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ABOUT 2010 CENSUS by 9Jb4QZHN

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									ABOUT 2010 CENSUS

What is a census count?
   Count of everyone in the U.S.
   All 50 states.
Who gets counted in the census?
   Everyone: citizens and noncitizens.
   All residents of the U.S.
   People of all ages, races, and ethnic groups.
Where will the questionnaire be mailed?
   Every household in the U.S.
   People should be counted where they live and sleep most of the year.
Why is this done?

       U.S. Constitution requires a Census every 10 years.
       April 1, 2010 is the next census.
How is this done?
    Questionnaires will be mailed March 2010.
    Second form will be mailed to households if you do not respond.
    Households that still do not respond will be called or visited by a Census worker.

BY BEING COUNTED YOU ARE STANDING UP FOR WHAT YOUR COMMUNITY NEEDS ARE!



WHY FILL OUT THE CENSUS FORM?
● Affects funding in your community.
    Hospitals
    Job Training Centers
    Schools
    Senior Centers
    Emergency Services

●   It’s easy: 10 questions-10 minutes

● It’s Required By Law.
    U.S. Constitution mandates a headcount every 10 years.
    Failure to respond will impose a fine up to $5,000.

● It’s Confidential.
    Used for statistical purposes.
    Census employees swear under oath to keep information private for life.
    If employees violate oath, they are fined up to $250,000 and 5 years of prison or both.
    Copies of data are not disclosed even under the Freedom of Information Act.
    Private information is never published.
IT’S IMPORTANT
● FEDERAL AND STATE FUNDING
   Distribute funds to communities for:

SCHOOLS:
    Special Education
    School Breakfast Programs
    School Renovation
    Literacy

PROGRAMS:
    Neighborhood Improvement
    WIC Programs
    Low Income Assistance Programs
    Child Care and Development

Census data helps:
    Plan where new roads will be built.
    New Businesses determine location sites.
    Analyze public safety needs
    Determines how many seats each State has in the U.S. House of Representatives.
    Determines funding levels for states.




MAKE A DIFFERENCE!
 YOU can help raise awareness
 Affect the quality of life in your community
 Help spread the word

Play an important role in making the 2010 Census a success by encouraging people in
your community to take part in the count.

 Census data tells how your community has grown since the last 10 years.
 Census data reflects where your community will go over the next 10 years.

Send a strong message:
                                     Fill out and return your
                                          CENSUS FORM
                                           APRIL 1, 2010


Quick facts regarding the 2010 Census and its impact on Michigan:
• In Michigan, for every person NOT counted, our state loses $10,000 ($40,000 for a family of
four) to other states over the course of 10 years.
• The census also determines reapportionment and redistricting of congressional, state and local
representation.
• It is estimated that 24,000 people will be hired at a pay range of $11.25-$19.50 per hour.
• Michigan would not have lost a congressional seat after the 2000 census if its snowbirds had
been counted in the right place.
• Because so many of Michigan’s snowbirds were counted in the wrong place by the 2000
census, roughly $200 million of federal funds are spent in other states each year instead of in
Michigan, which adds up to $2 billion over the course of a decade.


IF YOU DON’T FILL OUT YOUR FORM AND SEND IT BACK IN….YOU MAY
RECEIVE A VISIT FROM A CENSUS TAKER.

If a Census Taker visits you, here is what you should do:

       -       Ask to see their ID. All census workers carry official government
               badges marked with just their name; they may also have a “U.S.
               CENSUS BUREAU” tag.
       -       Note that the census taker will never ask to enter your home.
       -       If you are still not certain about their identity, please call the
               Regional Census Center’s to confirm they are employed by the
               Census Bureau.
       -       Answer the census form questions for your entire household (you
               must be at least 15 years old to answer questions) so that the census
               taker can record the results for submission to the Census Bureau.

Census takers visit local homes several times to capture resident information for the
2010 Census. If you prefer, you can schedule a visit with your census taker. Should a
census taker come when you are away from home, they will leave a contact number. If
a census taker has not visited your home or you have a question about your
participation with the census, call your Census office.

Census takers will have a flashcard containing a sentence about the 2010 Census
written in approximately 50 languages. If a resident does not speak English, the census
taker will show the flashcard to the resident, and the resident can point to the language
he/she speaks. A census crew leader will then be assigned to a person who speaks
that language.


2010 CENSUS
WHAT IS AT STAKE?

The Census only occurs every 10 years and while the Federal Government uses
estimates between each census it is not an exact science. Every decennial census
becomes a baseline for future estimates. If you are not counted in the census, it can
have a direct impact on your daily life for years to come. It is crucial everyone is
counted because a lot is at stake.

 -   Census affects funding in your community
    Census data directly affect how more than $300 billion per year in federal and state
    funding is allocated to communities for neighborhood improvements, public health,
    education, transportation, and much more….

-   Census affects your voice in Congress
    The number and size of a Congressional district in each state is based on
    population numbers from the census. In 1911 Congress limited the number of
    Members of Congress to 435 and in 1941 Congress adopted the “Equal
    Proportions” formula to calculate representation in Congress by population. As the
    population portion shifts between the states, the representation in Congress
    follows.

-   Census affects your representation in state and local government
    Census data is used to define legislature districts, school district assignment areas
    and other important functional areas of government.

-   Census helps forms your community’s decisions
    The census is like a snapshot that helps define who we are as a nation. Data
    about changes in your community are crucial to many planning decisions, such as
    where to provide services for the elderly, where to build new roads and schools, or
    where to locate job training centers.

								
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