Astronomy Journal Instructions by huanghengdong

VIEWS: 8 PAGES: 1

									                            Astronomy Journal Instructions
Objective: Use the graph papers provided to track the apparent path of celestial objects.

Materials: Compass, protractor, (optional astrolabe)

Part 1:      Hourly Position of the Big Dipper (Ursa Major):

             Note: This part requires several observations on the same clear night.

   1. Locate Polaris, the North Star; to do this, find the Big Dipper in the northern sky and use the
      pointer stars of the Big Dipper to locate Polaris.
   2. Use your fist, held at arm’s length, to get the altitude of Polaris. (Note, one fist = 10o ).
   3. Draw Polaris at the corresponding altitude on the y-axis of your graph.
   4. Using Polaris as your reference point, draw the Big Dipper onto your graph in its
      approximate location. Label the time of this position in the “pot” of the Big Dipper.
   5. Repeat step 4 again at 2-hour intervals until you have 4 positions drawn on your graph. Note
      that the pointer stars should always be the same distance from Polaris.

Part 2:      Hourly Position of the Moon:

             Note: This part requires several observations on the same clear night.

   1. Facing due South, locate the Moon.
   2. Use your fist, held at arm’s length, to get the altitude of the Moon. (Note, one fist = 10o ).
   3. Draw the Moon’s position, and approximate size, on the graph. Label the time of this
      position directly under the drawing.
   4. Repeat step 3 again at 1-hour intervals for a minimum of 4 observations.

Part 3:      Daily Position of the Moon:

   Note: This part requires one observation, at the same time, for several nights in a row.

   1. Facing due South, locate the Moon.
   2. Use your fist, held at arm’s length, to get the altitude of the Moon. (Note, one fist = 10o ).
   3. Draw the Moon’s position, and approximate size, on the graph. Label the time, and date, of
      this position directly under the drawing.
   4. Repeat step 3 again, at the same time, for the next 3 nights for a minimum of 4
      observations.

Challenge:   Moon Phases:

Note: This part requires one observation, at the same time, for 14 consecutive nights. Use
the larger graph papers for this activity.

   1. Starting just after the new moon, draw and label the Moon’s position, at the same time,
      every night for 14 days in a row. Try to draw accurately the light and dark proportion, and
      the shape, of each night’s moon.

								
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