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					                           ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
                                   ACTION AGENDA

                                                 CHAPTER SIXTEEN




LADA, P.C. Land Planners      October 22, 2010      The Route 6 Hop River Corridor
                           ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
                                  ACTION AGENDA

                                                        CHAPTER SIXTEEN

To continue the work in the Preliminary Economic Development Report included in Chapter
11, Garnet Consulting Services, Inc. prepared an Economic Development Action Agenda.
This report includes the likely development opportunities that exist or may exist along the
Corridor and how they may affect development. These development opportunities are
synthesized as a foundation for the Route 6 Hop River Corridor Master Plan.

In addition, Garnet Consulting Services, Inc. has suggested nine initiatives for the Corridor to
enhance the economic development viability of the Corridor. Two of these initiatives
(Initiative #5 – a Unified Zoning District and Regulations, and Initiative #6 – Uniform Design
Guideline) are expanded on as part of this project in Chapter 20.

Initiative #2 (Regional Business Park) and Initiative #3 (Speculative Building) are included
as part of the Route 6 Hop River Corridor Master Plan and included as one of the top
priorities identified in Chapters 22 and 23.

The Final Economic Development Report is included following this page.




LADA, P.C. Land Planners                  16-1                    The Route 6 Hop River Corridor
 Route 6 Hop River Corridor
  Economic Development
Challenges and Opportunities

           April 2010
                     Route 6 Hop River Corridor
          Economic Development Challenges and Opportunities


                                    Table of Contents

Section                                                               Page

Primary Research Findings                                              1
       Executive Demographic Summary Report                            2

Summary of Recommendations                                             15

Exhibit 1: Summary of Route 6 Hop River Corridor Zoning Regulations    18




______________________________________________________________________________
Garnet Consulting Services, Inc.                                              Phone and Fax:
157 Park Road                                                                   860-379-7449
Pleasant Valley, CT 06063-4119                                  E-mail: mwaterhouse@snet.net
                     Route 6 Hop River Corridor
          Economic Development Challenges and Opportunities

Primary Research Findings

This report summarizes the major findings from research regarding the economic development
potential of the 13± mile stretch of U.S. Route 6 through Bolton, Coventry, Andover and
Columbia, Connecticut. The intent of these findings is to position the Corridor for economic
growth that is supported by the market, desired by the host communities, and compatible with
physical features of the land and surrounding neighborhoods. Such growth includes both
attraction of new businesses and the retention and expansion of businesses already in the
region.

These findings were derived from discussions at several meetings of the Route 6 Regional
Economic Development Council; community meetings in each of the 4 communities; review of
documents and other information provided by the communities in response to a list of desired
research information; extensive website research; and interviews with state, regional and local
economic development officials, elected and appointed leadership, and business
representatives.

1. This is not an ideal time to be researching potential economic activity in a small,
   economically slow region because the complete uncertainty about the future economy is
   limiting ideas about economic demand and opportunities.

       While there is widespread agreement that the national recession has ended, there is
        also a general consensus that the recovery will be slow in coming, particularly in
        Connecticut.

       Current projections for both retail spending and commercial real estate in general
        indicate little improvement until 2011 or later.

       Connecticut is likely to lag behind the national recovery. Connecticut has historically
        been late in entering a recession and late in emerging from it.

       There is currently very little interest in new business development along Route 6 (or
        most anywhere else in the region) due to the economy. Therefore it is impossible to
        specify types of businesses that may be interested in locating in the Route 6 Hop River
        Corridor based on prospect inquiries.

       The bright side of this situation is that this is a good time to be planning for future
        economic growth without the pressure of coping with the demands of current economic
        development projects.
______________________________________________________________________________
Garnet Consulting Services, Inc.                                                    Phone and Fax:
157 Park Road                                                                         860-379-7449
Pleasant Valley, CT 06063-4119                                        E-mail: mwaterhouse@snet.net
Route 6 Hop River Corridor                                                                                            April 2010
Economic Development Challenges & Opportunities                                                                          Page 2
______________________________________________________________________________
2. The communities of the Route 6 Hop River Corridor area can be characterized as small and
   semi-rural, with above average white-collar occupations and good incomes.

        An Executive Demographic Summary Report provided by the MetroHartford Alliance
         shows the following:

                             Executive Demographic Summary Report
   Population
   The current year population in this selected geography is 26,073. The 2000 Census revealed a population of 24,528, and in
   1990 it was 21,688 representing a 13.1% change. It is estimated that the population in this area will be 25,852 in 2014,
   representing a change of -0.8% from 2009. The current population is 50.2% male and 49.8% female. In 2009, the median
   age of the population in this area was 41.2, compared to the US median age which was 37.1. The population density in your
   area is 287.4 people per square mile.
   Households
   There are currently 9,901 households in this selected geography. The Census revealed household counts of 9,181 in 2000,
   up from 7,828 in 1990, representing a change of 17.3%. It is estimated that the number of households in this area will be
   9,939 in 2014, representing a change of 0.4% from the current year. For the current year, the average household size in this
   area is 2.63 persons.
   In 2009, the median number of years in residence in this geography's population is 7.30. The average household size in this
   geography was 2.62 people and the average family size was 3.01 people. The average number of vehicles per household in
   this geography was 2.3.
   Income
   In 2009, the median household income in this selected geography was $84,589, compared to the US median which was
   $53,684. The Census revealed median household incomes of $66,966 in 2000 and $49,245 in 1990 representing a change
   of 36.0%. It is estimated that the median household income in this area will be $91,137 in 2014, which would represent a
   change of 7.7% from the current year.
   In 2009, the per capita income in this area was $36,267, compared to the $US per capita, which was $26,485. The 2009
   average household income for this area was $94,412, compared to the US average which was $69,346.

   Race & Ethnicity

   In 2009, the racial makeup of this selected area was as follows: 96.9% White; 0.6% Black; 0.8% Native American; 0.7%
   Asian/Pacific Islander; and 0.3% Other. Compare these to the US racial makeup which was: 73.9% White, 12.4% Black,
   0.8% Native American, 4.4% Asian/Pacific Islander and 5.4% Other.

   People of Hispanic ethnicity are counted independently of race. People of Hispanic origin make up 2.2% of the current year
   population in this selected area. Compare this to the US makeup of 15.6%. Changes in the population within each race and
   ethnicity category from the 1990 Census to the 2000 Census are as follows: 27.8% American Indian, Eskimo, Aleut
   Population; 53.6% Asian, Pacific Islander; 3.5% Black; 53.2% Hispanic Ethnicity; 96.4% Other; White 11.6%.

   Housing

   The median housing value in this area was $163,197 in 1990, compare this to the US median of $78,382 for the same year.
   The 2000 Census median housing value was $152,786, which is a -6.4% change from 1990. In 1990, there were 6,698
   owner occupied housing units in this area vs. 8,021 in 2000. Also in 1990, there were 1,130 renter occupied housing units in
   this area vs. 1,160 in 2000. The average rent in 1990 was $524 vs. $594 in 2000.

   Employment

   In 2009, there were 15,413 people over the age of 16 in the labor force in your geography. Of these 94.6% were employed,
   5.4% were unemployed, 26.4% were not in the labor force and 0.0% were in the Armed Forces. In 1990, unemployment in
   this area was 3.8% and in 2000 it was 3.1%.

   In 2009, there were 5,013 employees in this selected area (daytime population) and there were 722 establishments.

   For this area in 1990, 67.3% of employees were employed in white-collar occupations and 32.7% were employed in blue-
   collar occupations. In 2000, white collar workers made up 68.0% of the population, and those employed in blue collar
   occupations made up 32.0%. In 1990, the average time traveled to work was 18 minutes and in 2000 it was 26 minutes.



______________________________________________________________________________
Garnet Consulting Services, Inc.                                                                          Phone and Fax:
157 Park Road                                                                                               860-379-7449
Pleasant Valley, CT 06063-4119                                                              E-mail: mwaterhouse@snet.net
Route 6 Hop River Corridor                                                                April 2010
Economic Development Challenges & Opportunities                                              Page 3
______________________________________________________________________________
       The 4 town region has significant out-commuting for employment each day. 2000
        Journey to Work data provided by the MetroHartford Alliance showed 1,685 residents
        working in the town in which they lived, 423 workers commuting to other towns in the
        4-town area, 5,711 workers leaving the area’s 4 towns each day, and only 1,821
        workers commuting in. Current Journey to Work data is not expected to differ
        significantly from the 2000 data.

       Per capita and household incomes provide significant disposable income. However,
        because of the out-commuting workforce and relatively limited shopping opportunities in
        the 4-town area, there is likely a very high level of leakage of money spent on retail and
        service purchases.

       There are relatively high traffic counts at both ends of the project area, as well as along
        the entire stretch. This pass-through traffic has the potential of contributing to the 4-
        town economy if reasons to stop and spend can be provided.

       Once the economy has rebounded, the Route 6 Regional Economic Development Council
        should consider conducting a retail leakage study for the region to more fully
        understand the types and amounts of leakage that are occurring and the business
        opportunities that arise from this situation.

       For future marketing purposes, the Route 6 Regional Economic Development Council
        should assure that data such as this is the most accurate possible.

3. Economic activity has historically been slower in the eastern suburbs of Hartford, compared
   to activity to the north, south and west of the City. The 4-town region is even farther
   removed from the major centers of economic activity than the communities most typically
   included in data collection and trend analysis.

       The Manchester/South Windsor area has been a recent exception, but has also captured
        much of the market for larger scale, regional retail and services development. Planned
        development in East Hartford at Rentschler Field will further reduce the likelihood that
        the Corridor will attract “name brand” establishments.

       There are no good sources of data about project activity or real estate availability in the
        Route 6 Hop River Corridor area. Quarterly MarketView reports published by CB Richard
        Ellis (CBRE) on the greater Hartford industrial and office markets only include East
        Hartford, Glastonbury, Manchester and South Windsor as “Hartford East” market. Table
        1 provides some of the key data for the Hartford East Market as of the Third Quarter
        2009.

______________________________________________________________________________
Garnet Consulting Services, Inc.                                                    Phone and Fax:
157 Park Road                                                                         860-379-7449
Pleasant Valley, CT 06063-4119                                        E-mail: mwaterhouse@snet.net
Route 6 Hop River Corridor                                                                   April 2010
Economic Development Challenges & Opportunities                                                 Page 4
______________________________________________________________________________
                                           Table 1
                       Third Quarter 2009 Hartford East Market Statistics
                                                          Quarterly          YTD
         Type of Space      Vacant SF    Vacancy Rate
                                                          Absorption      Absorption
        Industrial          2,616,070      15.31%         (214,525)       (246,525)
        Office               348,482       10.81%          (61,050)        (63,932)
        Source: CB Richard Ellis MarketView Report, Third Quarter 2009


       There is a substantial inventory of vacant and available space in the Hartford suburbs
        just west of the 4-town project area.

       The majority of industrial and office prospects who express interest in the greater
        Hartford area would probably not be interested in the Route 6 Hop River Corridor area.
        The 4 Eastern Hartford suburbs included in CBRE’s analysis are considered by most
        interview sources to be more competitively located than the 4 Route 6 Hop River
        Corridor towns, which were described by one interview source as “not on the radar
        screen”. This evaluation includes access to four-directional, high speed transportation
        routes, availability of full utility services, and available sites in master-planned areas for
        business use, particularly larger scale and non-retail.

       Available space in the 4 Eastern Hartford suburbs would compete with similar sites in
        the Route 6 Hop River Corridor – if such sites existed. The Connecticut Economic
        Resource Center’s (CERC) Site Finder Inventory includes no available buildings in the 4-
        town area and only 4 sites, 3 of which are on Route 6 (2 lots totaling nearly 22 acres in
        Columbia and 2 sites at Lindholms Corner in Andover of 3 and 58 acres). It is likely that
        there are other available properties in the 4-town area that are available but have not
        been submitted to CERC’s Site Finder Inventory by listing brokers, property owners or
        the host towns. Since the Site Finder Inventory is a primary online tool used to look for
        available commercial and industrial properties, the 4 towns of Route 6 Economic
        Development Council should assure that all available properties are included in this
        information source.

4. New development in the corridor should generally be small scale, high quality and visually
   attractive and/or unobtrusive.

       There is strong but not unanimous opposition to “big box” uses along the corridor.
        There are multiple and sometimes conflicting definitions of what the term “big box”
        means. For some it is merely a reflection of a desire that all buildings be small in size;
        for others, it is an opposition to chains that would compete with locally owned
        establishments. It would be helpful if the 4 towns agreed on a definition of “big box”,
        and if these are not desired at all in the corridor, this should be reflected in the zoning
        regulations for the corridor.
______________________________________________________________________________
Garnet Consulting Services, Inc.                                                       Phone and Fax:
157 Park Road                                                                            860-379-7449
Pleasant Valley, CT 06063-4119                                           E-mail: mwaterhouse@snet.net
Route 6 Hop River Corridor                                                                    April 2010
Economic Development Challenges & Opportunities                                                  Page 5
______________________________________________________________________________
       There is some sentiment that development along the corridor should have limited
        visibility from Route 6. This will conflict with the importance of such visibility for retail,
        restaurant and service establishments.

5. Because Manchester, South Windsor and East Hartford are the likely locations for the larger
   retailers and service establishments that will be destinations serving a wide area, retail and
   services along the corridor will be locally oriented. For the more local market, Route 6 and
   Route 44 will compete with each other.

       Each community has identified a few retail or service uses, or other general forms of
        development that are desired in the communities. These should be a primary focus for
        business recruitment. Table 2 shows the desirable uses cited by residents during
        community meetings and research interviews:

                                               Table 2
            Types of Desired Uses On Route 6 Cited by Community Residents
        Andover                    Bolton                 Columbia                Coventry
                                            Specific Uses
Bank                      Bank
Doctor’s Offices                                    Doctors/dentists
Pharmacy                                            CVS/Walgreens
Restaurant/tavern         Restaurants               Restaurant/tavern      Storage
Farmers’ Market           Breakfast                 XtraMart               Automotive services
                          restaurant/coffee
                          shop
Nursing Home/Care         Fast food grouped                                Hardware store
Facility                  plaza
Grocery store             Golf course
                          Nurseries
                          Antiques
                                            General Uses
                      (Coventry suggestions specific to the Cotswold Property)
Industrial Park                                     Industrial Park        Business Park
Doctors/attorneys in      Light offices in historic Doctors/dentists in    Large medical facility
historic home             homes                     historic home
conversions                                         conversions
Professional Offices                                                       Retail-Home Depot
Plazas like Hebron,       Educational               Corporate              Hotel/conference
Coventry, Lebanon         facility/campus           headquarters           center
Pocket shopping                                                            Large research facility
Intellectual industries                                                    Something big
______________________________________________________________________________
Garnet Consulting Services, Inc.                                                       Phone and Fax:
157 Park Road                                                                            860-379-7449
Pleasant Valley, CT 06063-4119                                           E-mail: mwaterhouse@snet.net
Route 6 Hop River Corridor                                                                  April 2010
Economic Development Challenges & Opportunities                                                Page 6
______________________________________________________________________________

       It should be noted that this list is based on input from a limited sampling of residents so
        that the strength of support cannot be gauged with any accuracy. It would make sense
        for the Route 6 Regional Economic Development Council to create a master list of
        possible types of uses and survey the residents of the 4 towns to obtain a better
        estimate of both overall support and support by residents of each town.

       There are several examples of desired uses that are shared by multiple communities
        (banks, doctors/dentists offices, pharmacies, restaurants/tavern, fitness center, grocery
        store, business/industrial parks). For uses that are desired in adjacent communities, it
        would make sense to identify a corridor site that could serve both.

      Conversely, community residents identified forms of development that are not desirable;
       these are shown in Table 3:
                                          Table 3
          Types of Undesired Uses On Route 6 Cited by Community Residents
      Andover                  Bolton                 Columbia                Coventry
                                        Specific Uses
Adult entertainment    Adult entertainment      Adult entertainment    Adult entertainment
Car dealerships                                 Automotive             Car dealerships
                       Gas stations             Gas stations           More chain shopping
                       Salvage facility                                Nuclear waste
                                                                       disposal
                                                Fast food              Ash dump
                                                                       Scrap yard
                                                                       Jail
                                                                       Commuter lot
                                 General Uses/Comments

Berlin Turnpike/Silas      Heavy industry          Polluting uses           Polluting uses
Deane Highway
Residential uses           Not conducive to        Dense housing            Single family
                           existing residential                             residential
                           uses
Big boxes – Home                                   Big boxes
Depot, Walmart
Nothing larger than        Massive outdoor         Anything that would
20,000 square feet         storage                 disrupt Route 6
Subsidized housing


______________________________________________________________________________
Garnet Consulting Services, Inc.                                                    Phone and Fax:
157 Park Road                                                                         860-379-7449
Pleasant Valley, CT 06063-4119                                        E-mail: mwaterhouse@snet.net
Route 6 Hop River Corridor                                                                April 2010
Economic Development Challenges & Opportunities                                              Page 7
______________________________________________________________________________
       As with the list of desired uses, there are some areas of agreement among communities,
        as well as some differences in community opinion. In particular, because of the nature
        of the primary site available in Coventry, that community is more accepting of larger
        scale development that the other 3 communities.

6. A Route 6 Hop River Corridor location offers businesses a variety of strengths and
   weaknesses as a business location. Table 4 presents a summary list drawn from interviews
   of representative businesses in the corridor, testimony at community meetings, and
   observations by the consulting team. It should be noted that the perceptions and
   preferences of businesses varied greatly depending on the type and location of the
   business.

                                   Table 4
Strengths and Weaknesses of a Route 6 Hop River Corridor Location for Businesses

                    Strengths                                        Weaknesses
   Good traffic count to support merchants           Lack of public water and sewer (cited
    (cited multiple times)                             multiple times)
   Excellent visibility (cited multiple times)       Traffic speed/safety (cited multiple times)
   Excellent location for businesses not             Periodic traffic congestion
    needing high visibility                           Some tricky spots/tight corners
   Proximity to Manchester and Hartford              Some difficulty in crossing on-coming
    (particularly the west end of the corridor)        traffic
   Proximity to Willimantic and UConn                Some wireless dead spots
    (particularly the east end of the corridor)       Unattractive portions of the corridor
   Easy access to Interstate system                  Missing key retail/service uses needed to
   Proximity to Bradley International Airport         draw more customers
   Location between Boston and New York              Proximity to greenway
   Improved road and safety                          Vagrants/homeless sleep in vehicles
   Can draw from large labor pool                    Crime/inadequate police patrols
   Availability of nice piece of property            Route 6 is a transient road
   Great neighbors                                   Difficult development conditions for some
                                                       land
                                                      Route 44 better location for retail

7. There appears to be shared interest in the creation of at least one modestly sized, high
   quality, mixed use business park in which all the corridor communities could be investors.

       Being able to do this is dependent on finding a suitable site for which adequate utility
        capacity can be provided. In particular, the lack of sanitary sewers is a concern.
        Suitability of the use of one or more package treatment plants should be studied.
______________________________________________________________________________
Garnet Consulting Services, Inc.                                                    Phone and Fax:
157 Park Road                                                                         860-379-7449
Pleasant Valley, CT 06063-4119                                        E-mail: mwaterhouse@snet.net
Route 6 Hop River Corridor                                                                April 2010
Economic Development Challenges & Opportunities                                              Page 8
______________________________________________________________________________

       The idea of such a joint venture development might be applied to other types of
        commercial development as well.

8. Such a joint venture approach may allow the area to take advantage (and be a leader in the
   state) of new state legislation (Public Act 09-231) which authorizes the chief elected officials
   of two or more municipalities “…to enter into an agreement to promote regional economic
   development and share the real and personal property tax revenue from new economic
   development.”

       The ability to do this is currently limited by the statute’s requirement that such
        communities be “…members of the same federal economic development district,
        established under 42 USC 3171….” At the present time, there are no such districts
        (called EDDs) in Connecticut, despite support at the local and regional level. State
        government has not supported the establishment of one or more such EDDs, although
        the new draft State Economic Development Plan states support for regional economic
        development efforts.

       If the 4-town region is interested in taking advantage of this new legislation, the Route
        6 Regional Economic Development Council, in association with the two Councils of
        Government serving the region, should work with their state legislative delegation to
        begin the process of establishing an EDD for the region (or a single EDD for the state).

9. The scarcity of available business buildings in the Route 6 Hop River Corridor will
   significantly diminish the area’s ability to recruit businesses to the region. Because of the
   “need for speed” in the current site selection process, typically about 80% of business
   prospects look for an existing building rather than a site to build on.

       Sources at the Connecticut Department of Economic Development and MetroHartford
        Alliance verify that this is currently the situation in Connecticut.

       This raises the possibility that the 4 towns could jointly develop a speculative flex-space
        building that would be available to meet the space needs of multiple small occupants.
        Such a building could be part of a business park discussed in item 6 above.

       A new trend around the country is the creation of a virtual building that is designed in
        the computer and can be marketed to potential users, but for which construction does
        not begin until a user (for all or a portion of the building) has committed to the project.
        This approach reduces the front-end out-of-pocket costs for the project but requires a
        longer timeframe before the building is ready for occupancy.

______________________________________________________________________________
Garnet Consulting Services, Inc.                                                    Phone and Fax:
157 Park Road                                                                         860-379-7449
Pleasant Valley, CT 06063-4119                                        E-mail: mwaterhouse@snet.net
Route 6 Hop River Corridor                                                              April 2010
Economic Development Challenges & Opportunities                                            Page 9
______________________________________________________________________________
10. The 4 towns of the Route 6 Hop River Corridor have very diverse business bases.

       A June 2009 business inventory by the Andover Economic Development Committee
        found 109 businesses in Town of 12 different retail, service, manufacturing and other
        sectors. The predominant sector was builders/contractors/trades (45); there were also 7
        farms and 6 food/drink/groceries establishments.

       Columbia’s Business Directory as of April 2009 included 185 businesses in 18 sectors;
        the largest sectors were builders/contractors/trades (33), miscellaneous services (20),
        automotive/transportation (19), general/professional services (15) and lawn & garden
        (13).

       Coventry’s November 2009 Business Listings include 279 businesses of 139 business
        types. The largest groups are contractors/builders/construction (17), restaurants (12),
        carpentry (8), flooring (7), and beauty salons (7).

       The “2010 Bolton Business Yellow Pages” includes 173 businesses segmented into 17
        categories. Major sectors include builders/contractors/trades (23), specialty
        goods/services (23), general/professional services (16), automotive/transportation (14),
        health (14), child care (12) and real estate (12).

       The vast majority of the 4-town region’s nearly 750 businesses are small and could
        easily fit into a mixed use environment on Route 6.

       A master list of businesses located in the Route 6 Hop River Corridor should be prepared
        and maintained, and a cooperative marketing program should be developed. This should
        include weekly or other regular internet marketing to a list of interested recipients. The
        Heart of Danville (Kentucky) weekly e-mail marketing is an excellent example (see
        http://www.downtowndanville.com/newsletter.html). This list could also be used as part
        of the business retention and expansion efforts of the 4 towns.

11. Based on long term national business start-up trends (averaging annual business starts of 1
    new business per each 150 – 200 population, the 4-town Route 6 Hop River Corridor region
    should be expected to generate about 150 new businesses a year.

       Many of these will be home-based and therefore not in need of space in a typical
        business building, at least in their first generation. However, if the 4 towns of the
        corridor want to stimulate home-based business start-ups, they must assure that the
        home-based business regulations of their zoning regulations are conducive to this form
        of business activity.

______________________________________________________________________________
Garnet Consulting Services, Inc.                                                   Phone and Fax:
157 Park Road                                                                        860-379-7449
Pleasant Valley, CT 06063-4119                                       E-mail: mwaterhouse@snet.net
Route 6 Hop River Corridor                                                                April 2010
Economic Development Challenges & Opportunities                                             Page 10
______________________________________________________________________________

       Home-based businesses serve as an “incubator without walls” for the entrepreneurial
        development process, which can lead to space needs for later generation businesses.

       A potential use of the speculative building discussed in item 8 above is to provide lower
        cost space for small businesses that have outgrown the spare bedroom, garage or
        basement space in which they first operated.

12. The proximity of Route 6 to the Hop River State Park Trail as well as the Hop River and
    other recreational areas such as Bolton Notch State Park, Nathan Hale State Forest, and
    Andover Lake offers the possibility of positioning the Route 6 Hop River Corridor as a major
    location for outdoor recreation and businesses that serve that market niche.

       This would include not only retail and service establishments, but also manufacturers of
        outdoor recreation goods.

       A broader recreational cluster could include both outdoor and indoor opportunities such
        as the Bolton Ice Palace and other indoor facilities to be established.

       Completion of the Hop River State Park Trail and accessibility improvements are
        necessary to maximize the recreational business potential in the Corridor.

       Use of the trail and patronage of businesses along it may be increased by running
        events that are oriented to the trail (for example, a half marathon).



13. Because of the mixed-use nature of the corridor (including clusters of residential, business,
    agriculture and open space) and varying land characteristics, future development should be
    clustered in nodes.

       Such nodal development can create a critical mass of uses that becomes a destination,
        while at the same time minimizing curb cuts onto Route 6.

       Such nodal development can be smaller in scale for small land areas suitable for
        business development, but can also be larger where there is a larger site, particularly if
        such a site has available utility services or such services can be provided at reasonable
        cost. Package treatment plants should be used to provide sewage treatment in suitable
        locations.

       Such nodal development is in keeping with the state’s Responsible Growth guidelines.

______________________________________________________________________________
Garnet Consulting Services, Inc.                                                    Phone and Fax:
157 Park Road                                                                         860-379-7449
Pleasant Valley, CT 06063-4119                                        E-mail: mwaterhouse@snet.net
Route 6 Hop River Corridor                                                                April 2010
Economic Development Challenges & Opportunities                                             Page 11
______________________________________________________________________________

       Such nodal development also fits within the Windham Region Land Use Plan 2009 and
        Windham Region Council of Government’s (WINCOG) Draft Strategic Plan, and the
        Economic Development chapter of the Capitol Region Council of Government’s (CRCOG)
        2009 draft Plan of Conservation and Development.

       Development in these nodes should emphasize design that preserves the rural character
        of the Corridor towns and creates the feel of multi-use small villages where the site is
        large enough.

       Some of these nodes will be principally residential in character or a mix of residential
        and commercial. Development of age-restricted housing may be a means of attracting
        capital investment that pays property taxes while not adding to school enrollment.

14. Currently we perceive a conflict between how the 4 towns of the region are categorized in
    the State’s Plan of Conservation and Development, and future development along the
    corridor that this project is intended to stimulate.

       The majority of the area along Route 6 in all 4 towns is classified in the state’s plan as
        Rural Lands, Preservation Area or Conservation Area. A major portion of the Andover
        stretch of road is classified Rural Community Center, while there is a small area at the
        intersection of Routes 6 and 66 in Columbia that is designated a Regional Center.

       The state’s growth policy for Rural Community Centers is to “promote concentration of
        mixed-use development such as municipal facilities, employment, shopping, and
        residential uses within a village center setting”; this appears to support additional
        development in much of the Andover portion of Route 6.

       The state’s growth policy for Regional Centers is to “redevelop and revitalize the
        economic, social, and physical environment of the state’s traditional centers of industry
        and commerce”; because the intersection in Columbia that has this designation is
        already largely developed, the state’s policy may have limited value to the town.

       The state’s growth policy for Preservation Areas is to “protect significant resource,
        heritage, recreation, and hazard-prone areas by avoiding structural development, except
        as directly consistent with the preservation value.”

       The state’s growth policy for Conservation Areas is to “plan for the long-term
        management of lands that contribute to the state’s need for food, water and other
        resources and environmental quality by ensuring that any changes in use are compatible
        with the identified conservation value.”

______________________________________________________________________________
Garnet Consulting Services, Inc.                                                    Phone and Fax:
157 Park Road                                                                         860-379-7449
Pleasant Valley, CT 06063-4119                                        E-mail: mwaterhouse@snet.net
Route 6 Hop River Corridor                                                                April 2010
Economic Development Challenges & Opportunities                                             Page 12
______________________________________________________________________________

       The state’s growth policy for Rural Lands is to “protect the rural character of these areas
        by avoiding development forms and intensities that exceed on-site carrying capacity for
        water supply and sewage disposal, except where necessary to resolve localized public
        health concerns.”

       Thus, a major portion of the land along Route 6 is shown in the State’s Plan of
        Conservation and Development as areas in which future development should be
        minimized rather than promoted. The region will need to work with the Connecticut
        Office of Policy and Management and the state’s Office of Responsible Growth to assure
        that additional nodal development along Route 6 is seen as appropriate in the state plan
        and supported by the state.

15. The 13± mile Route 6 Hop River Corridor has multiple zoning districts including business,
    industrial, manufacturing, residential, residential/agriculture and river/aquifer. Exhibit 1
    provides a summary of allowable uses in the 4 towns along the Corridor.

       There are significant differences among the 4 towns on what uses are allowed in the
        various business districts, and whether they are permitted by right or require a Special
        Permit.

       The variation in allowable uses and procedures for obtaining zoning approval will cause
        confusion for business prospects. For those portions of the corridor judged appropriate
        for business use, consideration should be given to creating a Route 6 Corridor Zoning
        District and regulations that allow a broad mix of uses and could be adopted by all the
        communities. This would emphasize the cooperative nature of the corridor for
        marketing purposes. Form-based zoning rather than use-based zoning should apply in
        this District.
       Zoning regulations for the Route 6 Hop River Corridor should allow for the conversion of
        residential structures to business uses, while at the same time preserving the historic
        architecture of these structures.

       Consideration should be given to the inclusion of uniform design guidelines and review
        for new commercial construction or exterior renovation within the Route 6 Hop River
        Corridor. This can become a portion of the Corridor’s visual marketing.

       The reliance on Special Permit procedures reduces the competitiveness and desirability
        of the towns in the corridor. Well thought-out regulations with carefully selected lists of
        permitted and prohibited uses reduces both the uncertainty on the part of a business as
        to whether they will be allowed in the corridor and the need to rely on time-consuming
        and often expensive Special Permit procedures.
______________________________________________________________________________
Garnet Consulting Services, Inc.                                                    Phone and Fax:
157 Park Road                                                                         860-379-7449
Pleasant Valley, CT 06063-4119                                        E-mail: mwaterhouse@snet.net
Route 6 Hop River Corridor                                                                April 2010
Economic Development Challenges & Opportunities                                             Page 13
______________________________________________________________________________

16. Future development along the Route 6 Hop River Corridor will be incremental and
    “evolutionary”.

       Neither the areas available for development nor the market will support rapid or large
        scale development. While residents are concerned about major change in the
        appearance and character of the Corridor, this is not likely to happen.

       Nonetheless, the Route 6 Economic Development Council would be well advised to
        prepare an educational presentation that separates the myths and realities of future
        development along the Corridor.

17. The vast majority of future development will occur because private sector developers
    identify suitable sites that support forms of development they have in mind.

       The four host Towns and the Route 6 Economic Development Council can assist in this
        process by making information on development opportunities readily available and local
        development regulations and procedures well-thought out, swift, certain and fair.

       Upon completion of this project, the Route 6 Economic Development should prepare a
        sales prospectus that provides information most often needed by developers, shows
        areas identified for development, and identifies the types of development that are most
        desired.

18. Other relevant thoughts:

       The Route 6 Hop River Corridor needs to be “rebranded” (an effort that is already
        occurring). Overcoming the “Suicide 6” image requires aggressive image repositioning
        marketing. Appropriate gateway signage should be installed.

       Some commercial properties (as well as some residences) in the Corridor are visually
        unattractive. A Route 6 Hop River Corridor Beautification Program should be established.
        This should include both the capitalization of a low interest façade and landscaping loan
        program and an annual Beautification Awards program.

       There may be the opportunity to position the Corridor as a central location for
        businesses serving the higher education market because of the proximity of The
        University of Connecticut, Eastern Connecticut State University, Manchester Community
        College, Goodwin College, and even educational institutions in Hartford.

       Because of the number of farms in the region, there is a possibility for attracting value-
        added agribusinesses that process and sell goods made from what is raised on those
        farms.

       Some of the residential properties along Route 6 may lend themselves to use as B&Bs.


______________________________________________________________________________
Garnet Consulting Services, Inc.                                                    Phone and Fax:
157 Park Road                                                                         860-379-7449
Pleasant Valley, CT 06063-4119                                        E-mail: mwaterhouse@snet.net
Route 6 Hop River Corridor                                                                April 2010
Economic Development Challenges & Opportunities                                             Page 14
______________________________________________________________________________
       While some cluster development opportunities exist (the recreational or education
        services clusters discussed above, future development in the Corridor is likely to be “bits
        and pieces of lots of things” [a quote from one research interview conducted for this
        project].

       The region may be able to support a small grocery store such as an Aldi’s.

       The region may be able to support a pub & cinema (that is, a small movie house in
        which patrons sit at tables rather than in auditorium style seating and are able to order
        dinner and/or drinks while watching a movie). Such an establishment would
        simultaneously address both the dining and entertainment needs identified in
        community forums.

       Future development must be guided by a widely shared vision that both reflects the
        desires of the 4 communities comprising the Route 6 Hop River Corridor and clearly
        conveys the types and characteristics of desired growth to prospective businesses and
        developers.




______________________________________________________________________________
Garnet Consulting Services, Inc.                                                    Phone and Fax:
157 Park Road                                                                         860-379-7449
Pleasant Valley, CT 06063-4119                                        E-mail: mwaterhouse@snet.net
Route 6 Hop River Corridor                                                               April 2010
Economic Development Challenges & Opportunities                                            Page 15
______________________________________________________________________________
Summary of Recommendations

1. Once the economy has rebounded, the Route 6 Regional Economic Development Council
   should consider conducting a retail leakage study for the region to more fully understand
   the types and amounts of leakage that are occurring and the business opportunities that
   arise from this situation.

2. For future marketing purposes, the Route 6 Regional Economic Development Council should
   assure that data provided on the region by the MetroHartford Alliance, Connecticut
   Economic Resource Center (CERC) or other data sources is the most accurate possible.

3. Since CERC’s Site Finder Inventory is a primary online tool used to look for available
   commercial and industrial properties, the 4 towns of Route 6 Regional Economic
   Development Council should assure that all available properties are included in this
   information source.

4. New development in the corridor should generally be small scale, high quality and visually
   attractive and/or unobtrusive.

5. The 4 towns of the Route 6 Hop River Corridor should agree on a definition of “big box”,
   and if these are not desired at all in the corridor, this should be reflected in the zoning
   regulations for the corridor.

6. The Route 6 Regional Economic Development Council should create a master list of possible
   types of retail and service uses, and survey the residents of the 4 towns to obtain a better
   estimate of both overall support and support by residents of each town for these uses. For
   uses that are desired in adjacent communities, it would make sense to identify a corridor
   site that could serve both.

7. A site should be sought for development of at least one modestly sized, high quality, mixed
   use business park in which all the corridor communities could be investors under the
   provisions of Connecticut Public Act 09-231. In order to take advantage of this new
   legislation, the Route 6 Regional Economic Development Council, in association with the two
   Councils of Government serving the region, should work with their state legislative
   delegation to begin the process of establishing a federally recognized Economic
   Development District (EDD) for the region (or a single EDD for the state).

8. The 4 Route 6 Hop River Corridor towns should consider joint development of a speculative
   flex-space building (or the design of a virtual speculative building) that would be available to
   meet the space needs of multiple small occupants. Such a building could be part of the
   business park discussed in item 6 above.

9. A master list of businesses located in the Route 6 Hop River Corridor should be prepared
   and maintained, and a cooperative marketing program should be developed. This should
   include weekly or other regular internet marketing to a list of interested recipients.
______________________________________________________________________________
Garnet Consulting Services, Inc.                                                   Phone and Fax:
157 Park Road                                                                        860-379-7449
Pleasant Valley, CT 06063-4119                                       E-mail: mwaterhouse@snet.net
Route 6 Hop River Corridor                                                               April 2010
Economic Development Challenges & Opportunities                                            Page 16
______________________________________________________________________________

10. Marketing of the Route 6 Hop River Corridor should include its many outdoor recreation
    opportunities. A cluster of businesses catering to this market should be sought. This would
    include not only retail and service establishments, but also manufacturers of outdoor
    recreation goods. A broader recreational cluster could include both outdoor and indoor
    opportunities such as the Bolton Ice Palace and other indoor facilities to be established.
    Completion of the Hop River State Park Trail and accessibility improvements are necessary
    to maximize the recreational business potential in the Corridor.

11. Because of the mixed-use nature of the corridor (including clusters of residential, business,
    agriculture and open space) and varying land characteristics, future development should be
    clustered in nodes. Development in these nodes should emphasize design that preserves the
    rural character of the Corridor towns and creates the feel of multi-use small villages where
    the site is large enough.

12. Package treatment plants should be used to provide sewage treatment in suitable locations.

13. The region will need to work with the Connecticut Office of Policy and Management and the
    state’s Office of Responsible Growth to assure that additional nodal development along
    Route 6 is seen as appropriate in the state plan and supported by the state.

14. For those portions of the corridor judged appropriate for business use, consideration should
    be given to creating a Route 6 Corridor Zoning District and regulations that allow a broad
    mix of uses and could be adopted by all the communities. This District should have a
    detailed list of uses permitted by right and prohibited uses to reduce the uncertainty
    inherent in reliance on a Special Permit process for most possible uses. Form-based zoning
    rather than use-based zoning should apply in this District.

15. Zoning regulations for the Route 6 Hop River Corridor should allow for the conversion of
    residential structures to business uses, while at the same time preserving the historic
    architecture of these structures.

16. Consideration should be given to the inclusion of uniform design guidelines and review for
    new commercial construction or exterior renovation within the Route 6 Hop River Corridor.
    This can be a portion of the Corridor’s visual marketing.

17. The Route 6 Hop River Corridor needs to be “rebranded”. Overcoming the “Suicide 6” image
    requires aggressive image repositioning marketing. Appropriate gateway signage should be
    installed.

18. A Route 6 Hop River Corridor Beautification Program should be established. This should
    include both the capitalization of a low interest façade and landscaping loan program and an
    annual Beautification Awards program.



______________________________________________________________________________
Garnet Consulting Services, Inc.                                                   Phone and Fax:
157 Park Road                                                                        860-379-7449
Pleasant Valley, CT 06063-4119                                       E-mail: mwaterhouse@snet.net
Route 6 Hop River Corridor                                                            April 2010
Economic Development Challenges & Opportunities                                         Page 17
______________________________________________________________________________
19. Future development must be guided by a widely shared vision that both reflects the desires
    of the 4 communities comprising the Route 6 Hop River Corridor and clearly conveys the
    types and characteristics of desired growth to prospective businesses and developers.

20. The Route 6 Economic Development Council should prepare an educational presentation
    that separates the myths and realities of future development along the Corridor to help
    residents understand that such development will be slow and incremental, and result in
    “evolutionary’ change over an extended timeframe.

21. Upon completion of this project, the Route 6 Economic Development should prepare a sales
    prospectus that provides information most often needed by developers, shows areas
    identified for development, and identifies the types of development that are most desired.




______________________________________________________________________________
Garnet Consulting Services, Inc.                                                Phone and Fax:
157 Park Road                                                                     860-379-7449
Pleasant Valley, CT 06063-4119                                    E-mail: mwaterhouse@snet.net
Route 6 Hop River Corridor                                              April 2010
Economic Development Challenges & Opportunities                           Page 18
______________________________________________________________________________




                                          Exhibit 1

     Summary of Route 6 Hop River Corridor Zoning Regulations




______________________________________________________________________________
Garnet Consulting Services, Inc.                                    Phone and Fax:
157 Park Road                                                         860-379-7449
Pleasant Valley, CT 06063-4119                        E-mail: mwaterhouse@snet.net
                EXHIBIT 1
Route 6 Hop River Corridor Zoning Summary

               ANDOVER
                        Bus

    Res




    Ind




    Res


                                                  Ind


                              Bus


                                     Res


                                            Bus
Andover Route 6 Zoning                                          Exhibit 1 – Page 2




______________________________________________________________________________
Garnet Consulting Services, Inc.                                    Phone and Fax:
157 Park Road                                                         860-379-7449
Pleasant Valley, CT 06063-4119                        E-mail: mwaterhouse@snet.net
Andover Route 6 Zoning                                          Exhibit 1 – Page 3




______________________________________________________________________________
Garnet Consulting Services, Inc.                                    Phone and Fax:
157 Park Road                                                         860-379-7449
Pleasant Valley, CT 06063-4119                        E-mail: mwaterhouse@snet.net
Andover Route 6 Zoning                                          Exhibit 1 – Page 4




______________________________________________________________________________
Garnet Consulting Services, Inc.                                    Phone and Fax:
157 Park Road                                                         860-379-7449
Pleasant Valley, CT 06063-4119                        E-mail: mwaterhouse@snet.net
                     Route 6 Hop River Corridor Zoning Summary

                                         BOLTON




GENERAL BUSINESS ZONE (GB)

8A.1   Purpose. The purpose of the General Business Zone (GB) is to create an area where
       regional retail, service, professional office, and business activities can be located with
       access to the Interstate and State highway system, sewer, and water. This Zone is
       intended to allow intense commercial development, while still imposing a high standard
       of architectural and site design to preserve and enhance the scale, materials, and
       architectural character of Bolton as a small New England Town. This Zone recognizes
       that it is located at the gateway to Bolton for those arriving from the Hartford and
       Manchester urban areas, and that it will form the first impression of this Town that many
       travelers see. Control of signs, abundant landscaping, compatible uses, and limitation of
Bolton Route 6 Zoning                                                              Exhibit 1 – Page 6
          curb cuts are essential.

8A,2.a.   Permitted by Site Plan Review. Uses and use categories permitted as a matter of right
          subject to Site Plan Review by the Planning and Zoning Commission in accordance with
          Section 16A of these Regulations and all requirements of the GB Zone and any applicable
          provisions of these Regulations:

          1.    Public Utility Building or Substation
          2.    State or Town operated public commuter parking lots.
          3.    Municipal facilities of the Town of Bolton
          4.    Open Lot Sales, in accordance with Section 3B.3, for more than ninety (90) days; for
                periods of less than ninety (90) days, the Zoning Enforcement Officer may issue a
                Certificate of Zoning Compliance without Commission review.

8A.2.b.   Special Permit. Uses and use categories permitted subject to the issuance of Special
          Permit by the Planning and Zoning Commission in accordance with Section 16B of these
          Regulations, and all requirements of the GB Zone and any applicable provisions of these
          Regulations:

          1.    Grocery Store
          2.    Drug Store
          3.    Beauty Salon//Barber Shop
          4.    Business or Professional Office
          5.    Studio (photographic, graphic arts, crafts)
          6.    Retail Shop
          7.    Personal and Business Services
          8.    Restaurants, Full Service, per Section 3B.4
          9.    Restaurants, Fast Food, per Section 3B.4
          10.   Restaurants, Take-out, per Section 3B.4
          11.   Taverns
          12.   Package Stores
          13.   Bank/financial institution
          14.   Hotel, Motel, subject to Special Regulations of Section 3B.5; Bed and Breakfast up
                to 6 rooms
          15.   Motion Picture or Live Theater, subject to Section 8G
          16.   Newspaper printing and job printing
          17.   Mortuaries/Funeral Homes
          18.   Motor Vehicle Gasoline Station, subject to the Special Regulations of Section 3B.1
                of these Regulations
          19.   New and Used Car Sales, subject to the Special Regulations of Section 3B.2 of these
                Regulations
          20.   Motor Vehicle Service and Repair (General and Limited), subject to the Special
                Regulations of Section 3B.1 of these Regulations
          21.   Child Day Care Centers
          22.   Wholesale sales, sample room for such commodities as furniture, hardware,
                appliances, and other household goods.
Bolton Route 6 Zoning                                                                 Exhibit 1 – Page 7
           23. Candy manufacturing, with retail sales.
           24. Driving ranges and miniature golf courses


SECTION 9 - INDUSTRIAL ZONE (I)

9A.        Purpose. The purpose of the Industrial Zone (I) is to create an area where research
           facilities, warehousing, light manufacturing, professional offices, and other light industrial
           uses can be located with access to the Interstate and State highway system, sewer, and
           water. This Zone is intended to allow those activities which require truck traffic,
           materials processing, good employee access, and a certain degree of flexibility in site and
           building design to follow the function being served, while still imposing a high standard
           of architectural and site design to avoid the blight of traditional industrial districts that
           produce noise, dust, fumes, or other offensive activities that adversely affect other
           properties both within the industrial zone and outside of it. This Zone is also intended to
           allow office uses for businesses that provide services to other businesses or to a
           specialized clientele, and not the general public. The Business Zones, not the Industrial
           Zone, are intended for those businesses that provide products and services to the general
           public. Control of signs, outdoor storage, refuse, and truck parking; abundant
           landscaping; compatible uses; and limitation of curb cuts are essential.

9B.1.a.    Permitted by Site Plan Review. Uses and use categories permitted as a matter of right
           subject to Site Plan Review by the Planning and Zoning Commission in accordance with
           Section 16A of these Regulations and all requirements of the Industrial Zone and any
           applicable provisions of these Regulations:

          Town owned or operated public works or disposal facilities;

9B.1.b.    Special Permit. Uses and use categories permitted subject to the issuance of Special
           Permit by the Planning and Zoning Commission in accordance with Section 16B of these
           Regulations, and all requirements of the Industrial Zone and any applicable provisions of
           these Regulations:

           1.   Motor Vehicle use subject to the same conditions as for the General Business Zone;
           2.   Manufacturing or processing of goods;
           3.   Warehouse or freight terminal;
           4.   Construction business;
           5.   Outdoor storage of equipment and materials accessory to a permitted use listed in the
                industrial zone, provided that such storage is appropriately screened and does not
                constitute a health or safety hazard. All materials and waste classified as hazardous
                by the State of Connecticut shall be stored and disposed of as directed by the
                Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection. There shall be no display or
                storage of goods or products with any minimum required yard for the Industrial
                Zone.
           6.   Office buildings for corporate offices, medical services, financial businesses, and
                professional services, excluding those uses that are open to the general public such as
Bolton Route 6 Zoning                                                                Exhibit 1 – Page 8
                insurance agencies, banks, law, dentists, and doctor’s offices, and travel agencies.

9B.1.c.   Accessory Uses. Accessory uses, as defined in these Regulations, may be permitted
          subject to the same type of review (Certificate of Zoning Compliance, Site Plan Review,
          or Special Permit) as the use to which it is accessory.

9B.1.d.   Prohibited Uses

          1.    Acetylene Gas, Cyanide compound or oxygen manufacture;
          2.    Airport;
          3.    Asphalt manufacture or refining;
          4.    Bag, Carpet or Rug Cleaning establishments;
          5.    Carousel, Roller Coaster, Merry-go-round, Ferris Wheel, Shooting Gallery, Freak
                Show or similar attractions and amusement devices except that a Certificate of
                Registration may be issued by the Zoning Enforcement Officer upon application by a
                local charitable or non-profit organization for temporary use of similar amusement
                devices for a period not to exceed three (3) days;
          6.    Chlorine or Bleaching Powder manufacture;
          8.    Creosote manufacture;
          9.    Distillation of coal or wood;
          10.   Drop Forge Shop;
          11.   Explosives, fireworks or ammunition manufacture:
          12.   Fumigation plants;
          13.   Glue or size manufacture from fish or animal offal;
          14.   Gypsum, lime, cement, plaster or plaster of Paris manufacture;
          15.   Incineration or reduction of or dumping of offal, garbage or refuse on a commercial basis;
          16.   Linoleum manufacture;
          17.   Match manufacture;
          18.   Paint and lacquer manufacture;
          19.   Petroleum refining and the bulk storage of petroleum products;
          20.   Pyroxylin plastic manufacture;
          21.   Rubber, natural or synthetic, or gutta-percha manufactured from crude or scrap
                material;
          22.   Sewage disposal plant other than operated by the Town of Bolton;
          23.   Soap, tallow, grease or lard manufacture;
          24.   Slaughterhouse;
          25.   Sulphurous, sulphuric nitric or hydrochloric acid manufacture;
          26.   Tannery;
          27.   Tar or asphalt roofing manufacture;
          28.   Tire recapping or retreading;
          29.   Concrete Manufacturing;
          30.   Biological research, manufacturing, or processing;
          31.   All other enterprises or uses commonly regarded as hazardous, offensive or that pose
                a threat to the public health, safety or welfare or otherwise constitute a nuisance.
      Route 6 Hop River Corridor Zoning Summary

                    COVENTRY

                      West End

       Commercial




River/Aquifer



Residential




                      East End




                                                  Residential




                    River/Aquifer
Coventry Route 6 Zoning                                                                Exhibit 1 – Page 10
Section 6.05 River/Aquifer (R/A) Zone

       Section 6.05.01         Generally Permitted Uses

        a.      Uses Not Requiring Site Plan Review By the Commission

       The following uses are permitted in the River/Aquifer Zone upon the issuance of a zoning
permit by the Zoning Agent:

        1.     Any use, other than agriculture, that is generally permitted without the necessity of
site plan approval in the GR Zones.

        b.      Uses Requiring Site Plan Review By the Commission

       The following uses are permitted in the River/Aquifer Zone upon the issuance of site plan
approval by the Commission:

       .
       1       Any use that may be permitted by site plan approval in the GR Zones.

       Section 6.05.02         Specially Permitted Uses

       The Commission may issue a special permit in accordance with Section 7.03 of these
Regulations for the following uses in the River/Aquifer Zone:

        a.      Philanthropic, educational, religious, cemetery and eleemosynary use by a duly
incorporated, non-profit organization.

          b.      Agriculture, including a farm, provided (i) that any structures for the enclosure or
feeding of poultry or swine are located no less than 100 feet from any property line; (ii) that any
structures for the enclosure or feeding of animals other than poultry, swine, or common domestic
household pets such as cats or dogs, are located no less than 50 feet from any property line; (iii) that any
structures or open areas for the storage of manure or other animal waste products are located no less than
100 feet from any property line and are screened from dwellings on adjacent properties, except that
fully composted manure may be applied within 100 feet of a property line for soil restoration and
fortification; and (iv) that any parcel for the raising of animals other than common domestic household
pets shall be no less than one (1) acre in size. The special permit requirement does not apply to
nurseries and greenhouses that do not sell products on site, as such uses are permissible with site plan
approval under Section 6.05.01.b.

        c.      Water-dependent, riparia n recreational u ses.
Coventry Route 6 Zoning                                                                  Exhibit 1 – Page 11
Section 6.07 Commercial (C) Zone

        Section 6.07.01         Generally Permitted Uses

        .
        a       Uses Not Requiring Site Plan Review By the Commission

       The following uses are permitted in the Commercial Zone upon the issuance of a zoning
permit by the Zoning Agent:

         1.      Philanthropic, educational, religious, cemetery and eleemosynary uses by non-profit
organizations.
         2.      Fina nce, insurance, and real estate services.
         3.      G o v e r n m e n t a l se r v i c e s.
         4.      Historic sites and monuments open to the public, with or without an entrance fee.
         5.      Public parks, playgrounds, schools, museums and libraries.
         6.      Offices.
         7.      P er so n a l ser v i c e s.
         8.      P r o fe ssi o n a l se r v i c e s.
         9.      Studios for the creation, preparation, exhibition, demonstration and/or sale of
photography, sculptures, paintings or other artwork, and/or crafts, but without artistic instruction or
lectures.
         10.     Tourist homes a nd bed-and-break fa st fa cilities.
         11.     Agriculture, including a farm, but excluding nurseries, and greenhouses, and further
provided (i) that any structures for the enclosure or feeding of poultry or swine are located no less than
100 feet from any property line; (ii) that any structures for the enclosure or feeding of animals other
than poultry, swine, or common domestic household pets such as cats or dogs, are located no less than
50 feet from any property line; (iii) that any structures or open areas for the storage of manure or other
animal waste products are located no less than 100 feet from any property line and are screened from
dwellings on adjacent properties, except that fully composted manure may be applied within 100 feet
of a property line for soil restoration and fortification; and (iv) that any parcel for the raising of animals
other than common domestic household pets shall be no less than two (2) acres in size, except with a
special permit pursuant to Section 6.07.02.
         12.     R eta i l sa l e s o f fa r m pr o du c t s.

        b.      Uses Requiring Site Plan Review By the Commission

       The following uses are permitted in the Commercial Zone upon the issuance of site plan
approval by the Commission:

         1.     Business services that are not listed under subsection a of this section.
         2.     Commercial printing (including on-site sales), up t o 10,000 square feet of gross
building floor area per lot.
         3.     Retail trade, up to 5,000 square feet of gross building floor area per lot.
         4.     Artistic instruction and lectures, given in studios for the creation, preparation,
exhibition, demonstration and/or sale of photography, sculptures, paintings or other artwork, and/or crafts.
Coventry Route 6 Zoning                                                                Exhibit 1 – Page 12
No such studio shall be used for the presentation of musical, theatrical or similar “live” performances
without a special permit.

       Section 6.07.02         Specially Permitted Uses

       The Commission may issue a special permit in accordance with Section 7.03 of these
Regulations for the following uses in the Commercial Zones:

         a.       Golf courses, which may include as accessory uses clubhouses, retail golf pro shops,
restaurants, banquet facilities, and other athletic recreational facilities, such as tennis courts and
swimming pools.
         b.       Taverns and inns.
         c.       Hospitals, sanitariums, rest homes, convalescent homes, and long-term care and
assisted living facilities.
         d.       Amusement centers, including video, arcade (electric with mechanical operation), and
pool/billiard hall and bowling alley.
         e.       Hotels, motels, and conference and convention centers.
         f.       M o rtu a ri e s a n d fu n era l h o m e s.
         g.       Motor vehicle ga soline a nd service sta tions.
         h.       Mot or vehicle re pa ir a nd servic es.
         i.       Motor vehicle and motor equipment storage and sales operations, excluding the
display or sale of heavy machinery, trucks, motor homes, or trailers.
         j.       Retail trade, greater than 5,000 square feet of gross building floor area per lot.
         k.       R e st a u r a nt s a n d ca fé s.
         l.       C a t e r i n g fa c i l i t i e s.
         m.       Dance halls.
         n.       Movie and performing arts centers a nd theaters.
         o.       Ra ilroa d/ra pid ra il tra n sit lin e s.
         p.       Au t o m o b il e pa rk i n g l ot s.
         q.       Motor vehicle tra nsportation terminals.
         r.       Power-generating facilities, substations or offices and other public utilities or similar,
privately operated facilities.
         s.       Nursery schools, and child and adult day care facilities.
         t.       Pri va t e sc h o ol s a n d c oll e g e s.
         u.       V e t e r i n a r y h o sp i t a l s.
         v.       Enclosed storage and warehouse facilities, excluding storage of hazardous chemicals, fuels
or radioactive materials.
         w.       Assembly, processing or machine operations on materials such as wood, metal, glass,
        fabrics, clay, stone, synthetics, plastics, and electronic components and appliances, including
        retail sales of products produced at the site and wholesale storage yards for such materials, but
        excluding motor vehicle wrecking areas and junkyards.
        x.        Manufacturing and processing of foods; textiles, knitted goods, apparel and other
        fabric products; and lumber and wood products, including furniture; and retail sales of products
        produced at the site.
        y.        C a r wa s h fa c i l i t i e s.
        z.        The raising of animals other than common domestic household pets on a lot less than two
        (2) acres, but no less than one (1) acre, in size.
                         Route 6 Hop River Corridor Zoning Summary

                                           COLUMBIA




         SECTION 31 – COMMERCIAL AND MANUFACTURING DISTRICTS

31.3 Uses of land in the Commercial and Manufacturing Districts are permitted as follows:

Categories                                       Commercial Zone        Manufacturing Zone
                                                 Type of approval           Type of approval
                                                 Site Plan Special      Site Plan    Special
                                                            Exception                Exception
Services – Financial
Financial, business and professional services
and offices, including banks, real estate,
insurance, financial services: where footprint      X                       X
of any proposed building does not exceed
10,000 sf.
Financial, business and professional services
and offices, including banks, real estate,
insurance, financial services: where footprint                  X                       X
of any proposed building exceeds 10,000 sf.
Wholesale operations and                                        X           X
warehousing/distribution
Columbia Route 6 Zoning                                                         Exhibit 1 – Page 14
 Categories                                      Commercial Zone        Manufacturing Zone
                                                 Type of approval           Type of approval
                                                 Site Plan Special      Site Plan    Special
                                                            Exception                Exception
 Services – Personal, repair, construction
 Personal services, including and not limited
 to: dry cleaning, pick up and delivery only;       X                       X
 laundromat; shoe repair; tailor; beauty salon
 Wireless Telecommunication Facilities              X           X           X             X
 Restaurants under 1500 sq ft                       X                       X
 Restaurants over 1500 sq ft                                    X                         X
 Funeral Homes                                                  X
 Medical offices, physical therapy, health                      X           X
 service
 Convalescent homes, residential health care                    X                         X
 facilities
 Daycare centers and homes, adult & child                       X                         X
 Veterinary Office                                              X                         X
 Private schools of business, self defense,         X                       X
 music, dance, and art under 1500 sq ft
 Private schools of business, self defense,                     X                         X
 music, dance, and art over 1500 sq ft
Columbia Route 6 Zoning                                                        Exhibit 1 – Page 15


 Categories                                      Commercial Zone        Manufacturing Zone
                                                 Type of approval       Type of approval
                                                 Site Plan Special      Site Plan Special
                                                            Exception             Exception
 Services – Personal, repair, construction
 Repair and cleaning and construction services                  X          X
 Automotive repair shops                                                   X
 Indoor Storage facilities                                      X          X
 Car wash                                                                  X
 Pets – boarding, grooming, sales                               X          X
 Golf courses and driving ranges; miniature                     X                       X
 golf
 Contractor’s and construction offices and                      X          X
 yards
 Parking garages                                                X
 Liquor sales in restaurants                                    X                       X
 Recreational activities indoor: health clubs,
 skating arenas, tennis courts, similar uses                    X                       X
 Adult uses (see Section 52.7.11)                               X                       X
 Retail Sales
 Retail sales where footprint of any proposed
 building does not exceed 10,000 sf                 X                      X
 Retail sales where footprint of any proposed
 building exceeds 10,000 sf                                     X                       X
 Package stores                                                 X                       X
 Gasoline sales, retail                                         X                       X
 New car dealerships, with used car sales as
 accessory only                                                 X                       X
 Home, farm, garden supply sales                                X                       X
 Automobile and truck dealerships and rentals,
 new and used                                                   X          X
 Marine and recreational vehicle dealers, new
 and used                                                       X          X
 Heavy equipment, sales and service                             X          X
 Government, non-profit establishments
 Fire and police stations                                       X
 Post offices                                                   X
 Governmental offices                                           X          X
 Houses of worship                                              X
 Public utility buildings                                       X                       X
 Public works garage                                            X                       X
Columbia Route 6 Zoning                                                        Exhibit 1 – Page 16


 Categories                                       Commercial Zone       Manufacturing Zone
                                                  Type of approval      Type of approval
                                                  Site Plan Special     Site Plan Special
                                                            Exception             Exception
 Dwelling units
 Dwelling unit above a 1st floor business use
 only                                                           X                        X
 Caretaker dwelling unit under 800 sq ft total
 located in the same building as principle use,      X                     X
 one only
 Industrial
 Manufacturing, assembly, processing
 operations under 15,000 sq ft
                                                                X          X
 Manufacturing, assembly, processing
 operations over 15,000 sq ft
                                                                X                        X
 Forest product/agriculture processing, storage
 and distribution                                                                        X
 Ice skating, roller skating, indoor tennis
 facilities or similar uses over 15,000 sq ft
                                                                X                        X
 Open storage yards, including bulk storage of
 propane                                                                                 X
 Bulk storage of fuel oil over 5000 gallon
 capacity tanks                                                                          X
 Warehousing                                                    X                        X
 Trucking terminals and bus depots                              X                        X
 Miscellaneous
 Signs                                               X                     X
 Art galleries and studios over 2000 sq ft                      X                        X
 Museums over 2000 sq ft                                        X                        X
 Clubs                                               X                     X
 Parking garages, public                                        X                        X
 Theaters                                                       X                        X
 Drive-through facilities                                       X                        X
 Accessory uses customary with and incidental
 to any aforesaid use                                X                     X
 Sand and gravel operations                                     X                        X

				
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