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Bubbles

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									         Bubbles
Multimedia Science Fair Project
       Heather Kravitz
                Question:
Why is a bubble round?
             Hypothesis:
A bubble is round
because it is full
of air.
                 Materials:
•Bottle of bubbles
•Bubble blower
                   Procedure:
1.) Remove lid of bubble
   solution container
2.) Insert bubble blower
   (wand) carefully into the
   solution
3.) Remove blower and
   blow into the center of
   the film of bubble
   solution
4.) Watch how a bubble is
   formed and created
5.) Repeat
     Caution:
Do not try outside on a windy
day. A sudden gust might blow a
bubble backwards into your
mouth and you might eat it.
                Results:
Bubbles are definitely
round.
                  Conclusion:
So why are bubbles round?
• Following our trials, it
  appears the answer is
  surface tension and
  volume of air.
• The air inside the bubble
  is pushing out while the
  surface tension is pushing
  in which creates a
  balance.
• The bubble’s round shape
  is the smallest amount of
  surface area a bubble can
  have for the amount of air
  it has inside it.
                   Perimeter:
If we look at the                Perimeter of Different Shapes

perimeter of different       5
                                                             Circle
shapes with a fixed area,    4                               Square
                                                             Triangle
we see that the circle has   3                               Rectanle
the smallest perimeter.      2

                             1
If you imagine cutting a
bubble in half, it would     0

be a circle. Therefore, a
circle is the smallest
shape a bubble could be.
           BUBBLE SOLUTION RECIPE
        and WAND CONSTRUCTION TIPS:
What you need:
• good quality liquid dish soap
• glycerin
• shallow pan or a large dish
• misc. wand making materials such as
  wire, straws, netting, string, your
  hands...
What you do:
• Mix your bubble solution (make lots and
  store some. The older the mixture the
  better it seems to work.) Use about 1 cup
  of soap and about 1 tsp. of glycerin to a
  quart of water.
• Make different shaped wands. Be creative
  and experiment with many shapes and
  utilizing different materials.
• Method tips: Dip your wand into the
  solution and gently wave with full arm
  motion. Vary the speed of movement and
  try blowing into the soap film too!
 To learn more about bubbles go to:
• http://simscience.org/membr
  anes/intermediate/essay/why
  _bubbles_round1.html
• http://ksnn.larc.nasa.gov/we
  btext.cfm?unit=bubbles
• http://www.kids-science-
  experiments.com/cat_surface
  tension.html
• http://www.hobbyscience.co
  m/bubble.html
• http://www.bubbleblowers.com
  /index.html
• http://homepage.mac.com/keit
  hmjohnson/soapbubbler.com/i
  ndex.html
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