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									                        CIEE English Courses -2012 Spring

1. Important CIEE Dates and Deadlines
2012 Spring
First day of classes:                           February 20
Add /drop deadline                              March 2
Weeklong Fieldtrips (No class):                 March 24-April 1
Tomb Sweeping Day (No class):                   April 4
Make-up classes for April 4:                    April 6
Withdrawal deadline:                            April 6
Spring Break (No class)                         April 30-May 4
Last day classes & all exams:                   May 25
Important Note: ECNU students may drop a CIEE course without permission
before the add/drop deadline. Students who petition to withdraw from a CIEE
course before the withdrawal deadline require permission from the instructor
and will receive a W on their ECNU transcript. Students who stop attending a
CIEE course after the withdrawal deadline will receive a failing mark (F) for the
course on their ECNU transcript.

2. CIEE Final Grading Scale

                   Recommended Credit                    No Recommended Credit
                Numeric Grade Letter Grade             Numeric Grade Letter Grade

               95-100                A                0-59                 F
               90-94                 A-
               87-89                 B+               Incomplete           INC
               83-86                 B                Non-Reported         NR
               80-82                 B-               Withdraw             W
               76-79                 C+               A+, C-, D+, and D- are not valid
               70-75                 C                CIEE grades
               60-69                 D


3. CIEE English courses open to ECNU

1. Seminar on Issues of Globalization in China

Course Description:
Shanghai is a Chinese city in which the effects of globalization are visible everywhere.
What is globalization and what does it mean for China and the Chinese people? Why
did the Communist Party of China decide to engage globalization? How did it do so?
What are the effects, both intended and unintended? Where does Shanghai fit in this
picture of a globalizing China? What are the responses of Chinese political leaders,
intellectuals, and ordinary people to the “onslaught” of globalizing forces? These are
the main themes that this course aims to explore in an effort to understand a China
that is increasingly integrated with the world and which thrives to be a “responsible
stakeholder” in the international community.
Time: 1:00-4:00p.m., Wednesday
Instructor: DRAKE, Michael is a Ph.D. candidate at Durham University (UK) with
research interests in modernization theory in general and Chinese modernization and
sociopolitical development in particular. His research attempts to understand how
China's contemporary modernization compares to the historical paths towards
modernization in China and the West, and how the current forces of modernization are
shaping the emerging business class. He holds an M.A. degree in International
Relations (East Asia) from Durham University, and a B.A. degree in Political Science
from Calvin College (USA). He also studied on an intensive language course at
Peking University in 2008. In addition, in 2009-2010 he taught an International
Relations course at Durham University

2. Issues in Chinese Society

Course Description:
China’s transition to a market economy and return to the global community have huge
impacts over the lives of its people, as well as the rest of the world. While covering
other fields such as anthropology, political science, gender studies and urban studies,
this course mostly employs a sociological perspective to examine issues in
contemporary Chinese society. Topics examined include not only these well-known
aspects of Chinese society such as guanxi and face, collectivism and family-centered
culture, but also the emerging civil society, ongoing sexual revolution, and increasing
social polarization that are more likely associated with the enormous social change
over the past three decades. Students will be asked to critically and creatively think
about change and continuity in contemporary China in relation to the dynamic and
complex interaction of local factors and global forces.
Time: 1:00-4:00p.m., Tuesday
Instructor: WEI Wei received his BA in Sociology from Peking University (1996)
and his MA and Ph.D. in Sociology from Loyola University Chicago (2003, 2006).
Currently he is an Associate Professor of Sociology at East China Normal University.
Wei Wei’s research interests cover urban sociology, gender/sexuality, urban social
movements and qualitative methods, with a focus on identity formation, public space,
community mobilization organized around homosexuality in contemporary Chinese
society. He has published articles in both English and Chinese on leading academic
journals including Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, Society: Chinese Journal of Sociology,
and Sexuality Research in China.

3. Modern Chinese History

Course Description
This course will introduce the modern history and society of China from 1839-2008.
Mid-19th century marks the end of China’s self-isolation. Since then China’s history
has become inescapably a part of the world history. This course tackles a period
during which China underwent a desperate struggle for survival through wars,
revolutions, and drastic changes in political, ideological and ethical systems,
including the collapse of the imperial structure under Western intellectual influences
and military pressure, the “National Salvation” movements in the wake of foreign
invasions, and the communist rule following the Second World War.
Time: 1:00-4:00p.m., Thursday
Instructor: MAHONEY, Greg, Associate Professor of Politics, East China Normal
University; Senior Researcher, Central Compilation and Translation Bureau under the
Central Committee of the Communist Party of China; Assistant Editor of the
US-based Journal of Chinese Political Science. His training includes a BA, MPhil,
and PhD from George Washington University; and a MSPH and MPA from the
University of Alabama at Birmingham. An internationally recognized expert in
modern Chinese political thought and ideology, he has published numerous
translations, articles, chapters, and editorials, etc., in leading Chinese and international
publications, and presented at major conferences in the China, the United States,
Singapore, the United Kingdom and Germany. He has held posts at George
Washington University, the University of Maryland, College Park, Grand Valley State
University, and Liaoning University, and served as a dissertation director at Peking
University’s School of Marxism. He has held research and visiting positions with
Shaanxi Normal University (Xi’an) and Minzu University (Beijing). He has worked
previously at the local and national levels in both the Chinese and US governments.

4. Chinese Film and Society
Course Description
This course will examine Chinese cinema from its infancy to contemporary film
within a social, political and cultural context, focusing specifically on films produced
in mainland China. While acknowledging the importance of examining Chinese
cinema in the general framework of national tradition and identity, this course also
emphasizes the transnational or pan-Asian nature of Chinese film productions at
present. In this way, it is hoped that the course will not only help students cultivate a
greater command over current trends and debates in analysis and theorization of
Chinese cinema, but also help facilitate students’ understanding of Chinese
cinema/culture/history in the context of globalization.
Time: 4:00-7:00p.m., Tuesday
Instructor: SUN, Shaoyi is Research Professor of Film and Media Studies at
Shanghai University’ s School of Film & TV and Adjunct Professor at NYU Shanghai.
He has taught Chinese film, literature, and cultural studies at the University of
Southern California, University of California at Irvine, and New York University in
Shanghai. He was the NETPAC (Network for the Promotion of Asian Cinema) juror
of the 2009 Singapore International Film Festival (Chair), the 2007 Brisbane
International Film Festival, the 2001 Hawaii International Film Festival, and a jury
member of the 2011 Bengaluru International Film Festival, the 2011 Singapore
International Film Festival, the 2008 Shanghai International Film Festival’ s
International Student Shorts Award and the 2000 Dhaka International Film Festival.

,
5. The Changing Nature of Business in China
Course Description:
This subject aims to enhance students’ understanding of the opportunities and
challenges of doing business in China. China is indeed a market with tremendous
business potentials, but also remains as one of the riskiest markets in the world.
Topics of discussion cover major economic and business issues facing both foreign
and Chinese companies in China today, including political and economic environment
analysis, cultural challenges, assessment of business opportunities, understanding the
strength and weakness of Made-in-China, regional issues, investment ABCs, China’s
financial reforms, human resource management, and working with Chinese
companies. Upon successful completion of this subject, the students will be able to:
Analyze the dynamics of the business environment of China; understand basics of
specific aspects of China business, which present unique challenges for foreign
business people; compare regional differences; connect cultural and historical
dimensions to business practices in China; and use case analysis to study special
business topics.
Prerequisite: Three semesters of microeconomics and/or macroeconomics, or three
semesters of accounting, finance, management, or marketing.
Time: 1:00-4:00p.m., Monday
Instructor: MO, Charles holds an M.B.A. from California State University Fullerton,
a B.A. in Business Administration from Hong Kong Baptist College, and is a licensed
Certified Public Accountant in California and New Hampshire. He is the founder of
Charles Mo & Company, a wholly owned American consulting firm specializing in
recruiting, opening new factories and businesses, outsourcing accounting, and
providing HR related assessment tools for corporations. He is also an independent
Board Member and the Chairman of the Audit Committee on the Board of Directors
of Omnialuo, Inc. and China Ritar Power Corporation, both OTC public companies in
the US. In January 2008 he was appointed to the Board of Directors of NVIS
Intellimedia Technology Group, a NYSE listed company. Charles Mo moved to China
in 1995 as the Controller/General Manager for Polaroid China, and later served as the
Chief Financial Officer for Nike China, and finally as the Chief Operating Officer for
Coca-Cola in Shanghai until 2005. He previously worked for Wang Laboratories, Inc.
in Massachusetts in various financial management capacities. In 2003 Charles Mo
joined American Chamber of Commerce in Shanghai, and was appointed Corporate
Social Responsibility Committee Vice Chair in 2004, Board Treasurer in 2005, and
elected Board Vice Chairman in 2006, 2007, and 2008. He also served as the
Chairman of the Audit Committee in 2005 and member of the Audit Committee in
2006 and 2007.

6. China’s Macroeconomic Impact

Course Description:
This course focuses on economic development in China; industrialization
manufacturing capacity and international trade applied to problems of China’s
economic growth; and the role and trend of foreign direct investment to
industrialization. It also examines China’s banking and financial system; monetary
policy and capital market development; investment growth and capital formation; and
analyze RMB exchange rate policy.
Prerequisite: Three semesters of microeconomics and/or macroeconomics, or three
semesters of accounting, finance, management, or marketing.
Time: 1:00-4:00p.m., Tuesday
Instructor: YANG Laike received his PhD in economics from Xiamen University
(2000) and holds an MA and BA in economics from Shaanxi Normal University. He is
a full Professor in the School of Finance and Statistics at East China Normal
University, where he currently serves as the Dean of the Department of International
Trade. He has conducted postdoctoral research in the Chinese Academy of Social
Sciences (CASS) in Beijing and has participated in postgraduate programs overseas at
the Berlin University of Application Science and Berlin College of Economics in
Germany for advanced training in macroeconomics and monetary policy (2001), and
at the Tilburg University in the Netherlands for advanced training in microeconomics
(1998). Professor Yang is an expert in international trade, with a special focus on
Sino-US and Sino-EU trade relationships, as well as trade and environment, economic
globalization, and Asian economic integration. He has taught courses on international
business, international trade, marketing, Chinese economy and foreign trade, FDI in
China and in Asia, and Chinese business environment and culture at both BA and MA
levels for Chinese and international students. Professor Yang has more than 40
publications in both Chinese and English to his name.


7. China’s Economic Reforms

Course Description:
This course introduces students to both domestic and international aspects of China’s
economy. It explores the political, social, and cultural forces that are shaping China’s
modernization and how the country’s businesses interact with the world marketplace.
The course also provides students with the knowledge of processes of reforms in
different economic aspects in China and tries to help students to understand the
characteristics of Chinese economy. In this course, students are expected to learn the
macroeconomic and microeconomic characteristics of Chinese economy, to
understand the economic mechanism in the so called “Socialist Market Economy,”
and to gain a better understanding of the achievements and challenges that China is
facing in its further economic reform and modernization. By the end of the semester,
students are expected to analyze the Chinese economy using practical methods
appropriate to China’s actual current economic situation.
Prerequisite: Three semesters of microeconomics and/or macroeconomics, or three
semesters of accounting, finance, management, or marketing.
Time: 1:00-4:00p.m., Wednesday
Instructor: XU Mingqi received his Ph.D. in International Economics (1994) and
M.A. in Economics (1982) from the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences (SASS).
Dr. Xu currently serves as the Deputy Director of the Institute of World Economy and
Director of the Department of International Finance at SASS, where he also served as
Editor in Chief of Social Sciences and Academic Quarterly (1998-2001). His
international experiences includes working as a Visiting Scholar at the International
Institute of Asian Studies at Leiden University in the Netherlands (2001),
Harvard-Yenching Institute at Harvard University (1995-1996), and University of
Western Ontario in Canada (1987-1988). He has taught as a guest Professor in the
School of International and Area Studies at Seoul National University in South Korea,
where he researched regional monetary cooperation. Dr. Xu also worked as Senior
Financial Analyst and Vice President of the Shanghai Far East Credit Rating
Corporation (1993-1998). His main research areas are in the theory of world economy,
international finance, monetary economics and monetary policy, and China’s financial
system reforms. He has edited or authored over 13 books and book chapters published
in China, Netherlands and US, and has written over 65 journal and newspaper articles
about the Chinese economy.


8. The New Giants and the New Order: Economy and Business in the Emerging
   World

Course Description:
As the cold war wound down, new economic giants—and new global
challenges—began to emerge. The story begins in China, historically a rich, powerful,
and plentiful nation, but left reeling and impoverished from a century of turmoil. Now,
China boasts four of the world’s six largest companies by market capitalization and is
home to the second largest population of world’s wealthy. “Made in China” is
increasingly synonymous with manufacturing, and this flurry of activity has produced
a massive, complex, and sophisticated consumer market along with becoming a rising
international player on the world stage. Not long after, India, the world’s second most
populous nation and another ancient force, began to shed some of the bureaucratic
hubris of its recent past, and focus increasingly on growth. India, a democracy, looked
to services instead of manufacturing and quickly came to dominate the world’s back
office. “ We will look at how these two models from a macro (ie. policy) and micro
(ie. company) levels share similarities and differences. A relatively newer—and
related—game is the development of “new new markets” such as sub-Saharan Africa
and the Middle-East, and even exerting power in places as far as Latin America. Also
emerging from a chaotic period of decolonization and political instability, these
nations and people see greater promise in the Chinese and Indian models than the
traditional US led Washington Consensus. The great game of globalization, much
lauded in the late 1800’s, is on again with a new set of players. In this World Studies
Track seminar, we will look at the major issues and try to make sense of what has
happened and where things are headed in the future.
Prerequisite: Three semesters of microeconomics and/or macroeconomics, or three
semesters of accounting, finance, management, or marketing.
Time: 6:00-9:00p.m., Monday
Instructor: MARR, Jack has been teaching with CIEE since 2005. Additionally, he
serves as Advising Director for the NYU Stern program in Shanghai, where he
teaches Chinese Economics, the Economics of Globalization, and Marketing.
Additionally, Jack is a frequent lecturer at a number of other programs at the BA,
MBA, and DMBA levels at various US, Chinese, and Japanese universities. He also
works as a contributor to the Economist Group in Greater China and is often quoted in
leading publications and radio. In the past, he directed business development for the
State of Missouri in Japan and China, was an Associate with McKinsey & Co. in
Greater China, helped direct research on North and South China agribusiness markets
for the USDA from the US Consulate in Shanghai, and was an analyst at one of
China's first venture capital funds. Recent publications include "Winning in Emerging
Markets: Operational Issues" and "FDI in China's Secondary Cities" (Economist
Intelligence Unit, 2007/8). He holds an executive MBA from McKinsey, an MA in
International Political Economy from the University of Chicago, and a BA in
Philosophy and Rhetoric from the University of Illinois. He is fluent in Mandarin
Chinese and Japanese, and is an avid rock climber and mountaineer.

9. Marketing Management and Methods in East Asia and Emerging Markets
Course Description:
Marketing is a company-wide undertaking that drives an organization’s vision, mission,
and strategic planning. Marking is about learning the overall shape of the market,
deciding who the firm wants as its customers, which needs to satisfy, what products and
services to create and offer, what prices to set, what communications to send and receive,
what channels of distribution to use, and what partnerships to develop. Marketing deals
with the whole process of entering markets, establishing sustainable and advantageous
positions, and building loyal customer relationships. To achieve this, all departments must
work together: designing the right products, furnishing the required funds and accounting
for their use, buying the right inputs, and producing quality products. At the same time,
the traditional marketing mix is being transformed across many industries by new
information technologies, and as a result, some of the “traditional wisdom” is being
turned on its head.
Prerequisite: Three semesters of microeconomics and/or macroeconomics, or three
semesters of accounting, finance, management, or marketing.
Time: 1:00-4:00p.m., Thursday
Instructor: MARR, Jack has been teaching with CIEE since 2005. Additionally, he
serves as Advising Director for the NYU Stern program in Shanghai, where he
teaches Chinese Economics, the Economics of Globalization, and Marketing.
Additionally, Jack is a frequent lecturer at a number of other programs at the BA,
MBA, and DMBA levels at various US, Chinese, and Japanese universities. He also
works as a contributor to the Economist Group in Greater China and is often quoted in
leading publications and radio. In the past, he directed business development for the
State of Missouri in Japan and China, was an Associate with McKinsey & Co. in
Greater China, helped direct research on North and South China agribusiness markets
for the USDA from the US Consulate in Shanghai, and was an analyst at one of
China's first venture capital funds. Recent publications include "Winning in Emerging
Markets: Operational Issues" and "FDI in China's Secondary Cities" (Economist
Intelligence Unit, 2007/8). He holds an executive MBA from McKinsey, an MA in
International Political Economy from the University of Chicago, and a BA in
Philosophy and Rhetoric from the University of Illinois. He is fluent in Mandarin
Chinese and Japanese, and is an avid rock climber and mountaineer.


3. CIEE Enrollment Process
1. The students should officially enroll the course with ECNU on line first.
3. CIEE office will organize the oral and written test after we get the enrollment list
from ECNU.
2. The students should prepare their resume and one 500-word English paper related
to the enrolled course for the interview.
4. Students who pass the test can go to class and ask permission from the course
instructor, who should have the final say on if they do or don’t take his or her course
in the first two weeks.

4. Other Notes:
1. Candidate should provide the most recent transcript and CET-6 certificate.
2. CIEE doesn’t charge any tuition for the Chinese students, but the textbooks and all
the field trips costs will be paid by the students themselves.
3. Chinese students take these courses ECNU credits, and will receive a letter grade.
Therefore, Chinese students should read CIEE academic handbook and sign the
learning contract and attend the course orientation session.
4. The student should obey all CIEE academic policies, such as commit to doing the
reading, having good attendance and participating in class activities and assignments
for the entire semester. CIEE has the authority to dismiss the students in case he or
she has very bad performances.
5. For any questions, please contact CIEE Academic Coordinator, Zheng Laoshi

CIEE Study Center at East China Normal University in Shanghai, China

Global Education Center, 4th floor

East China Normal University Main Gate (East Gate)

3663 North Zhongshan Road, Putuo District, Shanghai 200062, P. R. China

Tel: 021-62230050-803

Email:hzheng@ciee.org

								
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