Organizational Performance Dimensions by anGlUa37

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									Understanding and Interpreting
Emotional Intelligence View 360
      and PeopleIndex



                  Kenneth M. Nowack, Ph.D.
   3435 Ocean Park Blvd, Suite 203  Santa Monica, CA 90405
            (310) 452-5130  (310) 450-0548 Fax
                   www.envisialearning.com
                  ken@envisialearning.com
Emotional Intelligence:
The State of the Field
What is Emotional Intelligence?

At the most basic level, Emotional
Intelligence (EI) is the ability to
perceive, understand and manage
your emotions and behavior as well
as others effectively
         Current Issues and Controversies
             with Diverse EI Measures
 Ability Measures
      Independent of FFM
      Weak convergent validity with other cognitive ability
       measures
      Scoring issues
      Confounded with a measure of knowledge

 Self-Report (Mixed) Measures of EI and ESC
      High correlations with FFM
      Limitations of self-report
      360 feedback
      Tend to ignore context, situation and setting

  Cherniss, C. (2009). Emotional Intelligence: Towards Clarification of a Concept. Rutgers
  University
            What Does EI and ESC Predict?
 A meta-analysis of 69 studies using diverse measures of EI correlated
  .23 with job performance (k=19, N=4158) and .22 with general mental
  ability (Van Rooy & Viswesvaran, 2004)

 New research by Joseph & Newman (2010) was based on 21
  published meta-analytic studies and new meta-analysis of over 171
  studies revealed:

      Self-report (mixed) measures and ability based measures do not appear
       to be assessing the same thing

      “Mixed” measures show incremental validity over mental ability and
       personality measures but it is not clear why

      When dealing with high emotional labor jobs, all types of EI/ESC
       measures exhibit meaningful incremental validity over cognitive validity
       and personality (weaker or negative for low emotional labor positions)

      Ability based EI measures favor women and Whites

       Joseph, D. & Newman, D. (2010). Emotional intelligence: An integrative meta-analysis and cascading model.
       Journal of Applied Psychology, 95, 54-78
          What Does EI and ESC Predict?
 The most comprehensive meta-analysis by
  O’Boyle et al. included 65% more studies and
  twice the sample size to estimate EI and job
  performance outcomes:

     Trait, personality and mixed measures demonstrated
      corrected correlations ranging from 0.24 ti 0.30 with job
      performance

     All measures show incremental validity over mental
      ability and personality measures

      O’Boyle, E., Humphrey, R., Pollack, Hawver, T. & Story, P. (2010). The
      relationship between emotional intelligence and job performance: A meta-analysis.
      Journal of Organizational Behavior, 10.1002/job.714
Goleman Emotional and Social Competence Model
         http://www.eiconsortium.org

                  Self-                          Social
                Awareness                      Awareness
           • Emotional Self-Awareness    • Empathy
           • Accurate Self-Assessment    • Organizational Awareness
           • Self-Confidence             • Service Orientation




                  Self-                         Social Skills
               Management
                                         •   Developing Others
           •   Self-Control              •   Leadership
           •   Trustworthiness           •   Influence
           •   Conscientiousness         •   Communication
           •   Adaptability              •   Change Catalyst
           •   Achievement Orientation   •   Conflict Management
           •   Initiative                •   Building Bonds
                                         •   Teamwork & Collaboration
     Cascading Model Emotional Intelligence

Conscientiousness
                               Emotion
                              Perception




    Cognitive
     Ability             Emotion Understanding




   Emotional
    Stability             Emotion Management




                    Job Performance        Health
Emotional Intelligence View 360
 Psychometrics and Research
Envisia Learning EI Competency Model


     Self                        Relationship           Communication
  Management                     Management
 • Self-Development            • Building Strategic     • Listening
••Self-Development
  •Adaptability/Stress
    Empathy                      Relationships
  • Organizational Awareness
                                                        • Oral Communication
• Adaptability/Stress          • Conflict
  •Tolerance
    Service Orientation                                 • Two-Way Feedback
 •Tolerance
   Self-Control                  Management
                                                        • Oral Presentation
••Self-Control
   Trustworthiness             • Leadership/Influence
                               • Interpersonal          • Written
••Trustworthiness
   Strategic Problem
   Solving                       Sensitivity/Empathy     Communication
• Strategic Problem
 • Achievement                 • Team/Interpersonal
  Solving                        Support
   Orientation/Drive for
• Achievement
   Results                     • Collaboration
  Orientation
    EIV360 Psychometrics and Norms

 Moderately high internal consistency reliability
  (Cronbach’s alpha) ranging from .74 to .89 across
  all 17 competencies
 High intercorrelations between competency groups
  (average r = .91 , p < .01)
 Factor analysis suggests a 5 factor solution (Eigen
  values over 1.0) accounting for over 71% of the
  variance suggesting that for research purposes an
  overall EI score may be useful
   EIV360 Psychometrics and Norms
 North American and European data base contains over 5,500 full time
  working adults
 Diverse job levels from executives to independent contributors and
  professionals
 No significant differences by age
 Women score significantly higher on Relationship Management (F =
  7.3, p < .01) and Communication (F = 21.1, p < .05) competency
  groups compared to men in the United States and higher on
  Communication (F = 5.96, p < .01) competencies only for European
  samples
 Those with higher education degrees report significantly higher
  Communication EI scores compared to lesser educated participants
  (F=7.58, p < .01)
 African Americans self-report significantly higher EI scores on overall
  EI, Self-Management and Relationship Management competencies
  compared to Whites (all p’s , >05) but no other ethnic/cultural
  differences were found
EIV360 Analysis: Significant Differences by Country
                                                Descriptives

                                                                                 95% Confidence Interval for
                                                                                           Mean
                               N         Mean     Std. Deviation   Std. Error   Lower Bound     Upper Bound

   EIVTot    Ireland               240   5.2127          .79164       .05110           5.1121          5.3134

             UK                 2959     5.3419          .71618       .01317           5.3161          5.3677

             Denmark                71   5.0624          .78447       .09310           4.8767          5.2481

             Canada                706   5.6285          .73083       .02751           5.5745          5.6825
             German                 32   5.7031          .51809       .09159           5.5163          5.8898
             Hungary               304   5.5284          .70831       .04062           5.4485          5.6083

             Spain              1872     5.4609          .92263       .02132           5.4191          5.5027
             New Zealand           110   5.0622          .89417       .08526           4.8932          5.2312

             Sweden                387   5.1463          .60940       .03098           5.0854          5.2072

             South Africa           55   5.4445          .67531       .09106           5.2620          5.6271

             Total              6736     5.3926          .79065       .00963           5.3737          5.4115
   SelfMgt   Ireland               240   5.2642          .79934       .05160           5.1626          5.3659
             UK                 2958     5.3807          .72217       .01328           5.3547          5.4067
             Denmark                71   5.1093          .84836       .10068           4.9085          5.3101
             Canada                706   5.6745          .72669       .02735           5.6208          5.7282
             German                 32   5.7199          .51875       .09170           5.5328          5.9069
             Hungary               304   5.4829          .74082       .04249           5.3993          5.5665
             Spain              1871     5.4727          .94106       .02176           5.4300          5.5153
             New Zealand           110   5.1009          .89478       .08531           4.9318          5.2699
             Sweden                387   5.2296          .63821       .03244           5.1659          5.2934
             South Africa           55   5.4259          .73532       .09915           5.2271          5.6246
             Total              6734     5.4234          .80094       .00976           5.4042          5.4425
   RelMgt    Ireland               240   5.0610          .89581       .05782           4.9471          5.1749
             UK                 2958     5.2376          .82001       .01508           5.2080          5.2672
             Denmark                71   5.0394          .79606       .09447           4.8510          5.2278
             Canada                706   5.4876          .84495       .03180           5.4252          5.5501
             German                 32   5.6675          .54158       .09574           5.4723          5.8628
             Hungary               304   5.4748          .77079       .04421           5.3878          5.5618
             Spain              1872     5.3437         1.01730       .02351           5.2976          5.3898
             New Zealand           109   4.9882         1.02597       .09827           4.7934          5.1830
             Sweden                387   5.0215          .68030       .03458           4.9535          5.0895
             South Africa           55   5.4217          .67012       .09036           5.2406          5.6029



                            ANOVA Overall EIV F (9, 6726) = 21.09, p < .01
             Note: USA EIV (N=1,801), SelfMgt.,RelMft, Com Means = 5.60, 5.63, 5.50, 5.66
A Comparison of EI in Leaders in Spain and
             United States
Objective: Explored emotional intelligence in Spanish (740) and US (1,271) leaders in diverse industries.

Measures: Emotional Intelligence View 360

Results: Leaders in Spain rated themselves significantly higher on overall emotional intelligence compared to those in
the United States as did direct reports (p < .05). In Spain, boss ratings of leaders were significantly lower than self or direct
report ratings. No significantly differences between self, manager and direct report ratings were observed in the US
sample.




Conclusion: In general, leaders in Spain are rated significantly higher by direct reports and perceive themselves to be
more emotionally intelligent on the three major areas measured in this study (Self-Management, Relationship
Management and Communication).

Nowack, K. & Pons, B. (2009).
              Executive MBA (EMBA) EI Research
Objective: To investigate the change in emotional intelligence with and
executive MBA program participating in a 2-year leadership development
program as part of their academic curriculum.

Measures: Emotional Intelligence View 360 (EIV360) and Talent Accelerator
(online developmental and planning and reminder system to support
professional action plans).

Design: Subjects for this study were full time working executives participating
in a 2-year EMBA program. A new leadership curriculum was introduced along
with a focus on developmental planning on interpersonal and team
competencies. The EIV360 was administered at the beginning of the EMBA
program and approximately 18 months later for 110 students.

Outcomes: Significant changes were observed for the Relationship
Management competency area (F = 4.04, p < .05) but not for self-management,
or communication competency areas during the two-year program. These
results support the focus on enhancing interpersonal competence of EMBA
students during their program.


Nowack, K. (2010). Unpublished Manuscript. Envisia Learning, Inc.
EI, Organizational Commitment & Performance

 Objective: Explored emotional intelligence, organizational commitment with job
 performance among administrators in Universiti Teknologi Mara (UiTM ) Malaysis

 Measures: Management View 360 Questionnaire as an index of job performance,
 PeopleIndex for emotional intelligence and Organizational Commitment Questionnaire
 for organizational commitment.
 Design: The population in the study was 153 administrative managers working at UiTM
 who completed a comprehensive survey measuring EI, commitment and performance.

 Results: Job performance was positively related to emotional intelligence (r = .761, p =
 0.001) and organizational commitment (r = .366, p = .001). Job performance is positively
 related to emotional intelligence dimensions: self-management (r = .742, p = 0.001),
 relationship-management (r = .746, p = .001) and communication (r = .766, p = .001).
 Overall emotional intelligence was significantly associated with organizational
 commitment (r = .354, p = .001).

 Conclusion: Emotional Intelligence was significantly associated with both self-reported
 organizational commitment and job performance.


 Yusof, R. (2006). The Relative Influence of Emotional Intelligence and Organizational Commitment on Job Performance
 of Administrators in UiTM. Unpublished Dissertation, University of Putra, Malaysia
EI & Academic Performance of Nurses
Objective: Explored the relationship between emotional intelligence and performance of third year
nursing students in a clinical course.

Measures: Emotional Intelligence View 360, Clinical evaluation scores on Nurses Related Learning
Experience (RLE; 60% professional and 40% personal), and overall grade point average.

Design: The population in the study was 48 third year nursing at the University of Santo Tomas,
College of Nursing. Students were asked to complete the Emotional Intelligence View 360 as part of
their curriculum during the year.

Results: Self-Management, Relationship Management and Communication competences were
significantly correlated (all p’s< .01) with RLE scores for both self ratings and other ratings. Self and
other emotional intelligence ratings were significantly associated with overall grade point average
ranging from .84 to .97 (all p’s < .01).

Conclusion: Emotional Intelligence was significantly associated with nursing academic performance
on qualitative and quantitative outcomes.


Agustin, V. et al. (2006). The Relationship Between the Competencies of Emotional Intelligence and the Performance
of Selected Junior Thomasian Nursing Students in their Related Learning Experience Course. A thesis presented to
the College of Nursing University of SantoTomas España, Manila
EI, Learner Autonomy & Performance
Objective: Explored emotional intelligence, learner autonomy, retention and academic performance
in students enrolled in an adult degree completion program.

Measures: PeopleIndex and the learner autonomy intentions measured the Learner Autonomy
Profile (LAP) Short Form (SF) were used. Student success was measured by cumulative grade point
average (GPA) and retention.

Design: 141 nontraditional undergraduates enrolled at a small, private, liberal arts college in the
northeastern U.S. completed web-based surveys measuring emotional intelligence and learner
autonomy.

Results: Emotional intelligence and learner autonomy were positively correlated (r = .486; p = .000; <
.01). Two of three emotional intelligence constructs to be predictors of retention but not grade point
average. Of the PeopleIndex competency groups, communication (p = .051) and relationship
management (p = .022) were the highest predictors of retention. Overall scores on PeopleIndex were
the single best predictor of overall learner autonomy. Self-management, but not Communication or
Relationship Management was significant predictors of learner autonomy in regression analyses. GPA
was not significantly correlated with EI in this study.

Conclusion: Emotional Intelligence was significantly associated with both retention and learner
autonomy.


Buvoltz, K., Powell, F. & Solan, A. (2007). Exploring Emotional Intelligence, Learner Autonomy and
Student Success in Accelerated Undergraduate Degree Completion Programs. Manuscript submitted
for publication. Regent University, Virginia
 EI and Transformational Leadership
Objective: Explored the relationship between emotional intelligence and transformational
leadership.

Measures: Emotional Intelligence View 360 and the Multi-Factor Leadership
Questionnaire (MLQ-36; Avolio & Bass).

Design: Surveys were administered to 57 managers in a multinational company within
the electronics industry.

Results: Transformational leadership scales of the MLQ-36 were significantly associated
with Self-Management (r = .93, p < .01), Relationship Management (r = .70, p < .01) but
not Communication competencies (r = .52, p = .16). Transactional leadership was
significantly correlated with Self-Management (r =.95) but not significantly with
Relationship Management (r = .70) or Communication (r = .36). Laissez-Fair leadership
was not significantly correlated with Self- Management (r = -.15), Relationship
Management (r = -.42) or Communication (r = .40). Transformational leadership was
significantly correlated with Transactional Leadership (r = .91, p < .01) and modestly
correlated with Laisse-Faire Leadership (r = .40).

Conclusion: Emotional Intelligence was significantly associated with both
transformational and transactional aspects of leadership.

Pedro, M. L. (2006). Emotional Intelligence and Transformational Leadership. Unpublished
Manuscript. Masters Thesis, University of Edora, Portugal
 EI and Transformational Leadership
Objective: Explored the relationship between emotional intelligence and
transformational leadership. .

Measures: Emotional Intelligence View 360 and the Multi-Factor Leadership
Questionnaire (MLQ-36; Avolio & Bass).

Design: The population in the study included 23 female managers from several
businesses/industries from Canada (6), Mexico (10), and the UK (7).

Results: Regression analyses indicated that overall EI was the single best predictor of
transformational leadership (r²=0.45). Self-Management, Relationship Management and
Communication were significantly correlated with Transformational leadership (rs = .66,
.65, .54, all p’s < .01).

Conclusion: Emotional Intelligence was significantly associated more strongly with
transformational versus transactional leadership outcomes.


Flores, M. (2007). Emotional Intelligence and Transformational Leadership in Female
Managers. Unpublished Thesis, University of Arkansas, Little Rock
  EI and Transformational Leadership
Objective: Explored the relationship between emotional intelligence and transformational
leadership.

Measures: Emotional Intelligence View 360 and the Transformational Leadership Scale
(Podsakoff et al. 1990). A measure of satisfaction with leadership, global satisfaction,
and follower’s performance were also included in this study.

Design: The population in the study was 120 managers working within a banking
organization in Portugal and 299 of their direct reports.

Results: Overall EI, Self-Management, Relationship Management and Communications
were correlated with transformational leadership behaviors in leaders (r = .74, .68, .76.
64, respectively; all p’s < .01) and with transactional leadership (r = .59, p < .01). A
positive correlation between EI, transformational leadership behaviors in leaders and
performance and satisfaction in their followers (only the EI communications scale
significantly was associated with follower’s performance; r =.18, p < .05).

Conclusion: Emotional Intelligence was significantly associated more strongly with
transformational versus transactional leadership outcomes.

Ana Maria Rocha, Madalena Melo, Nuno Rebelo dos Santos & Adelinda Araújo Candeias (2007). The Relationship
between Emotional Intelligence and Transformational and Transactional Leadership. Universidade de Évora,
Departament of Psychology, Portugal
                   EI, Stress and Coping
Objective: Explored the relationship between emotional intelligence, stress, coping and
well-being.

Measures: Emotional Intelligence View 360 (EIV360) and StressScan.

Design: Measures were administered to 109 executive MBA students working full time
during one of their required leadership courses in 2008.

Results: In multiple regressions, overall manager EI ratings (b = .25, t(84) = 2.5, p < .01)
incrementally predicted Threat Minimization coping above overall self-ratings accounting
for .17 of the variance in this dependent variable (b = .34, t(84) = 3.4, p < .01). No other
significant associations were found in regression analyses between emotional
intelligence, stress, coping and well-being.

Conclusion: Emotional Intelligence was significantly associated with Threat Minimization
coping in this EMBA sample of men and women. Students with higher EI tended to be
more perceptive of their stressors as indicated by using a type of coping that
acknowledges feelings and puts closure to them, rather than ruminating and obsessing
about them. Women students reported significantly higher levels of Cognitive Hardiness
but no more stress (F (1,107) = 6.12, p < .01), Type A behavior, emotional intelligence or
well-being compared to men (all p’s > .05).

Lukaj, M. (2010) Emotional intelligence and stress: An exploratory study. BA Honours Business
Studies Dissertation, University of the West of England, Bristol
                EI, Stress and Hardiness
Objective: Explored emotional intelligence, self-reported stress and cognitive hardiness in 109
Executive MBA students in a cross-sectional design.

Measures: Emotional Intelligence View 360 and the stress/resilient measure StressScan.

Design: 109 Executive MBA students were administered EIV360 and StressScan concurrently as
part of their academic program. Regression analysis was used to explore f the extent to which overall
EI and specific sub-scales predicts stress, cognitive hardiness and psychological well-being outcomes.

Results: No significant predictor variance was found between overall EI scores and stress, hardiness
and well-being However adaptability scores of EIV360 were a significant predictor variable for
hardiness and well-being scores, whereas self-control was a significant predictor variable of stress
scores.

Conclusion: Self-management competencies (adaptability/stress and self-control) were significantly
associated with stress, cognitive hardiness and psychological well-being providing evidence of
convergent validity with these EI scales. Emotional intelligence coping appears to be associated with
both resilience and global life satisfaction (psychological well-being).


Jessica Marie McGourty (2010). Emotional Intelligence and its relationship in predicting EMBA
student’s work/ life stress and hardiness and well-being using self-report measures. Dissertation
submitted as partial requirement for Masters of Sciences in Occupational Psychology, University of
Worcester, UK
     Emotional Intelligence and Leadership
                 Performance
Objective: To explore EI competencies and performance in 21 high potential leaders within
diverse industries and to identify factors associated with the highest performing individuals.

Measures: PeopleIndex was used to assess EI and senior management ratings were used to
evaluate performance of the high potential leaders.

Design: Participants for this study consisted of 21 middle managers in diverse industries.
Interviews will be conducted with a randomly sampled group of study participants to identify
success factors associated with high and low performers.

Outcome: ANOVA analysis found no significant differences in EI by competency group (Self-
management, Relationship management, Communication). Leaders who were categorized as
"Exceeding Results" rated themselves significantly higher on the EI competency called
Building Strategic Relationships compared to those categorized as "Gets Results" (F 1,20)
= 4.77, p < .05).

This finding provides construct validity to this mixed EIV360 measure of emotional and social
competence and the importance of the competency of Building Strategic Relationships to
leadership performance.

Teresa Lara (2011). Exploring the correlation between positive and productive work peers with their level
of Emotional Intelligence. Pepperdine University Masters Thesis
University of Barcelona Emotional Intelligence
        Educational Research Project
 Objective: To compare the impact of a one-year emotional intelligence education program to
 postgraduate students compared to a control group at the University of Barcelona.

 Measures: Emotional Intelligence View 360 (EIV360 self-assessment), MSCEIT (Mayer, Salovey,
 Caruso, & Sitarenios (2003), StressScan, QDE-A (self-report measure of emotional competencies
 with more about the design at http://stel.ub.edu/grop/files/Competencias_emocionales-P.pdf )

 Design: Subjects for this study will be approximately 200 postgraduate students at the University
 of Barcelona and Universitat de Lleida. Graduate students were divided randomly into a control
 and experimental group who participated in a one-year EI educational education. Pre and Post
 measures were collected on all assessments.

 Outcome: No significant correlations were found between the mixed measure EIV360 and ability
 measure subscores of the MSCEIT for 110 subjects. MSCEIT Overall, Emotional Experiencing
 and Emotional Reasoning subscores and overall EIV360 correlations were .12, .07, .12,
 respectively, all p’s > .05). The competencies of Trust and Empathy were significantly correlated
 with the Managing Emotions, Using Emotions branches of the MSCEIT as well as the total score
 (average r’s = .25, p < .01).

 This finding provides construct validity to this mixed EIV360 measure of emotional and social
 competence. Additional analyses are pending with the other measures

 Rafael Bisquerra Alzina, Nuria Perez Escoda, Laura Mari. Departmento MIDE Facultad de Pedagogia. Universidad de
 Barcelona (in progress)
Emotional Intelligence in Achieving Success in
  Women in Engineering and Technology
Objective: To examine the use of emotional intelligence (EI) and perceptions of success and burnout
among women in technology to better understand what EI competencies are needed to be successful.

Measures: PeopleIndex and Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI)

Design: A mixed method approach was used, which consisted of three surveys and an interview. 23 female
participants who earned a technical degree or who had a minimum of 5 years’ experience in a technical field
participated in the study

Outcome: the study found that success was defined as others’ favorable perceptions of them, their own
feelings of happiness, and making a difference. Nearly all participants (19 of 23) reported that the top factor
that influenced their success in engineering and technology was EI with their competency ranging from
neutral to high in self-management, relationship management and communication. Twenty-one of the
participants identified influence as the most important skill to develop as a woman progresses in her career,
with strategic relationships second

Significant correlations were observed with the MBI emotional exhaustion scale and overall EI, and
each of the three main competency groups (r’s = -.476, -.407, -.482 and -.461, all p’s < .05) as well as
specific competencies (Stress/Adaptability r = -.53, building strategic relationships,
sensitivity/empathy, collaboration and listening. Significant associations were also observed between
the MBI scale of Professional Efficiency and both overall EI and six competency scores. No
significant relationship was found between the MBI cynicism scale and any EI competencies.These
finding provide criterion related validity to this mixed EIV360 measure of emotional and social
competence and job burnout.

Kim Elisha Proctor (2011). The role of emotional intelligence in achieving success for women in engineering and technology.
The George L. Graziadio School of Business and Management at Pepperdine University for a Master of
Science in Organization Development
EI and High Commitment HR Management

 Objective: This study is exploring the relationship of
 emotional intelligence of the small and medium enterprise
 manager as a determinant of high commitment human
 resource management.

 Design: The population in the study is targeted to be 380
 between the size of 9 and 50 employees in Spain.

 Measures: PeopleIndex, Organizational practices,
 employee satisfaction

 Deybbi Cuéllar (in progress). The emotional intelligence of the small and medium
 enterprise manager as a determinant of high commitment human resource management.
 University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain (Doctoral Dissertation)
 EI and Transformational Leadership
Objective: Explored the relationship between emotional
intelligence and transformational leadership in Portugal and
Brazil.

Measures: Emotional Intelligence View 360 and the
Transformational Leadership Scale (Podsakoff et al. 1990).

Design: The study consists of 548 managers working
within a banking and health organizations in the two
countries.



Adelinda Araujo Candeias. (in progress). Emotional Intelligence and
Transformational and Transactional Leadership. Unpublished
Manuscript. Department of Psychology, University of Evora, Portugal
   EI and Student Team Effectiveness
Objective: This study is exploring the relationship between emotional
intelligence and team performance.

Measures: PeopleIndex, Team Satisfaction (Earley & Mosakowski);
Team Learning Scale (Druskat & Kayes); Instructor Ratings of team
performance; Peer ratings using the Team Building Scale (Maurer, Raju
& Collins); Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale; Trust among team members
(Earley & Mosakowsi) and the Big Five Personality Inventory (BFI;
John).

Design: The population in the study will consist of 60 teams
(approximately 150) graduate students in the Organizational Dynamics,
Human Relations & Social Work program


Roblyer, M. (in progress). Emotional intelligence and its relationship to student team effectiveness.
Doctoral Dissertation
Team and Individual Emotional Intelligence in Natural
    Resource Committee Members in Australia

  Objective: To investigate the type of team characteristics and
  behaviours associated with different Emotional Intelligence profiles.

  Measures: Emotional Intelligence View 360 and the Group Emotional
  Intelligence Questionnaire (Wolff and Druskat). Team performance will
  be determined using ranking to determine committee performance as
  this is consistent with the Australian Government process

  Design: Subjects for this study will be approximately 200 committee
  members.


  Schalk, T. (in progress). Team and individual emotional intelligence in Natural Resource
  Committee Members in Australia. Doctoral Dissertation. University of Canberra, Australia.
  Doctoral Dissertation.
   EI, Organizational Citizenship and
    Withdrawal In School Principals
Objective: This study is exploring the relationship between emotional
intelligence, organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and withdrawal
of teachers working for school principals in Israel.

Measures: Emotional Intelligence View 360 (EIV360), Organizational
citizenship behavior (Vigoda-Gadot, E., Beeri, I., Birman-Shemesh, T. &
Somech, A., 2007); Withdrawal behavior (Hanisch, 1990).

Design: The subjects in the study will consist of 50 high school
principals working in 30 districts. Teachers and superintendents will be
asked to complete the EIV360 on each school principal during district
meetings.


Krugliak Lahat, Y. (In progress). Emotional intelligence, organizational citizenship and
withdrawal behavior in school principals. Tel Aviv school district, Israel
EI, Transformational Leadership and Job
             Performance
 Objective: To determine the association between job
 performance of non-academic administrators in research
 universities with emotional intelligence and
 transformational, transactional leadership styles in
 Malaysia.
 Measures: Emotional Intelligence View 360 (EIV360),
 Transformational Leadership (MLQ)

 Design: The subjects in the study will consist of 107 non-
 academic administrators in research universities in
 Malaysia.

 Mehdinezhard, M. (In progress). Relationship between EI, transformational
 leadership styles and job performance. Department of Professional and
 Continuing Education, University Putra Malaysia
 Interpreting the
  PeopleIndex
Feedback Report
      PeopleIndex Features

 Measures 17 Competencies
 74 Behavioral Questions
 Online Administration
 Reliable and Valid Scales
 Scoring Bureau Service
 Comprehensive Summary Feedback
  Report
 EI Exercises
             PeopleIndex Research

 PeopleIndex questions are the same validated
  Emotional Intelligence View 360 (EIV360)
 EIV360 is one of several tools highlighted at the
  Consortium for Research on Emotional
  Intelligence in Organizations
  www.eiconsortium.org
 Established reliability (alphas .74-.89)
 PeopleIndex competencies have shown
  significant correlations with academic and job
  performance
             PeopleIndex Norms

 PeopleIndex report is based on a growing
  and large international data base (3,000+)
 PeopleIndex norms reflect diverse job
  levels and industries including talent in the
  private, public and non-profit sectors
 PeopleIndex norms are composed of
  employees in diverse countries (Europe
  and Asia) outside the US
  PeopleIndex Report Components


 PeopleIndex Competency Definitions
  and Conceptual Model
 Competency Graphs (self and Norm
  Group comparisons)
 Overall Behavior Summary
 Emotional Intelligence Exercises
 Developmental Action Plan
PeopleIndex Online
PeopleIndex Online
PeopleIndex Report Graphs
         PeopleIndex Report Graphs


    KEY POINTS
   PeopleIndex uses average scores based on
    the 1 to 7 frequency scale
   The line or bar graphs summarize self and
    other perceptions based on the large
    international normative database
   The legend to the right of the graph will
    summarize average score and number of
    raters for each category
   Range of scores for each rater group are
    graphed
PeopleIndex Overall Summary Table
     PeopleIndex Overall Summary

  KEY POINTS
 Self ratings are compared to the
  PeopleIndex norm sample for both
  competencies and individual behaviors
 Each of the PeopleIndex behaviors are
  organized under their respective
  competency for ease of interpretation
 Competencies can be presented in either
  ascending or descending order to facilitate
  development planning
PeopleIndex EI Exercises
        PeopleIndex EI Exercises

  KEY POINTS
 Suggested exercises are presented to
  enhance self-awareness, self-
  management, social awareness, &
  relationship management areas
 These exercises have shown to increase
  psychological well-being and decrease
  depression in recent placebo controlled
  studies over a 6-month set of studies by
  Seligman and colleagues (2005)
PeopleIndex Development Plan
    PeopleIndex Development Plan

  KEY POINTS
 Behavior change is challenging
 PeopleIndex introduces a developmental
  planning process based on change theory
  (assess, reflect, plan, implement,
  evaluate)
 PeopleIndex provides several a
  developmental action plan section to
  facilitate awareness into successful
  behavior change
PeopleIndex Report Questions to Consider


   Do I understand my PeopleIndex
    feedback report?
   Does it seem accurate/valid?
   What are my EI strengths to leverage?
   What are my EI development
    opportunities
   Am I motivated to change?
          PeopleIndex Next Steps


   Review your PeopleIndex summary
    feedback report
   Obtain additional feedback from your
    manager, direct reports, peers and
    team members
   Identify specific developmental goals
   Draft a development plan
   Meet with your manager to finalize
    your plan
   Implement your development plan
   Track and monitor progress
     Administration of the
Emotional Intelligence View 360
        Assessment
EIV360 360° Feedback Process
Voluntary    1. Adding
Sign-Up     Participants
EIV360 360° Feedback Process
            1. Adding
           Participants



                          2. E-Mail
                           Briefing
Participant Invitation
EIV360 360° Feedback Process
           1. Adding
          Participants



                         2. E-Mail
                          Briefing




                                      3. Rater
                                     Nomination
EIV360 360° Feedback Process
           1. Adding
          Participants



                         2. E-Mail
                          Briefing




                                           3. Rater
                                          Nomination




                             4. Manager
                              Approval
EIV360 360° Feedback Process
           1. Adding
          Participants



                              2. E-Mail
                               Briefing




                                                3. Rater
                                               Nomination




                                  4. Manager
                                   Approval


           5. Questionnaire
              Invites Sent
EIV360 Assessment Email Sent
EIV360 360° Feedback Process

                      1. Adding
                     Participants



                                         2. E-Mail
                                          Briefing




                                                           3. Rater
                                                          Nomination




          6.
                                             4. Manager
    Questionnaires
                                              Approval
     Completed

                      5. Questionnaire
                         Invites Sent
    EIV360 360° Feedback Process
                                 1. Adding
                                Participants



                                                    2. E-Mail
                                                     Briefing




                                                                      3. Rater
7. Automated                                                         Nomination
 Reminders




                     6.
                                                        4. Manager
               Questionnaires
                                                         Approval
                Completed

                                 5. Questionnaire
                                    Invites Sent
Automated Reminders
     EIV360 360° Feedback Process
                                 1. Adding
                                Participants
                  8. Reports
                  Available

                                                    2. E-Mail
                                                     Briefing




                                                                      3. Rater
7. Automated                                                         Nomination
 Reminders




                     6.
                                                        4. Manager
               Questionnaires
                                                         Approval
                Completed

                                 5. Questionnaire
                                    Invites Sent
       Interpreting the
Emotional Intelligence View 360
      Feedback Report
Emotional Reactions to Feedback: GRASP Model



 Grin or Grimace        Emotional Reaction

 Recognize or Reject    Cognitive Reaction

 Act or Accept          Commitment Reaction
 Strategize &           Behavioral Reaction
 Partner
     Emotional Intelligence View 360

Feedback Report Expectations

  Much of the feedback will be validating
  Some feedback might be surprising
  Participants will have some type of emotional
   reaction to it
  Not all rater groups necessarily experience
   the participant in the same way
  The participant will have a lot of information
   to review and reflect on
         Emotional Intelligence View 360

           17 EI Competencies/ 74 Behaviors
     Self                        Relationship           Communication
  Management                     Management
 • Self-Development            • Building Strategic     • Listening
••Self-Development
  •Adaptability/Stress
    Empathy                      Relationships
  • Organizational Awareness
                                                        • Oral Communication
• Adaptability/Stress          • Conflict
  •Tolerance
    Service Orientation                                 • Two-Way Feedback
 •Tolerance
   Self-Control                  Management
                                                        • Oral Presentation
••Self-Control
   Trustworthiness             • Leadership/Influence
                               • Interpersonal          • Written
••Trustworthiness
   Strategic Problem
   Solving                       Sensitivity/Empathy     Communication
• Strategic Problem
 • Achievement                 • Team/Interpersonal
  Solving                        Support
   Orientation/Drive for
• Achievement
   Results                     • Collaboration
  Orientation
Confidentiality of the 360 Feedback Process

   KEY POINTS
    All raters are anonymous except for the “manager”
    Online administration uses passwords to protect
     confidentiality (Internet administration)
    No line or bar graphs are shown unless at least two
     raters respond in a rater category (anonymity
     protection)
    The summary feedback report is shared only with
     the respondent and is intended for development
     purposes only
    The respondent decides how much of the summary
     feedback report he/she wants to share with others
   Self-Other Perceptions:
What Are Others Really Rating?



      BOSS           Performance


                     Derailment
   REPORTS
                     Factors (EI)


                     Leadership
    PEERS
                     Potential
EIV360 Feedback Report Components

  Introduction
  Self-Awareness View “Johari Window”
  Self-Other Rater Comparisons
  Most and Least Frequently Observed
   Behaviors
  Overall Competency/Behaviours
   Summary
  Written Comments
  Developmental Action Plan
Emotional Intelligence View 360
     Invited Raters Page
          Emotional Intelligence View 360
            Awareness View Section

KEY POINTS
  Emotional Intelligence View 360 provides a
  snapshot of self/social awareness in a series
  of graphs highlighting four areas:
     1.   Potential Strengths (Low Self Ratings & High Other
          Ratings)
     2.   Confirmed Strengths (High Self Ratings & High Other
          Ratings)
     3.   Potential Development Areas (High Self Ratings & Low
          Other Ratings)
     4.   Confirmed Development Areas (Low Self Ratings & Low
          Other Ratings)
Emotional Intelligence View 360
      Awareness View
      Emotional Intelligence View 360
      Graphs Self-Other Perceptions

KEY POINTS
 Emotional Intelligence View 360 uses average
  scores based on the 1 to 7 frequency scale
 The bar graphs summarize self and other
  perceptions on each of the 17 separate EIV360
  competencies
 The legend to the right of the graph will
  summarize average score and number of
  raters for each category
 Range of scores for each rater group are
  graphed
Emotional Intelligence View 360
   Self-Other Perceptions
     Emotional Intelligence View 360
   Most Frequent/Least Frequent Section
KEY POINTS
 The “Most Frequent” section and “Least Frequent”
  section summarizes those competencies and
  behaviors that were most frequently/least frequently
  observed by various rater groups
 The number in the first column corresponds to the
  average score for all raters providing feedback (1 to 7
  scale)
 The “Most Frequent” should be considered as
  perceived strengths to leverage and build on
 The “Least Frequent” should be considered as possible
  behaviors to practice more frequently
        Emotional Intelligence View 360
             Behavior Summary
KEY POINTS
 Each Emotional Intelligence View 360 question is
  summarized and categorized in its appropriate
  competency
 Average scores across all raters are reported for each
  competency and question
 A statistical measure of rater agreement based on the
  standard deviation is reported as a percentage—a score
  less than 50% suggests that the raters providing
  feedback had enough disagreement to warrant a
  cautious interpretation of the average score reported
  (e.g., raters had diverse perceptions and rated the
  participant quite differently on that question or
  competency)
Behavior Summary Report
      Emotional Intelligence View 360
        Written Comments Section
KEY POINTS
 Comments are randomly listed by all raters who
  volunteered to share written perceptions to two
  open-ended questions (perceptions of strengths
  and development areas)
 Comments are provided verbatim from the online
  questionnaire—no editing
 Some comments are specific, behavioral and
  constructive—others may be less useful or hard to
  understand
 It is important to focus on themes that emerge,
  rather than, to dwell on any one individual
  comment
Emotional Intelligence View 360
      Comments Report
     Necessary Ingredients for Changing
                 Behavior

1. Enlighten
Assessment and
Feedback Process                                                  2. Encourage
(awareness of
strengths and                                                  Readiness to Change
potential development                                          (clarification of motivations
areas)                                                         and beliefs)

                                                               Goal Setting/Developmental
                                                               Planning (measurable and
                                                               specific)
                                                               Skill Building




                                3. Enable

                        Reinforcement, Monitoring, and
                        Social Support to reinforce learning
                        and behavior change
                        Relapse Prevention Training
                        Evaluation (knowledge acquisition,
                        skill transfer, impact)
       360 Feedback and Coaching

 Olivero et al., (1997) found that an 8-week coaching
  program increased productivity over and above the effects
  of a managerial training program (22.4% versus 88.0%)
 Thatch (2002) found that 6 months of coaching with
  executives following 360 feedback increased leadership
  effectiveness up to 60% based on post-survey ratings
 Smither et al., (2003) reported that after receiving 360
  feedback, 1,361 managers who worked with a coach for 6
  months were significantly more likely to set specific goals,
  solicit ideas for improvement and subsequently received
  improved performance ratings
Randomised Executive Coaching Study
 Solution-focused cognitive-behavioural coaching
  intervention with 45 executives
 Half-day leadership development programme
 Measures
      360 feedback
      Goal Attainment Scaling
      Cognitive Hardiness/Resilience
      Workplace Well-Being
 Four coaching sessions over 10 weeks
 Control group got coaching ten weeks later

  Grant, Curtayne, & Burton (2009). Executive coaching enhances goal attainment,
  resilience and workplace well-being: A randomised controlled study. The Journal of
  Positive Psychology, 4, 396-40
Randomised Executive Coaching Study
         Goal Attainment
360 Feedback and Manager Involvement

 62% of the respondents reported being
  dissatisfied or highly dissatisfied with the
  amount of time their manager spent helping
  with a development plan
 More than 65% expressed strong interest in
  utilizing an online follow-up tool to measure
  progress toward behavior change

  Rehbine, N. (2006). The impact of 360 degree feedback on leadership
  development. Unpublished doctoral dissertation.
           Leader as Performance Coach
 A 2008 survey of over 2,000
  international employees and 60 HR
  leaders reported that 84% of managers
  are expected to coach talent but only
  52% actually do (only 39% in Europe)

 Only 24% of all leaders are rewarded or
  recognized for coaching and developing
  talent

 85% of all managers and employees
  see value in leaders as coaches but
  32% of managers reported it takes too
  much time and interferes with their job


  The Coaching Conundrum 2009: Building a coaching culture that drives organizational success.
  Blessing White Inc. Global Executive Summary
Leveraging the Impact of
    360 Feedback for
  Successful Behavior
        Change
  Talent Accelerator Behavior Change Model



                Conscious     Conscious
              Incompetence   Competence
 Feedback                                    Talent
    from                                   Accelerator
Assessments                                   and
                                            Coaching
               Unconscious   Unconscious
              Incompetence   Competence
       Description of Talent Accelerator

   Talent Accelerator is a web-based professional
    development tool integrated with Envisia Learning
    assessments

   Talent Accelerator will provide you with a guided
    process for developmental planning based on “Best
    Practices” of how people successfully change

   The online tool is designed to help translate awareness
    from all of our assessments into lasting behavior
    change
     Components of Talent Accelerator

   Educates: Talent Accelerator resource library provides a comprehensive
    source of over 2,500 readings, websites, media, and suggestions to facilitate
    your development.
   Monitors: Talent Accelerator provides you and your coach and/or manager to
    track and monitor your development plan progress.
   Coaches: Facilitates requesting and receiving feedback. Talent Accelerator
    sends an email to the individual’s coach and/or manager about development
    plan progress and they can communicate back to the user through Coach
    Accelerator with targeted feedback and support based on the most recent
    progress update.
   Promotes Insight: Talent Accelerator provides an opportunity for participants
    to maintain a personal journal to reflect on their reactions and feelings about
    his/her developmental journey.
   Teaches: Our development “wizard” will walk you through your assessment
    report and provide a structured way to allowing you to focus on those
    competencies that are most important.
   Reminds: Talent Accelerator allows you to select how often you want the
    system to send you reminders about due dates on your development plan.
Translating Awareness into Behavior Change

     Enlighten: Provide an electronic
      version of the assessment to help
      employees review and understand
      their feedback report
     Encourage: Provide a structured
      process to review the feedback
      report, ask reflective questions to
      increase motivation to want to
      change behavior and to identify one
      or more areas to focus
      developmental efforts
     Enable: Through the use of monthly
      reminders and a comprehensive
      competency resource library, users
      are able to track and monitor
      progress on their developmental
      action plans online and avoid relapse
            Talent Accelerator Process

   Users are sent an email with a unique username/password to allow
    access to Talent Accelerator
   Access to Talent Accelerator is for a 12-month period
   Upon log in users will have an electronic copy of their assessment report
    and begin to use the development “wizard” to identify key competency
    areas to focus on
   Clients can access the Competency Resource Library to find readings,
    articles, websites, developmental suggestions, media, blogs, podcasts
    and other resources targeted to the specific developmental areas of
    interest
   Once the developmental action plans are finalized, users can go in Talent
    Accelerator and update progress and set any new coaching goals
   Reminders on developmental plan progress will be emailed to your client
    every 30 days (they can change the preference on this)
   Clients can also utilize the Developmental Journal and decide which
    entries, if any, they wish to have shared with you at the Coach
    Accelerator site
Talent Accelerator Reminders to Facilitate
            Behavior Change
    Talent Accelerator sends out a reminder email
     every 30 days reminding participants about their
     wellness plan progress
    Research suggests that implementation intentions
     coupled with reminders result in greater behavior
     change

       Sheeran, P. et al. (2005). The interplay between goal intentions and
       implementation intentions. Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin, 31,
       87-97

       Prestwhich, A. et al. (2010). Can implementation intentions and text
       messages promote brisk walking: A randomized trial. Health Psychology,
       29-40-49.
    Coach Accelerator Site and Features

    Each Coach will have access to a separate website and tool called
     Coach Accelerator
    Features of Coach Accelerator include:
      • Access to all assessments of your client (PDF) including those of
        other vendors
      • Access to the Resource Library integrated with each assessment
        of ours that you are using with your client
      • Ability to track and monitor client’s progress on their development
        plan
      • Ability to provide comments and feedback directly to your client
        through the Coach Accelerator site
      • Confidential “Coaching Log” to enable you to create and maintain
        your professional notes about each client session
      • No additional cost to utilize the Coach Accelerator tool
Talent Accelerator
   Case Study
      Talent Accelerator Case Study

 Business Issue: Department of pathology at a
  leading University medical center wanted to
  improve leadership performance coaching to
  increase engagement and retention of talent
 Intervention:
     Executive performance coaching workshop + 360
      feedback and developmental planning (N = 15)
     Pilot with one of the pathology Departments: 360
      feedback + developmental planning + monthly follow
      up lunch discussion/support meetings (N = 23)
      Talent Accelerator Case Study


 Assessments included:
     Executive View 360 (senior team)

     Performance View 360 (departmental talent)

     Talent Accelerator (used by talent)

     Coach Accelerator (used by managers)
Talent Accelerator Case Study
Talent Accelerator Case Study Outcomes
 All participants created a development plan; 80%
  completed progress on at least one competency they
  targeted
 Participants targeted potential development areas rather
  than strengths
 The average time to complete their plan was 53 days (SD
  = 46 days) with 55% focusing on developmental
  suggestions from our resource library, 23% focusing on
  resource websites/Blogs, 12% reading books and the
  remainder watching videos/podcasts
 Time series 360 (ANOVA) demonstrated significant
  increase in interpersonal, task and communication
  competency ratings in talent over 12-months
 80% completed at least one competency based action
  plan
Talent Accelerator Research Summary
     Intervention         Completion of Plans


  360 Feedback Alone            < 5%



360 Feedback and Talent      15% to 25%
      Accelerator


   Coaching, Talent             > 80%
Accelerator and Manager
       Follow-Up
Envisia 360 Feedback Study “Best Practices”
  Provide individual coaching to assist in interpreting and
    using the 360 feedback results
  Hold participant and manager accountable to create and
    implement a professional development plan
  Track and monitor progress on the completion of the
    development plan
  Link the 360 intervention to a human resources
    performance management process
  Use 360 tools with sound psychometric properties
  Target competencies for 360 feedback interventions that
    are related to strategic business needs
    Nowack, K. (2005). Longitudinal evaluation of a 360 degree feedback program: Implications for
    best practices. Paper presented at the 20th Annual Conference of the Society for Industrial and
    Organizational Psychology, Los Angeles, March 2005
Maximizing the Impact of 360 Feedback


 • Some evidence that facilitated feedback enhances
   successful behavior change
   Seifert & Yukl, 2003; Nowack, 2005

 • Some evidence that coaching coupled with 360
   feedback can facilitate behavior change
   Smither, J. et al. (2003). "Can working with an executive coach improve multisource
   feedback ratings over time? A quasi-experimental field study." Personnel Psychology, 56,
   23-44

 • Some limited evidence that use of an online
   development planning system and competency
   based resource center can facilitate behavior
   change with managerial involvement
   Rehbine, 2006; Nowack, 2009
                360° Feedback Selected References
 Nowack, K. (2009). Leveraging 360 feedback to facilitate successful behavior change.
   Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Theory, 61, 280-297.
 Nowack, K. (2005). Longitudinal evaluation of a 360 degree feedback program: Implications for
   best practices. Paper presented at the 20th Annual Conference of the Society for Industrial and
   Organizational Psychology, Los Angeles, March 2005.
 Nowack, K. (1999). 360-Degree feedback. In DG Langdon, KS Whiteside, & MM McKenna
   (Eds.), Intervention: 50 Performance Technology Tools, Jossey-Bass, Inc., pp.34-46.
 Nowack, K., Hartley, G, & Bradley, W. (1999). Evaluating results of your 360-degree feedback
   intervention. Training and Development, 53, 48-53.
 Nowack, K. (1999). Manager View/360. In Fleenor, J. & Leslie, J. (Eds.). Feedback to
   managers: A review and comparison of sixteen multi-rater feedback instruments (3rd edition).
   Center for Creative Leadership, Greensboro, NC.,
 Wimer & Nowack (1998). 13 Common mistakes in implementing multi-rater systems. Training
   and Development, 52, 69-79.
 Nowack, K. & Wimer, S. (1997). Coaching for human performance. Training and Development,
   51, 28-32.
 Nowack, K. (1997). Congruence between self and other ratings and assessment center
   performance. Journal of Social Behavior & Personality, 12, 145-166
 Nowack, K. (1994). The secrets of succession. Training & Development, 48, 49-54
 Nowack, K. (1993). 360-degree feedback: The whole story. Training & Development, 47, 69-72
 Nowack, K. (1992). Self-assessment and rater-assessment as a dimension of management
   development. Human Resources Development Quarterly, 3, 141-155.

								
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