To access
                these materials, go to http://grants.gov Select “Apply for Grant”, and then
                select “Download Application Package”. Enter the CFDA number
                (typically 12.800). You should also enter the BAA number, and then
                follow the prompts to download the application package.
           ii. The applicant will receive a confirmation page upon completing the
                submission to Grants.gov. This confirmation page is a record of the time
                and date stamp that is used to determine whether the proposal was
                submitted by the deadline. A proposal received after the deadline is “late”
                and will not be considered for an award.
       h. Future Broad Agency Announcements for basic research that may result in
           grants or assistance instruments issued by this office will invite electronic
           proposal submission through the grants.gov government-wide portal.
       i. Section 3 below “Content and Form of Proposal Submission” applies to
           grants and cooperative agreement (in hard copy or electronic) and
           contract proposals.


3. Content and Form of Proposal Submission: The paragraphs below identify proposal
format and content. Proposals should be addressed to the Contracting Point of Contact
(POC) stated in each call for proposals.
     a. General Instructions: Offerors should apply the restrictive notice prescribed in
the provision of FAR 52.215-1(e) Instructions to Offerors—Competitive Acquisition.
Offerors should consider proposal instructions contained in the Broad Agency
Announcement (BAA) Guide for Industry, which can be accessed on line at
http://www.wpafb.af.mil/library/factsheets/factsheet.asp?id=9218. This guide is
specifically designed to assist the offeror in understanding the BAA proposal process.
Technical/management and cost volumes should be submitted in separate volumes, and
must be valid for 180 days. Proposals must reference the announcement number assigned
to each call for proposals issued hereunder. Offerors must submit one-original and 5 hard
copies of their proposals via mail to the Contracting POC, identified in each call for
proposals. In addition to the paper copies, offerors are required to submit a CD ROM
containing the technical/management volume in MS-Word and the cost/business volume
in MS-Word, with a cost proposal spreadsheet in MS-Excel. Offerors are advised that
only contracting officers are legally authorized to contractually bind or otherwise commit
the government. The cost of preparing proposals in response to any call for proposals
under this BAA is not considered an allowable direct charge to any resulting or any other
contract; however, it may be an allowable expense to the normal bid and proposal
indirect cost as specified in FAR 31.205-18.

    b. Technical/Management Proposal:

         i. Proposal Structure: The technical/management volume structure is
         dependent upon the type of contract/instrument:

               (a) Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (ID/IQ) type contract – A
                  two-part technical/management proposal is required. Part I of the
                  technical/management proposal shall describe the offeror’s proposed
                  approach for the entire program and include a Statement of
                  Objectives. Part II of the technical/management proposal shall
                  include a separate description of the technical approach for each
                  proposed delivery order. Additionally, a stand-alone Statement of
                  Work for each proposed task order must be included.

               (b) Cost type contracts or Assistance Instrument -- All
                  technical/management information shall be presented as a single
                  document.

             ii. Page Limitations: The following describes the page limitations on the
             proposal submittal:

               (a) Prepared and submitted in MS Office Word format, the number of
                   pages for each volume (technical/management/cost) for any type
                   contract or Assistance Instrument, will be specified in each call for
                   proposals.
           (b) Font shall be standard 10-point business font Arial.

           (c) Character spacing must be “normal,” not condensed in any manner.

           (d) Pages shall be double-spaced, single-sided, 8.5 by 11 inches, with at
               least one-inch margins on both sides, top and bottom. Lines between
               text lines must also be 10-point.

           (e) All text, including text in tables and charts, must adhere to all font
               size and line spacing requirements listed herein. Font and line spacing
               requirements do not have to be followed for illustrations, flowcharts,
               drawings, and diagrams. These exceptions shall not be used to
               circumvent formatting requirements and page count limitations by
               including lengthy narratives in such items.

           (f) Pages shall be numbered starting with the cover page being Page 1,
               and the last page being Page (to be determined in each call for
               proposals). The page limitation covers all information including
               indices, photographs, foldouts (counted as 1 page for each 8.5 by 11
               portion) tables, charts, appendices, attachments, resumes, etc.

           (g) The proposal page limit does not include the offeror’s proposed
               Statement of Work (SOW); however, the same formatting rules apply
               to the SOW. The page limit of the SOW will be specified in each call
               for proposals.

           (h) A CD with the WORD version of your Technical/Management
               Proposal and the SOW must be submitted with the hard copies of the
               proposal, and must match the hard copy.

           (i) Due to continuing attempts by numerous offerors to obtain an
               unfair advantage by failing to conform to the formatting rules
               above, the Government will check the proposal and SOW for
               conformance to the stated requirements. Any pages in excess of
               the stated page limitation after the format check will not be
               considered. In addition if the proposal or SOW does not conform
               to the above requirements, a notification will be sent to the
               offeror’s company management to advise of the nonconformance.

(iii) The proposal shall include a discussion of the nature and scope of the research
and the technical approach. Additional information on prior work in this area,
descriptions of available equipment, data and facilities and resumes of personnel who
will be participating in this effort should also be included as attachments to the
technical proposal. This volume shall include a SOW detailing the technical tasks
   proposed to be accomplished under the proposed effort and suitable for contract
   incorporation. Do not include any proprietary information in the SOW. Refer to
   the BAA Guide for Industry referenced above to assist in SOW preparation.

   (iv) Any questions concerning the technical proposal or SOW preparation shall be
   referred to the Technical POC cited in the Overview Information.

     c. Cost/Business Proposal:

           i. Separate the proposal into a business section and cost section. Adequate
       price competition is anticipated. The business section should contain all business
       aspects to the proposed contractual or instrument arrangements, such as type of
       contract/instrument, any exceptions to terms and conditions of the announcement
       model contract, any information not technically related, etc. Provide rationale for
       exceptions. Cost proposals have no limitations; however, offerors are requested
       to keep cost proposals to 20 pages as a goal. The proposal shall be furnished with
       supporting schedules and shall contain a person hour breakdown per task. Refer
       to the AFRL PRDA/BAA Guide for Industry for detailed proposal instructions.

               a. In the event the proposal is for an ID/IQ type contract, the cost section
                  shall contain a separately identifiable and severable cost proposal for
                  each individual task order proposed in the technical/management
                  volume. The twenty (20) page cost proposal goal applies to the cost
                  proposal for each individual task order proposed. No cost proposal is
                  required for the basic contract.

               b. If proposing a cost type contract or an Assistance Instrument, the cost
                  section shall reflect all costs for the effort proposed in the
                  technical/management volume.

          ii. Subcontracting plans, for efforts anticipated to exceed $550,000, shall be
       submitted along with the technical and cost proposals. Reference FAR 19.704,
       DFARS 219.704, and AFFARS 5319.704(a)(1) for subcontracting plan
       requirements. Small business concerns are exempt from this requirement.

     d. Proposal Content Summary: You may be ineligible for award if all
requirements of this solicitation are not met on the proposal due date. Reference Section
VIII for a checklist of the requirements.

3. Proposal Due Date and Time: Specified in each call for proposals to this solicitation.
NOTE: Proposal receipt after the due date and time shall be governed by the
provisions of FAR 52.215-1(c)(3).

   NOTE: Intent to Propose: Offerors that anticipate submitting a proposal are
     requested to submit an e-mail to the contract POC specified in each call for
       proposals. The intent to submit a proposal should include the name of the
       contractor and the contractor’s POC.

4. Two-step solicitation process: The Air Force reserves the right to use a two-step
solicitation process. If applicable, the call will specify and describe the two-step
process, which will normally follow these general guidelines: FIRST STEP solicits a
request for an abstract/white paper and a rough order of magnitude (ROM) cost. These
will be evaluated by a government team that will determine which of the abstracts/white
papers have the most promise of meeting Air Force needs. Offerors will be notified of the
disposition of their abstract/white paper. Those offerors submitting abstracts/white
papers assessed as meeting Air Force needs will be asked to submit a technical and cost
proposal. Those offerors not requested to submit a technical and cost proposal may,
however, still elect to submit a technical and cost proposal. The SECOND STEP consists of
offerors submitting a technical and cost proposal within xx days of the proposal request
(to be specified with each individual call for proposals). After receipt, proposals will be
evaluated in accordance with the award criteria in Section V below and/or as otherwise
adjusted in each call for proposals. Proposals will be categorized and subsequently
selected for negotiation. The two-step process will only be used if the call so specifies.

5. Intergovernmental Review: If applicable, to be specified in each call for proposals.

6. Funding Restrictions: If applicable, to be specified in each call for proposals.

7. Other Submission Requirements: Specified in each call for proposals, but
generally:

If by postal mail or hand delivery: AFRL/PKSR, Bldg 167, 2310 8th St., Wright-
Patterson AFB, OH 45433-7801

If by electronic submission: URL or e-mail address, whether a password is required and
a point of contact that will be available to resolve technical difficulties will be specified
in subsequent calls.


V. PROPOSAL REVIEW INFORMATION

The following basis for award requirements may apply in total, or in part, to
subsequent individual calls for proposals. Each amendment to this BAA calling for
proposals will detail which basis for award requirements apply and any tailored
criteria.

1. Evaluation Criteria: The selection of one or more sources for award will be based on
an evaluation of each offeror’s proposal (both technical and cost/price aspects) to
determine the overall merit of the proposal in response to the announcement, as well as
on Agency need and funding availability.
a. Technical: The technical aspect, which ranks as the first order of priority shall be
evaluated using the criteria shown below. The order of importance of the criteria
(either descending or equal) will be specified in each call. The evaluation criteria to
be used will be dependent upon the type of contract/instrument proposed as follows:

      (i). Cost type contracts including Cost, Cost Sharing, Cost Plus Fixed Fee
           (Completion), and Cost Plus Incentive/Award Fee and Assistance
           Instruments:

          (1) The proposal must reflect a new and creative solution that clearly
              demonstrates technical or scientific merit and be highly relevant to Air
              Force needs

          (2) Successful development of the proposed effort must have a significant
              impact on advancing technology for air and/or space power applications

          (3) The proposal, including the proposed Statement of Work (SOW), must
              reflect a sound technical approach

          (4) The proposal must indicate that competent experienced engineering,
              scientific and technical personal are available to support the program
              and that necessary research/ test/ laboratory facilities are available

          (5) The proposal must indicate that the offeror has quality experience with
              the technology to be developed

      (ii). BASIC ID/IQ Contract

            (1) The proposal must reflect an understanding of the overall technical
                scope of the technology area

            (2) The proposal must reflect a sound technical approach

            (3) The proposed concept/idea must have technical merit and be relevant
                to Air Force needs

            (4) The proposal must identify the management and organization of
                technical personnel and indicate that procedures are available to
                monitor and control the budget and schedule


      (iii) Individual Task Orders

            (1) The proposal must reflect a new and creative solution that clearly
                demonstrates technical or scientific merit and be highly relevant to
                Air Force needs

            (2) The proposal must reflect a sound technical approach
            (3) The proposal must indicate that competent experienced engineering,
                scientific and technical personal are available to support the program
                and that necessary research/ test/ laboratory facilities are available

            (4) The proposed Statement of Work (SOW) must be clear, well
                organized and reflect that the offeror understands the scope of the
                technical effort

            (5) The proposal must indicate that the offeror has quality experience with the
                technology to be developed.

 b. Cost/Price: Cost/Price includes the reasonableness and realism of the proposed
    cost and fee and consideration of proposed budgets and funding profiles.
    Cost/Price is a substantial factor, but ranked as the second order of priority.

 c. Proposal Risk Assessment: Proposal risk for technical, cost and schedule will be
    assessed as part of the evaluation of the of the above criteria. Proposal risk relates
    to the identification and assessment of the risks associated with an offeror's
    proposed approach as it relates to accomplishing the proposed effort. Tradeoffs of
    the assessed risk will be weighed against the potential payoff.

2. Review and Selection Process

 a. Categories: The technical and cost proposals will be evaluated at the same time
    and categorized as follows:

       i. Category I: Proposal is well conceived, scientifically and technically
          sound, pertinent to the program goals and objectives, and offered by a
          responsible contractor with the competent scientific and technical staff and
          supporting resources needed to ensure satisfactory program results.
          Proposals in Category I are determined to be acceptable, but will be
          recommended for award based on availability of funds. They are normally
          displaced only by other Category I proposals.


   ii. Category II: Scientifically or technically sound proposals requiring further
       development and are recommended for acceptance, but are at a lower priority
       than Category I.

   iii. Category III: Proposals not technically sound or do not meet agency needs.

 b. In general, no other evaluation criteria will be used. If other evaluation criteria
    apply, it will be specified in each call for proposals. The technical and cost
    proposals will be evaluated at the same time. The Air Force reserves the right to
    select for award of a contract or assistance instrument any, all, part or none of the
    proposal received. Award of a grant to universities or nonprofit institutions, or
       assistance instrument in lieu of a contract will be subject to the mutual agreement
       of the parties.


VI. Award Administration Information
    1. Award Notices: Offerors will be notified whether their proposal is recommended
for award, by letter or e-mail, on or about the date specified in each call. The
notification is not to be construed to mean the award of a contract, grant or assistance
instrument is assured, as availability of funds and successful negotiations are
prerequisites to any award.


2. Administrative Requirements: See Section I.

3. Reporting: See Section I.


VII. Agency Contact(s)
1. Address technical questions the AFRL CTC Leads:

CTC 1: Alan Kerrick, AFRL/RYR, Bldg. 620, 2241 Avionics Circle, Wright-Patterson
AFB, OH 45433-7304, Phone: 937-904-9330, Email: Alan.Kerrick@wpafb.af.mil

CTC 2: Michael Eismann, AFRL/RYJ, Bldg. 620, 2241 Avionics Circle, Wright-
Patterson AFB, OH 45433-7304, Phone: 937-904-9921, Email:
michael.eismann@wpafb.af.mil

CTC 3: David A. Wilkes, AFRL/RYZW, Bldg. 620, 2241 Avionics Circle, Wright-
Patterson AFB, OH 45433-7304, Phone: 937 904-9915, Email:
david.wilkes@wpafb.af.mil

CTC 4: Bill Taylor, AFRL/RYJW, Bldg 620, 2241 Avionics Circle, Wright-Patterson
AFB, OH 45433-7304, Phone : 937-255-4174 ext. 4004, Email:
william.taylor@wpafb.af.mil

CTC 5: Lori Westerkamp, AFRL/RYA, Bldg 620, 2241 Avionics Circle, Wright-
Patterson AFB, OH 45433-7304, Phone: 937-904-9815, Email:
Lori.Westerkamp@wpafb.af.mil

CTC 6: Chris Bozada, AFRL/RYDD, Bldg 620, 2241 Avionics Circle, Wright-Patterson
AFB, OH 45433-7304, Phone: 937-904-9633, Email: Christopher.Bozada@wpafb.af.mil
CTC 7: John Erickson, AFRL/RYT, Bldg 620, 2241 Avionics Circle, Wright-Patterson
AFB, OH 45433-7304, Phone : 937-320-9068 x 105, Email:
john.erickson@wpafb.af.mil

Note: The technical POC(s) for all requirements advertised under this open-ended
BAA will be specified with each individual call for proposal.
2. Address contracting questions to:

John Stovall, AFRL/PKSR, Bldg. 167, 2310 8th Street, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH
45433-7304, Phone: 937-255-5306, Email: John.Stovall@wpafb.af.mil;

or

Sarah Chaffe, AFRL/PKSR, Bldg. 167, 2310 8th Street, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH
45433-7304, Phone: 937- 255-4279, Email: Sarah.Chaffe@wpafb.af.mil;

Note: The contracting POC(s) for all requirements advertised under this open-
ended BAA will be specified with each individual call for proposal.


VIII. Other Information
    1. Acquisition of Commercial Items: Based upon market research, the Government
is not using the policies contained in Part 12, Acquisition of Commercial Items, in its
solicitation for the described supplies or services. However, interested persons may
identify to the contracting officer their interest and capability to satisfy the Government’s
requirement with a commercial item within 15 days of this notice.

    2. Support Contractors: Offerors are advised that employees of commercial firms
under contract to the Government may be used to administratively process proposals,
monitor contract performance, or perform other administrative duties requiring access to
other contractors’ proprietary information. These support contracts include nondisclosure
agreements prohibiting their contractor employees from disclosing any information
submitted by other contractors or using such information for any purpose other than that
for which it was furnished.

    3. Wide Area Work Flow: NOTICE:                Any contract award resulting from this
solicitation will contain the clause at DFARS 252.232-7003, Electronic Submission of
Payment Requests, which requires electronic submission of all payment requests. The
clause cites three possible electronic formats through which to submit electronic payment
requests. Pursuant to that clause, the Department of Defense is adopting Wide Area
Work Flow-Receipt and Acceptance (WAWF-RA). Any contract resulting from this
solicitation will establish a requirement to use WAWF-RA for invoicing and
receipt/acceptance, and provide coding instructions applicable to this contract.
Contractors are encouraged to take advantage of available training (both web-based and
through your local DCMA office), and to register in the WAWF-RA system. Information
regarding WAWF-RA, including the web-based training and registration, can be found at
https://wawf.eb.mil. Note: This WAWF-RA requirement does not apply to Universities
that are audited by an agency other than DCAA.

    4. Item Identification and Valuation. Any contract award resulting from this
solicitation may contain the clause at DFARS 252.211-7003, Item Identification and
Valuation, (JUN 2005) which requires unique item identification and valuation of any
deliverable item for which the Government’s unit acquisition cost is $5,000 or more;
subassemblies, components, and parts embedded within an item valued at $5,000 or
more; or items for which the Government’s unit acquisition cost is less than $5,000 when
determined necessary by the requiring activity for serially managed, mission essential, or
controlled inventory. Also included are any DoD serially managed subassembly,
component, or part embedded within a delivered item and the parent item that contains
the embedded subassembly, component, or part. Per DFARS 211.274-3 Policy for
Valuation, it is DoD policy that contractors shall be required to identify the
Government’s unit acquisition cost for all items delivered, even if none of the criteria for
placing a unique item identification mark applies. Therefore, your proposal must clearly
break out the unit acquisition cost for any deliverable items. Per DFARS 211.274-3
Policy for Valuation, “The Government’s unit acquisition cost is the Contractor’s
estimated fully burdened unit cost at time of delivery to the Government for cost type or
undefinitized line, subline, or exhibit line items” (Per DoD, “fully burdened unit costs”
to the Government would include all direct, indirect, G&A costs, and an appropriate
portion of fee). If you have questions regarding the Unique Item Identification
requirements, please contact the Contracting Point of Contact listed above. For more
information, see the following website: http://www.acq.osd.mil/dpap/pdi/uid/index.html.

    5. Excessive Pass-Through Charges. As prescribed in DFARS 215.408(3),
provision 252.215-7003, “Excessive Pass-Through Charges – Identification of
Subcontract Effort, is contained in this solicitation (as shown below). Any contract
valued greater than $650,000, resulting from this solicitation, shall contain the Clause at
DFARS 252.215-7004, Excessive Pass-Through Charges (APR 2007). This clause
requires the contractor to notify the Contracting Officer in writing if: (1) The Contractor
changes the amount of subcontract effort after award such that it exceeds 70 percent of
the total cost of work to be performed under the contract, task order, or delivery order.
The notification shall identify the revised cost of the subcontract effort and shall include
verification that the Contractor will provide added value; or (2) Any subcontractor
changes the amount of lower-tier subcontractor effort after award such that it exceeds 70
percent of the total cost of the work to be performed under its subcontract. The
notification shall identify the revised cost of the subcontract effort and shall include
verification that the subcontractor will provide added value as related to the work to be
performed by the lower-tier subcontractor(s).

       252.215-7003 Excessive Pass-Through Charges – Identification of Subcontract
       Effort.

                     EXCESSIVE PASS-THROUGH CHARGES—
             IDENTIFICATION OF SUBCONTRACT EFFORT (MAY 2008)
       (a) Definitions. Added value, excessive pass-through charge, subcontract, and
       subcontractor, as used in this provision, are defined in the clause of this
       solicitation entitled ‘‘Excessive Pass-Through Charges’’ (DFARS 252.215–7004).
       (b) General. The offeror’s proposal shall exclude excessive pass-through charges.
       (c) Performance of work by the Contractor or a subcontractor.
       (1) The offeror shall identify in its proposal the total cost of the work to be
       performed by the offeror, and the total cost of the work to be performed by each
       subcontractor, under the contract, task order, or delivery order.
       (2) If the offeror intends to subcontract more than 70 percent of the total cost of
       work to be performed under the contract, task order, or delivery order, the offeror
       shall identify in its proposal—
        (i) The amount of the offeror’s indirect costs and profit applicable to the work to
       be performed by the subcontractor(s); and
        (ii) A description of the added value provided by the offeror as related to the
       work to be performed by the subcontractor(s).
       (3) If any subcontractor proposed under the contract, task order, or delivery order
       intends to subcontract to a lower-tier subcontractor more than 70 percent of the
       total cost of work to be performed under its subcontract, the offeror shall identify
       in its proposal—
        (i) The amount of the subcontractor’s indirect costs and profit applicable to the
       work to be performed by the lower-tier subcontractor(s); and
        (ii) A description of the added value provided by the subcontractor as related to
       the work to be performed by the lower-tier subcontractor(s).
       (End of provision)

    6. Ombudsman: The Ombudsman clause, AFFARS 5352.201-9101 Ombudsman
(Aug 2005) will be contained in any contracts or agreements resulting from this
Solicitation. The AFRL Ombudsman is Ms Sue Hunter, Director of Contracting,
AFRL/PK, (937) 255-0432, email: Sue.Hunter@wpafb.af.mil.

   7. Post-Award Small Business Program Rerepresentation: As prescribed in FAR
19.308, FAR Clause 52.219-28, “Post-Award Small Business Program Rerepresentation
(JUN 2007),” is incorporated by reference in this solicitation. This clause will be
contained in any contracts resulting from this solicitation. This clause requires a
contractor to rerepresent its size status when certain conditions apply. The clause
provides detail on when the rerepresentation must be complete and what the contractor
must do when a rerepresentation is required.

    8. Proposal Content Checklist: You may be ineligible for award if all requirements
of this solicitation are not met on the proposal due date.
         a. Proposals are due to the Contracting POC specified in each call for proposals.
         b. Proposals are due no later than the due date and time specified in each call for
             proposals.
c. Proposal page limits are strictly enforced. See Section IV.2.b. & c. and the
   requirements of each call for proposals under the BAA for page limitations.
d. Completed Certifications and Representations (Section K) are due with the
   proposal. Certifications and Representations (Section K) can be found at
   http://www.wpafb.af.mil/library/factsheets/factsheet.asp?id=6790 under the
   Sample Contract Documents title of the Business Resources Header. In the
   interests of transformation and streamlining and in order to be in position to
   award within days of completion of the technical evaluation, it is imperative
   that you review the model contract appropriate for your business type and
   provide with your proposal any exceptions to terms and conditions.
e. The Cost/Business Proposal must contain all information described in the
   Content and Form of Proposal Section.
f. For any subcontracts proposed, the Cost/Business Proposal must contain a
   subcontractor analysis IAW FAR 15.404-3(b).
g. The Cost/Business Proposal must contain any exceptions to the sample Model
   Contract Terms and Conditions. (See
   http://www.wpafb.af.mil/library/factsheets/factsheet.asp?id=6790 for sample
   model contracts.) However, be advised that the document awarded may
   include contract line items (CLINs)/clauses/articles in addition to those in the
   models, and/or some of the CLIN/clauses/articles in the models may be
   deleted, depending on the specific circumstances of the individual program.
   Any additions or deletions will be discussed with the offeror prior to award of
   the document.
h. Offerors other than small businesses are to include a subcontracting plan in
   Microsoft Word Readable Format on a CD ROM as well as a hard copy.
i. Proposals must be submitted in the format specified in Section IV.
j. Offerors who have Forward Pricing Rate Agreements (FPRA’s) and Forward
   Pricing Rate Recommendations (FPRR’s) should submit them with their
   proposal.
k. If a DD254 is applicable, offerors must verify their Cognizant Security Office
   information is current with Defense Security Service (DSS) at www.dss.mil.
l. If effort is subject to export control, offerors must submit a Certified DD Form
   2345, Militarily Critical Technical Data Agreement, with proposal.

								
To top