Docstoc

Trimming the Fat

Document Sample
Trimming the Fat Powered By Docstoc
					            Healthy Cooking
      Trim the Fat and Halt the Salt
               Manny J. Delgado
NBCT, CCE, CEC, MCFE, CDM, CFPP, CPFM, CFSM
         Figuring out Fats
• Fat is a nutrient
• Fat provides 9 calories of energy per gram
• 3 major kinds of fats – saturated, mono-
  and poly-unsaturated
• Primary sources in food – butter, margarine
   – Cheese, cream, whole milk, meats,
     poultry; bacon; shortening; lard;
     chocolate; coconut; oils
              Why Low Fat?

• USDA requires that a school meal meet the US Dietary
  Guidelines
• The Dietary Guidelines recommend a diet low in fat – 30%
  - 35% of total calories maximum intake
• Reduces risk factors for chronic diseases such as - heart
  disease, obesity, high blood pressure, type II diabetes, some
  cancers
                      Sources of Fat in Foods
•   Main dish- meat, meat alternate – cheese, eggs, yogurt, Dried beans ( 0 grams fat/2
    oz); peanut butter(32 grams fat/2 oz)
•   Milk, Fluid – regular, reduced fat (2%); low fat (1%)
•   Vegetables – natural fat –avocado, olives, added fats – butter, margarine, oils, salad
    dressings, mayonnaise
•   Grains/Breads – added butter; frosting; doughnuts; muffins
•   Desserts – containing fats, cream etc
          Options for reducing fat content
•   Specify lean cuts of meat and/or lower fat products
•   Drain fat off meats after cooking
•   Oven bake menu items such as “fried chicken, French fries”
•   Limit the use of gravy
•   Off-set a higher fat entrée with other lower fat foods in the same
    meal – example: Oven Fried Chicken, rice or baked potato instead of
    mashed; steamed vegetables/salad; fruit; low fat milk or juice
          Options for reducing fat content
• Reduce added fat in cooked vegetables
• Substitute low fat desserts such as fruit, gelatin desserts
• Serve low fat condiments – ketchup, mustard versus
  mayonnaise based dipping sauces or dressings
• Use reduced fat or low fat cheeses
• Eliminate cheese on sandwiches
                 Reduced fat = Reduced Calories

• Calories may not meet the federal desired recommendations
• Increase calories by:
    – Increasing serving size of plain breads, pasta, rice and other grain products
    – Serve higher calorie vegetables such as corn or potatoes with low calorie
      vegetables like carrots or broccoli
    – Offer chocolate milk that contains more calories than other milks
    – Serve reduced fat desserts that can count as grain/bread components such as
      rice pudding, gingerbread, gelatin with fruit and whipped topping
    – Add high calorie, low fat condiments such as jams, jelly, syrup or honey
                    Follow Standardized Recipes

• Recipes are tested and tried for best results
• Fat content is already reduced, DO NOT add more than is stated in
  the recipe
    – Do not add margarine, oil or butter on vegetables if the recipe does not call
      for it
    – “butter the toast” AFTER the bread is toasted, not before
    – Put the mayonnaise and/or salad dressings on the side
    – Make your tuna/egg/chicken salads –”dry”, with just enough mayonnaise to
      hold it together
        Cooking with Less Fat
• Instead of :       Substitute-
Whole Milk         Skim or Low fat Milk
Whole Egg 1            2 Egg Whites
Cream Cheese       Low fat Cream cheese
Heavy Cream        half and half
Sour Cream         Low fat Yogurt
Frying             Bake, Broil, Sauté
Bacon              Canadian Bacon
Reducing Sodium – Choosing a
 diet with less sodium and salt
                Sodium/Salt
• Sodium is necessary for your health
• Sodium is one of the minerals found in salt
• Salt is made of two minerals -Sodium (40%) and
  Chloride (60% )
• Both occur naturally in foods
• Salt and sodium-containing ingredients are used
  in food processing
• Many sauces add salt as an ingredient – soy
  sauce, ketchup
• Salt enhances flavors of foods
  Functions of Sodium in the body
• Body needs about 500 mg (1/3 tsp) daily

• Regulates body fluids

• Regulates blood pressure
              Common Food Sources
•   Table Salt
•   Cured meats – deli meats, sausages, ham
•   Baking soda- bicarbonate of soda
•   Baking powder
•   Antacids – Tums, Alka-Seltzer
•   Snack foods – salted nuts, chips, pretzels, crackers
•   Canned soups and bouillon cubes
•   Cheeses
•   Condiments – pickles, ketchup, mustard
•   Seasonings and flavor enhancers – MSG
•   Ethnic Foods – Asian-( Chinese, Japanese, Thai)
   Reducing Sodium/Salt in the Diet
• Fresh is best ! Choose fresh or frozen foods
• Choose canned items without added salts and
  sodium –based preservatives
• Limit salty snacks like chips and pretzels
• Avoid adding canned/salted ingredients, soup
  bases to dishes for flavoring
• Avoid condiments such as mustard, ketchup, soy
  sauce
• Select low salt cheeses
• Avoid cold cuts and canned luncheon meats –
  “spam” or “vienna sausages”
      Daily Recommended Intake -
   1 teaspoon salt = 2,400 mg Sodium
  Do not add more than the recipe calls for:

• ¼ teaspoon salt        = 600 mg sodium

• ½ teaspoon salt        = 1,200 mg sodium

• ¾ teaspoon salt        = 1,800 mg sodium

• 1 teaspoon salt        = 2,400 mg sodium

• 1 teaspoon baking soda = 1000 mg sodium

• 1 teaspoon soy sauce   = 1000 mg sodium
• HEALTHY FOODS SHOULD TASTE
  GOOD AND LOOK APPEALING
• TOO MUCH FAT AND SALT WILL
  MAKE FOODS UNHEALTHY
• “IF A LITTLE BIT MAKES IT GOOD, A
  LOT DOES NOT MAKE IT BETTER!”
• FOLLOW THE RECIPE – DO NOT ADD
  TO “YOUR” TASTE!

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:3
posted:8/5/2012
language:English
pages:16