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					                                             P A R T - 01

EDITORIAL

In the Budget 2003-2004 presented by the Hon’ble Finance Minister on 28th February,
2003, he has indicated that Value Added Tax (VAT) will be implemented by the Central
Government as well as State Governments. However, it seems that full mechanism for
implementation of VAT has not been worked out. Many States, such as Delhi and Uttar
Pradesh have expressed their unwillingness to implement the VAT at the moment. There is
opposition from Traders for implementation of VAT. The officials of the State Governments
are not also happy. In view of the same, it is unlikely that VAT may be commenced from 1st
April, 2003 all over India.

Riding on the back of pick up in demand from construction sector and exports, the steel
sector staged a strong recovery with a growth rate of 4.7 per cent. Noting that the sector
had suffered slow output growth due to a combination of weak domestic demand growth
and competition from imports. This growth momentum was maintained during April-
November 2002 when output grew by 5.4 per cent, as compared with negative 1.5 per cent
in the same period in the previous year. Domestic steel demand rose, partly due to the
highway construction undertaken under the aegis of National Highway Authority of India
and it is estimated that the NHP alone led to a demand of one million tonne of steel.

The market of Steel and its products seems to be somewhat lower than a fortnight ago. It
may be due to international consideration. Exports from India have also declined
considerably as per latest reports. This Association suggest to its members to take the
opportunity to diversify their product mix giving more emphasis on the Value Added types
of Steel products. During the last one week, the prices of Pencil ingots all over India has
come down by Rs. 500/- per tonne.

II.    MEETING ATTENDED BY AIIFA REPRESENTATIVES

1)     Definition/Classification of Non-Prime (Seconds & Defective) Steel Products

Shri A.C.R. Das, Joint Industrial Adviser of Ministry of Steel invited AIIFA along with other
organizations to consider Definition/Classification of Non-Prime (Seconds & Defective) Steel
products on 27th March, 2003 at 3.30 PM in Steel Room, Udyog Bhawan. Mr. R.P.
Varshney, Executive Director attended the meeting.         This meeting was called by the
Ministry of Steel to discuss the Definition/Classification of Seconds and Defective steel
products, particularly those which are being imported. A draft in this regard was circulated
by the Joint Industrial Adviser giving the Definition/ Classification of Non-Prime Steel
products, Non-standards and Down-graded Steel products. This Classification is based
upon the European Union identification, etc. draft. It was decided in the meeting that
Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) should now make a BIS Standard for Seconds and
Defectives – Non-standard dimensions or Down-graded steel products based upon, (a)
product of small-standard dimension and (b) down-graded products for surface defects,

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internal (physico-chemical) defects and characteristic not in conformity with the relevant
national and international standards. They will issue necessary BIS standard based on the
discussions in this regard. For the guidance of imports, Pre-shipment inspection will be
done. The AIIFA representative supported the identification criteria of Non-Prime (Seconds
& Defective) Steel products.

2.     Value Added Tax (VAT) – Impact on Indian Industry

Shri RP Bhatia, Sr. Vice-President of AIIFA attended Seminar-cum-Meeting on Value Added
Tax (VAT) called by the PHD Chamber of Commerce and Industry on 26th March, 2003 at
New Delhi. Shri Bhatia made certain observations in the meeting so that it may help the
industry considerably. However, the opinion expressed by many representatives varied
widely. Some observations were made by the participants that all State Governments have
not yet agreed for the implementation of VAT. It was, therefore, decided in the meeting that
the PHD-CCI should take up the matter again when the Central Government calls a
meeting and is known that all State Governments are prepared for VAT. As per newspaper
reports some State Governments wants further consideration and not prepared for VAT
regime from 01.04.2003.

III.   GLEANINGS FROM THE PRESS

1.     Stainless time for Steel Sector
       China major market for Indian Companies

Steel manufacturers have never seen it so good. The capacity utilization of steel plants is
touching almost 100% due to a jump in exports by of 33% over the previous year. All steel
companies like Tisco, Essar and Ispat are showing an exceptionally high utilization of
capacities due to an increase in demand for hot rolled coils and cold rolled coils, primarily
from markets like China, South East Asia and Central Asia. Essar has achieved a 101%
capacity utilization since October. This is primarily due to a jump in steel exports to
China. Ispat officials also confirmed that its steel plant has achieved more than 95%
capacity utilization due to an upsurge in steel exports. Analysts felt that while exports to
the U.S. is expected to stabilize around current levels, buoyancy in exports to China is
likely to continue. The domestic steel prices are expected to stay firm for the next three to
six months. Increasing exports have diverted the domestic oversupply in flat products to
international markets.
                                         (Extracts: The Economic Times, dated 18.03.2003)

2.     Chinese Steel Plants to use Indian Technology

China, world’s largest steel market with an estimated consumption of over 100 million
tonnes, almost four times that of India’s may soon use Indian technology for commissioning
some of its mega steel projects, some of which are larger than combined capacity of SAIL
and Tata Steel. ABB India has recently won contracts from two large Chinese steel
comanies, Maanshan Iron & Steel Corp., Wuhan Iron & Steel, Hangzou Iron & Steel. The
contracts are for commissioning new projects. According to a senior official in ABB India,
many Chinese Steel and cement plants have been commissioned by Indian companies, as
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“our technical expertise has been better than theirs”, ABB India has commissioned such
projects, earlier bagged by ABB China. Industry sources say that a typical trend includes
roping in Indian companies for erection and commissioning.
                                         (Extrcts : The Economics Times, dated 18.03.2003)

3.     Industrial Production Shoots to 6.4% in January

The index of industrial production (IIP) shot to 6.4 per cent in January buoyed by a strong
growth in the manufacturing sector. IIP growth in the corresponding month of the previous
year was 3.8 per cent. In the April-Jan. 2002-2003 period, IIP posted a growth of 5.5 per
cent compared to 2.6 per cent in the same period of the previous fiscal. The manufacturing
sector which accounts for 80 per cent of the total IIP, registered a growth of 6.9 per cent
during the month compared to 4.1 per cent registered in January 2002. While the
electricity sector maintained a 4% growth rate in January this year, the mining sector grew
by 2.7% during the month compared to 2.3% in January 2002. In the first 10 months of
the current fiscal, manufacturing posted a growth of 5.8% against 2.8% registered in the
comparable period of the previous fiscal. Mining and electricity grew at 5.4% and 3.8%,
respectively against growth rates of 1 per cent and 2.9 per cent registered in April-Jan.
2001-02. In the use-based category, capital goods registered in impressive growth of 11.6%
in January, this year compared to a negative 4.7% in the same last year. While consumer
non-durables grew at 7.2 per cent in January 2003 against 4.9 per cent in the comparable
month of the previous year, consumer durables grew at 7.2% in January 2003 against
4.9% in the comparable month of the previous year.
                                        (Extracts: The Financial Express, dated 22.03.2003)

4.     Sail, Tisco want softer rates for SDF loans

After corporate debt-restructuring (CDR) bailout package for four new steel companies, now
it’s time for SAIL and Tisco to seek sops. SAIL and Tisco which account for more than 50%
of domestic steel production, have sought a cut in interest rates on loans from of Steel
Development Fund (SDF). Though SDF already bears a low interest rate of 8% and a penal
rate of 2% on repayment defaults, SAIL and Tisco want government to “correct the rates
and put in perspective”, top steel ministry sources said. The issue has been referred to the
SDF managing committee, which is represented by top officials from the finance and steel
ministries besides SAIL and Tisco. Incidentally, over the last few years, both SAIL and
Tisco have been seeking a complete waiver of SDF loan. The SDF fund was created from
cess on account of Steel sold by SAIL. Tata Steel and Vizag Steel Plant prior to de-
regulation of steel prices in the early ‘90s.
                                                (Extracts: The Economics Times 24.03.2003)
5.      Tisco to inject Rs. 20,000 Crore

Tata Iron & Steel Co. Ltd. (Tisco) has decided to increase its share of long products,
expanding its steel making capacity at Jamshedpur from four million tonnes to five million
tonnes at an investment of Rs. 20,000 crore. Long and semi-finished steel products
constitute a share of about 40% in Tata Steel’s product basket while flat steel items like
hot-rolled, cold rolld and galvanized steel constitute remaining 60%. The company plans to
set up matching mills to change product mix between long-cum-semis and flat products of
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50:50. Tata Steel’s board decided not to plan higher capacity expansion by two million
tonnes and commit a larger investment. Of the one-million-tonne expansion plan, Tisco is
looking at adding to its long product capacity by 0.6 million tonnes to take it around 1.9
million tonnes. Matching facilities and mills to add around 0.6 million tonnes of
construction grade re-rolled bars, light and medium structural items will be put up at its
Jamshedpur plant. With this, Tisco’s long capacity, including semis, will increase to 2.4
million tonnes while flat product capacity will increase to 2.6 million tonnes.

6.     Demand backed higher sponge iron price

Sponge iron prices having firmed up to new highs in the past couple of months, they show
no signs of capitulating. Many industry watchers say a slide could be months away. Prices
of the raw materials used in the steel industry are being quoted in excess of Rs. 7000/- per
tonne, a rise of Rs. 500/- per tonne over the levels prevailing last month. It is also a sharp
increase over the average net selling price, which has ranged from Rs. 4500/- per tonne to
Rs. 5100/- per tonne over the past four years. The surge has been attributed largely to a
shortage in scrap and reduced availability of non-coking coal. Those aware of the way
prices behave in this sector reckon that sponge iron is likely stay firm in the next two
quarters, driven by the brisk Chinese buying and encouraging conditions in the Steel
industry. A good demand from China is contributing significantly to raise prices, experts
said. Figures available for the first half of this fiscal show a grwoth of more than 20 per
cent in production, pegged over 3 mm tonnes. Analysts belief that the increase has been
more pronounced in coal based sponge iron.
                                                      (Source: MMR Weekly, March 10, 2003)
7.     Stainless Steel prices to rise by 2-5%

Helped by rising nickel demand and an increase in import duty of nickel Stainless Steel
prices are set to rise by 2-5 per cent in the domestic market. Nickel prices are at a two-
year high in world markets and have increase from $8,300 to $9,100 per tonne over the last
one month. Around two third of nickel goes into Stainless Steel, making it one of the most
important raw material for Stainless steel. This leaves scope for an appreciation in prices.
Jindal Stainless, the largest stainless steel producer in the country with a 50 per cent
market share, is looking at increasing prices. The steel market expects others to follow
suit. Domestic prices were ruling at levels marginally lower than international prices.
Sources pointed out that the consideration to increase prices, however, stemps more from
the galloping nickel demand across borders than the budget impact. Jindal sources said
that of the domestic production, around 15 per cent was in ferritic grade which did not
consume nickel. Another 5-10 per cent production was for 300 series where the nickel
content was 8 per cent and would result in an increase in cost by Rs. 1.5 – 1.75 per kg.
The other big player, Salem Steel plant of SAIL, was still assessing the situation, in view of
the rise in nickel import, industry sources put Salem’s market share at 10 per cent.
However, SAIL official pointed out that the impact of import duty in nickel on the whole
PSU would be to the extent of Rs. 40 million. Whether the cost would be absorbed by the
producer or be transferred to the consumer was still not decided.



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8.     Long Steel prices increase on hold

Primary Steel producers including Steel Authority of India Limited (SAIL), Tata Iron & Steel
Co. (Tisco) and Rashtriya Ispat Nigam Ltd. (RINL) have decided not to increase their long
products’ prices as proposed to be effected early March. The change in rule for calculating
excise duties proposed in the Budget is one key reason behind the steel major’s decision to
ease accelerating steel prices, witnessed in the last 11 months of current fiscal. SAIL, Tisco
and RINL together produce around 9 MT of long products. The move to hold on to long
steel prices comes at a time when international long steel prices jumped by $15 per tonne
over the last month. In comparison, rising flat steel prices have stabilized though contracts
for Apri-June 2003 are being nogotiated with a $20-30 per tonne increase, by Japanese
steel makers for exports to China. The Budget has proposed that excise on steel products
will henceforth be charged ex-depot or ex-stockyard prices and earlier practice of excise
calculation on ex-factory prices will be discontinued. While this move will not have any
major impact on moveable steel items, especially products which are used as intermediates,
finished steel sold to end-user like construction grade re-bars, wire and rods, will be more
expensive for customers, by an average Rs. 200-300 per tonne, depending on location of the
depots. Even finished flat products like galvanized sheets used for roofing will be affected
under the new excise rule. SAIL and RINL sources pointed out that market surveys are
being done on whether consumers can absorb a price rise in long products now and the
steel majors can at the same time liquidate year-end stocks. RINL, the 100 per cent long
steel producer, however, did not rule out a mid-month revision of prices. SAIL, TISCO and
new steel makers like Essar, Ispat and the Jindals, however, have effected a steep increase
in flat steel prices with effect from March 1. Prices of hot rolled coils (HRC) has been
increased by Rs. 8000 – 12000 per tonne and galvanized products by Rs. 1,000 a tonne
and galvanized products by Rs. 1250 – 1500/- per tonne. The average price of basic grade
of HRC has now touched Rs. 19,000/- per tonne, about 50 per cent higher than January
2002 prices.

                                             P A R T - 02
I.     CENTRAL EXCISE NOTIFICATION (N.T. SERIES)

We are reproducing below a copy of the Central Excise Notification (N.T. Series) No.
17/2003-CE (N.T.) dated 13th March, 2003 vide F.No. 201/4/2003-CX.6 issued by Ministry
of Finance and Company Affairs (Department of Revenue), New Delhi for information of all
members:

“In exercise of the powers conferred by Section 37 of the Central Excise Act, 1944 (1 of
1944), the Central Government hereby makes the following rules further to amend the
Central Excise Rules, 2002 (hereinafter referred to as the said rules), namely:-

1.     (i)     These rules may be called the Central Excise (Third Amendment) Rules, 2003

       (ii)    They shall come into force on the 1st day of April, 2003.


ISSUE NO. 07 VOL. IV INDUCTION FURNACE NEWSLETTER 01-04-2003 to 15-04-2003             7
2.     In rule 11 of the said rules, for sub-rule (2), the following sub-rule shall be
       substituted, namely:-

“(2) The invoice shall be serially numbered and shall contain the registration number, name
of the consignee, description, classification, time and date of removal, rate of duty, quantity
and value of goods and the duty payable thereon”.

3.    In rule 16 of the said rules, after sub-rule (2), the following Explanation shall be
inserted, namely:-

“Explanation:- The amount paid under this sub-rule shall be allowed as CENVAT Credit as
if it was a duty paid by the manufacturer who removes the goods”.

4.     After rule 16 of the said rules, the following rule shall be inserted, namely:-

“16A. Removal of goods for job work, etc. – Any inputs received in a factory may be
removed as such or after being partially processed to a job worker for further processing,
testing, repair, re-conditioning or any other purpose subject to the fulfillment of conditions
specified in this behalf by the Commissioner of Central Excise having jurisdiction”.

                                                                                                  Sd/-
                                                                                   (Vijay Mohan Jain)
                                                            Under Secretary to the Government of India
II.     CUSTOMS CIRCULAR
        NO. 16/2003-CUS. DATED 17TH MARCH, 2003

                                      F.NO. 467/09/2001-Cus.V
                                          Government of India
                                 Ministry of Finance & Company Affairs
                                   Department of Revenue (C.B.E.C.)
                                                New Delhi
To
All Chief Commissioner of Customs/Customs and Central Excise
All Commissioners of Customs
All Commissioners of Customs, Directorate of Valuation, Mumbai
DG., Directorate of Revenue Intelligence, New Delhi

                       Enhancement/Loading of Invoice Price – regarding

It has come to the notice of the Board that the Customs field formation(s) are arbitrarily
enhancing the invoice value of imported goods without giving a speaking order. Under
Rule 10A of Customs Valuation Rules, 1988, the Customs Officer may reject the declared
value in cases where under-valuation is reasonably suspected, based on evidence of
contemporaneous prices. Such prices are being made available by the Directorate of
Valuation through the weekly transmissions of NIDB data and monthly Valuation Bulletins.



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It may not be out of place to mention here that the proper officer should follow the
procedure laid down under Rule 10A of Customs Valuation Rules, 1988 to satisfy himself
about the possible under valuation. He should then intimate the importer in writing the
ground for doubting the truth or accuracy of the value declared in relation to the goods
imported and also provide a reasonable opportunity of being heard, before rejecting the
declared value.

In view of the above, all the officers in your jurisdiction may be intimated that where
declared value is rejected, an appealable order should be issued to the importer after
following the due process of law.
                                                                                       Sd/-
                                                                         (N.J. Kumaresh)
                                                      Under Secretary to the Govt. of India

III.   CUSTOMS NOTIFICATION (N.T. SERIES)
       NO. 20/2003-CUSTOMS (N.T.) DATED 03.03.2003

“In exercise of the powers conferred by sub-section (2) of section 75 of the Customs Act,
1962 (52 of 1962) and section 37 of the Central Excise Act, 1944 (1 of 1944), the Central
Government hereby makes the following rules further to amend the Customs and Central
Excise Duties Drawback Rules, 1995, namely:-

1.     Short title and commencement – (1) These rules may be called the Customs and
       Central Excise Drawback (Amendment) (No. 2) Rules, 2003.
2.     They shall come into force, on 1st April, 2003.

3.     In the Customs and Central Excise Drawback Rules, 1995 (hereinafter referred to as
       the said rules), in rule 6, -

(1)    In sub-rule 1, -
       (i)   for clause (a), the following clause shall be substituted, namely:-

       “(a) Where no amount of rate of drawback has been determined in respect of any
       goods, any manufacturer exporter or exporter of such goods may, within sixty days
       from the date relevant for the applicability of the amount or rate of drawback in
       terms of sub-rule (3) of rule (5), apply in writing to the Commissioner of Central
       Excise, having jurisdiction over the manufacturing unit, of the manufacturer exporter
       or, of the supporting manufacturer, as the case may be, for determination of the
       amount of rate of drawback thereof stating all the relevant facts including the
       proportion in which the materials or components are used in the production or
       manufacture of goods and the duties paid on such materials or components:

       Provided that such Commissioner of Central Excise or the Commissioner of Customs
       and Central Excise, as the case may be, may, if he is satisfied that the manufacturer
       exporter or exporter was prevented by sufficient cause from filing the application
       within the aforesaid time allow such manufacturer exporter or exporter to file such
       application within a further period of thirty days”.
ISSUE NO. 07 VOL. IV INDUCTION FURNACE NEWSLETTER 01-04-2003 to 15-04-2003          9
       (ii)    In clause (b), for the words “Central Government”, the words, “Commissioner of
               Central Excise or the Commissioner of Customs and Central Excise, as the
               case may be”, shall be substituted;

(2)    in sub-rule (2), -
       (i)   in clause (a) for the words “Central Government”, the words “Commissioner of
       Central Excise or the Commissioner of Customs and Central Excise, as the case may
       be”, shall be substituted.

       (iii)   for clause (b), the following clause shall be substituted, namely:-

       “(b) The Commissioner of Central Excise or the Commissioner of Customs and
       Central Excise, as the case may be, may, after considering the application, allow
       provisionally payment of an amount not exceeding the amount claimed by the
       manufacturer exporter or exporter in respect of such export:

       Provided that the Commissioner of Central Excise or the Commissioner of Customs
       and Central Excise, as the case may be, for the purpose of allowing provisional
       payment of drawback in respect of such export, require the manufacturer exporter or
       exporter to enter into a general bond for such amount, and subject to such
       conditions, as he may direct; or to enter into a bond for an amount not exceeding the
       full amount claimed by such manufacturer exporter or exporter as drawback in
       respect of a particular consignment and binding himself,

       (i)     to refund the amount so allowed provisionally, if for any reason, it is found the
               duty drawback was not admissible; or

       (ii)    to refund the excess, if any, paid to such manufacturer exporter or exporter
               provisionally if it is found that a lower amount was payable as duty drawback.

       Provided further that when the amount or rate of drawback payable on such goods is
       finally determined, the amount provisionally paid to such manufacturer exporter or
       exporter shall be adjusted against the drawback finally payable and if the amount so
       adjusted is in excess or falls short of the drawback finally payable, such
       manufacturer exporter or exporter shall repay to the Commissioner of Central Excise
       or the Commissioner of Customs and Central Excise, as the case may be, the excess
       or be entitled to the deficiency, as the case may be.

       (iii)   In clause (c), for the words “Commissioner of Customs”, the words
               “Commissioner of Central Excise or the Commissioner of Customs and Central
               Excise, as the case may be” shall be substituted.

(3)    for sub-rule (3), the following sub-rule shall be substituted, namely:-
       “(3) Where the Central Government considers it necessary so to do, it may-



ISSUE NO. 07 VOL. IV INDUCTION FURNACE NEWSLETTER 01-04-2003 to 15-04-2003              10
       (a) revoke the rate of drawback or amount of drawback, determined under clause (b)
           of sub-rule (1) by the Commissioner of Central Excise or the Commissioner of
           Customs and Central Excise, as the case may be; or

       (b) direct the Commissioner of Central Excise or the Commissioner of Customs and
           Central Excise, as the case may be, to withdraw the rate of drawback or amount of
           drawback determined”.

4.     In rule 7 of the said rules, -
       (i) for sub-rule (1), the following rule shall be substituted, namely:-

       “(1) Where, in respect of any goods, the manufacturer exporter or exporter finds that
       the amount or rate of drawback determined under rule 3 or, as the case may be,
       revised under rule 4, for the class of goods is less than four-fifth of the duties paid on
       the materials or components used in the production or manufacture of the said
       goods, he may within sixty days from the date relevant for the applicability of the
       amount or rate of drawback in terms of sub-rule (3) of rule (5), make an application
       in writing to the Commissioner of Central Excise or the Commissioner of Customs
       and Central Excise having jurisdiction over the manufacturing unit, of the
       manufacturer exporter or, of the supporting manufacturer, as the case may be, for
       determination of the amount or rate of drawback thereof stating all relevant facts
       including the proportion in which the materials or components are used in the
       production or manufacture of goods and the duties paid on such materials or
       components:

       Provided that the Commissioner of Central Excise or the Commissioner of Customs
       and Central Excise may, if he is satisfied that the manufacturer exporter or exporter
       was prevented by sufficient cause from making the application within the aforesaid
       time, allow such manufacturer exporter or exporter to make such application within
       a further period of thirty days.

       (2) in sub-rule (2), for the words “Central Government” the words “Commissioner of
       Central Excise or the Commissioner of Customs and Central Excise, as the case may
       be” shall be substituted.

       (3) for sub-rule (3), the following sub-rule shall be substituted, namely:-

       “(3) Where an exporter desires that he may be granted drawback provisionally, he
       may, while making an application under sub-rule (1), apply to the Commissioner of
       Central Excise or the Commissioner of Customs and Central Excise, as the case may
       be, in writing in this behalf in the manner as has been provided in clause (a) of sub-
       rule (2) of rule 6 for the applications made under that rule and the grant of
       provisional drawback shall be considered in the manner and subject to the
       conditions specified in clauses (b) and (c) of sub-rule (2), and sub-rule (3) of rule 6,
       subject to the conditions that bond required to be executed by the claimant shall
       only be for the difference between amount or rate of drawback determined under rule
       3 or, as the case may be, revised under rule 4 by the Central Government and the
ISSUE NO. 07 VOL. IV INDUCTION FURNACE NEWSLETTER 01-04-2003 to 15-04-2003               11
           provisional drawback authorized by the Commissioner of Central Excise or the
           Commissioner of Customs and Central Excise, as the case may be, under this rule.

           “(4) Where the Central Government considers if necessary so to do, it may-

           revoke the rate of drawback or amount of drawback, determined under sub-rule (2)
           by the Commissioner of Central Excise or the Commissioner of Customs and Central
           Excise, as the case may be or (b) direct the Commissioner of Central Excise or the
           Commissioner of Customs and Central Excise, as the case may be, to withdraw the
           rate of drawback or amount of drawback determined”.

5. In 9 of the said rules, in clause (d), for the words “the Central Government to be relevant
   or useful”, the words, Commissioner of Central Excise or the Commissioner of Customs
   and Central Excise, as the case may be, to be relevant or useful”, shall be substituted.

6. In rule 13 of the said rules, in sub-rule(2), in clause (iv), for the words “Central
   Government” the words “Commissioner of Central Excise or the Commissioner of
   Customs and Central Excise”, as the case may be, shall be substituted.

7. In rule 15 of the said rules, in sub-rule (1) –

    (i)       for the words “Central Government”, the words “Central Government or
              Commissioner of Central Excise or the Commissioner of Customs and Central
              Excise, as the case may be, shall be substituted.

    (ii)      In the second proviso, in clause (a), for the words, “Assistant Commissioner of
              Customs” the words “Assistant Commissioner of Customs and Central Excise or
              Assistant Commissioner of Central Excise, as the case may be, shall be
              substituted;

    (iii)     In the second proviso, in clause (b), for the words, “Commissioners of Customs”,
              the words “Commissioner of Customs and Central Excise or Commissioner of
              Central Excise, as the case may be, shall be substituted.

                                                                                                       Sd/-
                                                                                           (S.S. Renjhen)
                                                                      Joint Secretary to the Govt. of India


AIIFA IS TAKING OUT THIS NEWSLETTER AND GIVES MANY IMPORTANT
POINTS OF INTEREST OF THE MEMBERS. IN CASE MEMBERS COME TO
KNOW SOMETHING WHICH MAY BE OF INTEREST OF THE ENTIRE INDUCTION
FURNACE INDUSTRY, THEY MAY KINDLY BE WRITE TO THE AIIFA HEAD
OFFICE FOR PRINTING IT IN THE NEWSLETTER.


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Issue No. 7            Vol. IV “Fortnightly”                 Date : 01.04.2003 to 15-04-2003




ISSUE NO. 07 VOL. IV INDUCTION FURNACE NEWSLETTER 01-04-2003 to 15-04-2003                     13
ISSUE NO. 07 VOL. IV INDUCTION FURNACE NEWSLETTER 01-04-2003 to 15-04-2003   14

				
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