elkhart 2010 by kg1VS9

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									Governor’s Commission for a Drug Free Indiana
                 A Division of the




              Comprehensive Community Plan
     County: Elkhart County

     LCC: Elkhart County Local Coordinating Council (aka Elkhart
  County Drug-Free Partnership)

     Date Due: June 2008

     Date Submitted: June 17, 2009

      New Plan              Plan Update




      LCC Contact: Jessica Koscher
      Address: 222 Middlebury Street
      City: Elkhart
      Phone: 574-295-1650
      Email: koscherj@unitedwayec.org

      County Commissioners: Frank Lucchese, Terry Rodino, Mike
      Yoder
      Address: 117 N. 2nd Street
      City: Goshen
      Zip Code: 46526
Comprehensive Community Plan                                                 2


                             Plan Summary

Mission Statement: The Elkhart County LCC brings community
stakeholders together in a voluntary effort to reduce the prevalence of
substance misuse and other unhealthy behaviors. The LCC is a
multidisciplinary effort that shares resources, knowledge and expertise to
promote healthy behaviors among individuals and families leading to
community well-being.




History: The Elkhart County LCC was founded in 1992 by a group of
committed community volunteers. Their intent was to assist in combating
alcohol, tobacco and other drug (ATOD) issues in our community. Whether
through public awareness directly by the LCC, or it's support of prevention,
criminal justice and treatment programs throughout the county, the LCC has
and continues to be very effective in it's activities to reduce the harmful
effects of ATOD.
Comprehensive Community Plan                                               3


Summary of the Comprehensive Community Plan: The LCC
Comprehensive Plan was organized through the coordinators office with
oversight provided by the Executive Board of Directors, the duly elected
governing body by the general membership of the LCC. The Plan's process
includes steps that attempt to ensure both LCC members and others in the
community are involved.

A series of "focus groups" consisting of LCC members and additional
community members was conviened to assess the local ATOD problem in
Elkhart County, discuss objectives which would help alleviate the stated
problems and critera for measured success.

Over 100 people were invited to attend a focus group in their area of
speciality. A total of four focus groups occurred, one focusing on both
treatment and criminal justice with two additional groups examining
prevention.

The information derived from the focus groups resulted not only in problem
areas identified, but suggested remedies on how to best combat these issues.
The LCC membership including members of the BOARD of Directors also
contributed to this effort.

The Elkhart county commissioners also involved themselves by dedicating
one staff member to participate and assist in the planning, direction and
focus of the organization. Having this “Liaison” has assisted in keeping the
commissioners office informed and supportive of initiatives put fort by the
LCC including the 2008 Comprehensive Plan. The result of the entire
planning process was that at current and relevant comprehensive strategy to
address ATOD issues has been developed.
Comprehensive Community Plan                                    4


                          Membership List

County LCC Name:
#      Name      Organization           Race    Gender   Category
1        Sharol            A new        White   Female   Treatment
       Alexander         Beginning
2     Peg Andrews        Center for     White   Female   Treatment
                          Problem
                        Resolution
3     Karen Bartow          ARC         White   Female   Education
4      Cathy Blum       Cathy Blum      White   Female   Treatment
                        Counseling
5     Pamela Brock        Purdue        White   Female      Social
                         Extension                         Service
6      Joe Brown       Goshen Police    White    Male      Police
                        Department
7     Daniel Danen         Danen        White    Male    Treatment
                        Counseling
                          Services
8    John Ferguson     Boys and Girls   White    Male       Social
                            Club                           Service
9      Cindy Fink      Mental Health    white   Female      Social
                          America                          Service
10    Judith Forbes       ECADAP        White   Female    Criminal
                                                           Justice
11   Brook German          NPD          White    Male      Police
12     Larry Hale        Bashor         White    Male       Social
                        Children’s                        Services
                          Home
13   Lori Harrington   Mental Health    White   Female     Social
                         America                          Services
14      Kryston            ARC          White   Female   Treatment
        Hartzler
15   Keith Hataway      Millersburg     White    Male      Police
                        Police Dept
16    Sean Holmes          ECSD         White    Male      Police
17   John Hutchings       Elkhart       White    Male    Education
                        Community
                          Schools
18   Jessica Koscher    United Way      Asian   Female     Social
                                                          Services
19    Kris Krueger     Elkhart County   White   Female   Government
                       Commissioners
20   Hollie Lambert       Safe Kids     White   Female     Social
                           Elkhart                        Services
Comprehensive Community Plan                                    5


21   Barbara Leedy        Elkhart       White   Female   Education
                       Community
                         Schools
22    Tami Maier       Big Brothers     White   Female     Social
                        Big Sisters                       Services
23    Doug Ganger        Bashor’s       White   Male       Social
                        Children’s                        Services
                           Home
24   Sean McCrindle      Bashor’s       White   Male       Social
                        Children’s                        Services
                           Home
25     Jan Noble           ARC          White    Male    Treatment
26    Ken Norman         Oaklawn        White    Male    Treatment
27    Karen Pedler          CPR         White   Female   Treatment
28   Richard Pedler      Recovery       White    Male    Treatment
                         Journey
29    Mark Potuck        Tobacco        White   Male       Social
                        Control of                        Services
                      Elkhart County
30    Kham Piercy       Girl Scouts     Asian   Female     Social
                                                          Services
31    Gail Ryniak        Victims        White   Female    Criminal
                        Assistance                         Justice
32     Jim Sharp          YMCA          White   Male       Social
                                                          Services
33     Jim Smith      Elkhart County    White   Male     Government
                       Health Dept
34    Trent Smith          ISP          White   Male       Police
35    Jim Starkey         Health        White   Male     Government
                       Department
36   Jeff Stutsman        ECSD          White    Male      Police
37     Adrienne         North Side      White   Female     Social
        Thomas         Community                          Services
                      Coalition, Inc.
Comprehensive Community Plan                                                        6


                          Problem Identification

A. Problem Statement #1: Limited resources inhibit the ability of Law
Enforcement Agencies (LEA) in addressing issues of alcohol, tobacco and
drug interdiction.

B. Supportive Data:

  1. There is an inconsistency in the use of equipment among the 9 police departments in
Elkhart County. Some departments like Nappanee Police Department have equipped
100% of their vehicles with mobile video cameras while others have as few as 16% of their
vehicles equipped (Indiana State Police).
  2. Elkhart County ranked 3rd in the state for the number of Meth Labs dismantled
with 39 in 2007 (Indiana State Police).
  3. Most departments in Elkhart County do not have provisions for overtime hours.
Those which do expect to see a 10-20% decrease in current budget.
  4.
  5.

End of Year 1 Update:
  1. The Indiana State Police added 5 mobile video cameras to their Elkhart County
patrol leaving 2 vehicles without cameras with funding from the DFCF. Nappanee Police
Department upgraded one car with a new mobile video system and PBT through DFCF
funding. There continues to be an inconsistency in the use of equipment among all
departments. LEA's (Elkhart Sheriff's Deparment, Indiana State Police, Goshen Police
Department) express appreciation for DFCF monies which help them purchase
equipment.
  2. Elkhart County reported over 50 meth labs recovered in 2008. (Prosecutor's Office).
  3. Budgets were again cut by municipalities for overtime hours. 456 additional man
hours were added at the Elkhart County Sheriff's Department for the implementation of
the STAR specialized patrol which focuses on underage drinking and parties with DFCF
funding for 2008.
  4.
  5.

End of Year 2 Update:
 1.
 2.
 3.
 4.
 5.


Final Update (end of Year 3):
  1.
  2.
Comprehensive Community Plan                                                            7


  3.
  4.
  5.
C. Goals:

  1. Elkhart County will be a safer community to live and work in because
law enforcement agencies will have the equipment, training and ability to
perform ATOD interdiction activities.


End of Year 1 Annual Benchmarks:

   1. Over 460 additional man hours were spent on ensuring the community's youth
   were safe through the STAR program. Activities included three high school K9
   searches, 154 tobacco citations, 35 ICOAB, 1 OWI, 1 noise violation, 2 resisting arrest, 1
   disorderly conduct, 1 felony batter, 1 public intoxication, 1 furnish alcohol, 1 bar raid
   multiple arrests and 336 additional contacts.
   2. Officers were able to better utilize their time and spend less time in court. The new
   mobile video cameras given to the Indiana State Police filmed 4,179 roadside stops in
   2008 resulting in 159 arrests. These are arrests that would not have been filmed
   before.
   3. The Goshen Police Department's addition of K9 Hex resulted in 24 service calls
   while working the night shift. Fifteen of those calls were request for narcotic searches
   and the remaining calls for building searches, area searches and backup. In October
   Hex assisted in a traffic stop where 15 grams of marijuana were recovered. In 2008,
   Hex assisted in 35 contacts/citations.
    4. The Nappanee Police Department were able to obtain better information and video
   recordings on 20 roadside stops in 2008 with the assistance of new video mobile
   equipment granted through the DFCF.

End of Year 2 Annual Benchmarks:

   1.
   2.
   3.

Final Report (end of Year 3):

   1.
   2.
   3.

D. Objectives:

  1. There will be an increase in criminal justice activities due to the
presence of the Partnership and LEA collaboration.
  2. Local LEA will be better equiped to combat ATOD issues.
Comprehensive Community Plan                                                            8


  3. An increase in specialized patrols focused in high risk areas and with
high risk populations will result in a decrease in criminal activity and ATOD
misuse
  4.
  5.

End of Year 1 Update:
   1. The Elkhart County Sheriff's department conducted 14 additonal STAR details (456
additonal man hours) which resulted in three high school K9 searches, 154 tobacco
citations, 35 ICOAB, 1 OWI, 1 noise violation, 2 resisting arrest, 1 disorderly conduct, 1
felony batter, 1 public intoxication, 1 furnish alcohol, 1 bar raid multiple arrests and 336
additional contacts.

   2. Five additional police cars were equipped with mobile video units at the Indiana
State Police, leaving only two additional cars in need of video equipment. One squad car
from the Nappanee Police Department was upgraded with 100% of the Nappanee fleet
equipped with mobile video cameras. Goshen Police Department received a new K9
named Hex who assisted in 24 service calls including 15 narcotics searches and a traffic
stop which resulted in the confiscation of 15 grams of marijuana.
   3. A total of 49 additional patrols were made possible through support of the DFCF.
This includes 14 STAR patrols though the Elkhart County Sheriff's Department which
focused on underage drinking, drug use and parties and 35 patrols though the Goshen
Police Department assisted by K9 Hex.
   4.
   5.

End of Year 2 Update:
 1.
 2.
 3.
 4.
 5.

Final Update (end of Year 3):
  1.
  2.
  3.
  4.
  5.

A. Problem Statement #2: Elkhart County is limited in the number of
criminal justice programs focused on recidivism and successful re-entry into
the community.

B. Supportive Data:
Comprehensive Community Plan                                                           9


   1. Individuals who attend Victim Impact Panels have a recidivism rate of
approximately 14.3% which is significantly less than the approximately 20-28% of first-
time DWI offenders that repeat their offense (from CCJ's DFCF Proposal).
   2.
   3.
   4.
   5.

End of Year 1 Update:
  1. Recidivism rate of those who attended a Victim Impact Panel in 2006 was at 8.9% in
2008 (reported by CCJ)
  2.
  3.
  4.
  5.

End of Year 2 Update:
 1.
 2.
 3.
 4.
 5.


Final Update (end of Year 3):
  1.
  2.
  3.
  4.
  5.


C. Goals:

  1. A decrease in recidivism of alcohol use, OWI and DUI criminal activities
by youth and adults.


End of Year 1 Annual Benchmarks:

   1. Recidivism went from 14.3% in 2007 to 8.9% in 2008 which is significantly less
   than the approximately 20-28% of first time OWI offenders.
   2.
   3.

End of Year 2 Annual Benchmarks:
Comprehensive Community Plan                                                       10


   1.
   2.
   3.

Final Report (end of Year 3):

   1.
   2.
   3.

D. Objectives:

  1. An increase in the number of people participating in programs which
decrease recidivsm of criminal behaviors involving alcohol and OWI/DUI
arrests.
  2.
  3.
  4.
  5.

End of Year 1 Update:
  1. Through 23 Victim Impact Panels, 1,218 individuals (838 adults/ 173 youth)
participated in the program with 90% reporting an attitude change due to the program.
  2.
  3.
  4.
  5.

End of Year 2 Update:
 1.
 2.
 3.
 4.
 5.

Final Update (end of Year 3):
  1.
  2.
  3.
  4.
  5.
Comprehensive Community Plan                                                           11


A. Problem Statement #3: Youth are misinformed about current drugs, the
impact of drug use and the law.

B. Supportive Data:

  1. According to 2006 statistics by SAMHSA, Elkhart County youth aged 12 and older
percieved drug use (tobacco, alcohol and marijuana) to be less of a risk than their national
counterparts. (i.e. Only 69.3% of Elkhart County youth thought smoking one or more
packs of cigarettes a day was harmful while 74.1% of youth nationally felt that level of use
was harmful).
  2.
  3.
  4.
  5.

End of Year 1 Update:
  1. According to the 2007 SAMHSA National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 65.2%
youth aged 12 and older percieved binge drinking to be a risk and 73.9% felt smoking one
or more packs of cigarettes a day was harmful. IPRC's Indiana Survey indicates 80.9% of
Indiana 12th graders feel that smoking more than one pack of cigarettes a day is risky and
66.1% of Indiana 12th graders feel binge drinking is risky in their 2008 study. (IPRC and
SAMHSA) Elkhart County specific data is not avaliable that we could find.
  2.
  3.
  4.
  5.

End of Year 2 Update:
 1.
 2.
 3.
 4.
 5.


Final Update (end of Year 3):
  1.
  2.
  3.
  4.
  5.
Comprehensive Community Plan                                                           12



C. Goals:

  1. Prevention programs will address and inform about the risk/harm of
drug use with participants, educate youth on the law and consequences of
ATOD use and increase knowledge.


End of Year 1 Annual Benchmarks:

  1. At the 2008 Elkhart County fair, during the Safe Kids Safety Fair, the Partnership
  handed out ATOD information to approximately 300 children and their families.
  Materials included current information on drug use, ways for families to talk about
  ATOD and treatment information on where to get help in Elkhart County.
  2. The Mental Health Association's Jr. Mental Health program served 517 students in
  seven area schools. 82% of the students showed an increased knowledge of ATOD
  issues of at least 20% as measured by a pre/post test. Risk and harm issues are
  addressed through the Lion's Quest SFA curriculum which specifically addresses the
  negative effects of alcohol, tobacco and marijuana.
  3. Elkhart Community Schools uses "Too Good For Drugs" program which addresses
  peer pressure, advertising, perceived and actual prevalence of use, as well as the social,
  emotional, mental and physical consequences of ATOD use at all grade levels. One
  thousand four students participated in the "Too Good for Drugs" program where they
  received ten lessons at the third, fourth and fifth grade level.
  4. Safe Kids Coalition surveyed 1,478 local high school and middle school students
  who participated in the Drive Rite program and experienced driving a golf cart with
  visual impairment simulating inebriation. 5% of the students felt it is ok to drink and
  drive as long as you feel in control and 5% said they would ride in a car with an
  impaired driver. Sixty-two percent of the students thought they were able to behave
  normally wearing fatal vision goggles and 87% thought they were able to maintain
  control of the vehicle. The Safe Kids Coalition believes that while the equipment
  affects ability to judge visually, it does not impair the teens brains as alcohol or drugs
  could.

End of Year 2 Annual Benchmarks:

  1.
  2.
  3.

Final Report (end of Year 3):

  1.
  2.
  3.

D. Objectives:
Comprehensive Community Plan                                                           13



  1. Participants in prevention activities focused on ATOD will report
increased knowledge ATOD issues.
  2.
  3.
  4.
  5.

End of Year 1 Update:
   1. 519Youth who participated in Jr. Mental Health and through Elkhart Community
Schools programs focused on prevention report an increased knowledge in ATOD issues.
   2. The 1,478 students who participated in the Safe Kids program where they drove a
golf cart while wearing fatal vision goggles reported that while the goggles impaired the
driver’s vision, the project lacked the ability to simulate the other physical and mental
impairments that occur under the influence. Of the students in the program 5% of the felt
it is ok to drink and drive as long as you feel in control and 5% said they would ride in a
car with an impaired driver. Sixty-two percent of the students thought they were able to
behave normally wearing fatal vision goggles and 87% thought they were able to maintain
control of the vehicle. The Coalition is re-examining other ways to simulate the
distractions that happen while driving under the influence.
   3. The program at Elkhart Community Schools uses the “Too Good For Drugs”
curriculum. This program addresses peer pressure, the impact of advertising, perceived
and actual prevalence of use as well as the social and emotional consequences of ATOD
use at all grade levels. Of the children who participated 70% were able to identify
inherent consequences of ATOD use and were also able to identify healthy behaviors as
alternatives to risk taking ones. Over 70% of the children knew how to use at least two
refusal strategies as a tool for getting away from risky situations.
   4.
   5.

End of Year 2 Update:
 1.
 2.
 3.
 4.
 5.

Final Update (end of Year 3):
  1.
  2.
  3.
  4.
  5.
Comprehensive Community Plan                                                       14


A. Problem Statement #4: While ATOD use has decreased in Elkhart County
in the past several years, it still continues to be a problem. At the same time
support systems, enrichment programs and prevention activities are limited
and do not fill the need.

B. Supportive Data:

   1. In 2007, the 17th Annual Survey of Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use by Indiana
Children and Adolescents, conducted by the Indiana Prevention Resource Center at
Indiana University Bloomington, suggest that drug use among Indiana adolescents is
continuing to decline.
   2. According to SAMHSA's report in 2006, Elkhart County has one of the highest at-
risk youth populations in the State of Indiana with between 9.25-17.67% of youth at risk
for substance abuse.
   3.
   4.
   5.

End of Year 1 Update:
  1. Reported in the 18th Annual Survey of Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs by Indiana
Children and Adolescents, conducted by the IPRC again suggest that drug use among
Indiana adolescents is either holding steady or on the decline.
  2. While an update of the SAMHSA report conducted in 2006 cannot be found, Elkhart
County continues to have children who exist in environments which put them "at-risk" for
future substance abuse and delinquent behaviors. In 2008, the number of children in
poverty increased from 16.2% (2007) to 18% (2008). The number of children abused
increased from 8.4 (2007) to 9.4 (2008) per 1,000. The number of juvenile delinquency
case filings increased from 798 (2007) to 932 (2008). Sixty-two percent of children in
Elkhart County received free or reduced lunches in 2008. The number of High School
drop-outs did decrease from 482 (2007) to 204 (2008). (source: Indiana Youth Institute).
52% of adults surveyed in treatment funded through Partnership scholarships reported
that their substance use began between the ages of 10-15 and an additional 40% reported
they began using between the ages of 16-20 (source: Partnership Treatment
Organizations)
  3.
  4.
  5.

End of Year 2 Update:
 1.
 2.
 3.
 4.
 5.


Final Update (end of Year 3):
Comprehensive Community Plan                                                        15


 1.
 2.
 3.
 4.
 5.


C. Goals:

   1. Youth and families will have prevention opportunities which address
ATOD issues providing them with correct information, peer-to-peer
interactions and a variety of learning opportunities focused on ATOD.


End of Year 1 Annual Benchmarks:

  1. 519 youth participated in the Mental Health Association’s Jr. Mental Health
  program which uses the Lion Quest curriculum which specifically addresses the
  negative effects of alcohol, tobacco and marijuana.
  2. 1,478 middle school and high school students had the opportunity to use fatal vision
  goggles while driving a “jeep” golf cart.
  3. 1,004 elementary school children were introduced to the “Too Good for Drugs”
  program through Elkhart Community School which addresses peer pressure,
  advertising, perceived and actual prevalence of use, as well as the social, emotional,
  mental and physical consequences of ATOD.
  4. Approximately 300 families were given information at the Elkhart County 4H Fair
  during the Safe Kids Safety Fair. Materials included current information on drug use,
  ways for families to talk about ATOD and treatment information on where to get help
  in Elkhart County.


End of Year 2 Annual Benchmarks:

  1.
  2.
  3.

Final Report (end of Year 3):

  1.
  2.
  3.

D. Objectives:

  1. An increase in the number of programs offering peer-to-peer mentoring
and prevention.
Comprehensive Community Plan                                                         16


  2. The distribution of ATOD information materials in schools, social
service agencies, and other community partners which educate correct
information on ATOD use.
  3. An increase in the number of measurable prevention activities available
for youth in Elkhart County.
  4. Expanded prevention activities in schools including the extended use of
ATOD curriculums, trained staff and the availability of materials
  5.

End of Year 1 Update:
  1. 519 school aged youth met once per week at their school where they experienced the
Lion's Quest "Skills For Adolescence" which covers life skills and character education
along with drug prevention.
  2. 1,478 youth participated in educational activites focused on the dangers and risks
for driving under the influence through the Safe Kids program and the use of fatal vision
goggles and a specialize golf cart.
  3. 1004 school aged youth participated in the SAVE program where the "Too Good For
Drugs" curriculum was used.
  4.
  5.

End of Year 2 Update:
 1.
 2.
 3.
 4.
 5.

Final Update (end of Year 3):
  1.
  2.
  3.
  4.
  5.
Comprehensive Community Plan                                                          17




A. Problem Statement #5: One contributing factor to the treatment gap is the
severe shortage of trained and credentialed substance abuse professionals in
our community. This severely impact the quality and availability of
treatment in Elkhart County.


B. Supportive Data:

   1. Local treatment organizations report not only a lack of trained and certified
professionals in the county, but also a lack of interested interns and people entering the
field.
   2. According to the US Department of Labor, in 2007 the national average of
substance abuse counselors was 2.2 couselors per 10,000 people with a population of
199,000 people we need a minimum of 44 practicing, trained and certified substance
abuse counselors.
   3. According to a report by the Johnson Institute Workforce Development Forum in
2006, the formal education pipline is too small to supply the needed number of
counselors per year.
   4. A report from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics stated in 2004-05 in their
Occupational Employment Statistics that only 72,210 substance abuse counselors were in
practice with an annual replacement rate of 10.6%. They also noted that Substance Abuse
counselors were one of the lowest paid counseling professionals in the field with an
average annual salary of $34,800.
   5.

End of Year 1 Update:
   1. Treatment organizations report having fewer professionals in the field and a lack of
interest in the field.
   2. New US Department of Labor statistics for the national average of substance abuse
counselors is unobtainable at this time. Using the 2007 average, Elkhart County would
continue to need minimum of 44 practicing and trained certified substance abuse
counselors.
   3. While the Johnson Institute Workforce Development Forum has not made an
additional comment on the formal educational avenues for upcoming counselors, locally
from observation with the MSW program at IUSB, the number of individuals in that
program interested in substance abuse continue to be disproportionately low in
comparison to other specialties.
   4. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics stated in the 2008 Occupational
Employment Statistics, 79,180 substance abuse counselors were in practice. A
replacement rate was not given. However an expected 10 year growth rate is expected to
be 21%. Substance Abuse counselors continue to be the lowest paid counseling
professionals in the field with an annual salary of $37,030.
   5.
Comprehensive Community Plan                                                           18


End of Year 2 Update:
 1.
 2.
 3.
 4.
 5.


Final Update (end of Year 3):
  1.
  2.
  3.
  4.
  5.


C. Goals:

  1. Increase the number of qualified counselors in Elkhart County.


End of Year 1 Annual Benchmarks:

  1. We have not progressed on this goal. While providers state this is a critical issue in
  our community, we are limited in scope on how to address the issue. In 2008, the
  Partnership hosted a two day workshop for the community and professionals focused
  on marijuana as our continued commitment to provide training for providers.
  2.
  3.

End of Year 2 Annual Benchmarks:

  1.
  2.
  3.

Final Report (end of Year 3):

  1.
  2.
  3.

D. Objectives:

 1. Increase the number of ACIT/APIT counselors in Elkhart County.
 2. Encourage recruiting into the field of counseling with a specialization in
Addictions.
Comprehensive Community Plan                                                              19


  3.
  4.
  5.

End of Year 1 Update:
   1. In 2008, the Partnership hosted a two day workshop on Marijuana in our ongoing
effort to provide training for those in the field. While this training did not help to increase
the number of professionals in the field, the Partnership did offer opportunities for
existing counselors to obtain required CEU's locally. This training provided both NASW
and IAAP CEU's.
   2. While the Partnership listed this as one of our key goals, none of our treatment
partners showed an interest in addressing this problem statement even though they have
been verbal about the need for additional staff. We continue to discuss with them ways to
increase the number of professionals in the field.
   3.
   4.
   5.

End of Year 2 Update:
 1.
 2.
 3.
 4.
 5.

Final Update (end of Year 3):
  1.
  2.
  3.
  4.
  5.

A. Problem Statement #6: Financial barriers to alcohol, tobacco and other
drug treatment are limiting access to available services.

B. Supportive Data:

   1. A local survey conducted by the LCC determined the number one barrier to
treatment is associated with the financial limitations of the client.
   2. In 2007, over 95 individuals received reduced treatment that they would not have
been able to afford, accounting for over 1,900 treatment hours and $53,477 in treatment.
   3.
  4.
  5.
Comprehensive Community Plan                                                       20


End of Year 1 Update:
   1. A discussion with seven treatment agencies (Addictions Recovery Center, A New
Beginning, Cathy Blum Counseling, Center for Problem Resolution, Danen Counseling
Services, Oaklawn and Recovery Journey) indicated that the number one barrier to
treatment continues to be the ability to pay. Especially with the difficult economic
situation in Elkhart County at this time.
   2.   In 2008, 124 individuals received reduced treatment, benefitting from 2,045
treatment hours and $56,109
  3.
  4.
  5.

End of Year 2 Update:
 1.
  2.
  3.
  4.
  5.


Final Update (end of Year 3):
  1.
  2.
  3.
  4.
  5.


C. Goals:

   1. By collaborating with local treatment organizations, and supporting
treatment scholarship programs, the LCC will ensure that financial barriers
to treatment are reduced and at least 50 people will receive treatment who
before were unable to obtain it.



End of Year 1 Annual Benchmarks:
Comprehensive Community Plan                                                         21


   1. In 2008, 124 individuals who would not have been able to afford treatment were
   able to participate in a treatment program lead by a certified therapist.
   2.
   3.

End of Year 2 Annual Benchmarks:

   1.
   2.
   3.

Final Report (end of Year 3):

   1.
   2.
   3.

D. Objectives:

  1. Assist in reducing the financial barriers for treatment through grants,
scholarships and cost effective treatment options.
  2. Educate the Elkhart County population in regards to treatment services
available in the community as well as informing same regarding substance
abuse issues.
  3. Evaluate the impact of availability and the cost of new curriculums to
treatment organizations and the quality of treatment being offered. Explore
ways to more economically share the burden and increase the quality of
materials used in treatment at the same time.
  4.
  5.

End of Year 1 Update:
   1. Over $56,000 dollars were contributed toward reduced treatment for those who
experienced financial barriers to treatment.
   2. Informational brochures designed by the treatment committee, listing treatment
programs in the community were distributed through medical establishments, the court
and through schools.
   3. A roundtable discussion occurred to discuss with organizations about the cost of
new curriculums and different treatment/educational tools. At this time there was not an
interest in sharing resources. Dollars were used to purchase curriculum to be used in the
schools for the Jr. Mental Health Program. Partners seem to be interested in continuing
to look into new and better treatment/educational/training resources.
Comprehensive Community Plan                                                          22


  4.
  5.

End of Year 2 Update:
 1.
  2.
  3.
  4.
  5.

Final Update (end of Year 3):
  1.
  2.
  3.
  4.
  5.


Please attach the County’s Fiscal Report for review!


Next Annual Update Due: June 2010

Next Comprehensive Community Plan Due: June 2011

Date of Community Consultant Review:

Disclaimer:

You agree that the information provided within this Plan is subject to the following Terms
and Conditions. These Terms and Conditions may be modified at any time and from time
to time; the date of the most recent changes or revisions will be established by the
Commission and sent electronically to all Local Coordinating Councils.

Terms and Conditions:

The information and data provided is presented as factual and accurate. I hereby
acknowledge that I can be asked to submit proper documentation regarding the data
Comprehensive Community Plan                                                             23


submitted within the Plan. Failure to do so could result in a “denied approval” by the
Commission under IC 5-2-6-16.

The Local Drug Free Communities Fund must be spent according to the goals identified
within the plan. I hereby acknowledge that I can be asked to submit proper
documentation regarding funds that are collected, allocated, and disbursed within the
county. Failure to do so could result in a “denied approval” by the Commission under IC
5-2-6-16.


                                         Initials: JK
Comprehensive Community Plan                                                           24




                                  Elkhart County

 LOCAL DRUG FREE COMMUNITIES FUND INFORMATION
(1)   Amount deposited into the drug-free communities fund during the most recent,
      complete calendar year, per the County Auditor:

             The Elkhart County Auditor’s office deposited $195,881.00 into the LCC’s
              Drug-Free Community Fund from fees collected last calendar year, 2007.

             $10,800.00 rolled over from unused funds from the previous years.

             $206,681.00total amount available for programs and administrative costs for
              the upcoming calendar year.

             $18,716.00approved for administrative costs leaving $182,855.00 available
              for the upcoming year for programming


(2)   Funding approval by category, including a brief description of the purpose of the
      grant funding:

               APPLICANT/PROJECT &                         AMOUNT         AMOUNT
              PROGRAM DESCRIPTION                         REQUESTED       GRANTED
Prevention/Education
 Example: County Sheriff, 10,000 Bracelets for           $ 800.00         $530.00
      Red Ribbon Week
WaNee Drug Awareness Committee, Police robot to          $14,946.00       $10,035.00
use in schools to talk about drug prevention
Mental Health Association,                               $6,500.00        $6,500.00
Safe Kids Elkhart County, a golf cart to use with        $13,100.00       $13,100.00
fatal vision goggles to be used at schools and
community events
Elkhart community Schools, "Too Good For Drugs"          $7,200.00        $7,200.00
materials and support for their Safe and Drug Free
Schools
Office: Activities / Presentations, Drug Test            $10,000          $10,000
    Comprehensive Community Plan                                                           25


    Campaign and Mini Grants
                                                 TOTAL(S)      $51,746.00     $46,835.00
                                                                 AMOUNT        AMOUNT
    Treatment/Intervention                                     REQUESTED      GRANTED
    Center for Problem Resolution, treatment                   $23,467.00     $15,840.00
    scholarships for indigent and under-insured.
    Oaklawn, treatment scholarships for indigent and           $28,600.00     $22,400.00
    under-insured awaiting placement in other
    programs within in the Work-Release Center.
    Addiction Recovery Center, treatment                       $20,124.00     $20,124.00
    scholarships for indigent and under-insured.
    A New Beginning, treatment scholarships for                $10,000.00     $5,000.00
    adolescent treatment who are indigent and under-
    insured.

                                                 TOTAL(S)      $82,191.00     $63,364.00

                                                                 AMOUNT       AMOUNT
    Criminal Justice Services                                  REQUESTED      GRANTED
    Nappanee Police Department, Digital video system           $13,351.00     $4,460.00
    for patrol car and a PBT
    CCJ, support for the Victim Impact Panel                   $17,500.00     $14,088.00
    ISP, mobile video units for patrol cars                    $52,119.00     $26,660.00
    Elkhart County Sheriff's Department, support for           $20,000.00     $15,000.00
    the STAR program and PBT units
    Goshen Police Department, replaced a K-9                   $10,000.00     $10,000.00

                                                 TOTAL(S)      $112,970.00    $70,208.00


    (3)    Total amount of dollars approved (including previous annual deposit and all
           unused/rolled over dollars) and dollars awarded (percentages included):

          CATEGORY             Percentage of         Dollars        Percentage of     Dollars
                              Dollars Approved      Approved      Dollars Awarded    Awarded
Prevention/Education         25%                  $51,670         $24.00            $46,835
Treatment/Intervention       25%                  $51,670         $32.00            $63,364
Criminal Justice Services    25%                  $51,670         $35.00            $70,208
Administrative               25%                  $51,670         $9.00             $18,716
TOTAL(S)                           100%           $206,680        $100.00           $199,123

    (4)    Describe the grant process and requirements for the grantees:
Comprehensive Community Plan                                                       26



      • Each year in July, the Elkhart County LCC sends out letters to agencies in the
county that proposals will be accepted for events/projects related to ATOD
prevention/education, treatment/intervention and criminal justice/law enforcement.
•       All grantees from the previous year receive a letter
•       The LCC Coordinator’s provide a RFP template on CD-Rom and review a power
point presentation for each section of the grant application. Rules and expectations of
the grantees are reviewed at this time as well,.
•       After the deadline for submission, the Coordinator’s review and screen all the
applications ensuring they meet the established criteria.
•       The coordinators then distribute the grant applications to the Executive Board
members and outside grant readers to critique and score. The LCC has outside grant
readers for each of the three areas and they review the grant applications that fall
under the area of their expertise. The Executive Board has a conflict of interest policy
and has any Board member abstain from reading grants in their area if their agency
submitted a grant for possible funding—otherwise the Executive Board members read
all of the grants submitted.
•       The Coordinators and executive Board set up interviews in October with each
agency that has submitted a grant application. This allows for the Executive Board to
ask any questions that might not be clear on the application.
•       Letters go out informing applicant’s of their approval, denial, or conditional
funding. This letter explains that the final approval for funding will need to be voted
on by the County Commissioner’s and the County Council before the
recommendations are finalized.
•       The LCC and County allow for an appeals process once the final vote for
allocations has been made by the appropriate county bodies.
•       The agencies that are approved for funding are sent a grant packet and a
funding agreement that must be signed and is sent back to the County Commissioner’s
Office for record.
•       The County Commissioner’s liaison completes the claim forms for all approved
grants and submits them to the Elkhart County Auditors Office for payment. Most of
the grants are paid out in the beginning of the calendar year.
•       The grantees are required to submit monitoring reports throughout the year for
evaluation.


(5)   Provide administrative expenses (be specific):

                                   EXPENSE                               COST
      Examples: Coordinator’s Salary                                     $28,000
       Mileage: Meetings, Conferences                                    $232.77
       Conference Registration                                           $387.05
       Office Supplies: Paper, Scissors, Printer Ink Cartridge, Pens     $185.46
Comprehensive Community Plan                                                       27


      Salaries: Coordinators & Supportive services                    $17,078.00
      Office Supplies: postage, paper, ink, cd-roms, etc               $1,947.00
      Printing Expenses                                                $4,997.00
      Community Outreach, presentations, workshops                    $23,490.00


                                                           TOTAL(S)   $47,512.00

(6)   Provide summary explanation of amount of any unused dollars from previous
      years:


(7)   Additional Comments:

								
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