archive by huanghengdong

VIEWS: 204 PAGES: 359

									  EPPnet Listserv Archive
April 2007 – November 2011




                             1
                                         Table of Contents

Recycled Silicone Sheet Rubber – ½” thick, April 2007                                12
Local Businesses with Green Offices, April 2007                                      13
Remanufactured Toner Cartridges, April 2007                                          16
Old Windows, April 2007                                                              18
Green Stairway Material, May 2007                                                    20
Green Paint Needed, May 2007                                                         21
Impact of Purchasing Individual Serving Containers vs. Multiple Serving Containers   23
Model Office Supply Contract Language, May 2007                                      24
Request for Green Biking Product Info, May 2007                                      26
Green Sealer, Granite Countertop, May 2007                                           28
Bio-based Oil Approvals from Manufacturers? May 2007                                 30
EPEAT Specs, June 2007                                                               31
City of Portland Posts Online Studies, June 2007                                     33
Specs for computer servers, networks and switches, June 2007                         34
Battery contract, July 2007                                                          36
Remanufactured Toner Cartridges & Warranties on Printers, August 2007                38
Cell phone recycling, procurement language, August 2007                              40
Water responsible truck washes, August 2007                                          46
Compostable garbage can liners, August 2007                                          48
Fluorescent Bulb Recycling Statewide Contracts, August 2007                          49
Trade show/Vendor booth banner, August 2007                                          51
Looking for "green" catering & function contracts, August 2007                       53
Life cycle comparison of reusable bags, paper bags, & plastic bags, August 2007      54
Water conservation EPP resources, August 2007                                        56
Source Reduction Boilerplate Language, September 2007                                57
Hybrid Electric Bus Information, September 2007                                      58
EPP Cleaners in Schools, September 2007                                              60
Remanufactured toner cartridges, October 2007                                        61
Request for bid language, October 2007                                               65
City Recycling System, November 2007                                                 67
Organic Pesticides & IPM, December 2007                                              69
Government Vendor Requirement, December 2007                                         71
                                                                                      2
Question about Prizes, February 2008                                                   73
RFP questions to differentiate fuel efficiency, etc. for deliveries, February 2008     75
States' mercury-free purchasing guidance, February 2008                                76
Carbon footprint of a water bottle, February 2008                                      77
Paper & office supply policies, specs & RFP language, February 2008                    79
Restroom stall advertising, March 2008                                                 80
EPP professional job description, March 2008                                           81
Bamboo flooring, March 2008                                                            86
LEDs vs. CFLs, March 2008                                                              87
Aluminum Wheel Cleaner, March 2008                                                     88
Promotional items - seeking green specs & contract language, April 2008                90
Reuse/Recycle of 3-gallon toilets, April 2008                                          91
Compressed air for cleaning of computers, April 2008                                   93
Reusable shopping bags for City distribution, April 2008                               95
Green furniture purchasing, April 2008                                                 97
Construction Contract Question, May 2008                                               98
Rags: wiping & sorbent material, May 2008                                              99
Cleaning Standards: EcoLogo & Green Seal Harmonization, May 2008                      100
Swimming pools, May 2008                                                              102
Hand sanitizers, May 2008                                                             103
Electrolyzer, Corp., June 2008                                                        104
Hand dryers, June 2008                                                                105
Coffee stir sticks, June 2008                                                         106
New abrasive blasting technique, June 2008                                            107
Post-consumer paper cost, June 2008                                                   109
Left over paint, June – October 2008                                                  111
EPP in promotional items, July 2008                                                   114
Food Packaging - life cycle Assessments, content comparisons, & opinions, July 2008   117
In-vessel composting systems, July 2008                                               118
Mulch/compost purchasing policies, July 2008                                          119
Specs for dry cell batteries, July 2008                                               120
Furniture RFI/RFP information, July 2008                                              121
Green Janitorial Services specs, July 2008                                            124

                                                                                        3
Refuse/recycling contracts: focus on waste reduction, recycling, August 2008                128
Defining low VOC, August 2008                                                               130
EPP training for purchasers, August 2008                                                    134
Polystyrene trays at schools, September 2008                                                136
Multi-stream Recycling to Single Stream Recycling Conversion, September 2008                138
Funding for green building - public projects, October 2008                                  141
Task Chairs, October 2008                                                                   144
30% post-consumer content paper, November 2008                                              145
Microfiber towels for bathing, November 2008                                                146
Deicers, November 2008                                                                      147
All ‘n One Cleaners & Disinfectants, December 2008                                          151
Looking for decision making tools, January 2009                                             152
Dining service policies, January 2009                                                       154
An Ideal Green Company Profile, January 2009                                                156
Consolidated Deliveries, January 2009                                                       159
EPP Preference, February 2009                                                               160
Recycled Content for Carts, February 2009                                                   162
Food Service Greening Language, February 2009                                               163
Vehicle Maintenance Products, February 2009                                                 164
Green IT Policy, March 2009                                                                 165
EPP Model Policy, March 2009                                                                167
Idling Policies, March 2009                                                                 168
EPP custodial products, April 2009                                                          170
Paper Policy Questions: Reduction & Environmental Qualities, April 2009                     171
Alternative Food Service Ware Success, April 2009                                           174
EPP Product Information: Disposable Food Containers, April 2009: Alternative Food Service Ware
Discussion                                                                                   182
Contract for refilling toner cartridges, April 2009                                         185
Air Conditioning Filters, April 2009                                                        186
Federal EPP Requirements, April 2009                                                        187
EPP Hospital Case Studies, April 2009                                                       190
LED Traffic Light Policies, May 2009                                                        191
Graffiti Removal Sustainable Specifications, June 2009                                      192

                                                                                               4
Paper calculator that includes sanitary papers, June 2009                       195
State Agency employee travel/preference for "green" facilities, June 2009       197
Green Savings, July 2009                                                        198
Water Saving Device, July 2009                                                  200
LEED requirements in furniture contracts, July 2009                             201
Amount of material sent to landfills, August 2009                               203
Sample carpet RFQs, August 2009                                                 205
How Should Suppliers Market to Us? September 2009                               210
Effective anti-mold cleaners for locker rooms, September 2009                   212
Responding to product vendors, September 2009                                   213
Recycling Old Car Seats, October 2009                                           214
Suggestions Needed for EPP Exercise Room Wipes, October 2009                    215
Pro’s & Con’s - EPA's DfE Program, November 2009                                217
EPP Scorecard & Report, November 2009                                           223
Mattress Recyclers, November 2009                                               225
Anyone familiar with Grenk remanufactured cartridges, November 2009             226
EPP & Cost Savings, November – December 2009                                    227
Specs for green product substitution in office supply contracts, January 2010   229
Tracking & Reporting on Sustainable Purchasing, February 2010                   232
Looking for service vendor sustainability questionnaire, February 2010          237
Recycling food service gloves, February 2010                                    239
CD Mailers - looking for guidance, March 2010                                   240
Solar powered waste handling equipment, March 2010                              242
Fragrance free institutional bathroom deodorizer, March 2010                    243
Swimming Pool Solutions, March 2010                                             248
Business Card Printing, April 2010                                              250
Compostable Food Service Ware In Jails and Hospitals, April 2010                252
10,000 lb. Hotel Bed and Bath Linens to Donate, April 2010                      254
Recycling pharmaceutical bottles, April 2010                                    255
Elevator purchase, install, maintenance, April 2010                             258
History of Recycling Collection, April 2010                                     259
Wanted: Info Life Cycle Costing, May 2010                                       260
Chemical do not use list - construction, May 2010                               262

                                                                                  5
Post-consumer content for paper bags, May 2010                                            263
Green specifications for toilets, standard & composting, June 2010                        264
Sustainable criteria for home compost bins, June 2010                                     265
Paint certifications, June 2010                                                           266
Sustainable Printing Policies, July 2010                                                  270
Designing Sustainable Learning Resources                                                  277
Energy Saving Vending Machine Services Contract Ideas, July 2010                          280
Cooperatively Bid RFPs, August 2010                                                       281
Health care provided to the employees of your vendors, August 2010                        282
Trade show displays, August 2010                                                          283
Contract language for inclusion in EPA EPP Database, August 2010                          285
Carpet & Resilient Flooring Specifications, September 2010                                286
Manufacturers for Trash Liners with 10% or 20% PCRC, September 2010                       287
Green hand soap packaging, October 2010                                                   288
Environmentally "Best” disposable cups for Bottled water cooler/dispenser, October 2010   289
Seeking alternative deicing products, October 2010                                        290
City of Portland Posts Green Specification Examples, October 2010                         292
Accelerated hydrogen peroxide, November 2010                                              293
The Curious Case of the TerraChoice 2010 Greenwashing Report & EPEAT, November 2010       294
Recycling at State Parks, December 2010                                                   295
Recommend a good retail bag for use by an art gallery, December 2010                      297
Nontoxic railroad cross ties, January 2011                                                300
Cleaning Railroad Yards, January 2011                                                     302
Integrated pest management, January 2011                                                  303
Remanufactured Toner Cartridges for HP 5550DN, January 2011                               304
Portable recycling stations-containers, January 2011                                      306
Durable Delivery Totes, January 2011                                                      307
Dealing with product claims in the absence of 3rd party certification, January 2011       308
Quieter electric hand dryers, February 2011                                               310
Green cleaning in correctional facilities, February 2011                                  311
Trash can liners, March 2011                                                              312
Paper statistics, March 2011                                                              314
Returnable Packaging, March 2011                                                          315

                                                                                            6
Recycled content aluminum for sign manufacture, March 2011                                317
Contract Language for Sourcing Green Office (Copy) Paper, April 2011                      318
Environmentally preferable, April 2011                                                    321
Soy-based laser toner cartridges, April 2011                                              325
Sustainable Cleaners for Concrete & Asphalt, April 2011                                   326
EPP Vendor Questionnaires, June 2011                                                      327
Testing laboratories for laser cartridges, July 2011                                      328
Office supplies contract language, July 2011                                              329
Green professional services contract, July 2011                                           331
Road salt, July 2011                                                                      334
Language to specify water efficient fixtures, August 2011                                 339
Tools or sample contracts on how to weight environmental considerations, September 2011   340
Sustainable IT policies, September 2011                                                   341
Laundry service specifications, October 2011                                              342
Strategies to Reduce Paper Towel Waste, October 2011                                      343
Attachment A – Paper Towel Rolls vs. Folded                                               345
Attachment B – Hand Dryers Article, 2000                                                  352
Attachment C – Paper Towel Composting                                                     353
Cities that have Eliminated Plastic Foam Packaging, October 2011                          356
Standardized Environmental Questions for Medical Products, October 2011                   358




                                                                                            7
                                                                                                  Index

Air quality ................................................................................................................................. 97, 144, 201, 207, 208, 249, 333
Aluminum ............................................................................................................................................................................ 87, 88, 313
Asphalt .................................................................................................................................................................................. 32, 33, 325
Automotive ....................................................................................................................................................................................58, 88
Bathroom(s) ................................................................................................................................... 105, 212, 243, 343, 352, 354
Battery(ies) .................................................................................................................. 36, 42, 74, 93, 120, 213, 215, 229, 276
Bid ......... 1, 43, 49, 65, 90, 97, 99, 115, 121, 126, 162, 170, 173, 182, 202, 227, 248, 260, 263, 281, 286, 332,
   340, 347
Biobased ....................................................................................................... 22, 30, 51, 52, 89, 182, 187, 258, 268, 284, 325
Cafeterias ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 177
Calculators ........................................................................................................ 145, 195, 198, 199, 232, 233, 234, 235, 346
Carpet ........................................................................................................ 14, 51, 52, 60, 124, 151, 205, 206, 207, 208, 286
Case studies ...................................................................................................................................................................................14, 33
Catering .............................................................................................................................................................................. 53, 163, 331
Cell phones .............................................................................................................................................................. 40, 41, 42, 43, 44
Certification ..... 5, 20, 41, 43, 70, 104, 127, 130, 154, 160, 163, 166, 185, 200, 207, 208, 217, 260, 279, 294,
   308, 318, 321
CFL ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 49, 87
Cleaners/Cleaning supplies ............................................................................ 60, 93, 124, 125, 151, 158, 190, 293, 326
Compost(ing) . 68, 118, 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, 180, 182, 252, 253, 264, 265, 343, 344, 345, 351, 353, 354
Compostable . 48, 117, 124, 136, 175, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 184, 213, 252, 253, 254, 289,
   297, 312, 313
Computers ..................................................................................................... 31, 32, 34, 57, 93, 94, 159, 229, 261, 356, 357
Concrete .................................................................................................................................................................................... 133, 326
Construction .................................................................................................................................................................................. 18, 19
Containers 23, 67, 71, 113, 116, 117, 121, 124, 138, 159, 162, 175, 176, 177, 179, 180, 182, 183, 184, 233,
   243, 252, 256, 265, 275, 283, 288, 306
Contract Language ....................................................................................................................................... 24, 34, 240, 276, 318
Correctional facilities/Jail/Prison ........................................................................................................................ 180, 252, 311
Cost savings ......................................................................................................................................................... 174, 198, 227, 346
Custodial (products) ....................................................................................................................................................... 3, 170, 212
Deicer(s)................................................................................................................................. 147, 148, 149, 290, 334, 335, 336
Delivery(ies) ...... 18, 36, 43, 57, 72, 75, 115, 116, 159, 224, 271, 276, 307, 316, 318, 330, 332, 333, 356, 357
Disinfectant(s) .................................................................................................................................................... 103, 151, 215, 293
Energy Star...................................................................................34, 49, 56, 126, 165, 166, 200, 229, 234, 260, 280, 322
EPEAT.......................... 31, 32, 34, 76, 97, 165, 187, 199, 224, 229, 232, 260, 271, 294, 305, 321, 322, 341, 342
Filter(s) ......................................................................................................................................... 77, 93, 125, 126, 186, 240, 248
Flame retardants ............................................................................................................................................... 116, 122, 144, 208
Food .. 48, 53, 69, 117, 118, 136, 149, 154, 163, 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180, 182, 183, 184, 239, 249,
   252, 280, 283, 297, 312, 336, 344, 356, 357
Formaldehyde............................................................................................................................................................................... 20, 97
Fuel efficiency ............................................................................................................................................................................ 75, 260
Furniture ....................................................................................................................................................... 97, 121, 122, 144, 201
Glass ................................................................................................................................................................... 18, 19, 125, 164, 244
Green building ............................................................................................................................................... 14, 65, 102, 141, 142
Green IT ........................................................................................................................................................................... 232, 294, 341

                                                                                                                                                                                                              8
Green Seal . 22, 54, 95, 100, 101, 104, 109, 125, 126, 127, 130, 131, 132, 163, 215, 219, 220, 229, 266, 267,
   288, 311, 318, 321, 322, 330
Greenwashing ............................................................................................................ 190, 193, 194, 218, 223, 224, 294, 327
Integrated Pest Management (IPM) ......................................................................................................................... 69, 70, 303
Hand dryer ...................................................................................................................................... 105, 310, 346, 348, 350, 352
Healthcare ............................................................................................................................................................ 118, 123, 190, 358
Hospitals ................................................................................................................................................................................... 190, 214
Hydrogen peroxide ................................................................................................................................................................ 151, 293
Janitorial................................................................................................... 124, 127, 128, 146, 171, 173, 199, 284, 347, 352
Job description .................................................................................................................................................................................... 81
LED(s) ............................................................................................................................................. 26, 27, 87, 191, 258, 280, 292
LEED ................. 29, 100, 102, 119, 121, 122, 130, 168, 190, 201, 262, 280, 292, 300, 306, 310, 327, 328, 343
Life cycle....... 63, 72, 77, 87, 106, 117, 142, 145, 163, 180, 205, 209, 227, 232, 260, 261, 284, 297, 325, 345,
   348, 350, 358
Lighting............................................................................................................................................................................................ 13, 33
Mattress............................................................................................................................................................................................... 225
Mercury ............................................................................................................ 49, 76, 90, 115, 116, 131, 232, 258, 273, 321
Model contract language ............................................................................................................................................... 53, 69, 128
Model Policy ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 167
Motor Oil ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 30, 33
Office paper.................................................................................................................................................................................. 71, 278
Office Supply(ies) ............................................................................................... 13, 24, 36, 37, 93, 110, 172, 229, 329, 333
Office supply contract ............................................................................................................................................................... 24, 38
Packaging . 23, 31, 50, 54, 57, 72, 116, 117, 121, 125, 126, 131, 140, 156, 159, 171, 180, 184, 224, 240, 252,
   263, 268, 275, 278, 279, 288, 298, 299, 315, 316, 318, 321, 323, 327, 330, 342, 346, 347, 356, 357
Paint ..................................................................... 18, 20, 21, 22, 33, 111, 112, 113, 115, 131, 199, 239, 262, 266, 267
Paper....... 13, 51, 54, 55, 65, 67, 72, 79, 95, 105, 109, 110, 115, 136, 138, 140, 145, 160, 171, 172, 173, 174,
   175, 183, 184, 187, 195, 196, 199, 215, 229, 233, 234, 235, 240, 252, 263, 272, 273, 274, 276, 277, 278,
   279, 289, 297, 298, 299, 312, 314, 318, 319, 320, 322, 323, 329, 332, 333, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348,
   349, 350, 351, 352, 353, 354, 357
Paper bags ................................................................................................................................................................................... 54, 263
Pesticides ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 69
Plastic, 1, 16, 54, 55, 65, 73, 80, 95, 106, 113, 116, 138, 156, 162, 176, 177, 178, 179, 183, 185, 198, 201,
   214, 224, 233, 239, 252, 255, 273, 275, 287, 288, 297, 298, 299, 300, 301, 307, 312, 313, 316, 323, 324,
   333, 353, 356, 357
Plastic bags............................................................................................................................... 54, 116, 138, 297, 312, 313, 324
Printers ............................... 16, 38, 39, 61, 171, 173, 270, 273, 274, 275, 276, 278, 279, 298, 304, 305, 314, 330
Printing ......................... 72, 95, 115, 171, 173, 250, 251, 270, 271, 272, 274, 275, 276, 277, 278, 298, 314, 318
Professional services ................................................................................................................................................. 331, 332, 333
Promotional items ......................................................................................................................................................... 90, 114, 275
Railroad ........................................................................................................................................................................... 300, 301, 302
Recycled content . 65, 67, 72, 79, 109, 114, 115, 117, 121, 145, 146, 160, 161, 162, 171, 173, 183, 184, 187,
   188, 195, 208, 215, 216, 229, 233, 240, 250, 251, 265, 275, 277, 278, 286, 287, 289, 297, 307, 308, 312,
   317, 318, 319, 320, 321, 323, 329, 333
Remanufactured ...................................................................................... 16, 38, 39, 61, 63, 185, 198, 226, 304, 305, 328
Remanufactured toner ................................................................................................................. 16, 38, 39, 61, 185, 198, 304
Restaurants ................................................................................................................................................. 118, 154, 163, 177, 356
Reusable bags .........................................................................................................................................................54, 114, 297, 298
RFP ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 24, 36, 37
                                                                                                                                                                                                           9
Rubber ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 12, 33
Salt ......................................................................................................................... 102, 147, 148, 290, 334, 335, 336, 337, 338
Sanitizers .................................................................................................................................................................................. 103, 248
School(s) .............................................................................. 18, 60, 70, 73, 101, 118, 122, 136, 167, 168, 179, 217, 354
Sealer ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 28, 29
Shopping bags..................................................................................................................................................................... 54, 95, 324
Single stream..................................................................................................................................................................... 67, 138, 139
Source reduction ......................................................................................................................... 57, 66, 68, 113, 226, 270, 295
Soy ................................................................................................................................................ 22, 88, 89, 95, 96, 273, 325, 326
Specifications ... 31, 40, 51, 52, 65, 79, 84, 90, 95, 98, 114, 115, 117, 122, 127, 128, 132, 144, 147, 149, 152,
  161, 162, 176, 185, 186, 192, 197, 201, 205, 210, 215, 229, 230, 243, 258, 263, 264, 270, 280, 281, 286,
  291, 292, 318, 319, 321, 322, 334, 336, 338, 340, 342,346
Styrofoam .................................................................................................................................. 31, 174, 175, 182, 229, 289, 357
Swimming pool(s).......................................................................................................................................................... 33, 102, 248
Tires ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 33
Toilets............................................................................................................................................................................................ 91, 264
Toner ............................................................ 16, 38, 61, 62, 63, 79, 185, 198, 199, 226, 229, 304, 305, 314, 325, 328
Towels ..................... 105, 146, 172, 195, 215, 216, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 350, 351, 352, 353, 354
Toxics ................................................................................................................................. 18, 90, 115, 190, 243, 274, 298, 299
Trade show ................................................................................................................................................................................. 51, 283
Training ........................ 70, 82, 118, 125, 126, 134, 151, 163, 167, 170, 179, 217, 219, 237, 260, 261, 318, 330
Trash liners .................................................................................................................................................................... 287, 312, 313
Trays ..................................................................................................................................................... 93, 136, 174, 175, 183, 252
Vehicles.......................................................................................................................................................33, 58, 88, 164, 168, 281
Vending................................................................................................................................................................................................ 280
VOC ........................................................................................................ 28, 88, 121, 130, 131, 201, 206, 207, 208, 274, 286
Waste reduction.................................................................. 20, 128, 174, 195, 237, 256, 288, 292, 297, 343, 346, 349
Water .. 14, 21, 22, 28, 36, 46, 47, 56, 61, 69, 73, 75, 77, 79, 88, 102, 103, 105, 114, 115, 124, 147, 148, 152,
  158, 163, 177, 178, 181, 183, 193, 197, 198, 199, 200, 206, 208, 215, 226, 229, 233, 237, 248, 249, 267,
  273, 275, 276, 277, 289, 324, 325, 329, 334, 335, 339, 342, 344, 345
Water bottle................................................................................................................................................................................... 73, 77
Wood......................................................................................................... 20, 28, 65, 106, 145, 148, 208, 275, 300, 335, 346




                                                                                                                                                                                                             10
                                              Introduction

This document is a compilation of selected postings to the EPPnet listserv during the period of April 2007
– November 2011.

What is included: Only postings for which there was a dialogue – at least one response – are included.

Table of contents: The contents are organized by date of posting.

The Index: The Index captures topics and phrases that were most frequently mentioned in the postings.
There are additional topics included in this compilation that are not specifically reflected in the Index.

For more information, contact Lynn Rubinstein, NERC Executive Director.




                                                                                                         11
                         Recycled Silicone Sheet Rubber – ½” thick, April 2007
2 Posts

Original post:
Does anyone know of a manufacturer of this material? Also - I've lost my bookmark for the recycled
materials directory, if anyone can send it. Thanks!

Tabitha Leigh Anderson
THRIVE urban gardens
206 406 8025

Response:
Hello, Tabitha, I suggest you contact the Washington State Recycling Association to help find the recycled
product you're looking for and perhaps also the materials directory - their annual trade show and
conference is this week in Vancouver WA ( at the Vancouver Hilton) * that may be a good place for you to
find connections as well.

Washington State Recycling Association
6100 Southcenter Blvd., Suite 180
Tukwila, WA 98188
Phone: 206-244-0311
Fax: 206-244-4413
E-mail: recycle@wsra.net
Website: http://www.wsra.net




                                                                                                        12
                            Local Businesses with Green Offices, April 2007
5 Posts

Original post:
Hi – I am developing a workshop for local businesses in Massachusetts on how to “green” their
offices. Currently, I am looking for material to include in the workshop manual connecting environmental
initiatives with financial and other benefits for businesses. If you know of one or more businesses (not
necessarily in Massachusetts) that have implemented at least one of the following initiatives and saved
money or successfully marketed their efforts, please let me know or encourage them to contact me!

 Energy efficiency and renewable energy: energy/lighting retrofits, purchasing energy efficient
products, purchasing renewable energy.

 Recycling: businesses that have established recycling programs for paper and/or other materials and
saved money or achieved other benefits (especially businesses that convinced their landlords to provide
recycling programs).

 Green purchasing: businesses that purchase more durable, recycled-content, less-toxic or other EPPs,
businesses that implemented green cleaning initiatives, renovated their offices using “greener” building
materials and made other changes to their purchasing practices.

 Staff behavior change: businesses that implemented behavior change campaigns to encourage staff to
turn off lights and equipment in the office, examples of businesses that encourage staff to make changes
at home.

 Green marketing: businesses that have made the changes above and successfully incorporated
information about their “green” initiatives into their marketing.

I will be grateful for any additional resource recommendations (books, articles, guides, people to talk to,
etc.)! Thank you,

Dmitriy Nikolayev, Procurement Manager
Facilities and Environmental Services
Operational Services Division
Commonwealth of Massachusetts
One Ashburton Place, Room 1017
Boston, MA 02108
Phone: 617-720-3351
Fax: 617-727-4527
dmitriy.nikolayev@osd.state.ma.us

Responses:
1. EPA did a report called Private Sector Pioneers: How Companies are incorporating Environmentally
Preferable Purchasing in 1999. A little dated now, but may still be worth a look:
http://www.epa.gov/epp/pubs/doccase.htm.

We also did a report called Buying Green Online: Greening Government E-Procurement of Office Supplies.
Although it highlights federal government effort to green their office supply purchases, you may want to
use some of the examples there. The EPA has a green office supply Blanket Purchase Agreement which
                                                                                                          13
could be copied by many institutional purchasers. Document can be found at same URL -
http://www.epa.gov/epp/pubs/doccase.htm. Hope this helps!

Holly Elwood
USEPA
The Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
USEPA Headquarters, MC 7409-M
EPA East Building
1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20460
Email: elwood.holly@epa.gov
Ph: 202-564-8854
Fx: 202-564-8901
www.epa.gov/oppt/epp

2. Hi Dmitriy, I work with green cleaning people and have many contacts with businesses that have
incorporated such things into their cultures. I teach green cleaning (especially in regards to carpet & tile)
and have a presentation that I'd be happy to share with you if you're interested.

Regards,
Debbie
Deborah Lema
Research and Education
Racine Industries, Inc.
dlema@hostdry.com

3. Hello, Dmitriy, In Seattle and King County, WA, there are a few resources you might refer to in
identifying green businesses: One is the Seattle Public Utilities Resource Venture, our
conservation/waste prevention services for business customers of the department I work for. I've cc'd a
contact person for you above, and you can also see the website for featured businesses and those
recognized by the program in the past: www.resourceventure.org. These services relate to water
conservation, waste prevention and recycling, stormwater pollution prevention, and green building.

Another is the Envirostars program of the Local Hazardous Waste Management Program, a multi-
jurisdictional program including Seattle, King County, and other local cities. Envirostars' originated with
a focus on hazardous waste management; businesses are audited and ranked with one-to-five stars.
http://www.envirostars.com/
Shirli Axelrod
Senior Environmental Analyst
Seattle Public Utilities
PO Box 34018
700 5th Ave. Suite 4900
Seattle WA 98124-4018
Phone 206-684-7804
E-mail shirli.axelrod@seattle.gov

4. Hi, regarding the recent request for local businesses with "green" offices, you can find many case
studies at the StopWaste.Org website, www.stopwaste.org and go to the StopWaste Partnership (click on
"Meet the Heroes"). It describes local businesses that have reduced waste and/or purchased green and
                                                                                                           14
how/what they saved.

You can also find case studies of businesses and agencies buying "green" by clicking on the
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing links and review the fact sheets.

In the Bay Area, we have a Bay Area Green Business Program that certifies businesses as green. For more
information, visit http://www.greenbiz.abag.ca.gov/index.html.

Beth Eckl
EPE Consulting
Danville, CA
(925) 838-2731




                                                                                                     15
                            Remanufactured Toner Cartridges, April 2007
3 Posts

Original posting:
Hello, EPPNet'ers, Issues about using remanufactured toner cartridges have arisen again for us, and I
wonder if any of you have recent experience and/or studies you can share with me.

Are your jurisdictions buying remanufactured cartridges still? Are you using them in printers, copiers, or
both? Do you have standards or performance requirements in your contracts for remanufactured
cartridges?

Do you know of recent statistics on performance? Do you know of life-cycle studies?

One of the claims I've heard recently is that "virgin" OEM cartridges last much longer, so have a smaller
environmental impact over the life-cycle, even if they are shredded into plastic pellets rather than
remanufactured after use * I'd like to know more about this.

Thanks for your help.

Shirli Axelrod
Senior Environmental Analyst
Seattle Public Utilities
PO Box 34018
700 5th Ave. Suite 4900
Seattle WA 98124-4018
Phone 206-684-7804
E-mail shirli.axelrod@seattle.gov

Responses:
1. If you have some questions about inkjet and toner cartridges and what are some of the best
manufacturers in the market place. I would love to give you some information. Please feel free to give me
a call at 303-875-7733.

Thank you!
Gilbert L. Bailey
Environmental Preservation Solutions
Consultant

2. FYI - Rochester Institute of Technology's Remanufacturing Center has done a lot of research and
testing of remanufactured toner cartridges in an effort to help standardize product and product testing,
and improve performance and cost-effectiveness.

I'd consider them an excellent resource on this subject, and suggest you contact the Center directly:
Ctr for Remanufacturing and Resource Recovery
Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT)
133 Lomb Memorial Dr.
Rochester, NY 14623-5603
Phone: (585) 475-5385
Fax: (585) 475-5455
                                                                                                            16
E-mail: info@cims.rit.edu
http://www.reman.rit.edu/

Brenda Grober
Environmental Services Unit
Empire State Development
30 South Pearl Street
Albany, NY 12245
(518) 292-5342 / FAX (518) 292-5886
bgrober@empire.state.ny.us




                                      17
                                        Old Windows, April 2007
6 Posts

Original post:
I’m writing to see if anyone on this list knows of a glass recycling company that will accept and recycle
one or two windows on an individual basis? Of course, many recyclers have dumpsters set up at
construction sites, but I’m thinking more of the individual homeowner who has one or two old windows
that they don’t want to add to landfills.... This is for a story I’m writing for a major metropolitan
newspaper. I’m leading readers to places like architectural salvage yards, reuse web sites, and Habitat for
Humanity....but still wonder if there’s a recycling company that accepts small deliveries.....
I’d love to hear from you if you know of any companies that fit this bill!
Thanks kindly!
Tiffany Meyers [tiffanymeyers@verizon.net]

Responses:
1. Sounds like most of the PCB caulking is from commercial buildings; but I don’t find that particularly
comforting. http://www.pcbinschools.org/Studies%20on%20PCB.htm. I wouldn’t know if
recycle/refurbish/reuse systems are taking precautions (as they should). The same would be true for the
potential for paint containing lead on window frames, and leaded glass windows.

This is yet another reason not to grow edible fruits, flowers, and vegetables next to my house.
Doug
Douglas Reed, Purchasing Agent
Department of Administrative Services (DAS)
Hoover State Office Building, Level A
Des Moines, IA 50319-0105
doug.reed@iowa.gov
Phone: (515) 242-6151

2. We have heard about PCB content in window caulking and are wondering how recycling centers
separate the glass from the caulking. Our concern has been occupational exposure but I would assume it
is an environmental issue as well.

Tolle Graham
MassCOSH
Organizer, Healthy Schools Coordinator
USW local 9358-1
42 Charles St., Suite F
Dorchester, MA 02122
P. 617-825-7233 x19
F. 617-822-3718
tolle.graham@masscosh.org

3. Your landfill/or recycling agency may have a program for collecting ‘other’ (not-clear container,
ceramic, tempered, and plate) glass. One of the largest sources is auto glass stores, so you might check
with them if they have found solutions. ‘Other’ glass is a bad contaminant when mixed in the container
glass recycling stream. Small percentages (usually less than 1%) can replace some of the aggregate in
concrete without adding an extra binder. It is better placed in the lower levels of blacktop. You might
check with your local solid waste agency or Department of Natural Resources. Just one blacktop hiking
                                                                                                           18
or biking trail project can use a large amount of ‘other’ glass. See
http://www.epa.gov/jtr/jtrnet/aggregat.htm and http://www.epa.gov/jtr/jtrnet/glass.htm

At one time they were grinding glass to a point that they were using it in playground sand (possible
liability nightmare); but it could be used for filling emergency sand bags and the like. They can use a
small amount in fiberglass production, sandblasting medium, and as a drainage material around septic
fields, etc. Have you checked for your local C & D recycling centers (like
http://www.phoenixrecycling.net/aboutus.htm). Then there are the innovative things like
http://optics.org/cws/article/research/19184.

As you mentioned, you can donate usable home construction materials to any one of the chain of ReStore
locations or find a local, non-chain facility in your area like a Home Recycling Exchange . They exist upon
small purchasers…so they should welcome small material donations.
Doug
Douglas Reed, Purchasing Agent
Department of Administrative Services (DAS)
Hoover State Office Building, Level A
Des Moines, IA 50319-0105
doug.reed@iowa.gov
Phone: (515) 242-6151

4. Dlubak Glass with 6 locations in Ohio, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Oklahoma, Arizona and Texas, recycles
window plate glass, see
http://www.dlubak.com/locations.htm and http://www.dlubak.com/index.htm

You can also look on www.earth911.org, with the zip code of where you are looking to recycle the glass
and clicking on Recycling Services and then scroll down to the Glass category and click on Other Glass.
Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3WC21)
Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3163
giuranna.mike@epa.gov

5. Doug et al, NYSDOT has successfully used crushed glass cullet for construction projects for filtering
out hydro-demo concrete on bridges or retaining walls and sediment pumped behind coffer dams.
http://www.pwmag.com/industry-news.asp?sectionID=765&articleID=271433. If you have any
questions, please let me know.

Chris
Christopher E. Anderson
Environmental Specialist I
NYSDOT - Syracuse Office
Environmental Services - Western Zone
333 E Washington St.
Syracuse, NY 13202
(315) 428-4628


                                                                                                           19
                                  Green Stairway Material, May 2007
2 Posts

Original post:
I would appreciate learning of any information you might have on “green” stairway material for
basements, especially that material that comes bullnosed on one side for the treads. Typically basement
stairs are being built with particleboard (urea – formaldehyde bonded). The particleboard off gasses the
formaldehyde. Some companies such as Sierra Pine have received environmental certification for their
recovered/recycled wood fiber content from such organizations as Scientific Certification Systems, but it
is particleboard and does not seem to denote whether it contains formaldehyde. Does anyone know of
materials for stairs other than Forest Stewardship Council certified wood stairs since basement stairs do
not have to be made from such a valuable resource and other than Trex stairs since often folks want to
paint their basement stairs?

Look forward to hearing from you----Sandra

Sandra Cannon
Tel. 509-529-1535
cannon@ecopurchasing.com

Response:
Hi Sandra – just a personal experience – we were able to make our cellar stairs out of cut ends of planks
that had been used for joists. They aren’t beautiful (and they aren’t bullnosed) but they are very sturdy
and strong, and have worked just fine for five years now. Based on our house building experience, there
are a lot of cut ends on a construction job that can be used for other purposes – waste reduction!

PS Apologies to all for personal posting yesterday – I forget sometimes that this listserv defaults to the
whole list, since the listserv isn’t in the incoming address (obviously others besides me sometimes forget
this as well!)

Sarah O'Brien
EPP Program Manager
Hospitals for a Healthy Environment (H2E)
One Lyme Common
P.O. Box 376
Lyme, NH 03768
802 479 0317 Phone
866 379 8705 Fax
www.h2e-online.org




                                                                                                            20
                                    Green Paint Needed, May 2007
5 Posts

Original posting:
I’m trying to find what I think of as biodegradable spray paint. We need to do some surface geophysics at
and need to mark our path. It’s over 20 acres so it would add up to quite a bit and would probably even
be visible from the air. The site is in a remote and pristine area and I’m trying to find a paint that is
biodegradable or at least won’t last too long (weeks) and is non-toxic. I struck out at the major home
supply places. Surveyors Supply and Holman’s both have a water-based spray paint that may work. I
poked around online for truly biodegradable paint but could only find sources in Europe.

Any thoughts on this? Have you run across spray paint that is specifically labeled as
biodegradable? Most traditional paint will break down pretty fast under our intense UV; that coupled
with a water-base may be sufficient. But I appreciate any ideas or sources you may know of.

Thx,
Mike
Mike Goodrich, RG
Project Manager/Hydrogeologist
Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure
2400 Louisiana Blvd. NE
AFC Building 5, Suite 300
Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110
505.262.8908 direct
505.262.8855 fax
www.shawgrp.com

Responses:
1. Michael was looking for rapidly biodegradable markings for a pristine area. He should pose his
question to a coatings association like the National Paint and Coatings Association (NPCA)
http://www.paint.org/contact.cfm (Not a New Mexico branch; but there is a Dallas and Oklahoma
branch), or Canadian Paints and Coatings Assn. http://www.cdnpaint.org/

He may rather be looking for an inexpensive ‘white wash’ type material or dye rather than paint; but I’m
sure they can help him with the right solution to his request. Even white wash (hydrated lime) can be
caustic and a dust hazard in its raw form. Most all liquids can be put in aerosol or pump container form
and the associations should be able to make suggestions in that regard too. If not; commonly local auto
body shops will custom mix paints and will put them in aerosol form for customers.
Doug
Douglas Reed, Purchasing Agent
Department of Administrative Services (DAS)
Hoover State Office Building, Level A
Des Moines, IA 50319-0105
doug.reed@iowa.gov
Phone: (515) 242-6151

2. What about the vegetable-based dyes that golf courses and professional fields use to make the greens
look greener (if available in a color other than green)? Or the blue dye that is sometimes added to make

                                                                                                       21
water more blue? Or the end zone paint used by major sports arenas that use real grass? I would guess
they might be less permanent than a "regular" paint.

Mark
Mark T. Petruzzi
Vice President of Certification
336-956-2211 (NC office)
mpetruzzi@greenseal.org
www.greenseal.org

3. Milk paint is an interesting example of a green-conundrum. Many milk paints do not have the same
performance as “green” paints certified by Environmental Choice EcoLogo
(www.environmentalchoice.com) or Green Seal (www.greenseal.org). In fact to get adequate
performance, many milk paints require the use of special primers that have some pretty non-green
ingredients.

When I’ve used milk paints in the past, I’ve avoided the primers completely. I’ve used it on things like a
children’s toy box and some homemade book shelves. The milk paint alone (without the primer) gives a
nice artsy, old-fashioned looking finish. It’s not something that most commercial facilities would be
comfortable putting on their walls.
     - Scot
Scot Case
TerraChoice Environmental Marketing
1706 Friedensburg Road
Reading, PA 19606
(w) 610 779-3770
(c) 610 781-1684
scase@terrachoice.com

4. Milk and soy based paints are biobased. Some even come in spray paint version, though they may
clog equipment so be sure to check with the manufacturers about the equipment you are using.

A quick internet search for milk paints will bring up a number of manufacturers. Purchasing the
powdered mix is a good option because it only requires water to reconstitute and does not contain toxic
solvents, though the colorants may be hazardous. Be sure to read the MSDS sheets and ask the
manufacturer about any colorants. Milk paint is usually manufactured from waste milk solids and
typically biodegradable.

Because Every Purchase Matters,
Mary Jo Snavely
Fellow
Responsible Purchasing Network
Center for a New American Dream
6930 Carroll Ave., Suite 900
Takoma Park, MD 20912
301.891.3683 x. 118 (ph)
301.891.3684 (fax)
www.responsiblepurchasing.org

                                                                                                             22
Impact of Purchasing Individual Serving Containers vs. Multiple Serving Containers, May 2007
2 Posts

Original post:
Hello, has anyone calculated or found a site that looks at the impact of purchasing individual serving
containers versus multiple serving containers? Of course, I am assuming that the individual portions are
consumed on reusable containers from the multiple use containers. I've looked some on the 'net, but am
only finding process change suggestion instead of the calculations behind the process and materials.
Thank you.
Tessa

Tessa David, Director
North Central Regional Solid Waste Cooperative
Recycle@charter.net

Response:
In response to your question go to...

The MN Pollution Control Agency has done some extensive research and marketing on product
packaging. They list some of the info on their website.

http://www.pca.state.mn.us/oea/p2week/everyone-packaging.cfm
http://www.pca.state.mn.us/oea/p2week/everyone-intro.cfm
http://www.pca.state.mn.us/oea/reduce/handbook2.cfm

For more info contact the MN Pollution Control Agency

Thanks,
Nathan Reinbold
Planning Analyst/Recycling Specialist
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing
Lead by Example Incentive Fund Administrator
Hennepin County Environmental Services
417 North 5th Street, Suite 200
Minneapolis, MN 55401-3206
PH. (612) 596-0993
nathan.reinbold@co.hennepin.mn.us
www.hennepin.us




                                                                                                       23
                           Model Office Supply Contract Language, May 2007
2 Posts

Original post:
Hi, I am researching model language for inclusion in our new office supply contract. If anyone has a
recent model they like, I would appreciate seeing it.

Thanks,
Deborah
Deborah Fleischer
San Francisco Department of the Environment
Green Purchasing Specialist
11 Grove Street San Francisco, CA 94102
Tel. (415) 355-3707
Fax. (415) 554-6393
deborah.fleischer@sfgov.org

Response:
Hi Deborah, I am part of EPA's Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program, the team mandated by
the President to help federal agencies (including EPA!) green our purchases of products and services.

EPA has a nationwide Green Office Supply Blanket Purchase Agreement (BPA). We set green criteria for
the office supplies we buy through this BPA. This BPA is our mandatory source for all our office supply
purchases. I was the green lady on the EPA's Green Office Supplies Blanket Purchase Agreement Team
until moving over to cover electronics.

Here is the URL for the EPA BPA ecatalogue website (without the pricing info - only available through
EPA's intranet): www.epasupplies.com

To see the green office supply criteria we set, from www.epasupplies.com:
1. Click on "About EPA"
2. Click on "Green Office Supplies"
3. Click on "Green Criteria for Office Supplies" under the photo of the desk in the forest.

This will get you to the green criteria we are using under this BPA.

To read about how other agencies are greening their office supply BPAs, go to:

http://www.epa.gov/epp/pubs/buying_green_online.pdf

To view EPA's RFP for Green Office Supplies, go to http://www.epa.gov/oam/green/index.htm

Please feel free to call me if you have any questions!

Sincerely,

Holly Elwood
USEPA
The Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
                                                                                                          24
USEPA Headquarters, MC 7409-M
EPA East Building
1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20460
Email: elwood.holly@epa.gov
Ph: 202-564-8854
Fx: 202-564-8901
www.epa.gov/oppt/epp




                                 25
                           Request for Green Biking Product Info, May 2007
8 Posts

Original post:
A friend is planning a cross-continental bike trip and is wondering whether there are any means of
generating electricity (either from the revolving wheels or a solar mechanism) while riding; he would be
looking to potentially recharge cell phone, digital recorder etc., palm pilot type product...(trip will be
recorded on blog...) Any ideas on these or related issues he should know about?

thanks, kamala
kamalap@earthlink.net

Responses:
1. While picking up some other bike gear a couple months ago, I saw some pedals that generate power to
make LED's flash via the circular motion between the pedal and the pedal bars. I'd also heard that
someone powered their TV while on a stationary bike. Maybe the pedal charging could be adapted to
other voltages?

Samuel McCord
Pollution Prevention
Sandia National Laboratories
samccor@sandia.gov
505.845.7935 (w)
505.844.9977 (f)

2. A solar powered backpack could be a good option - http://www.voltaicsystems.com

Matt Kittell
Program Manager
Responsible Purchasing Network
Center for a New American Dream
6930 Carroll Ave., Suite 900
Takoma Park, MD 20912
301.891.1004
301.891.3684 (fax)
www.ResponsiblePurchasing.org

3. The most recent issue of Bicycle magazine featured a bike which had a modern power generator. In the
front wheel hub, I believe. If I remember correctly it works on the same principles as an electric motor i.e.
magnetically coupled. Very elegant. I would email the magazine editors and ask them if they can identify
the bicycle maker who in turn could point you to the manufacturer, provided it is not proprietary
technology.

Stephen Bickel
D&R International, Ltd.
1300 Spring Street, Suite 500
Silver Spring, MD 20910
Tel: 301-588-9387

                                                                                                           26
Fax: 301-588-0854
sbickel@drintl.com

4. I think the pedal LEDs which are being referred to may be Pedalites -
http://www.pedalite.com/ProductCode=PEDALITE

Kinley Deller

5. Does anyone know whether a system is being developed to generate power from stationary bikes for
lighting/TV’s at workout facilities? i.e.; 24 Hour Fitness, Bally's etc.

Debra Taevs
PPRC
503-336-1256
www.pprc.org

6. I don't know this, but when I was a kid (quite a few years ago) we got an ad for a flour mill powered by
a stationary bike. I remember it vividly because my family thought the "model" demonstrating it looked a
lot like my cousin. Next time they visited from CA, we found out it had been her...

Thanks, everyone who is sending ideas!--I am forwarding to my friend (and saving them for a time when
I can perhaps use them myself...)

Kamala Platt

7. There was a story on NPR recently about a gym in Hong Kong that is doing exactly that. I can't
remember if it was on MarketPlace or All Things Considered, but I'm sure you could search on the site
and come up with it.

Lise Glaser
Cascadia Consulting Group, Inc.
1109 First Avenue, Suite 400
Seattle, WA 98101




                                                                                                         27
                              Green Sealer, Granite Countertop, May 2007
5 Posts

Original post:
I’m a writer working on a story for a major newspaper, in which I would like to provide examples of a
very specific product. From my research, it seems to be rather uncommon.

The product is this: I’m looking for a green sealer for granite countertops, one that is healthy in terms of
the environment as well as for the homeowners.

I’ve found a water-solvent product, but this of course doesn’t mean it’s VOC-free. I have also found green
sealants for concrete and wood. But I am still looking for something that works with granite.

If anyone knows of such a project on the market, I would be absolutely thrilled to hear from you. I would
also be interested to be in touch with an expert on the subject of VOC’s as it pertains to products such as
sealers.

Thank you,
Tiffany Meyers [mailto:tiffanymeyers@verizon.net]

Responses:
1. I do not know which manufacturers sells a “green” sealer for granite countertops but I have cc’d some
gentleman who might. Dr. Fernando and Dr. Jones are both professors at CalPoly and experts on VOC in
paints, but I don’t know if they are also experts in sealers or someone who is. I have also cc’d Robert
Wendoll with Dunn-Edwards paints as he may know of such products.
Good luck!
Heidi
Heidi Sanborn
R3 Consulting Group
4811 Chippendale Drive, Suite 708
Sacramento, CA 95841
Office: 916-576-0306
E-mail hsanborn@r3cgi.com
www.r3cgi.com

2. Here is some info I found when I snooped around.
http://www.greenhomeguide.com/index.php/product_detail/121/C135
Safecoat MexeSeal. Extremely durable finish for porous, unpolished Mexican clay tile, stone, granite,
concrete and stone pavers and masonry surfaces where oil and water repellency are desired.

http://www.greenhomeguide.com/index.php/product/C135
Hope this is helpful. I'm sure there are other products out there. This website lists two products that
would work.

Thanks,
Nathan Reinbold
Planning Analyst/Recycling Specialist
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing
Lead by Example Incentive Fund Administrator
                                                                                                           28
Hennepin County Environmental Services
417 North 5th Street, Suite 200
Minneapolis, MN 55401-3206
PH. (612) 596-0993
nathan.reinbold@co.hennepin.mn.us
www.hennepin.us

3. Ecologo (Environmental Choice Program) certifies surface coatings. Product listings are available for
Responsible Purchasing Network (RPN) members at http://www.ResponsiblePurchasing.org website or
check EcoLogo's site for product listings.

Mary Jo Snavely, Program Manager
The Center for a New American Dream
Responsible Purchasing Network
301.891.3683 x.110 w
maryjo@newdream.org
6930 Carroll Avenue, Suite 900
Takoma Park, MD 20912
http://consciousconsumer.org
www.ResponsiblePurchasing.org

4. Hi TM, I am building a ten-room eco-inn in Northwestern Massachusetts according to LEED Platinum
guidelines and going the extra mile with all nontoxic building materials and organic beds and linens. I
used Brightstone Universal Stone Sealer on my IceStone countertops. The product is advertised as
working well on granite as well as other stones. It was a pleasure to use with no VOCs.

http://www.brightstn.com/stoncarprod.html

My Inn is a showcase for the green products it is built from - American Clay Earth Plaster, AFM Safecoat
paints and sealers and more. I sell Brightstone Universal Stone Sealer in my green store - Green Topia at
Topia Inn.

www.TopiaInn.com

Cheerio,
Caryn
Caryn Heilman
Nana Simopoulos
CoOwners
Topia Inn
10 Pleasant Street
Adams, MA 01220
413.743.9605
917.592.5709 cell
stay@TopiaInn.com




                                                                                                          29
                       Bio-based Oil Approvals from Manufacturers? May 2007
2 Posts

Original post:
Hello, EPPNetters, Two requests relating to our efforts to use more vegetable-based oils in our
operations:

1. Have any of you obtained written statements from equipment manufacturers regarding use of
vegetable-based oil in their products? We are trying some bio-based oils in different applications, and
staff sometimes wants reassurance that the equipment makers are "okay" about those oils. We've heard
that some manufacturers even offer "factory-fill", but I would like to provide some written/electronic
statements if they are available.

2. Have any of you determined whether there are third-party independent test results of biodegradability
of vegetable-based oils? I have seen test results from the suppliers of these oils, but have been asked
whether there's any "independent" testing to verify.

If anyone can send to me (use my direct e-mail address, please: shirli.axelrod@seattle.gov) or let me
know if any are available on-line such as on a manufacturer's website. Thanks for your help.

Shirli Axelrod
Senior Environmental Analyst
Seattle Public Utilities
PO Box 34018
700 5th Ave. Suite 4900
Seattle WA 98124-4018
Phone 206-684-7804
E-mail shirli.axelrod@seattle.gov

Response:
Shirli, PPRC did an EPP Rapid Research page on the question of warrantees for biodiesel that may be
helpful for your first question. John Deere was the only equipment manufacturer using any biodiesel as
factory fill in January 2007.
http://pprc.org/research/epp/WarrantiesForBiodieselUse.pdf
Hope this helps!
Debra Taevs
PPRC
503-336-1256
www.pprc.org




                                                                                                         30
                                         EPEAT Specs, June 2007
4 Posts

Original posting:
We are in the process of developing specifications for our new computer contract. If anyone has model
language that they have successfully integrated into a computer contract, I would love to see the
language.

I am also researching Styrofoam packaging and trying to identify which computer companies are able to
deliver their products without using it--any information on this issue would also be great.

Thanks,

Deborah
Deborah Fleischer
San Francisco Department of the Environment
Green Purchasing Specialist
11 Grove Street San Francisco, CA 94102
Tel. (415) 355-3707
Fax. (415) 554-6393
deborah.fleischer@sfgov.org

Responses:
1. Hi Deborah, We've started inputting this EPEAT clause in our computer contracts, but
I think it will probably have to be revised since for federal entities, a new Executive Order came out that I
believe requires (not just "recommends") at least 95% of applicable purchases be EPEAT registered.

Section O. ENVIRONMENTAL PREFERABLE PRODUCTS
All desktops, laptops, and computer monitors provided under this contract are recommended to have
achieved Bronze registration or higher under the Electronic Products Environmental Assessment Tool
(EPEAT). EPEAT is a procurement tool designed to help large volume purchasers evaluate, compare, and
select desktop computers, laptops, and monitors based upon their environmental attributes as specified
in the consensus-based IEEE Standard for the Environmental Assessment of Personal Computer Products
(1680). [12/06]

Samuel McCord
Pollution Prevention
Sandia National Laboratories
samccor@sandia.gov
505.845.7935 (w)
505.844.9977 (f)

2. Deborah, Please take a look at EPA's EPPnet Database of Environmental Information for Products and
Services for Computers at
http://yosemite1.epa.gov/oppt/eppstand2.nsf/Pages/ListTables.html?Open&Computer%20Store&Com
puters&Type=A
and also at the New American Dream's web page on computer purchases at
http://www.newdream.org/computers/index.php

                                                                                                           31
Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3WC21)
Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3163
giuranna.mike@epa.gov

3.  Deborah, Below are three more resources that may help you. In addition, RPN's
Responsible Purchasing Guide for Computers
(http://www.responsiblepurchasing.org/purchasing_guides/computers/) has a number of resources on
EPEAT computers. Feel free to call me for more info.

 Sample federal government EPEAT contract language - http://www.epeat.net/ContractLingo.aspx
 Massachusetts contract specifying EPEAT -
http://www.responsiblepurchasing.org/UserFiles/File/Computers/Specs/Massachusetts_RFRITC16_20
04.pdf
 There's more at http://www.responsiblepurchasing.org/

Please keep us updated on your progress!

Matt Kittell
Program Manager
Responsible Purchasing Network
Center for a New American Dream
6930 Carroll Ave., Suite 900
Takoma Park, MD 20912
301.891.1004
301.891.3684 (fax)
www.ResponsiblePurchasing.org




                                                                                              32
                           City of Portland Posts Online Studies, June 2007
2 Posts

Original post:
Hello, Just a quick announcement that the City of Portland, Oregon has posted 12 new green procurement
case studies http://www.portlandonline.com/omf/index.cfm?c=44701&.

Each case study discusses the scope of the purchase, benefits, costs, performance, and lessons learned.
There are many more examples of green purchasing/EPP taking place at the City, and we hope to add
more case studies over time. The following is a list of the case studies posted:
            Antifreeze - Recycled & Extended-Life
            Asphalt Release Agent - Soy-Based
            Crumb Rubber - Sports Fields
            Electricity Generation, On-Site - Wind
            Electricity Generation, On-Site - Biogas
            Inks, Print Shop - Vegetable-Based
            Lighting - Sports Fields
            Motor Oil - Rerefined
            Paint - Recycled Latex
            Parking Meters - Solar Powered
            Tires - Retreaded
            UV Filters - Pool Sanitation
And if you are curious about the author of these great case studies, that would be Kelly Panciera (formally
with the Center for a New American Dream), who has been helping our office out for the past few months
to put these together. If you have any comments on the above case studies, both Kelly and I would be
interested in hearing them (Kelly will be with working with our office through the end of June). Email:
kelly.panciera@ci.portland.or.us and stacey.foreman@ci.portland.or.us.
Thanks!
-Stacey
Stacey Foreman
Sustainable Procurement Program Specialist
City of Portland, Oregon, Bureau of Purchases

Response:
Stacy & Kelly, These are FABULOUS. Thanks for doing such a great job. These case
studies are short and to the point, all structured the same, and nicely laid out.

Thank you for doing this and sharing it with others.
Karen Hamilton , Environmental Purchasing Program
King County Procurement and Contract Services
Seattle, WA 98104
(206)263-4279
www.metrokc.gov/procure/green




                                                                                                        33
                    Specs for computer servers, networks and switches, June 2007
3 Posts

Original post:
Many thanks to everyone who responded to my earlier request regarding green computers. To be even
more specific, we are now researching specs to help guide the purchase of servers, networks, and
switches, which currently are not covered by EPEAT or Energy Star.

Has anyone researched these categories and developed contract language? If so, we would love to see
what you have come up with.

This is my last week with the City, so please direct your responses either to the list or respond directly to
Chris Geiger at Chris.Geiger@sfgov.org.

THANKS,
Deborah
Deborah Fleischer
San Francisco Department of the Environment
Green Purchasing Specialist
11 Grove Street San Francisco, CA 94102
Tel. (415) 355-3707
Fax. (415) 554-6393
deborah.fleischer@sfgov.org

Responses:
1. Greetings -- In my work supporting the Green Electronics Council and EPEAT, the green
computer standard, I've collected a number of reports and articles about the energy intensive nature of
servers. I haven't yet seen any good contract language, but I'm happy to share the reports with anyone
who is interested.

And, as mentioned by others on this listserv, the EPEAT website does include recommended contract
language and a continually incomplete list of purchasers specifying EPEAT. It's just tough to keep the list
up-to-date because more and more folks are specifying EPEAT.

Other quick EPEAT news -- Over the last two weeks, both HP and Dell have registered the first EPEAT-
Gold products. By almost any standard that could be designed, these are some of the greenest electronic
products ever made available.

Check out -- www.epeat.net

Contract Language & List of Purchasers --
http://www.epeat.net/Procurement.aspx

Let me know if anyone has any questions.
- Scot
Scot Case
TerraChoice Environmental Marketing
1706 Friedensburg Road
Reading, PA 19606
                                                                                                           34
(w) 610 779-3770
(c) 610 781-1684
scase@terrachoice.com

2. Like Scot said I wasn’t able to find any really current contract language; but I was glad to see that
WSCA (Western States Contract Alliance) Computer cooperative purchasing had put some green
language for computer equipment, software, peripherals and related services in their master agreements
back in 2004, especially item # 17. I complimented them on their foresight in 2004 the other day, and
was told they are in the process of updating the language for when those contracts get replaced. You
might check with them.
Federal Electronics Challenge has some Key Environmental attributes at
http://www.federalelectronicschallenge.net/resources/aquisit.htm then select Key Environmental
Attributes to Consider for the FEC (PDF, 90 KB) and there are some sample document links there for the
Department of Interior ‘Consolidated IT Hardware Buy’ RFQ # NBQ030027 Amendment No. 3. , especially
section VI ‘Environmental Preferability’.

Doug
Douglas Reed, Purchasing Agent
Department of Administrative Services (DAS)
Hoover State Office Building, Level A
Des Moines, IA 50319-0105
doug.reed@iowa.gov
Phone: (515) 242-6151




                                                                                                      35
                                        Battery contract, July 2007
3 Posts

Original post:
Has anyone done anything environmentally-related with a batteries contract? For instance, have you:
- Required/Requested the supplier, if they have retail sites, to participate in the RBRC program?
- Required/requested suppliers, when a customer selects a non-rechargeable battery, to indicate that
rechargeable batteries are available that can substitute for the customer's selection?
- Required/requested suppliers to provide information about battery recycling at the point of sale or
delivery?
- Required the supplier to actually provide battery recycling services?
- Anything else?

Please let me know if you have done anything, and send copies of RFP/RFI or contract language you have
used, and whether you found vendors to meet those requests/requirements. Thanks!

Lara
Lara Sutherland
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing
Health Care Without Harm
ph: 303-377-7048
LSutherland@hcwh.org

Responses:
1. Would it make sense to have them provide testing equipment so people can check if maybe their old
batteries are not really dead before they throw them out?

Ensure that the used batteries are stored safely - many hazards involved here, with acids and water
reactives.

Rick Reibstein, OTA

2. Hey Lara et al, We covered batteries in the EPA Green Office Supply BPA. We required
our vendor to have rechargeable batteries and the battery chargers for sale in their catalog, and to place
an "EPP" logo next to those products. We also required them to set up a battery recycling program
throughout our facilities nationwide, which they did with RBRC.
Let me know if you need any more information.

Below is EPA's internet web site for Acquisition. You will note that there is a section on Green
Purchasing. Click on that link - it will take you to another page that gives the EPP link but also provides a
sample of our Statement of Work for the BPA:
http://www.epa.gov/oam/

EPA has a nationwide Green Office Supply Blanket Purchase Agreement (BPA). We set green criteria for
the office supplies we buy through this BPA. This BPA is our mandatory source for all our office supply
purchases.

Here is the URL for the EPA BPA ecatalogue website (without the pricing info - only available through
EPA's intranet): www.epasupplies.com
                                                                                                           36
To see the green office supply criteria we set:
1. Click on "About EPA"
2. Click on "Green Office Supplies"
3. Click on "Green Criteria for Office Supplies" under the photo of the desk in the forest.
This will get you to the green criteria we are using under this BPA.

To read about how other agencies are greening their office supply BPAs, go to:
http://www.epa.gov/epp/pubs/buying_green_online.pdf

To view EPA's RFP for Green Office Supplies, go to http://www.epa.gov/oam/green/index.htm

Holly Elwood
USEPA
The Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
USEPA Headquarters, MC 7409-M
EPA East Building
1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20460
Email: elwood.holly@epa.gov
Ph: 202-564-8854
Fx: 202-564-8901
www.epa.gov/oppt/epp




                                                                                              37
             Remanufactured Toner Cartridges & Warranties on Printers, August 2007
4 Posts

Original post:
Hello - We have a new office supply contract which includes remanufactured toner cartridges but does
not require their use exclusively. We are encouraging all departments to use them and have received
some push back with the comment that if they use them, it will void the manufacturer’s warranty for the
printer. While we realize that this is likely just an excuse, we want to provide more detailed information
to alleviate their fears. Does anyone have more specific information from manufacturers on how using
reman's affects warranties and/or information on the legality of a manufacturer requiring the use of
OEM's or forfeit the warranty?

FYI, we did addressed faulty cartridges in our contract by requiring that the reman. vendor warrant the
cartridges and the repair of machines damaged by faulty cartridges.

Thanks,
Karen Cook
County of Alameda

Responses:
1. Hi. We are in a similar situation with remanufactured cartridges provided on state contract but not
mandated. When we first started introducing the idea to people, we heard a lot of different excuses. I
have attached a flyer that we created to address the issue. I hope this helps.

Meranda Reifschneider
Waste Reduction, Grants, and Public Outreach
Bureau of Waste Management
Kansas Department of Health and Environment
Curtis State Office Building
1000 SW Jackson, Suite 320
Topeka, Kansas, 66612
(785) 296-1617 voice
(785) 296 1600 main

2. Many of the companies that manufacture the OEM cartridges have remanufactured cartridges
available on their web-sites as well. Companies like Xerox and Dell both sell remanufactured and OEM
cartridges for their machines. It doesn't void there warranties, and because the market for
remanufactured and compatible cartridges is increasing daily. Many of the companies who are not
offering then will probably jump on board as well. There are a lot of companies producing
remanufactured cartridges and they are not producing a quality product either due to lack of experience
or not using quality cores to produce them.

It is important to search the market place to find the best cartridges that you can get. One has to also
keep in mind that even the best cartridges sometimes fail to produce a quality print. There are some
measures that agencies can take to prepare themselves for when they have a defective cartridge. Since
most cartridges are purchased and shipped to the customer and turn around for defective cartridges can
take up to 5 days or more. Planning plays and important roles in avoiding your operation from being
shut down for long periods of time until you can get a replacement for the defective cartridge. Here are
some tips:
                                                                                                          38
 If at all possible always order at least one back up cartridge for your printers.
 Purchase your cartridges from a company that focuses on good customer service.
 Purchase your cartridges from a company that has a live answering service and that returns your calls.
 Purchase your cartridges from a company that can drop ship to your location using next day services
when necessary.
 Purchase your cartridge from companies that only use the OEM core once and don’t use non-virgin
cores.
 Train agency employees how to solve the small problems that occur sometimes when using
remanufactured cartridges

It is the belief of Environmental Preservation Solutions that there is still a lot of education to be done in
both government and private sector on the benefits of using environmentally preferable products and
services in our everyday workplace where it is feasible, and when they meet the price, performance and
availability criteria. If you would like to discuss contract language please feel free to give me a call at:

Gilbert L. Bailey
Consultant
Environmental Preservation Solutions
2323 S. Troy Street Bldg. 5-209
Aurora, Colorado 80014
Phone 303-875-7733

3. Karen, The U.S. Department of Energy has a protocol for selecting quality
remanufactured toner cartridges on their website at
http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/nsep/p2/epp/cartridges.html. At
that location, we also have a copy of a warranty letter from Hewlett Packard.

We look forward to learning from your experience as well.
Sandra
Sandra Cannon, Technical Support
U.S. Department of Energy Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
Tel. 509-529-1535




                                                                                                            39
                       Cell phone recycling, procurement language, August 2007
4 Posts

Original post:
I am looking for examples of procurement language that would support environmentally responsible
recycling of cell phones. Please send language samples or links to contracts that contain these
specifications.

Thanks!
Molly Chidsey
Pollution & Waste Prevention Specialist
Multnomah County Sustainability Program
(503) 988-4094
www.co.multnomah.or.us/sustainability

Responses:
1. We have a convenience contract for state agencies to recycle all electronic equipment. It's pretty
cool. Check it out at http://www.doa.state.nc.us/PandC/926a.pdf.

Rachel Eckert
Recycling and Green Purchasing Coordinator
NC Division of Pollution Prevention and Environmental Assistance
1639 Mail Service Center
Raleigh, NC 27699-1639
919-715-6505
919-715-6794 (fax)
www.p2pays.org/epp
www.re3.org

2. Hi Molly, In California we have a state law (AB 2901 Cell Phone Recycling Act -- see bottom of my
message) that requires take back of cell phones. It also directs state agencies to incorporate take back
into their contracts (see Article 5). Consequently, the state contract developed after passage of this bill
incorporates take back language.

I don't have a copy of the actual contract and I don't see it on-line. The user's guide at
http://www.documents.dgs.ca.gov/pd/strategic/WirelessUserInstructions2.pdf has this information
about recycling:
http://www.pd.dgs.ca.gov/StratSourcing/wireless.htm This web page has additional information.

Here is the bill language:

BILL NUMBER: AB 2901 CHAPTERED
BILL TEXT

CHAPTER 891
FILED WITH SECRETARY OF STATE SEPTEMBER 29, 2004
APPROVED BY GOVERNOR SEPTEMBER 29, 2004
PASSED THE ASSEMBLY AUGUST 25, 2004
PASSED THE SENATE AUGUST 24, 2004
                                                                                                          40
AMENDED IN SENATE AUGUST 19, 2004
AMENDED IN SENATE JULY 8, 2004
AMENDED IN SENATE JUNE 16, 2004
AMENDED IN ASSEMBLY MAY 20, 2004
AMENDED IN ASSEMBLY APRIL 20, 2004

INTRODUCED BY Assembly Members Pavley and Kehoe (Coauthors: Assembly Members Hancock,
Jackson, Koretz, Levine, and Lieber) (Coauthors: Senators Kuehl and Romero)

             FEBRUARY 20, 2004

An act to add Chapter 8.6 (commencing with Section 42490) to Part 3 of Division 30 of the Public
Resources Code, relating to solid waste.

LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST

AB 2901, Pavley. Solid waste: cell phones: recycling.
Existing law requires the California Integrated Waste Management Board to administer state programs to
recycle various specified materials, including the Electronic Waste Recycling Act of 2003, which governs
certain electronic devices with display screens greater than 4 inches in size.

This bill would enact the Cell Phone Recycling Act of 2004 and would make it unlawful to sell, on and
after July 1, 2006, a cell phone in this state to a consumer, as defined, unless the retailer of that cell phone
complies with the act.

The bill would require a retailer selling a cell phone in this state to have in place, by July 1, 2006, a system
for the acceptance and collection of used cell phones for reuse, recycling, or proper disposal. The bill
would require the system to include specified elements.

The bill would require the Department of Toxic Substances Control on July 1, 2007, and each July 1
thereafter, to post on its Web site an estimated California recycling rate for cell phones, as specified.

The bill would impose requirements upon state agencies that purchase or lease cell phones regarding a
certification of compliance with the act by prospective bidders. The bill would contain a severability
clause.

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:

SECTION 1. Chapter 8.6 (commencing with Section 42490) is added to Part 3 of Division 30 of the Public
Resources Code, to read:

CHAPTER 8.6. CELL PHONE RECYCLING ACT OF 2004
  Article 1. General Provisions
42490. This act shall be known, and may be cited as, the Cell Phone Recycling Act of 2004.
42490.1. The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:

  (a) The purpose of this chapter is to enact a comprehensive and innovative system for the reuse,
recycling, and proper and legal disposal of used cell phones.
  (b) It is the further purpose of this chapter to enact a law that establishes a program that is convenient
                                                                                                              41
for consumers and the public to return, recycle, and ensure the safe and environmentally sound disposal
of used cell phones, and providing a system that does not
charge when a cell phone is returned.
  (c) It is the intent of the Legislature that the cost associated with the handling, recycling, and disposal of
used cell phones be the responsibility of the producers and consumers of cell phones, and not local
government or their service providers, state government, or
taxpayers.
  (d) In order to reduce the likelihood of illegal disposal of hazardous materials, it is the intent of this
chapter to ensure that all costs associated with the proper management of used cell phones is
internalized by the producers and consumers of cell phones at or
before the point of purchase, and not at the point of discard.
  (e) Manufacturers and retailers of cell phones and cell phone service providers, in working to achieve
the goals and objectives of this chapter, should have the flexibility to partner with each other and with
those private and nonprofit business enterprises that
currently provide collection and processing services to develop and promote a safe and effective used cell
phone recycling system for California.
  (f) The producers of cell phones should reduce and, to the extent feasible, ultimately phase out the use
of hazardous materials in cell phones.
  (g) Cell phones, to the greatest extent feasible, should be designed for extended life, repair, and reuse.
  (h) The purpose of this chapter is to provide for the safe, cost free, and convenient collection, reuse, and
recycling of 100 percent of the used cell phones discarded or offered for recycling in the state.
  (i) In establishing a cost effective system for the recovery, reuse, recycling and proper disposal of used
cell phones, it is the intent of the Legislature to encourage manufacturers, retailers and service providers
to build on the retailer take-back systems initiated recently by some cell phone service providers.
  (j) An estimated 5 percent of obsolete cell phones are currently being recycled through a mechanism,
whereby private sector recyclers provide retailers with a postage paid box for mailing returned cell
phones to the recycler at no cost to the retailers. In some
instances, the scrap value of these used phones is sufficient for the recycler to either pay the retailer or
make a financial contribution on behalf of the retailer to a nonprofit charity. It is the intent of the
Legislature that this model system be substantially expanded
as a result of the enactment of this act.

    Article 2. Definitions
 42493. For the purposes of this chapter, the following terms have the following meanings, unless the
context clearly requires otherwise:
  (a) "Cell phone" means a wireless telephone device that is designed to send or receive transmissions
through a cellular radiotelephone service, as defined in Section 22.99 of Title 47 of the Code of Federal
Regulations. A cell phone includes the rechargeable battery that may be connected to that cell phone. A
cell phone does not include a wireless telephone device that is integrated into the electrical architecture
of a motor vehicle.
  (b) "Consumer" means a purchaser or owner of a cell phone. "Consumer" also includes a business,
corporation, limited partnership, nonprofit organization, or governmental entity, but does not include an
entity involved in a wholesale transaction between a distributor and retailer.
  (c) "Department" means the Department of Toxic Substances Control.
  (d) "Retailer" means a person who sells a cell phone in the state to a consumer, including a
manufacturer of a cell phone who sells that cell phone directly to a consumer. A sale includes, but is not
limited to, transactions conducted through sales outlets, catalogs,
or the Internet, or any other similar electronic means, but does not include a sale that is a wholesale
transaction with a distributor or retailer.
                                                                                                             42
  (e) (1) "Sell" or "sale" means a transfer for consideration of title or of the right to use, by lease or sales
contract, including, but not limited to, transactions conducted through sales outlets, catalogs, or the
Internet or any other, similar electronic means, but does not include a wholesale transaction with a
distributor or a retailer.
  (2) For purposes of this subdivision and subdivision (d), "distributor" means a person who sells a cell
phone to a retailer.
  (f) "Used cell phone" means a cell phone that has been previously used and is made available, by a
consumer, for reuse, recycling, or proper disposal.
    Article 3. Cell Phone Recycling
42494. (a) On and after July 1, 2006, every retailer of cell phones sold in this state shall have in place a
system for the acceptance and collection of used cell phones for reuse, recycling, or proper disposal.
  (b) A system for the acceptance and collection of used cell phones for reuse, recycling, or proper
disposal shall, at a minimum, include all of the following elements:
  (1) The take-back from the consumer of a used cell phone that the retailer sold or previously sold to the
consumer, at no cost to that consumer. The retailer may require proof of purchase.
  (2) The take-back of a used cell phone from a consumer who is purchasing a new cell phone from that
retailer, at no cost to that consumer.
  (3) If the retailer delivers a cell phone directly to a consumer in this state, the system provides the
consumer, at the time of delivery, with a mechanism for the return of used cell phones for reuse,
recycling, or proper disposal, at no cost to the consumer.
  (4) Make information available to consumers about cell phone recycling opportunities provided by the
retailer and encourage consumers to utilize those opportunities. This information may include, but is not
limited to, one or more of the following:
  (A) Signage that is prominently displayed and easily visible to the consumer.
  (B) Written materials provided to the consumer at the time of purchase or delivery, or both.
  (C) Reference to the cell phone recycling opportunity in retailer advertising or other promotional
materials, or both.
  (D) Direct communications with the consumer at the time of purchase.
  (c) Paragraph (4) of subdivision (b) does not apply to a retailer that only sells prepaid cell phones and
does not provide the ability for a consumer to sign a contract for cell phone service.
 42495. On and after July 1, 2006, it is unlawful to sell a cell phone to a consumer in this state unless the
retailer of that cell phone complies with this chapter.

    Article 4. Statewide Recycling Goals
 42496.4. On July 1, 2007, and each July 1, thereafter, the department shall post on its Web site an
estimated California recycling rate for cell phones, the numerator of which shall be the estimated number
of cell phones returned for recycling in California during the previous calendar year, and the
denominator of which is the number of cell phones estimated to be sold in this state during the previous
calendar year.

    Article 5. State Agency Procurement
  42498. (a) A state agency that purchases or leases cell phones shall require each prospective bidder, to
certify that it, and its agents, subsidiaries, partners, joint venturers, and subcontractors for the
procurement, have complied with this chapter and any
regulations adopted pursuant to this chapter, or to demonstrate that this chapter is inapplicable to all
lines of business engaged in by the bidder, its agents, subsidiaries, partners, joint venturers, or
subcontractors.
  (b) Failure to provide certification pursuant to this section shall render the prospective bidder and its
agents, subsidiaries, partners, joint venturers, and subcontractors ineligible to bid on the procurement of
                                                                                                              43
cell phones.
  (c) The bid solicitation documents shall specify that the prospective bidder is required to cooperate
fully in providing reasonable access to its records and documents that evidence
compliance with this chapter.
  (d) Any person awarded a contract by a state agency that is found to be in violation of this section is
subject to the following sanctions:
  (1) The contract shall be voided by the state agency to which the equipment, materials, or supplies were
provided.
  (2) The contractor is ineligible to bid on any state contract for a period of three years.
  (3) If the Attorney General establishes in the name of the people of the State of California that any
money, property, or benefit was obtained by a contractor as a result of violating this section, the court
may, in addition to any other remedy, order the disgorgement of
the unlawfully obtained money, property, or benefit in the interest of justice.

   Article 6. Effect of Act
  42499. This chapter shall not be construed to affect Chapter 6.5 (commencing with Section 25100) of
Division 20 of the Health and Safety Code, any regulation adopted pursuant to that chapter, or any
obligation imposed on a person pursuant to that chapter, relating to cell phones or used cell phones.
 SEC. 2. The provisions of this act are severable. If any provision of this act or its application is held
invalid, that invalidity shall not affect other provisions or applications that can be given effect without the
invalid provision or application.

Kathy
Kathleen Frevert
California Integrated Waste Management Board
1001 I street, PO 4025, MS 13A
Sacramento, CA 95812
Website: www.ciwmb.ca.gov
Phone: 916-341-6476
Email: Kfrevert@ciwmb.ca.gov


3. Hi Molly, Check out these links for more information on various types of e-waste (including cell
   phones).

   MN E-Waste Recycling Info (MPCA) MN Pollution Control Agency Click HERE

   MN Product Stewardship Initiatives and Laws for Electronics Click HERE

   E-waste Initiatives in Other States: Click HERE

The State of California Act is more directed at your question.
Cell Phone Recycling Act of 2004 Click HERE

Thanks,
Nathan Reinbold
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing
Lead by Example Incentive Fund Administrator
Hennepin County Environmental Services
                                                                                                             44
417 North 5th Street, Suite 200
Minneapolis, MN 55401-3206
PH. (612) 596-0993
nathan.reinbold@co.hennepin.mn.us
www.hennepin.us




                                    45
                            Water responsible truck washes, August 2007
2 Posts

Original post:
I am trying to find some literature on truck wash systems that conserve water, enable water to be
recycled and meet occupational health and safety requirements. The situation we have is for a truck wash
in a cattle and sheep saleyard. The system would need to be able to cater for B-Doubles. Any information
on existing systems or research would be greatly appreciated. I am also interested in learning about other
saleyards that already have these systems in place.

Kind regards,
Mikaela Griffiths
CSO GLENRAC

Response:
Diana, we have assisted several companies with this situation. There are a number of wash water
capture, treatment and reuse systems. I believe the initial impetus for this technique may have been
developed for military operations such as aircraft washing stations etc. Here are some example vendors
and case studies-
Closed Loop Wash Rack Case Study
http://p2library.nfesc.navy.mil/P2_Opportunity_Handbook/11_3.html

Danco Metal Surfacing Case Study http://www.nmfrc.org/pdf/ro.htm

Water Efficiency: Water Management Options http://www.p2pays.org/ref/04/03104.pdf

Riveer Company
233 Veterans Blvd
South Haven MI 49090
(269) 637-1997 or (888) 857-7304
Fax: (269) 637-0177
Email: Sales@Riveer.com
http://www.cyclonator.com/

Pressure Island
3925 Bohannon Drive, Suite 100
Menlo Park, CA 94025
Toll Free: (888) DE-GREASE (334-7327)
Fax: (650) 780-9988
info@pressureisland.com
http://www.pressureisland.com

Hydro Engineering, Inc.
865 W. 2600 S.
Salt Lake City, UT 84119
(800) 247-8424
Fax: (801) 972-3265
Email: Info@Hydroblaster.com
http://www.hydroblaster.com/HydrokleenWastewaterFiltration.htm
                                                                                                       46
*Hydrobay indoor portable wash rack system
http://www.hydroblaster.com/3picsinsidewashbay.htm

CPR Systems
1400 South Main Street
South Bend, Indiana 46613
(800) 897-7515
Fax: (574) 233-3899
Cleaner Phosphoric Recycling Systems
http://www.cprsystemsonline.com/phosphatizing.html
*A CPR System recycles the wash water and reclaims the cleaner thus monitoring and record keeping of
industrial wastewater discharge is not required. This system can reduce chemical consumption by 70 to
80 percent over typical wash water discharge methods.

Ron Smith
Ohio EPA, Office of Compliance Assistance & Pollution Prevention
614-644-2813
614-644-2807 fax
ron.smith@epa.state.oh.us
http://www.epa.state.oh.us/ocapp/ocapp.html




                                                                                                    47
                           Compostable garbage can liners, August 2007
5 Posts

Original post:
Has anyone encountered sacks or liners for garbage cans that are compostable? I'm looking for a way to
contain food wastes so that the garbage cans do not need to be sanitized as often. Thanks,
Tom Barron, Civil Engineer

Responses:
1. Tom, Yes, this is a common practice which works very well. contact The Bag Company:
http://www.thebagcompanyinc.com/main.htm, Mansfield Paper:
http://www.mansfieldpaper.com/environmentallysafe.html OR
Biobag: http://www.biobagusa.com
Amy Donovan
Program Director
Franklin County Solid Waste Management District
50 Miles Street
Greenfield, MA 01301
Tel: (413) 772-2438
Fax: (413) 772-3786
amy@franklincountywastedistrict.org
http://www.franklincountywastedistrict.org/

2. If you go to Resourceful Bag & Tag, they have a compostable liner. Their website www.bagandtag.com.
Virginia Walton, Recycling Coordinator
Town of Mansfield
4 South Eagleville Rd
Storrs, CT 06268
860-429-3333

3. BioBag has 3, 13 and 33 gallon compostable kitchen and lawn and leaf bags, see
http://www.biobagusa.com/Consumer.htm
Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3WC21)
Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3163
giuranna.mike@epa.gov

4. We get ours from the link below.
http://www.ecoproducts.com/Home/home_biobags/home_index_biobags.htm
Judy Usherson, Senior Environmental Analyst
Eastern Research Group (ERG)
2300 Wilson Blvd. #350
Arlington, VA 22201
judy.usherson@erg.com
703-841-0503
703-841-1440 (fax)

                                                                                                     48
                     Fluorescent Bulb Recycling Statewide Contracts, August 2007
4 Posts

Original post:
Our governor recently signed a bill that requires all state facilities in buildings greater than 1,000 square
feet to recycle their fluorescent bulbs. It also requires that only Energy Star bulbs be purchased in the
future. So we're going to be recycling a lot of CFLs in the future.

Geographically, Illinois is a pretty large state, and many of our buildings are in rural areas. We
currently have a state wide fluorescent bulb recycling contract, but since recycling was not mandatory
when we bid it out, rural areas aren't covered on the contract.

Does anyone have examples of how we can set up a statewide program that will reach facilities in the
entire state? We would like to avoid the use of drum top crushers.

Thanks,
Becky Lockart
Office of Pollution Prevention
Illinois Environmental Protection Agency
P.O. Box 19276
Springfield, IL 62794-9276
Phone: (217) 524-9642

Responses:
1. Vermont has a contract that includes bulk recycling of mercury-containing lamps for higher use areas
and container (kit) recycling for rural (low volume) users. The contractor is also able to transport the
spent lamps to a central facility in some cases. See contract #8262 at our web site
http://www.bgs.state.vt.us/PCA/purcont.htm#Electrical Items 53 – 57 are the recycle options.

Judy Jamieson, Senior Purchasing Agent
Purchasing and Contract Administration
State of Vermont
1078 US Route 2-Middlesex
Drawer 33 Montpelier VT 05633-7601
phone (802) 828-2217 - fax (802) 828-2222
http://www.bgs.state.vt.us/pca

2.  I see the Vermont contract includes container recycling for CFLs (line item 56). How is the "fiber
drum" designed to prevent breakage during collection and transport? Perhaps there are some lessons
learned for new retailer collection programs, e.g., Wal-Mart's recent events. I've recently been asked by
the press how safe CFL collection might take place. Any thoughts?

Lloyd Hicks
Program Advisor
INFORM
212-361-2400 x244



                                                                                                            49
3. Here is a link http://veoliaes-ts.com/OnyxPak to the collection and recycling subcontractor working
with VT’s lamp & ballast supplier. This provides some insight into compliance issues, packaging and may
address some of your questions.

Judy Jamieson, Senior Purchasing Agent
Purchasing and Contract Administration
State of Vermont
1078 US Route 2-Middlesex
Drawer 33 Montpelier VT 05633-7601
phone (802) 828-2217 - fax (802) 828-2222
http://www.bgs.state.vt.us/pca




                                                                                                         50
                            Trade show/Vendor booth banner, August 2007
5 Postings

Original posting:
I apologize if this topic has sailed across this listserv before. I am looking into getting a banner printed
that can be hung from a table during events like vendor fairs and other trainings. It wouldn't necessarily
need to be durable enough to withstand outside conditions, but it should be reusable and handle a little
abuse. I think regular paper would be unacceptable.

Have you come across anything: Biodegradable? Cool. Recycled content? Good. Low impact? Please.

Has anyone done this research? Looking for some good starting places. I have almost two months to get it
spec'd, ordered and delivered. Any info is appreciated. Thanks!

Liz Kunz
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing
Pollution Prevention & Sustainability Division
Hazardous Waste and Toxics Reduction Program
Washington State Department of Ecology
360.407.6358
lkun461@ecy.wa.gov

Responses:
1. Liz, have you looked at the natural carpet makers (i.e. sisal, wool, linen, jute, cotton)? It would
probably be pricey, but many of the mills will custom make something to your size specifications with
something either printed on it or woven into it. Some even will add grommets for hanging for you. All
these fibers are biobased, and some are recycled as well.

Fibers such as linen and cotton would need a little more care than the others, but they're easier to print
and travel/hang lighter. The others are thicker, might last longer, and can be beat up somewhat.

Here's a link to one off the top of my head (there are many more) to start you off if you're interested:
http://www.meridameridian.com/

2. Liz and all, Fastsigns International, a local (Kirkland, Washington) company is promoting a material
called BIOflex, made by New Jersey-based Ultraflex Systems, as an alternative and green material for
banners. Short article in Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Monday, Aug 20, Business section column called "The
Insider." (in the continuation on page E3)

I haven't researched the product/material, but yours might be a good occasion to try it out and let us
know what you think. The article doesn't say what material is used, but the claim is that it's
"biodegradable." That could mean a variety of things, of course.

There was a "Green Print Summit" in Seattle last spring, attended by many graphic design and print
services firms, so ask the ones on contract with the state, or contact me directly if you want to see the list
of those who have contracts with the City of Seattle, because State of WA can use those -- I don't mean to
suggest they will immediately have a banner material for you, but you can ask them what they can find
for you...

                                                                                                             51
Shirli
Shirli Axelrod, Senior Environmental Analyst
Seattle Public Utilities
PO Box 34018
700 5th Ave. Suite 4900
Seattle WA 98124-4018
Phone 206-684-7804
E-mail shirli.axelrod@seattle.gov

3.  New American Dream purchased its canvass matte cotton (unfortunately not organic cotton) banner
from www.pingo.com.

Mary Jo Snavely, Fellow
Responsible Purchasing Network
Center for a New American Dream
6930 Carroll Ave., Suite 900
Takoma Park, MD 20912
301.891.3683 x. 116 (ph)
301.891.3684 (fax)
www.responsiblepurchasing.org

4. Liz, Have you looked at the natural carpet makers (i.e. sisal, wool, linen, jute, cotton)? It would probably
be pricey, but many of the mills will custom make something to your size specifications with something
either printed on it or woven into it. Some even will add grommets for hanging for you. All these fibers
are biobased, and some are recycled as well.

Fibers such as linen and cotton would need a little more care than the others, but they're easier to print
and travel/hang lighter. The others are thicker, might last longer, and can be beat up somewhat.

Here's a link to one off the top of my head (there are many more) to start you off if you're interested:
http://www.meridameridian.com/

Regards,
Debbie
Deborah Lema, Research and Education
Racine Industries, Inc.




                                                                                                             52
                   Looking for "green" catering & function contracts, August 2007
3 Postings

Original post:
Hi all: I'm in the process of developing a green event contract and am looking for examples of contract
language or RFP language that specifies local/organic/fair trade food and other "green" event criteria
(e.g., everything from waste separation available in the event rooms to food presentation and dishes etc.
to room set up). Does anyone have any examples of this that they can share?
thanks, Lynda

Lynda Rankin, Environmental Analyst
Nova Scotia Department of the Environment and Labour
Box 697, Halifax Nova Scotia B3J 2T8
Tel: (902) 424-2578
email: rankinlx@gov.ns.ca

Responses:
1. Lynda, A few months ago I was looking into this for our own meetings. As a first crack one can follow
the general guidelines from Oceans Blue Foundation's BlueGreen Meetings
http://www.bluegreenmeetings.org/HostsAndPlanners/Food.htm

I did, however come across some model contract language. I'll take a quick look for it this afternoon and
get back to you. The Green Meeting Industry Council may have some specific language available.

Jeremy Brown
Trade and Environment Program
Commission for Environmental Cooperation
393, rue Saint-Jacques, Suite 200
Montreal, QC H2Y 1N9
Canada
Tel: (514) 350-4302
jbrown@cec.org

2. Lynda, My colleague has done some work around this for several Health Care Without Harm events,
but he is out of the country right now. In the meantime, I'll point you to a brochure put out by the Society
for Nutrition Education http://www.sne.org/guidelinesformeetings.htm on serving local food at
meetings. They include some contract suggestions, though they are pretty general.

Marie Kulick, Senior Policy Analyst, Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy
Co-Coordinator, Health Care Without Harm Purchasing Work Group
2105 First Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55404
612-870-3422
mkulick@iatp.org




                                                                                                          53
             Life cycle comparison of reusable bags, paper bags, & plastic bags, August 2007
5 Postings

Original post:
Can you point me in the direction of such a study?
Virginia Walton
Recycling Coordinator
Town of Mansfield
4 South Eagleville Rd
Storrs, CT 06268
860-429-3333

Responses:
1. Try looking at http://www.epa.gov/region1/communities/shopbags.html and
http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=535932 .

Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3WC21)
Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3163
giuranna.mike@epa.gov

2. I assume you are asking about shopping bags. Shipping bags (such as those used in e-commerce) are
addressed in a report and summary documents available here:
http://www.deq.state.or.us/lq/sw/packaging/resources.htm (scroll down to “Life Cycle Inventory
Analysis”).

David Allaway
Oregon Department of Environmental Quality
Solid Waste Policy & Program Development
811 S.W. Sixth Avenue
Portland, OR 97204
phone: (503) 229-5479
fax: (503) 229-6977
TTY: (503) 229-6993
Toll Free in Oregon: 1-800-452-4011

3. Hi Virginia, There have been several LCA studies comparing paper vs. plastic, but here is one of the
only ones I found that included reusable bags:
http://www.environment.gov.au/settlements/publications/waste/plastic-bags/analysis.html

Thanks!
Christine Chase
Green Seal
1001 Connecticut Ave., NW, Suite 827
Washington, DC 20036
ph: 202.872.6400
cchase@greenseal.org
                                                                                                          54
www.greenseal.org

4. If you Google "paper vs. plastic" or "paper versus plastic" you will find some info. Everything I've
read says that reusable is the way to go. And there are pros and cons to paper and plastic with no clear
winner.

This was also recently debated on Grist.org on Ask Umbra's archives.

Katherine Murray
Waste Diversion Planner
City of Austin Solid Waste Services
512-974-9043
fx: 974-9048
www.AustinRecycles.com




                                                                                                           55
                           Water conservation EPP resources, August 2007
3 Posts

Original post:
Is there anything equivalent to Energy Star for water conservation? A resource to help purchasers figure
out how to spec products that go beyond regulations?

Lara
Lara Sutherland
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing
Health Care Without Harm
ph: 303-377-7048
LSutherland@hcwh.org

Responses:
1. There's a fairly new program at EPA called Watersense for that purpose. There's a link to their
website http://www.epa.gov/watersense/.

Julie
Julie Shannon, Chief
Prevention Integration Branch
Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics
US Environmental Protection Agency
1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW (7409M)
Washington, DC 20460
202-564-8834
202-564-8899 (fax)
shannon.julie@epa.gov

2. Lara, EPA has an initiative called WaterSense, see http://www.epa.gov/watersense/
and also http://www.epa.gov/waterinfrastructure/waterefficiency.html.

Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3WC21)
Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3163
giuranna.mike@epa.gov




                                                                                                       56
                      Source Reduction Boilerplate Language, September 2007
2 Posts

Original post:
Hi, I’m curious if anyone has truly had success with boilerplate language regarding reduced packaging
and other source reduction methods when putting out bids/RFPs. I added boilerplate language years ago
when I worked for a County and it had no measurable impact. The better route would be to expand
beyond boilerplates and use specifics based on packaging and transportation options. Thoughts?

Beth Eckl
EPE Consulting
Danville, CA
(925) 838-2731

Response:
Beth, I understand several years ago Boeing added “take back packaging” to their electronic equipment
contracts and it worked. The computers began to be delivered not only with less packaging but what was
there went away with the delivery truck. At the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, we included “take
back packaging” in our contract with our local office product supplier. They were using their own trucks
and appreciated not having to continually buy new pallets, etc. In that case, the take back only referred to
the “large packaging” such as pallets and case boxes. The lesser packaging (ream wrappers) for instance
were kept on for storage until used. -----Sandra

Sandra Cannon, Technical Support
U.S. Department of Energy Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
Tel. 509-529-1535




                                                                                                         57
                           Hybrid Electric Bus Information, September 2007
6 Posts

Original post:
Greetings – Someone just called me looking for a list of hybrid electric bus manufacturers for a potentially
substantial purchase. I know King County, Washington, has bought them so I’ll reach out to them. Does
anyone else on the listserv have any experience or can you recommend any potential bidders? Thanks.

Scot
Scot Case
TerraChoice Environmental Marketing Inc.
29 North Carolina Avenue
Reading, PA 19608
(w) 610 779-3770
(c) 610 781-1684
scase@terrachoice.com

Responses:
1. Scot, We have busses made by Orion here in Syracuse http://www.orionbus.com/orion. They are
diesel-electrics and seem to be working ok... our transportation professional group will be going for a ride
on one next month.

Regards,
Chris
Christopher E. Anderson
Environmental Specialist I
Region 3 Environmental Services
333 E Washington St.
Syracuse, NY 13202
(315) 428-4628

2. Scot, My mistake. The CNG's were made by Orion not the DieselElectrics here's the link for CENTRO
http://www.centro.org/news/hybrid.htm.

Chris
Christopher E. Anderson
Environmental Specialist I
Region 3 Environmental Services
333 E Washington St.
Syracuse, NY 13202
(315) 428-4628

3. Metro Transit/Metropolitan Council in Minnesota has purchased several 40-foot hybrid buses from
Gillig Corporation in Hayward, CA.
http://www.gillig.com/New%20GILLIG%20WEB/hybrid.htm

The public contact at Met Council for transportation questions is David Vessel at
david.vessel@metc.state.mn.us

                                                                                                         58
Mark Snyder
Senior Pollution Prevention Specialist
Environmental Economic Development Unit
Prevention and Assistance Division
Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
mark.snyder@state.mn.us

4. Scot, Albuquerque, NM is building up an inventory of nice diesel-electric hybrid buses from New Flyer:
http://www.newflyer.com/index/hybrid_buses_intro
http://www.cabq.gov/transit/rapidbus2.html

Samuel McCord
Pollution Prevention
Sandia National Laboratories
samccor@sandia.gov
505.845.7935 (w)
505.844.9977 (f)

5. Hi Scot, King County's original purchase of 214 hybrid electric articulated buses in 2004 were made by
New Flyer of America with a Caterpillar engine and Allison hybrid transmission. You can find out more at:
http://transit.metrokc.gov/am/vehicles/hy-diesel.html

In 2007, King County Metro Transit announced the intention to purchase 500 buses over the next five
years. These buses will be built by New Flyer of America using a hybrid drive built by General Motors and
an engine built by Cummins Engine Company. http://www.metrokc.gov/procure/green/BUL102.pdf

There are lots of links to explore on the website that will lead you to contract details, background, etc.
Hope this helps.

Karen Hamilton
Environmental Purchasing Program
King County Procurement and Contract Services
401 5th Avenue, 3rd Floor
Seattle, WA 98104
(206)263-9294
E-mail: karen.hamilton@kingcounty.gov
Website: www.metrokc.gov/procure/green




                                                                                                             59
                               EPP Cleaners in Schools, September 2007
4 Posts

Original post:
Hi, Can anyone provide names of schools, preferably school districts in CA, which have switched to green
cleaning products?

Thanks,
Beth
Beth Eckl
EPE Consulting
Danville, CA 94526
(925) 838-2731

Responses:
1. Beth, I know at least Hanford School District and Visallia USD are doing green carpet cleaning, if that
helps.

Deborah Lema
Research and Education
Racine Industries, Inc.

2. Chicago Public Schools switched. New York and Illinois have state laws requiring schools to use green
cleaners. NY has guidelines and other information on the web
(http://www.ogs.state.ny.us/bldgadmin/environmental/default.html) The IL law was just signed by the
gov in August. We are in the process of developing our guidelines.

Becky Lockart
Office of Pollution Prevention
Illinois Environmental Protection Agency
P.O. Box 19276
Springfield, IL 62794-9276
Phone: (217) 524-9642

3. Try contacting the Healthy Schools Network in Albany, NY for more information.
(www.healthyschools.org)

Robert Guillemin
Environmental Protection Specialist
US EPA, Region 1 (SPP)
One Congress Street, Suite 1100
Boston, MA 02114-2023
Phone: 617-918-1814
Fax: 617-918-0814
Email: guillemin.robert@epa.gov




                                                                                                             60
                           Remanufactured toner cartridges, October 2007
5 Posts

Original post:
Questions about remanufactured toner cartridges abound. Do they work? Do they void manufacturer
warranties? Are there reliable third party standards or testing procedures?
Between October 9 and November 9, RPN is soliciting questions on remanufactured toner cartridges
from procurement and sustainability professionals. Questions will be circulated to experts from the
Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the International Imaging Technologies Council. Answers will be
made public in early December. Email your question(s) today to Matt Kittell at matt@newdream.org.

Because Every Purchase Matters,
Matt Kittell
Program Manager
Responsible Purchasing Network
Center for a New American Dream
6930 Carroll Ave., Suite 900
Takoma Park, MD 20912
301.891.1004
301.891.3684 (fax)
www.ResponsiblePurchasing.org

Responses:
1. Matt, yes, remanufactured cartridges abound. Yes, they work, but just like any product (including OEM
cartridges) there are top quality remanufactured cartridges on the market and lower quality ones. The
U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory began testing remanufactured
cartridges in 1997. The results of roughly 6 years of testing brought us to the following conclusions: all
printers work well with QUALITY remanufactured cartridges; some printers work well with even low end
remanufactured cartridges; different brands of quality cartridges seem more amenable to certain
printers than others. DOE has posted a protocol for selecting quality remanufactured cartridges on their
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing website at
http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/nsep/p2/epp/cartridges.html.

Feel free to call any time with questions----Sandra

Sandra Cannon, Technical Support
U.S. Department of Energy Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
Tel. 509-529-1535

2. Can anyone point me to a resource that discusses resources saved from using remanufactured
cartridges compared with traditional cartridges and related costs? We’re trying to get energy use info to
calculate GHG emission reductions from the recycled products we purchase. Thanks very much for any
input!

Julie Weiss
City of Palo Alto
Regional Water Quality Control Plant
2501 Embarcadero Way
Palo Alto, CA 94303
                                                                                                        61
650.329.2117
fx: 650.494.3531

3. Julie, You might contact the International Imaging Technology Council (Tricia Judge, Tel. (702) 838-
4279, tricia@i-itc.org)----Sandra

4. Several years ago, NYS invested in research on problems that might hinder the remanufacture of
toner cartridges by the Ctr for Remanufacturing and Resource Recovery at Rochester Institute of
Technology (RIT). I encourage to review the project summary below, which was prepared in 2002, and if
the information is still useful and you would like more information, feel free to contact Robert Maresic at
RIT via email at rjmasp@rit.edu http://www.cims.rit.edu/




                                                                                                          62
                                           New York State
                                  Environmental Investment Program
                                      Research Project Summary

                                   Rochester Institute of Technology
Background
The replacement toner cartridge market is nearly $6 billion per year and it is growing rapidly in the
United States. This rapid growth presents a disposal problem affecting the environment unless the toner
cartridge remanufacturing industry can increase its reuse of cartridge components. Currently, 75% of
some 30.9 million units used in the U.S. every year are not remanufactured, but are recycled or go to
landfill. Effective remanufacturing of these cartridges could help limit the number that need to be
produced from virgin materials or end their useful life in landfills each year. NYS is home to over 400
toner cartridge remanufacturing companies, with over 2000 employees. This project was initiated to
provide NYS remanufacturers with reliable reuse procedures for key cartridge components.

Project Description
The National Center for Remanufacturing and Resource Recovery (NCR3) at RIT partnered with two NYS
remanufacturing companies for this project. The study focused on the reusability of two key components
contained in all-in-one toner cartridges: the organic photo-conducting (OPC) drum and the wiper blade.
The objective of the project was to identify and assess measurement techniques that determine the
remaining life of each component to enable their reuse. The project resulted in the selection of the best
methods to evaluate the remaining life of each component.

Project Results
Extensive life testing was conducted to quantify the physical changes in the components throughout their
life cycle. Over 10,000 independent observations were made to characterize the life cycle of these
components.

The key findings of this study are:
    For the models tested, re-use of OEM OPC drums is not recommended.
    Wiper blades are highly reusable (as many as ten times) but only if the condition of the cleaning
      edge can be assessed.

The research found that there was insufficient remaining life on the OPC drums to reliably perform
another life cycle. The partner companies will be able to significantly improve their product quality by
eliminating the possibility of mid-cycle OPC drum failures.

This study also demonstrated that wiper blades might be reusable up to ten times, if certain procedures
are followed. One partner company plans to implement a new business based on these findings, worth
over one million dollars annually and adding three new jobs. If just half of the New York State
remanufacturers began to reuse OEM wiper blades with an estimated 65% reclaim rate, it would reduce
landfill by 65 tons per year and create a total savings of over two and a half million dollars per year.




                                                                                                           63
Contractor:            Rochester Institute of Technology         Investment:
                       National Center for Remanufacturing and
                       Resource Recovery
                       133 Lomb Memorial Drive
                       Rochester, NY 14623
County:                Monroe                                    NYS EIP:      $200,000
Contract Project       Simon Jessop                              Contractor    $90,810
Manager:                                                         Match:
Phone:                 585.475.6091                              Total:         $290,810
ESD Project Manager:   James Gilbert                             Completion    July 2002
Phone:                 585.325.1944                              Date:

Brenda Grober
Environmental Services Unit
Empire State Development
30 South Pearl Street
Albany, NY 12245
(518) 292-5342 / FAX (518) 292-5886
bgrober@empire.state.ny.us




                                                                                      64
                                Request for bid language, October 2007
4 Posts

Original post:
Hello Everyone, We are evaluating the feasibility of starting a small scale plastic lumber recycling facility
in Vermont that would use agricultural film plastics. I am researching how state purchasers (or other
purchasers) might specify the end products in their bid documents. This might include specs that include
sourcing products made from local feedstocks or any other strategies state purchasers do to encourage
local recycling market development.

Thanks in advance for any bid language or recommendations

Carolyn Grodinsky
Waste Prevention Coordinator
Waste Management Division
103 South Main Street
Waterbury, VT 05671
(802) 241-3477
 http://www.anr.state.vt.us/dec/wastediv/R3/DECwpPLAN.htm

Responses:
1. Carolyn, Roger Guttentag of Resource Recycling has listed several links to information about Ag
Plastic on their web site at
http://www.resource-recycling.com/cyberspace.html#June%202003

Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3WC21)
Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3163
giuranna.mike@epa.gov

2. Hi Carolyn, for recycled content products, purchasers typically spec the percentage of recycled
content in a product. I've included some references below. Although green building projects receive
credit for sourcing local building materials, I'm unaware of this aspect for plastic lumber.
Environmentally preferable wood products (lumber and paper) now included a "chain of custody"
approach for sustainable forestry practices (certified by the Forest Stewardship Council), but a similar
situation does not exist for local sourcing for plastic lumber -- although it is a very interesting idea.

The EPA's Comprehensive Procurement Guidelines (CPG) for recycled content products includes criteria
for plastic lumber. Purchasing officers use these criteria as specifications in their contracts. Visit:
http://www.epa.gov/cpg/products/timbers.htm

King County (WA) is a progressive "green" purchaser that is well respected by state and local government
purchasing officers. For insight on the procurement of plastic lumber, bid language, see their fact sheet on
"plastic lumber" http://www.metrokc.gov/procure/green/plastic.htm.

I also found the following link on bid language, which may be helpful.
http://vendornet.state.wi.us/vendornet/recycle/4plast27.asp
                                                                                                            65
Let me know if I can be of any additional help.

Rob
Robert Guillemin
Environmental Protection Specialist
US EPA, Region 1 (SPP)
One Congress Street, Suite 1100
Boston, MA 02114-2023
Phone: 617-918-1814
Fax: 617-918-0814
Email: guillemin.robert@epa.gov

3. Hi Carolyn, I'm not sure if this is what you are looking for - but there is a list of CT state statutes and
policies that support and guide environmentally preferable purchasing efforts in Connecticut at:
http://www.das.state.ct.us/Purchase/Epp/regulations.htm .
Also a factsheet at: http://www.das.state.ct.us/Purchase/Epp/General_Information.htm

Hope this is what you are looking for.

Judy
Judy Belaval
CT DEP Office of Source Reduction and Recycling
(860) 424-3237




                                                                                                                 66
                                 City Recycling System, November 2007
4 Postings

Original posting:
The City of Walla Walla is switching to a co-mingled collection system for their recyclables. They are
selling these co-mingled materials to Material Recovery Facilities. Because the facilities are across the
state, we have yet to visit any of them but have questions about whether they are separating out the
materials so they can be redirected to their respective waste streams and indeed end up in recycled
content products or whether they are selling the co-mingled materials to overseas buyers or…. Our calls
have not been answered by the Material Recovery Facilities involved. We also wonder if the claims by the
paper manufacturers that they do not have access to enough used paper to produce more recycled
content paper is not perhaps the result of such co-mingled systems.

I would appreciate hearing from you as to whether 1) your communities are still source separating and
2) any information you have about Materials Recovery Facilities, especially any located in the state of
Washington----Sandra

Sandra Cannon, Chair
Walla Walla Area Resource Conservation Committee
Tel. 509-525-8849
E-mail cannon@ecopurchasing.com

Responses:
1. If you haven't already, suggest you read Conservatree's Single Stream Recycling Best Practices
Manual which covers this issue. www.conservatree.org.

Judy Usherson
Senior Environmental Analyst
Eastern Research Group (ERG)
2300 Wilson Blvd. #350
Arlington, VA 22201
judy.usherson@erg.com
703-841-0503
703-841-1440 (fax)

2. I run a large MRF in Boulder, Colorado, that is a 2-stream facility (paper and containers) that is
switching over to “single stream recycling” which allows all recyclables to be put into one bin. I have
been designing and running recycling facilities for decades, so I thought I’d share my thoughts on this
situation.

The Conservatree SS Manual you reference is written by my two good friends, and I was on the “advisory”
panel that helped guide the report development. The authors are experts in their fields, but, we have
been “mudwrestling” this SS issue for a few years now. So, there is a degree of uncertainty and
controversy here.

My view… I support SS and am investing $5 million to upgrade our facility with modern technology so
that the recyclable paper I sell to the world will go to the same buyers at the same price. I understand the
issue of “glass shards” in the fiber, but after doing my own research, I am convinced that the screening
and cleaning technology at the modern paper mills can handle it. One big problem is that all the
                                                                                                          67
“modern” paper mills are being built outside the USA. However, I can’t solve the problems that
globalization creates. The demand for recycled paper is fantastic right now, and the prices paid to MRF’s
has been high for many years now. I think this situation will not change in the future.

My career is recycling and Zero Waste. I am convinced that a great leap forward will be accomplished if
we can convert the world away from a “1-bin trash can” and over to a “3-bin world –
recycling/composting/trash”. If we can get all the households and the businesses of the world to sort
their discards three ways, then the economics of recovering those valuable resources (recycling and
composting) will put a dagger through the heart of landfills and incinerators … which is where scarce
natural resources go to die.

The Conservatree Manual is a good document and rightly warns the world that SS recycling can be done
wrong and on the cheap. That is true, and we must all confront that when we see it. I will volunteer to
call the MRF that is servicing Walla Walla to see if they are doing it correctly. The key statistic for any
MRF is how much material is going to the landfill AFTER it’s been processed in the MRF. This is called a
“contamination” rate, and that is the place to start asking questions. There is no “right number”, but if
that rate goes over 10%, then you have a problem.

Hope this is helpful,

Eric
Eric Lombardi
Executive Director
Eco-Cycle Inc.
5030 Pearl St.
Boulder, CO. 80301
303-444-6634
www.ecocycle.org

3. You might also want to read the article "Rethinking Recycling" that appeared in the August 2007 issue
of Resource Recycling.

Judy Belaval
CT DEP Office of Source Reduction and Recycling
(860) 424-3237




                                                                                                          68
                               Organic Pesticides & IPM, December 2007
4 Posts

Original post:
The Commonwealth of MA is working on a new integrated pest management (IPM) contract. One of the
significant issues we are looking at is trying to incorporate organic pesticides into the contract, if it is
feasible. A few factors make this difficult.
· Our IPM contract has a goal of reducing and eliminating the use of any pesticides (organic or not). An
encouragement to use organic pesticides may sound contrary to the goal of the contract. Some organic
pesticides do not necessarily represent a lower risk to human health. According to the MA Department of
Agricultural Resources, “Just because a product is "organic" it does not necessarily mean low or reduced
risk. Pyrethrums, for example, are pesticides derived from plant extracts but are currently listed as a
'likely' human carcinogen by EPA.”

Our questions are:
· How do other organizations deal with the factors listed above?
· Are there organic pesticides that are definitely lower risk than “regular” ones and (if yes) what are the
ways to specify those?
· Does any organization currently promote the use of organic pesticides in their pest management
contract and (if yes) what is their process/specification for this?

Thank you for your help!
Dmitriy Nikolayev
Procurement Manager
Facilities and Environmental Services
Operational Services Division
Commonwealth of Massachusetts
One Ashburton Place, Room 1017
Boston, MA 02108
Phone: 617-720-3351
Fax: 617-727-4527
dmitriy.nikolayev@state.ma.us

Responses:
1. I have never hear of an organic pesticide.....and I'm not sure this is a good distinction to make....Here's
what [I think] you should include in your specs: encourage the use of non-volatilizing pesticides like baits
and gels, also boric acid....Discourage or prohibit the use of sprays, bombs and foggers. For all pesticides,
require "spot treatments" rather than "broadcast applications," don't allow for scheduled pesticide
"treatments." Minimize pesticide use by allowing their use only when absolutely necessary. For rodents,
encourage the use of snap traps, instead of rodenticides (which poison more kids every year than any
other class of pesticides, according to the Amer Assoc of Poison Control Centers). Make sure your
contract specs address key elements of IPM such as monitoring and inspections, pest identification,
education, and eliminating the conditions that lead to infestations (presence of food, water and harborage
or a "way in" for critters that belong outdoors) rather than relying on the use of chemical controls..

EPA has worked with the National Center for Healthy Housing to develop model contract language for
IPM in affordable housing...It is posted on:
http://www.healthyhomestraining.org/ipm/index.htm

                                                                                                           69
(See sidebar at right)...

You can find IPM contract language for schools at: http://schoolipm.ifas.ufl.edu/Florida/list.htm

GSA has developed good contract language for office buildings (which I have in PDF versions) but they
are not posted on the web.

Finally, there are several emerging training and cert programs for IPM providers ("exterminators" who
practice greener pest control). They include Green Shield, Eco-Wise and Quality Pro Green.

Kathy Seikel
Environmental Protection Agency
Office of Pesticide Programs (7506C)
1200 Penna. Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20460
703-308-8272 (ph)
703-305-5558 (fax)
visit: www.epa.gov/pesticides

2. From the Safer Pest Control Project, an Illinois NGO: The best resource we have is the City of San
Francisco, they have a very comprehensive website-that outlines an approved list of pesticides. They also
have a very good system for allowing pesticides to be used. I think the phrase 'organic pesticide' is
misleading. He is right, pyrethrums are just as toxic as other products. Since pesticides are toxins
designed to kill living things, they all have levels of risk. The challenge is to measure the use of least toxic
within good IPM plans that promotes prevention, maintenance and monitoring. The city of Santa Clara in
California also has a very good website that has samples of contracts, procedures and policies.

3. I cannot remember who asked the original question but one example of a successful local law that has
restricted the use of certain classes of pesticides (on public properties, at least!) is Local Law 37 in NYC.
This law prohibits the use of Tox Category 1 pesticides; pesticides that are classified as known, probable
or possible carcinogens; and pesticides classified by California's Office of Enviro Health Hazards as
developmental toxins.

The law is posted at: http://www.nyccouncil.info/pdf_files/bills/law05037.pdf , and here's a summary:
https://a816-health12ssl.nyc.gov/ll37/PDF/1%20-%20Summary%20LL37%20100605.pdf

Two other resources for using IPM approaches to pest mgmt are: Eco-Wise, a certification program
based out of the SF Bay area....I believe Eco-Wise certified practitioners commit to NOT using certain
classes of pesticides. The web site is: http://www.ecowisecertified.org/

The guy who manage this program is Bart Brandenburg. Bart could answer questions about specific
pesticides. bart_brandenburg@msn.com

Also, Tom Green at the IPM Institute of North American runs a training and cert program for IPM
practitioners called Green Shield. You can read about it at: http://www.greenshieldcertified.org/

or contact Tom at ipmworks@ipminstitute.org


                                                                                                              70
                          Government Vendor Requirement, December 2007
3 Posts

Original post:
Is anyone aware of any state or local government requiring vendors to certify they have a recycling
program in place before being able to do business with the state or local government?

Suzanne Boroff, Environmental Specialist II
Florida Department of Environmental Protection
Waste Reduction Section, Recycling Program
2600 Blair Stone Rd., MS 4570
Tallahassee, FL 32399-2400
Voice 850-245-8718 (Suncom 205-8718)
Fax 850-245-8803 (Suncom 205-8803)
E-mail suzanne.boroff@dep.state.fl.us
Web http://www.dep.state.fl.us

Responses:
1. As of 1993, businesses in Montgomery County, Maryland, must have recycling programs, but I do not
know if Contracting Officers check for compliance with this law before awarding contracts.
http://www.hca.montgomerycountymd.gov/apps/dpwt/solidwaste/store/documents/sorrt/sorrt_guide
book_eng.pdf

Best wishes,
Sam Kanaga, ContractDesk Inc, sam@contractdesk.com, www.contractdesk.com, 877.879.3375

2. Massachusetts included the following language in our grocer contract, but in all honesty we have not
followed up to ensure that the recycling is going as promised.

On-site Recycling – All Bidders must agree to have in place at the time of contract or within three
months of contract award the following recycling programs:
      All corrugated cardboard generated at any company operations
      Recycling/repair reuse for all pallets.
Contractors must also agree to take back from all customers any working pallets at a schedule to be
determined by the contractor and contract user.
It is desirable that bidders have in place or agree to implement other recycling programs at their
facilities such as, but not limited to:
      Office paper
      Mixed containers
      Organics
      Other materials

The following is additional language that we include in most of our contracts. It does not require the
Bidder to have anything in place, but it does keep an open door for us to follow up with the awarded
vendors to investigate and encourage various sustainable activities and practices.

Environmental Plan – Beginning the first year of the contract and throughout the life of the contract,
awarded Contractors must agree to work with OSD and the PMT to examine the feasibility of
implementing an environmental plan. Such a plan may include but not be limited to, the following:
                                                                                                          71
      Periodically review and upon mutual agreement, determine where additional recycled, and/or
       other environmentally preferable products may be added to the contract.
      Consider the introduction of recycled and/or environmentally preferable products into other
       operational areas such as using recycled paper that meets that federal standard for all
       printing/publishing and/or advertising needs (brochures, catalogs, etc.) vehicles maintenance re-
       refined oil and antifreeze retread tires).
      Examine the feasibility of source reduction efforts to reduce or eliminate the use of primary
       packaging (e.g. cardboard, cartons) and secondary packaging (e.g. polystyrene, shrink-wrap).
      Develop a plan to implement collection and recycling of additional materials at the manufacturer’s
       distributor’s facility (ies).
      Encourage environmental initiatives at a corporate/manufacturing level, such as clearly
       identifying recycled content of packaging on the packaging, product life cycle assessments, the
       elimination of ozone depleting chemical usage in the manufacturing process and internal
       environmental auditing related to pollution control, for the purpose of identifying ways to reduce
       the impact of manufacturing on the environment.
      Work with the PMT to develop and distribute information and/or materials to Commonwealth
       customers on the Contractors environmental practices and initiatives throughout the term of the
       contract.
      Implementation of green design initiatives in building renovation or construction projects.
      Utilize alternative fuel vehicles for delivery and/or vehicles equipped with diesel emission control
       devices.

Marcia Deegler
Director of Environmental Purchasing
Operational Services Division
One Ashburton Place, Room 1017
Boston, MA 02108-1552
617-720-3356, 617-727-4527 fax
marcia.deegler@state.ma.us
Visit the EPP Website at www.mass.gov/epp




                                                                                                        72
                                Question about Prizes, February 2008
6 Posts

Original Post:
Hi: I'm helping my son's elementary school initiate a recycling program and they want to run a contest.
Does anyone have a suggestion for prizes that could be awarded for K-6th grade?

Thanks
Fran McPoland

Responses:
1. -How about a Kleen Kanteen water bottle? It is made from stainless steel and is reusable and does not
leach like plastic: www.kleenkanteen.com (Maybe the grand prize)
-Canvas tote bags
-Check out Signature Marketing; they make items out of 100% recycled plastic. The drawback is you may
have to buy a large quantity. This page in particular: http://www.signaturemarketing.com/page/31
-another company like the one above (bigger selection):
http://www.amerimarkdirect.com/ProductHome.aspx?Catalog=Recycling
-A tree to plant
-Wooden pencil or one made from recycled materials
-A trophy made of reused materials

Good luck!
Amy Donovan
Program Director
Franklin County Solid Waste Management District
50 Miles Street
Greenfield, MA 01301
Tel: (413) 772-2438
Fax: (413) 772-3786
Email: amy@franklincountywastedistrict.org
Web: http://www.franklincountywastedistrict.org/

2. Fran, How about:
Solar powered backpack (maybe expensive)
Wind up radio
Wind up torch/phone charger

Otherwise we have a comprehensive list of green products at our database
ECO-Find at www.ecobuy.org.au

This may give you some other ideas.
Regards
Hugh
Hugh Wareham
Email hwareham@ecobuy.org.au
Phone (03) 9349 0401


                                                                                                          73
3. What about a dynamo/battery-less flashlight?

Charen Fegard
Environmental Health Programs Manager
Association of Vermont Recyclers
43 State Street; Suite 8
Montpelier, VT 05601
802.224.1000
techassist@vtrecyclers.org
www.vtrecyclers.org

4. T- Shirts are also popular with most kids K-6. Here are a few T-Shirt sites, if you don't have something
available locally.

http://www.cafepress.com/buy/environmental

http://www.printfection.com/earth/Recycle-Every-Day/_s_44309

http://www.defdesigns.com/environmenttshirts.htm

Good luck!
A. Georgiana Ball
Recycling Coordinator
Virginia Department of General Services
georgiana.ball@dgs.virginia.gov

5. Bicycles are always good - every age one for a girl and one for a boy and they're not too expensive. You
may even get a local vendor to donate!




                                                                                                         74
           RFP questions to differentiate fuel efficiency, etc. for deliveries, February 2008
2 Posts

Original Post:
Has anyone required anything of suppliers/distributors related to fuel efficiency and other
environmental impacts of deliveries?

I'm particularly interested in a way to accurately compare different bidders to each other.

I've thought of a lot of questions, but all of them seem to have biases:
* Average Gallons of petroleum fuel used per delivery (this would favor those who have more
warehouses, because they will travel less miles from warehouse to delivery location, but it doesn't take
into account the additional fuel they use to stock those warehouses)
* Average gallons of petroleum fuel used per miles traveled from warehouse to delivery (same problem
as above)
* Average number of miles traveled by empty trucks per delivery (although this encourages distributors
to schedule pickups to coincide with deliveries, this could also favor those with more warehouses, etc.)
* Fuel efficiency per delivery improvement over last 5 years (favors those who had a lot of improvement
to do)
* Requiring participation in EPA's SmartWay transport program (because SmartWay allows participants
to set their own goals, this would not differentiate those with more ambitious goals or achievements).

Lara
Lara Sutherland
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing
Health Care Without Harm
ph: 303-377-7048
LSutherland@hcwh.org

Response:
What about simply fuel efficiency per delivery (leave off the improvement part)? Also, requiring
SmartWay at least identifies companies that are setting goals (are conscientious) and could be a
screening criterion.

Just a few thoughts off the top of my head.
Beth
Beth Martin
410-436-5202
Chief, Compliance and Pollution Prevention
Ground Water and Solid Waste Program




                                                                                                       75
                      States' mercury-free purchasing guidance, February 2008
2 Posts

Original post:
Our DMB is in the process of updating their contractual boilerplate language for solicitations, included in
a section on Environmental Provisions (see attached) It includes a small paragraph on mercury. It has
been almost 4 years since we last commented on the section and I wondered what other states in the
NEWMOA's jurisdiction were doing. Do you have any recommended language that other states are using
effectively to guide state purchasing decisions? Suggestions? Recommendations?? Referrals??
Thanks in advance !!

Steve
Steven J. Kratzer
Mercury P2 and Policy Specialist
Environmental Science and Services Division Michigan Dept. of
Environmental Quality P.O. Box 30457 Lansing, MI 48909
517/373-0939 tx
517-241-0858 fax
e-mail: Kratzers@michigan.gov

Response:
Purchasers can buy EPEAT registered computer desktops, laptops, and monitors to get products that
meet the RoHS Guidelines which cover mercury. The list of EPEAT registered products is at
www.epeat.net.

Holly Elwood
USEPA
The Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
USEPA Headquarters, MC 7409-M
EPA East Building
1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20460
Email: elwood.holly@epa.gov
Ph: 202-564-8854
Fx: 202-564-8901
www.epa.gov/oppt/epp




                                                                                                         76
                           Carbon footprint of a water bottle, February 2008
4 Posts

Original post:
Are there any life cycle studies on PETE water bottles?
Virginia Walton
Recycling Coordinator
Town of Mansfield
4 South Eagleville Rd
Storrs, CT 06268
860-429-3333

Responses:
1. The US Conference of Mayors has put together a report BOTTLED WATER: THE IMPACT ON
MUNICIPAL WASTE STREAMS which is on the web at
http://www.usmayors.org/uscm/mwma/bottledwaterfactsheet08.pdf

Also the Container Recycling institute has a report on bottled water's impact entitled: Water, Water
Everywhere: The growth of non-carbonated beverages in the United States which is on their web site at:
http://www.container-recycling.org/assets/pdfs/reports/2007-waterwater.pdf

Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3WC21)
Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3163
giuranna.mike@epa.gov

2. Also see the Responsible Purchasing Guide on Bottle Water, with discussions of social &
environmental issues, best practices, cost and supply considerations, and more.

Available for viewing and download at
http://www.responsiblepurchasing.org/purchasing_guides/bottled_water/

Matt Kittell
Program Manager
Responsible Purchasing Network
Center for a New American Dream
6930 Carroll Ave., Suite 900
Takoma Park, MD 20912
301.891.1004
301.891.3684 (fax)
www.ResponsiblePurchasing.org

3. I need to comment on this. Maybe I'm a rarity in this whole issue, but I don't think so. I drink bottled
water when I'm away from home and I recycle my bottles. I don't drink any other bottled beverages,
whether they are alcoholic, carbonated, or sports drinks. Occasionally I drink fruit drinks.

I filter my water at home because it tastes better than what comes out of my faucet in my 50 year old
                                                                                                              77
house - and see lots of evidence of particulates in the filter that are probably lead. That has nothing to do
with the quality of our municipal water but I am not going to replace all the plumbing coming into my
house. And I know that the municipal water tastes different even coming out of different drinking
fountains in our state building. Who knows what those devices are adding to the water (does anyone on
the list serve know?) besides bad tastes.

When are the same arguments going to be raised against people who drink all the more expensive, calorie
high sugary drinks full of chemicals that are manufactured in factories that have larger carbon footprints
than the bottled water I prefer? They are also a much larger percentage of what is being consumed than
bottled water. According to the second attachment, bottled water in 2005 was 14% of the market share
compared to soda (42%), beer (29%), wine and liquor (2%) and flavored non-carbs (13%).

I'd rather see people drinking bottled water than any of the other choices.
Thanks, I try not to rant too often.

Laurie
Laurie J. Tenace
Environmental Specialist
Florida Department of Environmental Protection
2600 Blair Stone Road, MS 4555
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400
PH: (850) 245-8759
FAX: (850) 245-8811
Laurie.Tenace@dep.state.fl.us




                                                                                                            78
                   Paper & office supply policies, specs & RFP language, February 2008
2 Posts

Original post:
Greetings, all. The City of Palo Alto is revising its specifications for copy paper and its contract for office
supplies. If you have any of the following that you could forward, I would be much obliged.

-Specs for 100% recycled content PCF paper (or similar) and vendor you purchase from
-Specs/RFP language for office supplies and vendor you contract with
-Specs for copier contracts and vendor

Many thanks!!!

Julie Weiss
City of Palo Alto
Regional Water Quality Control Plant
2501 Embarcadero Way
Palo Alto, CA 94303
650.329.2117
fx: 650.494.3531

Response:
Julie, Just one advice that I can pass along from experience is to check with your copier vendor to ensure
they have a recycle program (or a program is available through a vendor) for used toner cartridges. A
change in vendors was made and the new equipment does not have a recyclable toner cartridge. We are
actively seeking an option for the spent equipment.

Hope this helps.

Regards,

David John Flammio
Environmental, Health and Safety Manager
Pall Life Sciences - Long Island Operations
2200 Northern Boulevard
East Hills, New York 11548
Phone: 516.801.9009
Cell: 516.369.0683
Fax: 516.484.3818




                                                                                                                  79
                                Restroom stall advertising, March 2008
2 Posts

Original post:
Hello, Has anyone out there done a restroom stall advertising campaign? If so, did you buy a plastic case
to hold the signage up on the door or wall of the stall? Where did you buy them? How much did they cost?
Is it necessary to buy and install a plastic holder/cover for the signage? Any suggestions and feedback
are appreciated. Thanks!

Amber Wells
Education and Outreach Specialist II
Thurston County Solid Waste
929 Lakeridge Drive SW
Bldg. 4, Room 100
Olympia, WA 98502
Phone: (360) 754-3355 ext. 7669
Fax: (360) 754-4682

Response:
Hi, As Sandia National Laboratories, we use a venue called the Porcelain Press. It’s a monthly newsletter
that addresses safety and environmental topics; 3-4 topics per issue. We use a simple plastic file cover
taped on the door. The old issue is recycled and the new issue slipped inside the cover monthly. I think
the issues would get too dog-eared without the cover.

Kristin
Kristin Klossner
Sandia National Laboratories
Division 2000 Environmental Management System Coordinator
Org 4131/MS 0958
Bldg. 878 Room A203
Albuquerque, NM 87185
(505) 844-9204
Fax (505) 844-2894
kakloss@sandia.gov




                                                                                                        80
                             EPP professional job description, March 2008
2 Postings

Original post:
Hello- I am working with a municipality that is interested in filling a position for an EPP
professional. Does anyone have access to a job description- or thoughts on what should be included in
such a job description- for an entry or mid-level employee that will be responsible for researching and
specifying greener products- particularly for public office facilities. Thanks!

Abigail Corso, PE
Delta Institute
53 West Jackson, Suite 230
Chicago, Illinois 60604
312-554-0900 ext. 25
www.delta-institute.org
www.deltacarbon.org

Response: See next page.




                                                                                                          81
STATE OF CALIFORNIA                                              DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL SERVICES
DUTY STATEMENT
GS 907T (REV. 03/05)                  SHADED AREA TO REFLECT RECLASS POSITION NUMBER ONLY
INSTRUCTIONS: Refer to the Essential Functions Duty           RPA-              EFFECTIVE DATE:
Statement Manual for instructions on how to complete the               -PROC
Duty Statement.
DGS OFFICE OR CLIENT AGENCY                            POSITION NUMBER (Agency - Unit - Class -
Procurement Division                                   Serial)
                                                                - -      -
UNIT NAME AND CITY LOCATED                             CLASS TITLE
Engineering Unit – West Sacramento                     Associate Procurement Engineer (EPP)
WORKING DAYS AND WORKING HOURS                         SPECIFIC LOCATION ASSIGNED TO
Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.           West Sacramento
PROPOSED INCUMBENT (If known)                          CURRENT POSITION NUMBER (Agency - Unit -
                                                       Class - Serial)
                                                             - -       -
YOU ARE A VALUED MEMBER OF THE DEPARTMENT’S TEAM. YOU ARE EXPECTED TO WORK
COOPERATIVELY WITH TEAM MEMBERS AND OTHERS TO ENABLE THE DEPARTMENT TO PROVIDE
THE HIGHEST LEVEL OF SERVICE POSSIBLE. YOUR CREATIVITY AND PRODUCTIVITY ARE
ENCOURAGED.2YOUR EFFORTS TO TREAT OTHERS FAIRLY, HONESTLY AND WITH RESPECT ARE
BRIEFLY (1 or sentences) DESCRIBE THE POSITION’S ORGANIZATIONAL SETTING AND MAJOR
IMPORTANT TO EVERYONE WHO WORKS WITH YOU.
FUNCTIONS
Under the direction of the supervising engineer you are responsible for statewide Environmental
Preferable Purchasing (EPP) Program. Your duties include integration of environmental friendly
products into State purchasing operations, maintaining a web based best practices manual, training state
employees on EPP awareness, and working with others to accomplish the business goals of the
Procurement Division.




                                                                                                      82
% of     Indicate the duties and responsibilities assigned to the position and the percentage of time
time     spent on each. Group related tasks under the same percentage with the highest percentage
perfor   first. (Use additional sheet if necessary)
ming
duties
         ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS

 35%     In order to integrate environmental friendly products into State purchasing operations you are
         responsible for identifying commodities or groups of commodities for Product Life Cycle
         Assessment, Benefits to Human Health, the Environment, conservation of natural resources,
         and Economy that have a reduced effect on human health and the environment as compared to
         competing goods serving the same purpose by conducting research, working with
         environmental agencies, manufacturers, reviewing state procurements, and prioritizing
         products in terms of their potential environmental benefits and expenditures.
 30%
         In order to promote EPP, work in cooperation with other agencies and organizations as
         appropriate, support progress toward the goals of the Governor’s Green Action Team,
         recommend additional actions, mandates or legislation that may be warranted to ensure
         progress is consistent with Assembly Bill 498 by using technical research, technical expertise,
 25%     and networking.

         In order to ensure State Purchasing Operations are in compliance be cognizant of existing and
         new Laws, Mandates, and Guidelines relating to Environmentally Preferable Purchasing by
         using technical research, expertise, and networking with others and organizations.

         In order to promote EPP, work in cooperation with other agencies and organizations as
         appropriate, support progress toward the goals of the Governor’s Green Action Team,
         recommend additional actions, mandates or legislation that may be warranted to ensure
         progress is consistent with Assembly Bill 498 by using technical research, technical expertise,
         and networking.


SUPERVISOR’S STATEMENT: I HAVE DISCUSSED THE DUTIES OF THE POSITION WITH THE EMPLOYEE
SUPERVISOR’S NAME (Print)     SUPERVISOR’S SIGNATURE                      DATE

EMPLOYEE’S STATEMENT: I HAVE DISCUSSED WITH MY SUPERVISOR THE DUTIES OF THE POSITION
AND HAVE RECEIVED A         COPY OF THE DUTY STATEMENT
The statements contained in this duty statement reflect general details as necessary to describe
the principal functions of this job. It should not be considered an all-inclusive listing of work
requirements. Individuals may perform other duties as assigned, including work in other
functional areas to cover absence of relief, to equalize peak work periods or otherwise balance
the workload.
EMPLOYEE’S NAME (Print)             EMPLOYEE’S SIGNATURE                                DATE




                                                                                                           83
STATE OF CALIFORNIA                                               DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL SERVICES
DUTY STATEMENT
GS 907T (REV. 03/05)                                                                   RPA- 6900-PROC
% of     Indicate the duties and responsibilities assigned to the position and the percentage of time
time     spent on each. Group related tasks under the same percentage with the highest percentage
perfor first. (Use additional sheet if necessary)
ming
duties
         MARGINAL FUNCTIONS
  10%    In order for successful procurement of goods, increased EPP awareness, and to keep current in
         the field and emerging technologies coordinates and participates in meetings, workshops, and
         conferences with customers, suppliers, and colleagues by using technical expertise, oral and
         written communication, visual aids, handout literature, etc.

         KNOWLEDGE AND ABILITIES
         Knowledge of:
         Engineering mathematics, engineering fundamentals, dimensional tolerance, testing methods
         and limitations as to repeatability, accuracy and reliability; purchasing standard and
         specification development, and aspects of rejecting nonconforming purchases.
         Ability to:
         Make engineering computations; analyze design capabilities of equipment, determine
         compliance with written specifications and determine relevance of deviation from
         specifications; prepare accurate and concise reports; speak and write effectively; and develop
         accurate and concise standards of specifications reflecting product suitability, adaptability and
         utility of items in relation to their use.

         DESIRABLE QUALIFICATIONS
          Intermediate computer skills including electronic mail, routine database activity, word
           processing, spreadsheet, graphics, flow charts, internet, etc.
          Ability to write comprehensively, communicate with all levels of management, including
           executive and peers, attorneys, and external customers.

         SPECIAL PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS
          Dependable; responsible; positive attitude
          Ability to lead and participate in teams
          Ability to provide objective overview of situations
          Willingness to accept challenges and handle multiple projects simultaneously
          Ability to effectively handle stress and deadlines

         WORK ENVIRONMENT, PHYSICAL OR MENTAL ABILITIES
          Professional office environment, appropriate business attire required
          Daily use of phone, fax, copiers and general office and communication equipment
          Occasional use of cell phone, pagers, and laptop computer.
          Frequent use of a computer and related software applications and the Internet at a
           workstation
          Sitting in a seated position for extended periods of time
          Travel throughout the State to survey State agencies and suppliers
          Occasional off-site meetings within Sacramento and occasional out-of-town meetings within
                                                                                                         84
STATE OF CALIFORNIA                                               DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL SERVICES
DUTY STATEMENT
GS 907T (REV. 03/05)                                                                   RPA- 6900-PROC
% of     Indicate the duties and responsibilities assigned to the position and the percentage of time
time     spent on each. Group related tasks under the same percentage with the highest percentage
perfor first. (Use additional sheet if necessary)
ming
duties
            California that may require the use of various transportation modes, i.e. airplane, taxi, car,
            etc.
          Use of a hand cart to transport documents and/or equipment up to 15-20 lbs., i.e. laptop
            computer, files, reference manuals, solicitation documents, etc.




                                                                                                         85
                                     Bamboo flooring, March 2008
2 Posts

Original post:
Does anyone know whether there is a way to ensure/certify that bamboo flooring is safe from toxic glues
and other toxic materials? Most bamboo comes from China. Anyone hear of Teragren Signature Bamboo?
Any type that you can recommend?

Scott Cassel, Executive Director/Founder
Product Stewardship Institute, Inc.
137 Newbury Street, 7th Floor
Boston, MA 02116
617-236-4822 (ph)
617-859-9889 (fax)
scott@productstewardship.us
www.productstewardship.us

Response:
I do know that there is a lot of poor quality bamboo that will not last. Bamboo should be 3 or 4 years old
before it is harvested, that is when it gets a much denser hard composition. Some bamboo is
harvested way to young and the bamboo is softer and so will not last or be as strong.




                                                                                                        86
                                         LEDs vs. CFLs, March 2008
2 Posts

Original post:
I'm writing to inquire if any of you have done, seen, or have data, case studies, or links to life cycle
analysis done on LED lighting vs. CFL lighting? Cost benefit/utility, etc.?

We're looking into how to plan current and future buildings and their replacement. Recognizing T-8
fluorescent are specified for most current projects.

Thanks,

Frank Kinder
Sustainability Project Coordinator
1638 Elwell Street, Bld. 6236
Fort Carson, CO 80913-4000
Office: 719-526-4682
Cell: 719-337-5522
Website: http://sems.carson.army.mil

Response:
Frank , The U.S. Department of Energy is developing the ENERGY STAR standard for white LEDs.
Manufacturers are presently having their white LEDs tested against the standard. ENERGY STAR criteria
are based on luminaire efficacy (not the device/chip) so the entire luminaire needs to be tested. I'd
encourage you to read the criteria (http://www.netl.doe.gov/ssl/). Some LEDs being tested are only
marginally more efficacious than incandescent. Some outperform CFL luminaires. Your best assurance is
to make sure the LEDs you consider have the ENERGY STAR label. We should see the first
products available after Sep. 30, 2008----Sandra

Sandra Cannon, Technical Support
U.S. Department of Energy Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
Tel. 509-529-1535




                                                                                                           87
                                Aluminum Wheel Cleaner, March 2008
3 Posts

Original post:
Does anyone have any experience with environmentally preferable aluminum wheel cleaners? Maybe the
soy based ones?

Thanks.

Karen Hamilton
Environmental Purchasing Program
King County Procurement and Contract Services
Seattle, Washington

Responses:
1. Hi, Karen, I don't personally, but one of my favorite resources, California's Institute for Research and
Technical Assistance (IRTA) has done studies on various solvents for automotive applications. From this
page: http://www.irta.us/reports.htm. Comes this report:
Automotive Aerosol Cleaning Products; Low-VOC, Low Toxicity Alternatives - 2006 (No Appendices).

This project was sponsored by Cal/EPA's Department of Toxic Substances Control. The project involved
working with 10 auto repair facilities in the southern California area to assist them in converting away
from toxic and high VOC aerosol cleaners for at least a three month period. Facilities decided to convert
to various alternatives including spray bottles using water-based cleaners instead of aerosols, water-
based brake cleaning systems in place of aerosols and alternative water-based, vegetable based and
acetone low-VOC aerosols developed by IRTA. The results demonstrated that auto repair shops can
convert to low-VOC, low toxicity alternatives.

And,

Safer Alternatives to Solvent Aerosol Automotive Cleaning Products - 2004 (No Appendices) The Hazard
Evaluation System and Information Services (HESIS) contracted with IRTA to identify and test alternative
safer water-based aerosol cleaning products. The focus was on developing and testing alternative aerosol
cleaners for four categories of automotive cleaning including engine degreasing, carburetor and fuel
injection system cleaning, brake cleaning and general purpose degreasing. The California Air Resources
Board (CARB) also contracted with IRTA to conduct a related project that involved investigating low-VOC,
low toxicity alternatives and the research and testing for the HESIS project were expanded and enhanced.
The reports prepared for CARB can be accessed on their website at
http://www.arb.ca.gov/homepage.htm
I hope it helps.

Diana Ruth Olegre
Washington State Department of Ecology
Hazardous Waste and Toxics Reduction Program
Community Outreach and Environmental Education Specialist
dole461@ecy.wa.gov
360-407-6609


                                                                                                         88
2. Karen, In 2005, the Idaho National Laboratory tested soy based “SAFE CARE Aircraft and Metal
Cleaner” (From Gemtek www.gemtek.com) in different applications and found most to work well: rubber
surfaces, fender flares, aluminum wheels. INL found it to be a good cleaner and polish but not abrasive
enough to take off initial road grit: “We found that the biobased metal cleaner keeps the wheels sparkling
and it reduces significantly the amount of the harsher abrasive used to remove corrosion.” If you think
your fleet folks are interested, I could put them in contact with the person in charge of the testing at
Idaho----Sandra

Sandra Cannon, Technical Support
U.S. Department of Energy Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
Tel. 509-529-1535




                                                                                                       89
              Promotional items - seeking green specs & contract language, April 2008
2 Posts

Original post:
Does anyone have any experience with environmentally preferable aluminum wheel cleaners? Maybe the
As MA prepares to go out to bid for a state contract for promotional items, I am looking for current
specifications and contract language to strengthen the selection of environmentally preferable products
on contract and address a broader range of environmental impacts. For example, any language, specs or
suggestions you may have to eliminate the use of mercury, lead, and other toxics in promo items,
preference (or requirements where appropriate) for use of recycled materials, specifications directed at
social responsibility issues, metrics to measure any specifications or criteria referenced, evaluation tools
or strategies to provide preference to vendors offering sustainable solutions, etc. Your comments and
sample language along these lines is welcome. Thank you.

Marcia Deegler
Director of Environmental Purchasing
Operational Services Division
One Ashburton Place, Room 1017
Boston, MA 02108-1552
617-720-3356, 617-727-4527 fax
marcia.deegler@state.ma.us

Response:
Ms. Deegler, You might check King County, WA's site:
http://www.metrokc.gov/procure/green/index.htm

Theirs seems to be one of the most comprehensive EPP programs around. Also, Eric Nelson of King
County is a phenomenal resource, you might try contacting him.

Eric Nelson, Environmental Purchasing Manager
eric.nelson@kingcounty.gov
(206)263-9300

Regards,
Ashley
Ashley Wilson
NYSDEC - Pollution Prevention
625 Broadway, 4th Floor
Albany, NY 12233-1750
E-mail: alwilson@gw.dec.state.ny.us
P: 518.402.9175
F: 518.402.9168




                                                                                                          90
                               Reuse/Recycle of 3-gallon toilets, April 2008
3 Posts

Original post:
We are working with the construction community in Walla Walla to cross share information on more
environmental construction methods and materials. One of the items we are struggling to handle as a
result is the 3-gallon toilets. As folks install the dual flush (0.8 – 1.6 liters), we have an excess of toilets
that we do not want reused as toilets nor do we want them going to the landfill. We have checked with
our local supplies of stone and fill and they do not take porcelain. How are your communities recycling
toilets?

Appreciate your help---Sandra
Sandra Cannon, Chair
Walla Walla Area Resource Conservation Committee
Tel. 509-525-8849

Responses:
1. San Antonio used their glass crusher on the toilets and made a walking path with the product...
2. Sandra, Here's a story from Waste News a few years back:

WMI converts old toilets into new homes for oysters, By: Susanna Duff October 29, 2001
Howard Burns wants your toilet. He'll take worn tubs, old sinks and chipped china, too. The regional
manager for Waste Management Inc.'s landfill in Hampton, Va., is collecting porcelain to help save oysters
in the Chesapeake Bay.

``The only unknown is if we'll get enough,'' Burns said. The Chesapeake Bay's oyster population has
dropped by more than 98 percent in the past century. An effort to increase it tenfold by 2010 has been
hampered by the oysters' self-sufficiency. They live in reefs made from their own shells. Fewer oysters
mean fewer reefs, which leads back to fewer oysters.

Toilets and other appliances are a logical substitute, said Cheryl Copper, environmental manager for the
city of Hampton. ``Porcelain appliances are smooth on one side and rough on the inside, just like an
oyster shell,'' she said.

Following a successful pilot that added porcelain to an existing reef, Copper and Burns launched the
porcelain project in June.

Local plumbers and construction and demolition haulers have brought old appliances, typically with the
plumbing removed, to the landfill. Volunteers arrive throughout the day to smash the porcelain into small
pieces. Sometimes Waste Management employees help with the smashing. WMI stores the crushed
porcelain on-site. Since June, it has collected 100 cubic yards from local markets, including plumbers and
construction and demolition companies. ``We're uncovering sources,'' Burns said. ``We've had calls from
as far away as Rhode Island. But it's not enough.''

Copper estimates the project will need a total of 1,000 cubic yards. If it relied only on the local market,
collection could take 30 months. ``The real coup is tapping into manufacturers,'' Burns said.

The two are working out a deal with a porcelain manufacturer who would transport damaged porcelain
to the landfill. The quantity could speed the collection to possibly three months, Burns said.
                                                                                                                   91
While he is offering storage space, Burns has a personal interest in the oyster bed. The plan was hatched
when Burns became one of 50 waterfront homeowners raising oysters for the project. ``Most people get
into this industry because of their interest in the environment,'' he said. ``The porcelain project is just an
example of Waste Management's environmental stewardship.''

Contact Waste News reporter Susanna Duff at (202) 662-7210 or sduff@crain.com

Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3WC21)
Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3163
giuranna.mike@epa.gov




                                                                                                             92
                         Compressed air for cleaning of computers, April 2008
3 Posts

Original post:
Hi, Does anyone have any information regarding the global warming potential of compressed air used to
clean computers? I have read that using HFC152a instead of HFC134a is "better" for the environment, but
you have any suggestions for other alternative products that perform similarly? Or know of any
alternative cleaning methods?

Thanks for your help, Johanna

Johanna Kertesz
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Specialist
Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
(651) 297-5518
johanna.kertesz@state.mn.us

Responses:
1. Johanna, The Port of Seattle has eliminated the use of compressed "air" for cleaning keyboards,
computers, etc. We stopped using it for two reasons; ozone damage and possibility of exacerbating
conditions like asthma. We use battery powered or plug in mini-vacs for those basic cleaning jobs now.
Some folks still use the compressed air in a limited capacity, like for blowing out the filters in fire
detectors and cleaning some internal components for computers where a vac or blower is simply not
powerful enough. Here is a copy of a statement that our Health and Safety Team put out a few months
ago.

Product Alert
FROM: Health and Safety Team
RE: Product Alert: Compressed Air Keyboard Cleaners products May Be Harmful

Compressed air keyboard cleaner products can be harmful to your health and the environment. Health
and Safety is in the process of reviewing the Port's chemical inventory. As part of this review, it was noted
several organizations list compressed air products for cleaning of computer keyboard trays. These
products include Dust Off, Office Duster, Dust Free, Air Duster, and other products available from
Keeney's Office Supply.

Many of these products are labeled "nonflammable" and "ozone safe". However, a review of the material
safety data sheet (MSDS) for these products indicate that these products are comprised of chemicals that
can exacerbate pre-existing health conditions for certain people and are a hazard to the ozone layer.

The Port is committed to environmental stewardship and providing a healthy and safe workplace.
Therefore, Health & Safety and Seaport Environmental are requesting your support in discontinuing use
of compressed air products for computer keyboard cleaning. As an alternative, an environmentally
friendly and self-regenerating product can be purchased for keyboard cleaning, such as the Battery
Operated Dust Blower listed on page 501-F of the 2007 Keeney's catalog.

Hope this helps
Rob Lane
Port of Seattle, Marine Maintenance
                                                                                                          93
2. The best way to clean PC/MACs and components is compressed air from an AIR COMPRESSOR.

There is not enough air pressure (or volume of air) in any can to actually clean anything, plus as this
message points, out there are chemicals in cans that could pose a health risk.

I have been cleaning computers for over 15 years, and at 60 - 80 PSI with a suitable air nozzle, using
compressed air from a small portable compressor. This cleans hidden dust from the power supplies and
all nooks and crannies.

BTW, I do not recommend using a vacuum cleaner on any laptop keyboards or delicate internal circuitry
as damage may result from static or physical contact.

-Daniel Hoviss
Dosolutions Inc.




                                                                                                          94
                       Reusable shopping bags for City distribution, April 2008
3 Posts

Original post:
Is anyone aware of a Reusable Shopping Bag that fits this specification?

Objectives:

   Bag price to be less than $1 each
   Supplier to have capability for large quantities – up to 500,000 in three months
   Bags to be made in USA or, if overseas, in a factory meeting Fair Trade standards or conforming the to
    the Workers’ Rights Coalition Code of Conduct (used by U.S. colleges and universities)
   Delivery of 10% of order by July 1, 2008
   Balance of order delivered by Sept. 1, 2008
   Bags will last through regular shopping trips for 3—5 years

Type of product: Reusable shopping bag

Product specifications:
 Made 100 % from recycled material
 Fully recyclable in Seattle curbside collection program at end of life
 Sewn or otherwise constructed so there is flat bottom equal to the flat bottom of a standard
   disposable paper shopping bag typically used at grocery stores. Dimensions of rectangular bottom: to
   come at least XX inches deep Depth of standard paper grocery bag, dimension come
 A handle on each of the long sides
 Available in various colors
 Logos printed on both long sides
 Text/graphics to come
 Printing to be done with soy-based inks

    Thank you in advance,
    Jason L. Edens
    Purchasing and Contracting Services
    Dept. of Executive Administration
    City of Seattle
    206-684-0445 Office
    206-233-5155 Fax
    jason.edens@seattle.gov

Responses:
1. Hi Jason, Green Seal is working on a standard for reusable shopping bags, I'd love to touch base with
you about your specifications.

As far as recycled materials, I think your best bets will be recycled PET (plastic soda bottles) and recycled
cotton, although I am not sure if they are being offered at 100%. Your typical recyclable material is non-
woven polypropylene (PP). It's equivalent to a plastic #5, so it may/may not be able to be handled by
curbside recycling. As far as the PP, I know of several companies that can be made in bulk, can be many
different colors and logos and some of them say that they meet Fair Trade standards. For the most part,
                                                                                                           95
those are your typical bags that you see in the grocery stores. Not sure about the soy-based inks.

For more specific information, I'd recommend getting in touch with Vincent Cobb at
www.reusablebags.com. He may know more about what products are available.

Hope that helps!

Christine Chase
cchase@greenseal.org
202-872-6400

2. The city of Austin just paid $4/bag for a USA-made, fair-wage bag, but we bought in small quantity. If
you'd like to contact the lady that purchased these and find out who the vendor is, call Rebecca Hays,
512-974-1986. You can also look into a US woman-owned company to see if they fit your specs:
http://www.enviro-tote.com/

Katherine




                                                                                                        96
                                Green furniture purchasing, April 2008
3 Postings

Original post:
I am looking for EPP standards for the purchase of office furniture, ideally something similar to the
EPEAT criteria for electronics. Can anyone help?

Thanks!
Christina
Christina Reeves
Conservation Resource Analyst
Whatcom County, WA
(360)676-6700 ext. 50121

Response:
1. Christina, Try our EPP web page for office furniture at
http://yosemite1.epa.gov/oppt/eppstand2.nsf/Pages/DisplayAisle.html?Open&Office%20Store&Furnish
ing&Type=2
or
http://yosemite1.epa.gov/oppt/eppstand2.nsf/Pages/ListTables.html?Open&Office%20Store&Furnishin
g&Type=A
homepage is at http://yosemite1.epa.gov/oppt/eppstand2.nsf

Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3WC21)
Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3163
giuranna.mike@epa.gov

2. Christina, There are several EPP standards that may apply to office furniture:
The Business and Institutional Furniture Manufacturer's Association (BIFMA, www.bifma.org) has
released a draft Sustainability Assessment Standard (SAS) for office furniture. This is cutting-edge and
can be found at http://bifma.org/public/SusFurnStd.html. Unfortunately, this is not final so no product is
certified as meeting it.

BIFMA also has a standard for Formaldehyde and TVOC (toluene) Emissions of Low-emitting Office
furniture and seating which can be found at www.bifma.org/standards.

Scientific Certification Systems certifies office furniture meeting SCS's Indoor Air Advantage and
California's Section 01350 for indoor air quality. You can find certified products at
www.scscertified.org/iag.

Greenguard is another that certifies to indoor air quality, www.greenguard.org.

The State of CA has released an office furniture bid for modular office furniture that has stringent
environmental requirements, http://www.cscr.dgs.ca.gov/ads/contract_ad_detail.asp?AdNbr=A55017.
This will not be awarded until later this year. In the SF Bay Area, local vendors can be found at
www.builditgreen.org/guide and check under "furnishings."
                                                                                                        97
                              Construction Contract Question, May 2008
2 Posts

Original post:
Greetings – A recent participant in one of NIGP’s green purchasing webinars sent me a question and I’m
hoping someone on this list can help:

[We are] trying to develop a worksheet for our [construction] contract specifications which will request
that contractors include a breakdown of costs for recycling, etc. in their contract bids. Are there any
templates or examples you can recommend that will aid us in developing this worksheet?

Can anyone help?

       - Scot
Scot Case
TerraChoice Environmental Marketing Inc.
29 North Carolina Avenue
Reading, PA 19608
(w) 610 779-3770
(c) 610 781-1684
scase@terrachoice.com

Response:
Hello Scott, I assume there are lots of versions out there so no need to start from scratch. Our Agency of
Natural Resources developed a job-site form and it is available on our website at
http://www.anr.state.vt.us/dec/wastediv/recycling/planning.htm#tracking. You can use the Excel form
or calculate simpler projects in Word.

The University of Vermont also developed a tracking form which I will send in a separate email.

Carolyn

Carolyn Grodinsky
Waste Management Division
103 South Main Street
Waterbury, VT 05671
(802) 241-3477
http://www.anr.state.vt.us/dec/wastediv/recycling/CandD.htm




                                                                                                         98
                              Rags: wiping & sorbent material, May 2008
3 Posts

Original post:
Hi, does anyone have any environmental specs for rags? One of our contract specialists is looking into
developing a contract for the following: "The rags will be made of both recycled and new materials, 100%
cotton. And the sorbent materials will consist of booms, socks, pads, spill kits, etc. that would be used to
soak up both oil and other liquids."

Thanks in advance for your help,

Johanna
Johanna Kertesz
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Specialist
Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
(651) 297-5518
johanna.kertesz@state.mn.us

Responses:
1. It sounds to me like you're looking for absorbents. Both USDA's Biobased products program and the
CPG program cover these items. You can find specs and suppliers by going to www.epa.gov/cpg
(Miscellaneous Products) and to http://www.biopreferred.gov.

Judy Usherson
Senior Communications Manager
Eastern Research Group (ERG)
judy.usherson@erg.com
703-841-0503
703-841-1440 (fax)

2. Joanna, You might want to add this company to your bid list:
   United Textiles
   2225 Grant Avenue
   San Lorenzo, CA94580
   (510) 276-2288
   www.unitedtextileinc.com

Their website appears to be down now but this company has been recycling clothing and other materials
since 1931 into absorbents, rags, etc.

Beth
Beth Eckl
EPE Consulting
52 Saint Timothy Ct.
Danville, CA 94526
(925) 838-2731
eckl@sbcglobal.net


                                                                                                          99
                Cleaning Standards: EcoLogo & Green Seal Harmonization, May 2008
4 Posts

Original post:
Greetings – Some of you have been following the revisions to the Green Seal GS-37 cleaning standard.
Part of the revision was to bring the Green Seal (GS-37) and EcoLogo (CCD-146) standards closer
together.

The EcoLogo standard is about to launch its formal review of the CCD-146 standard and is soliciting
public opinion about continuing efforts to harmonize the EcoLogo and Green Seal standards.

I strongly encourage folks to let your voices be heard. Please e-mail: Robin Duchesneau, Manager,
Environmental Science & Criteria, at rduchesneau@terrachoice.com

If you would like more information, I have a document I can e-mail you that outlines the remaining
differences between the EcoLogo and Green Seal standards and provides additional information useful
comparing the two standards.

Thank you.
       - Scot
 Scot Case
TerraChoice Environmental Marketing Inc.
29 North Carolina Avenue
Reading, PA 19608
(w) 610 779-3770
(c) 610 781-1684
scase@terrachoice.com

Responses:
1. Hello Fareed, From the analysis we did comparing the cleaning standards from Green Seal and
Environmental Choice we concluded they were comparable. While one might be stronger in one area, the
other was stronger in another. And in the end we concluded that they were both excellent programs.

But the real reason I am commenting is because we believe there is a very different issue that has to be
considered beyond which standard might have some minor advantage over the other. And this issue has
to do with what happens when there is only a single approach used in the marketplace?

Today we are trying to find solutions for problems that have never really been dealt with before such as
asthmagens, persistent and bioaccumulative compounds, and other chronic health problems caused by
the additive effective of numerous compounds at low concentrations over extended periods of
time. Since there is so much we don’t know, I believe that we would all benefit by pursuing multiple
approaches.

Furthermore, I think history has proven that competition also leads to other benefits. These include
improved products, better customer service and reduced costs.

In the end, I think the issue of “harmonization” goes far beyond how similar their standards are and in the
specific case of the commercial cleaning industry which has seriously bought into the “green cleaning”
concept and where end-user programs such as LEED-EB, Green Guide for Healthcare, Quick & Easy Guide
                                                                                                       100
to Green Cleaning is Schools from the Healthy Schools Campaign, as well as the new legislation on Green
Cleaning in New York and Illinois all use both Green Seal and Environmental Choice (giving preference to
neither).

I believe this demonstrates that commercial and institutional suppliers and consumers are sophisticated
enough to use multiple standards (please know that I am NOT trying to denigrate the average residential
consumer, but the fact is that an institutional buyer literally will spend many hours, if not days trying to
figure out which glass cleaner to buy, while the average residential consumer might spend a few minutes
and be more influenced by which coupons they have…).

So my preference would be to see a number of organizations all offering solutions to some of the most
challenging health and environmental problems we’ve yet to tackle.

Steve
Stephen P. Ashkin, President
The Ashkin Group, LLC - The Green Cleaning Experts
3644 Tamarron Drive Bloomington, IN 47408
Voice: 812/332-7950 Fax: 812/332-7965
Email: SteveAshkin@AshkinGroup.com
Visit us at: www.AshkinGroup.com

2. Dear Scot, I would love to see the document comparing the two standards. I was under the
impression that GS and EcoLogo were going to harmonize their standards this time around, but that
doesn't seem to have happened. Do you know why?

Thanks for the information.
Best,
Carol Westinghouse
INFORM, Inc.
Cleaning For Health
Program Manager
www.informinc.org
westies@ecoisp.com
802-626-8643




                                                                                                         101
                                       Swimming pools, May 2008
4 Postings

Original post:
Greetings EPPers, What do folks think is the best technology for alternative ways to treat water at
commercial sized swimming pools? YMCA's etc. I've been looking at salt chlorine generators, ozonators,
ionizers and ionizer/ oxidizers. All methods to reduce the amount of chlorine needed to sanitize the pool.
Any experience with the ins and the outs of these technologies would be appreciated.

Peter Cooke , Pollution Prevention Program Manager
Maine Department of Environmental Protection
312 Canco Road
Portland, ME 04103
(207) 791-8101 (207) 822-6303 fax
peter.cooke@maine.gov
www.state.me.us/dep

Responses:
1. Several years ago, recycled glass as filtration media was tested/proven in a King County Aquatic
Center pool. I am not sure how much it reduced chlorine usage. If of interest, I can find out from the
consultant how this system worked, if still in use, etc. Michelle Gaither, PPRC

2. Several years ago, I learned about the Dolphin WaterCare technology, a non-chemical technology that
is being used for boilers and cooling towers. It's been popular with the green building movement (LEED
points can be earned). The technology uses a series of electromagnetic pulses to destroy bacteria and
eliminate scale. As I remember, an application was being prepared for swimming pools, but I couldn't find
any documentation on their web site. www.dolphinwatercare.com/Index.aspx. Anyway, a follow-up call
may be worthwhile. Rob

3. Peter, We have all of those technologies on a statewide contract in MA. the ionization was added
around 2002 and has had the most experience - mostly very good as far as I know. Several of the
application went into college campus pools and a couple in our outdoor park pools. The salt chlorine
generation and ozonation were just added last year, so we don't have as much experience. (Contract #
FAC46).

Our vendor on contract who carries all three technologies is Water Purification Associates (WPA). I think
he can provide a good comparison discussion for you as well as info on his MA customers. His contact info
is: James Cochin, 617-524-3160, jrcwpa@msn.com.

Marcia Deegler, Director of Environmental Purchasing
Operational Services Division
One Ashburton Place, Room 1017
Boston, MA 02108-1552
617-720-3356, 617-727-4527 fax
marcia.deegler@state.ma.us
Visit the EPP Website at www.mass.gov/epp



                                                                                                         102
                                       Hand sanitizers, May 2008
3 Postings

Original post:
Hi, Does anyone have language or other resources on hand sanitizers? I am working with an agency that
is purchasing Purell Hand Sanitizer but wants to specify the greenest product that still prepares for
concerns about a flu pandemic.

Thanks,
Beth
Beth Eckl
EPE Consulting
52 Saint Timothy Court
Danville, CA 94526
Phone/Fax: (925) 838-2731

Responses:
1. We have a new contract for Disinfectants and Odor Counteractants here in NC that includes a few
options for green cleaners, and there is some information in there regarding sanitizers. I know our
engineers did a lot of research to change our contract language and get some new products on state
contract.

Check it out at http://www.ncpandc.gov/435a.pdf.

Have a great day!
Rachel Eckert
NC DENR
Division of Pollution Prevention and Environmental Assistance
1639 Mail Service Center
Raleigh, NC 27699-1639
919-715-6505
www.p2pays.org

2. I have no info on hand sanitizers but you should note that no hand sanitizer, green or not, will prepare
for concerns about a flu virus pandemic. That's because sanitizers don't kill viruses, just bacteria (and
even then, less than 100% of bacteria). Regular hand washing with soap and water works to wash off
viruses, bacteria, dirt. Hand sanitizers would likely be no more effective against a virus than regular soap
and water.




                                                                                                         103
                                      Electrolyzer, Corp., June 2008
2 Posts

Original post:
Dear Colleagues, Has anyone conducted any research on the Electrolyzer Corporation's cleaning
products? Since the Boston Globe article of 6.3.08 I have received many requests for information. They
have not gone through third-party certification to my knowledge.

Thanks,
Carol Westinghouse
INFORM, Inc.
Cleaning For Health
Program Manager
www.informinc.org
westies@ecoisp.com
802-626-8643

Response:
Carol, Our facilities purchasing team just met with the vendor today and he advised that they are in the
process of obtaining a Green Seal Certification for the cleaning solution. I’m not sure how far along they
are in that process. Our building also piloted the technology and was very happy with the cleaning. We
are very interested to pilot it in other MA facilities. In the meantime, the contact information we have for
the company is Patrick Lucci, plucci@electrolyzercorp.com, 781-933-8801.He is probably the best person
to provide info on testimonials. I hope that’s helpful.

Marcia Deegler
Director of Environmental Purchasing
Operational Services Division
One Ashburton Place, Room 1017
Boston, MA 02108-1552
617-720-3356, 617-727-4527 fax
marcia.deegler@state.ma.us
Visit the EPP Website at www.mass.gov/epp




                                                                                                        104
                                         Hand dryers, June 2008
2 Posts

Original post:
Hello-Recently, when I approached a vendor about using electric hand dryers in restrooms the vendor
responded that he had yet to see an electric hand drier that was as sanitary as using paper towels. While
I didn't have time to get into the details regarding the reasoning for his statement, I got the impression it
had to due mainly with 1) water drippings on floors/walls, etc. and 2) the air blowing spreads more
germs.

Has anyone any information comparing paper towels vs. electric hand dryers, specifically as it relates to
sanitation (both in terms of bathroom cleanliness and the effect on users)?

Thank you.
-Stacey
Stacey Foreman
City of Portland, Oregon, Bureau of Purchases

Response:
I first saw this cutie in Osaka, Japan Airport:
http://gizmodo.com/gadgets/gadgets/dyson-airblade-400mph-no-hot-air-204828.php

Sherrie Moomey - Global Procurement - 503-671-3889




                                                                                                          105
                                       Coffee stir sticks, June 2008
2 Postings

Original post:
Hello-I have received a question and am looking for some input from the experts. Which is more
environmentally friendly, wood or recycled plastic stir sticks? Are there readily available alternatives to
one of those two items?

Your advice is greatly appreciated.

Jon Bischetsrieder
Purchasing Agent
City of Santa Clarita
Suite# 245
23920 Valencia Blvd.
Santa Clarita, CA 91355
Phone: (661) 286-4184
Fax: (661) 286-4186
Email: jbischetsrieder@santa-clarita.com
Web: http://www.santa-clarita.com

Response:
If you have ability - in your area - to compost yard/green waste, wood coffee sticks can be composted,
which would give an advantage to the life cycle comparison of wood vs. plastic.




                                                                                                         106
                              New abrasive blasting technique, June 2008
2 Posts

Original post:
I was informed of a new abrasive blasting technique using dry ice as the abrasive material. Needless to
say this eliminates any runoff issues and results in a "dry" cleaning process. The concern has to do with
the potential impact of the evaporated dry ice.

Has anyone heard of any comparisons of the pros and cons of this process compared to other common
abrasive or chemical cleaning processes?

Your help will be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

Jon Bischetsrieder
Purchasing Agent
City of Santa Clarita
Suite# 245
23920 Valencia Blvd.
Santa Clarita, CA 91355
Phone: (661) 286-4184
Fax: (661) 286-4186
Email: jbischetsrieder@santa-clarita.com
Web: http://www.santa-clarita.com

Responses:
1. Hi Jon, I ran your question by some colleagues and they referred me to this:
http://www.dec.ny.gov/public/22542.html

Hope it's helpful!

Ashley Wilson
NYSDEC - Pollution Prevention
625 Broadway, 4th Floor
Albany, NY 12233-1750
E-mail: alwilson@gw.dec.state.ny.us
P: 518.402.9175
F: 518.402.9168

2. I do not know anything more about the use of CO2 as a blast media, but several years ago, our office --
through the NYS Dept. of Economic Development's Environmental Investment Program-- helped a NY-
based company develop an alternative to blast media for coating removal that physically abrades
surfaces using a robotic-type device that's hooked directly to a vacuum system that captures the material
removed for management. This alleviates the need for blast media, as well as any ancillary devices
needed for containing the media or the coating that's been removed. The Climbing Machine also
eliminates potential health concerns related to airborne blast media or coating.

The device is also useful for providing remote access to hard to reach or dangerous (e.g., nuclear
facilities) places. As it is operated using a toggle-type device, operators can work from a distance and
avoid possible exposure.
                                                                                                           107
Check out this other alternative: http://www.icm.cc/

Brenda Grober
Environmental Services Unit
Empire State Development
30 South Pearl Street
Albany, NY 12245
(518) 292-5342 / FAX (518) 292-5886
bgrober@empire.state.ny.us




                                                       108
                                  Post-consumer paper cost, June 2008
6 Posts

Original post:
Has anyone recently purchased 30% or higher post-consumer recycled content paper at a price that is
competitive with virgin paper? If so, can you provide information about how you did it?

We know the word on the street is that p/c recycled content paper costs more than virgin, but we’re
hoping that some clever shoppers out there in the institutional purchasing world may have found a way
to beat the system. Any examples you can share would be greatly appreciated!

Thank you!

Mark S. Rentschler, Ph.D.
Director of Institutional Greening Programs
Green Seal, Inc.
1001 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 827
Washington, D.C. USA 20036
tel. +1 202 872-6400
fax +1 202 872-4324
mrentschler@greenseal.org
www.greenseal.org

Responses:
1. Dear Mark, Find a retailer that will work with you on the price, this cannot be accomplished with the
big retailers. You have to find a company that is owned by an individual who is proactive in helping to
drive the demand for environmentally preferable "Green" products. Please give me a call if you would
like to know of some vendor’s. Environmental Preservation Solutions is a company that believes in
bringing buyers and venders together.

Thank you!
Regards,
Gilbert L. Bailey
Environmental Consultant
Environmental Preservation Solutions
303-875-7733

2. Sorry, I don't compare cost carefully, but I do look at recycled content. Staples offers a 100% post-
consumer recycled copy paper whitened without chlorine. It works very well for us.

Jane, Executive Director
413-442-6815 home/office, 413-230-7321 cell
jane@thebeatnews.org
BERKSHIRE ENVIRONMENTAL ACTION TEAM (BEAT)

3. In California, our Department of General Services adopted a policy that helps reduce paper use, while
at the same time adopting a policy to purchase 100 % post-consumer paper. (It should be noted that not
all agencies follow this policy.) To reduce costs, truck load purchases can help, if feasible.
www.documents.dgs.ca.gov/green/EPP/AO06-04.pdf.
                                                                                                           109
Kathy
Kathleen Frevert
Senior Specialist, Environmentally Preferable Purchasing and Product Stewardship
Cal/EPA, Integrated Waste Management Board, Statewide Technical & Analytical Resources Division
kfrevert@ciwmb.ca.gov
www.ciwmb.ca.gov

4. Minnesota has a program called Office Supply Connection through our Department of Administration
that allows bulk purchasing to save costs. See
https://www.officesupplyconnection.org/statemn/catalog.srv.

It currently advertises 100% PC copier paper for $3.60 per ream while virgin copier paper is $3.66 per
ream. 30% PC is $3.73 per ream.

5. Our office, EPA Region III in Philadelphia, buys Harbor 100 ( 100% Post-consumer Waste, 84
Brightness, 20 lb. Grain Long ), made by Grays Harbor Paper, through XpedX, a distributor out of New
York, our contact there is Carmel Flanigan, whom our Facilities person says is very nice to work with.
Carmel's phone number is 212-863-1673. We buy 2700 cases per year at $30 per case. Contact here is
Kelly Conway at 215-814-5713.

Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3WC21)
Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3163
giuranna.mike@epa.gov




                                                                                                         110
                                    Left over paint, June – October 2008
10 Posts

Original post:
This isn't a green "purchasing" issue, but it is related to a waste stream, so hopefully you all can help out!

For agencies who have painters, stripers, etc. When you have paint left over from a job (small amounts
like half a quart where it does not make sense to store it) do you have an area where you spray it out, or
do you collect all of the colors together and send them off as dangerous waste? What do non-
governmental companies do with their leftover paint?

It doesn't seem cost effective to create another waste stream, but on the other hand it doesn't seem
environmentally friendly to spray out the leftover paint (even if technically paint that is sprayed out is
considered "used for its intended purpose" and therefore not dangerous waste).

Thanks,
Rob

Responses:
1. If it is oil based paint, it is hazardous waste and must be managed as such. If it is latex paint, it is not
hazardous and may be thrown away. Pouring partially filled cans together will help lower disposal costs
for the user and the governmental agency managing the waste. Check with your state's DEP.

Amy Donovan
Program Director
Franklin County Solid Waste Management District
50 Miles Street
Greenfield, MA 01301
Tel: (413) 772-2438
Fax: (413) 772-3786
Email: amy@franklincountywastedistrict.org
Web: www.franklincountywastedistrict.org/
Mass Recycles Paper! Learn more at: www.massrecyclespaper.org/

2. You can also call your county's Hazo House, and they can tell you if they collect waste for a regional
latex paint reprocessing facility.

Karin Kraft
Sustainability Specialist
Hazardous Waste and Toxics Reduction Program
Washington State Department of Ecology
kakr461@ecy.wa.gov
360-407-6693
http://www.ecy.wa.gov/beyondwaste/epp.html

3. It is very much a green purchasing policy issue. Left over liquid paint is seldom, if ever, used. After a
certain period of time the paint in the can doesn't match what was put on the wall anyway. Exactly
matching colors is difficult enough while the paint is fresh. Don't save it. Purchase only what you need,
and if at the end of the job there is some left over ...put on that extra partial coat on the wall now, or
                                                                                                             111
return it now, or recycle it now, or donate it now. Change your purchasing policy to ‘we don’t store
leftover liquid paint’. Don’t consider the paint job done until the liquid paint is "used for its intended
purpose".

Cost to properly dispose of liquid paint can reach and exceed the initial purchase price. Paint companies
advertise they can produce consistent tinting color formulations. Take them at their word and store the
paint tinting formulations; not excess paint. If you need temporary touch ups; how about exercising
creativity by using a new complementary color for the affected area?

http://www.paint.org/pubs/index.cfm then The Five-Point Program for Leftover Paint - PDF (850 KB)

Doug
Douglas Reed, Purchasing Agent
Department of Administrative Services (DAS)
Hoover State Office Building, Level A
Des Moines, IA 50319-0105
doug.reed@iowa.gov

4. Be careful combining paints. Make sure you know what is in each type of paint. The presence of other
elements such as Hg, Cd, and/or Pb could change the hazardous waste designation and could change
disposal opportunities and costs.

Bob Bechtold, Jr., CHMM, REM
Environmental Protection Specialist
Acadia National Park
P.O. Box 177, Rte. 233 McFarland Hill
Bar Harbor, ME 04609
207-288-8752
Fax 207-288-8759
bob_bechtold@nps.gov

5. Thanks for all of your feedback. It does seem to be almost a toss-up. Either you use up the paint
(releasing unneeded chemicals into the air) or you handle it as waste, which puts another chemical
burden on the environment.

Based on everyone's answers, I would be inclined to make it policy that we let excess latex air dry and
we recycle or dispose of oils.

Thanks again,
Rob Lane
Port of Seattle
Marine Maintenance

6. A national consensus has emerged among stakeholders that we should attempt to derive value from
leftover latex and oil-based paint. The paint industry has agreed to assume responsibility for setting up a
collection, reuse, and recycling system for all leftover paint in the United States. There are about a dozen
paint recyclers in North America that manufacture recycled paint, for sale in the U.S. and abroad. A
demonstration project for the collection, reuse, and recycling of leftover latex and oil-based paint is
planned for implementation in Minnesota, followed by a roll-out to other states, then nationally.
                                                                                                             112
7. The CT DEP website has a factsheet on disposal options for paint in CT that might be helpful- see:
http://www.ct.gov/dep/cwp/view.asp?A=2718&Q=325496#Paint

Judy Belaval
CT DEP Office of Source Reduction and Recycling
(860) 424-3237

8. When I first started at the Lab (9 years ago) they had over 500 gallons of surplus paint that was never
going to be used. It included latex, oil-based, road paint, pastels, etc....). To waste it through Waste
management was going to cost in excess of $60,000. I was able to get it donated to the Town, who
subsequently donated it the Boy Scouts, Habitat for Humanity and a local museum - So it all got used.

Fast forward to today, the paint shop keeps an inventory of about 20 gallons and schedules larger jobs to
get the paint in on time. Unless you are the Lab Director, you get one of the following 3 choices of paint
color: white, off-white and off-off-white. This significantly cuts down on left over paint.

Hopefully this helped.
Peter D. Pohlot
BNL P2 Coordinator
Building 120
(631) 344-5660
pohlot@bnl.gov

9. I think the general recommendation is to look for places that recycle used paint. See the Responsible
Purchasing Guide for Paint http://www.responsiblepurchasing.org/purchasing_guides/paint/index.php
for details. If you can't find a local recycler, you can leave the containers open in a ventilated place. Let the
paint dry out, throw away the dried paint, recycle the steel or plastic containers.

Mary Jo Snavely, Program Coordinator
The Center for a New American Dream
Responsible Purchasing Network
301.891.3683 x.110 w
maryjo@newdream.org
6930 Carroll Avenue, Suite 900
Takoma Park, MD 20912
http://consciousconsumer.org
www.ResponsiblePurchasing.org




                                                                                                             113
                                  EPP in promotional items, July 2008
5 Posts

Original post:
Hello, Does anyone have example EPP specifications for promotional items? Promotional items in this
scenario include: "giveaways" like refillable water bottles, pencils, pens, magnets, reusable bags,
etc. While many of our departments are focusing on "useful or practical" promotional items (not just
"junk") and trying to selectively reduce the use of such giveaways, they are interested in "greening"
remaining items.

I have the usual ideas: recycled content, recyclable, no biphenyl-A, lead-free, etc., but would appreciate
any examples from actual contract specifications.

Thank you!

-Stacey
Stacey Foreman
City of Portland, Oregon, Bureau of Purchases

Responses:
1. Hello Stacy, Environmental Preservation Solutions can assist you in finding promotional items that
are available in the market place. At the present time we are conducting an Environmentally Preferable
Purchasing "Green" Pilot Project that provides this type of assistance to those who participate. If you
would like to hear more about our Pilot Project please send me and e-mail or give me a call at 303-875-
7733.

Thank you!
Regards,
Gilbert L Bailey
Environmental Preservation Solutions
Environmental Consultant
303-875-7733

2. Stacy, We use our Restricted Substance List. Actually I think there are three and can be found on our
website. Hope this helps. http://www.nikeresponsibility.com/#environment-design/rsl

Sherrie Moomey - Global Procurement - 503-671-3889

3. FYI, PromoMart (http://www.promomart.com/) is a “promo products shopping mall”. It would be nice
to be able to search for “green” promo items & I think that if they hear this request from enough folks,
they’ll add “green” as a search feature. I don’t know the exact right contact, but I’m guessing from their
website that it is Melinda Ligos - MLigos@asicentral.com




                                                                                                             114
4. Stacy, Below is some of the language we recently used in the MA state contract bid for promo items.
Please let me know if you have questions, as I removed the section numbers and other formatting. I hope
it’s helpful.

Environmental Provisions (Will be scored in evaluation)
The Environmental Provisions section is limited to one-half (½) of one side of a standard 8½ x 11
page. Ten (10) pt. font is suggested. If the response to this section exceeds this limit, documentation
exceeding this limit will not be evaluated. As part of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts’ program to
purchase environmentally preferable products (EPPs) and in the interest of promoting sustainable
practices throughout state government, qualified Bidders shall include in their responses details of the
environmental products and/or initiatives they can offer under this contract. EPPs are products or
services that have a lesser or reduced effect on human health and the environment when compared with
competing products or services that serve the same purpose. Such products or services may include, but
are not limited to, those which contain recycled content, minimize waste, conserve energy or water,
eliminate the use of mercury and otherwise reduce the amount of toxics disposed or consumed.

State the percentage amount of dollars of business’ total yearly gross for EPP incentives provided to
customers in each of the bid categories in calendar years 2005, 2006 and 2007. To be included in the
calculation, materials must have been identified in catalog with a symbol to clearly indicate they
represent EPPs. State the percentage of recycled and recyclable shipping / packing materials used by the
company, and itemize recycled and recyclable shipping /packing materials currently used. As an
alternative to printing and mailing, state electronic means of information delivery used in regular
business practices: (e.g. websites, email, electronic file transfer protocol (FTP) applications, CD-ROM,
etc.). Quantify in one percentage figure the amount of business done electronically. Exclude shipping of
incentives when calculating this percentage.

Environmental Specifications
Contractors must comply with the following environmental specifications wherever the specifications are
appropriate to the operations that Bidder is providing under the awarded contract PRF36. Contractors
must be able to offer a significant amount of incentives made with post-consumer recycled materials and
other types of environmentally preferable materials. Such materials must be identified in their catalog
with a symbol to clearly indicate they represent EPPs. Contractors must be able to demonstrate that the
promotional incentives offered do not contain toxic or harmful materials, such as but not necessarily
limited to lead paint, cadmium, lead, mercury (also see below), and hexavalent chromium.

Contractors designing, producing and/or offering printed materials must specify the use of recycled
paper with a minimum of 30% post-consumer recycled content for uncoated stocks and a minimum of
10% post-consumer recycled content for coated stocks. All printed materials must bear a standard
recycled logo and/or the words “Printed on Recycled Paper.” Any printed materials must be designed in
a way that would use paper efficiently and minimize paper waste in the printing and other production
operations.

Mercury Content and Preference:
Contractors must provide mercury-free products wherever available in line with Massachusetts’ Mercury
Management legislation enacted in 2006; viewable with this link:
http://www.mass.gov/legis/laws/seslaw06/sl060190.htm, and the intent of state agencies to avoid
purchasing such products. Should mercury-free products not exist, contractors shall provide products
with the lowest mercury content available. Awarded Contractors shall disclose products that contain

                                                                                                      115
added mercury and provide an explanation that includes the amount or concentration of mercury, and
justification as to why added mercury is necessary for the function or performance of the product.

Awarded Contractors must inform customers when an incentive contains mercury in excess of 250ppm
by labeling it “contains mercury,” and attach an explanation that includes the concentration (or amount)
of mercury and a justification as to why that particular product is being proposed.

The purchasing department reserves the right to require receipt of proof of compliance with said
requirements within ten (10) calendar days from the date of request, and to terminate this Contract as a
material breach for noncompliance with any requirement of this section.

Packaging
Contractors must agree that all corrugated cardboard materials and containers used in the packaging and
transport of office furnishings, accessories and miscellaneous supplies will be made with a minimum of
35% post-consumer recycled material. It is also desirable that Contractors must offer packaging which
eliminates the use of cadmium, lead, mercury, and hexavalent chromium, and set limits on the incidental
concentration of these materials and determined by the Toxics in packaging Clearinghouse.
http://www.toxicsinpackaging.org/ and eliminates the use of polystyrene, flexible plastic bags made of
polyvinylchloride (PVC) that often contain lead and cadmium, or other difficult to recycle materials,
provides for a return program where packaging can be returned for recycling, and/or reduces
unnecessary packaging wherever possible.

Polybrominated Flame Retardants (BFR)
Awarded Contractors must disclose whether the products being offered contain toxic flame retardants
(e.g. clothing and textile products). Bidders are encouraged to provide BFR-free alternatives whenever
available.

Contractors must clearly identify (using a symbol or other relevant character) in e-catalogs and on-line
systems all products considered as an EPP of this RFR to facilitate accurate tracking of such purchases
and to enable the Commonwealth to promote such products and practices to contract users.

Any incentives found to contain harmful levels of any contaminant material(s), as described [above] after
delivery may be returned by the purchasing eligible entity to the contractor at the contractor’s expense,
and with a full refund of cost to the purchasing eligible entity.

Marcia Deegler
Director of Environmental Purchasing
Operational Services Division
One Ashburton Place, Room 1017
Boston, MA 02108-1552
617-720-3356, 617-727-4527 fax
marcia.deegler@state.ma.us
Visit the EPP Website at www.mass.gov/epp




                                                                                                       116
          Food Packaging - life cycle Assessments, content comparisons, & opinions, July 2008
2 Posts

Original post: Hi there, as part of our work with the West Michigan Sustainable Purchasing Consortium,
we’re hoping to gather as much info. as possible about environmentally preferable food service and food
packaging products.

1. Has anybody seen life cycle assessments of bagasse or PLA?

2. Is there a good resource(s) you could recommend for comparing the environmental impacts of
bagasse, PLA, and recycled content?

3. Do you have example EPP specifications for food service products or food packaging?

4. We’d also appreciation any success or horror stories you’d like to share about your experiences with
some of these newer materials in food packaging (ranging from compostable forks and plates to hot and
cold carry-out containers)?

Thanks in advance for all your help,
Paula
Paula Levin
Delta Institute
53 West Jackson, Suite 230
Chicago, Illinois 60604
312-554-0900 ext. 17
www.delta-institute.org

Response:
There is some good information on the Healthcare without Harm website at: http://www.noharm.org/

Look for "Choosing Environmentally Preferable Food Service Ware - Reusable and Sustainable Biobased
Products"

Karen Hamilton
Environmental Purchasing Program
King County Procurement and Contract Services
401 5th Avenue, 3rd Floor
Seattle, WA 98104
(206)263-9294
E-mail: karen.hamilton@kingcounty.gov
Website: www.metrokc.gov/procure/green




                                                                                                     117
                                In-vessel composting systems, July 2008
2 Posts

Original post:
I’m working with a bunch of hospitals that want to start composting. Can anyone recommend in-vessel
composting systems suitable for a healthcare facility parking lot, for example? Thank you!

Laura Brannen
laura.brannen@valley.net
Home Office: 603-795-4393
Cell: 603-496-9885

Response:
Hello Laura, Here is some information that you might be interested in on in-vessel systems for
composting. Green Mountain Technologies (GMT): GMT sells in-vessel systems designed specifically for
on-site composting of food-wastes. One of their products, the Earth Tub, is a fully enclosed composting
vessel featuring power mixing, compost aeration, temperature control, and biofiltration of all process air.
This self-contained unit is suited for composting at institutions such as schools, universities, restaurants,
hospitals and supermarkets. This product is designed for waste of 50-2000 lbs. /day and allows for
expansion.

Another product, that handles 1-150 tons/day, is the Containerized Compost System (CSS). This sealed-
vessel design controls odors and collects leachate. The computer controlled aeration system meets EPA
503 requirements, produces a compliance record, and minimizes odor generation. The turnkey system
includes mixing, loading and screening equipment. The CCS is useful for composting biosolids at
wastewater treatment plants, food wastes at processing facilities and institutions, and manures at
feedlots. There is an installation of the containerized system at the Wastewater Treatment Plant in
Westport, Washington.

NaturTech Composting Systems, Inc.: The NaturTech Composting System is an in-vessel, containerized
composting system that provides pathogen destruction, odor control, and leachate prevention. Enclosed
mixing reduces fugitive dust, odors, and health concerns and achieves pathogen destruction in as little as
three days. This product is sized for loads of 4-400 tons per day. The turnkey system provides operator
training, process monitoring, compost utilization, and regulatory compliance. These products and
services can be bought or leased. There is an installation Land Recovery Inc. (LRI) Compost Facility in
Puyallup.

Environmental Preservation Solutions is conducting a "Green" Pilot Project and is inviting you to
participate, if you would like to hear more about it please send us an e-mail at envsolus@yahoo.com.

Gilbert L. Bailey




                                                                                                          118
                            Mulch/compost purchasing policies, July 2008
3 Posts

Original post:
Hi! Does anyone have any sample language for an EPP Policy regarding procurement of mulch/compost?
Thanks! Have a nice day,

Johanna
Johanna Kertesz
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Specialist
Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
(651) 297-5518
johanna.kertesz@state.mn.us
www.greenguardian.com/government/eppg

Responses:
1. We have information in this section of our EPP Best Practices Manual.
http://www.green.ca.gov/EPP/Grounds/compost.htm

Kathy
Kathleen Frevert
Senior Specialist, Environmentally Preferable Purchasing and Product Stewardship
Cal/EPA, Integrated Waste Management Board, Statewide Technical & Analytical Resources Division
1001 I Street
PO Box 4025, MS 13A
Sacramento, CA 95812-4025
Phone: 916-341-6476
Fax: 916-319-7246
kfrevert@ciwmb.ca.gov
www.ciwmb.ca.gov

2. Texas also has some specs.
http://search.tceq.state.tx.us/search?site=tceq&client=tceq&proxystylesheet=tceq&output=xml_no_dtd
&q=compost+spec

Katie Jensen, LEED®AP
Austin Energy Green Building
Multi-Family Program Coordinator
Physical Address: 811 Barton Springs Rd, Suite 300
Mailing Address: 721 Barton Springs Rd
Austin, TX 78704
P 512-482-5407       F 512-482-5441
katie.jensen@austinenergy.com
www.austinenergy.com/go/greenbuilding




                                                                                                  119
                                Specs for dry cell batteries, July 2008
2 Posts

Original post:
Hello-Does anyone have an EPP dry cell battery specification that has worked well for them? I am
interested in specs for rechargeable and non-rechargeable batteries.
Thank you.

-Stacey
Stacey Foreman
City of Portland, Oregon, Bureau of Purchases

Response:
There is a new alkaline rechargeable battery recently introduced by LePage's of Romulus, MI. You may
want to get info on this less toxic battery from: Ms. Shernee Chandaria at 416-757-6700 Ext. 2112.

Martin A. Prince
Environmental Specialist (QSDABA)(R02)
GSA Northeast and Caribbean Region
Phone 212-264-7883
Fax 212-264-3574




                                                                                                       120
                                Furniture RFI/RFP information, July 2008
4 Posts

Original post:
Hello – We are working to develop environmental questions for an upcoming furniture RFP. Does
anyone have any sample language that you could share? I would like to incorporate a question about
packaging, take-back programs and/or blanket-wrapping. Any input is greatly appreciated.
Thanks,
Laura Schrubb
lschrubb@medassets.com
314-770-7239

Responses:
1. Laura, Below are some of the specs we put in our furniture contract a couple years ago. They reference
a couple of attachments that I will have to send to you individually if you like, as I don’t think the listserv
can handle attachments. We give extra points in our evaluation for blankets and other source reduction
practices. We get that info in the bid process via the attachments.

3.23.1 Identification of Environmentally Preferable Products
Upon receiving a contract award, Bidders must agree to clearly designate all catalog products (including
those in on-line catalogs) considered by definition of this RFR to be either an EPP or an example of a
sustainable practice (see Section 2.12). Such designation may be in the form of a recycled logo, or other
symbol easily identifiable an environmental attribute and should reference an explanation of the symbol
next to the product or somewhere in the publication. The purpose of this symbol is to assist the
Commonwealth in promoting these products to contract users.

3.23.2 Packaging
Bidders must agree that all corrugated cardboard materials and containers used in the packaging and
transport of office furnishings, accessories and miscellaneous supplies will be made with a minimum of
35% post-consumer recycled material. Confirmation of this recycled content requirement must be made
to the Commonwealth by submitting a letter from the corrugated box manufacturer verifying the
recycled content ratio. If Bidders have replaced corrugated cardboard materials with alternative means
of packaging for some, or all of their shipments, a description of such materials must be included in their
Response.
NOTE: (There is a separate form that we attach that gives credit in the evaluation process for blankets
and other reduced-packaging practices. I can send the form separately if you like).

3.23.3 LEED-CI Rating System
Bidders must agree to familiarize themselves with the LEED-CI Rating System and promote the policies
outlined in the system to contract users. Bidders must also include a separate sheet with their RFR
submission to address the following questions and their responses will be considered in the RFR
evaluation process:
   a) List and describe the products, materials and/or related services your company can provide to
      optimize LEED-CI point ratings in appropriate projects. Such products/materials may include but
      not be limited to, energy efficiency, CFC reduction/elimination, IAQ performance, VOC reduction,
      recycled content, renewable materials, resource reuse, and innovation in design.
   b) Provide a description of the LEED projects in which your company has been involved, indicating
      specific locations, capacity of your involvement and the general outcome.

                                                                                                            121
  c) Describe the type of assistance in LEED-CI planning that a contract user may obtain from your
     company and indicate any fees for such a service.

3.23.4 Flame Retardants Information
The Commonwealth of Massachusetts is concerned about the increasing environmental problems caused
by certain flame retardants (FRs). To make an informed purchasing decision, Bidders must disclose all
FRs used in the products offered. Products are preferred that meet flame retardancy standards and/or
the flammability requirements of Massachusetts Board of Fire Regulations, 527 CMR 29.00: M.G.L. c. 148,
§§10 and 28 (which also addresses CAL 133), without added FRs; with particular attention to
halogenated FRs. As more information on FRs becomes available, the Commonwealth will prefer
products that contain FRs for which comprehensive toxicity data is available and demonstrates the FR is
not toxic, persistent or bioaccumulative. The Commonwealth understands that such preferred products
may not yet be available.

For each product offered, Bidders must list the components that contain FRs and the name and CAS
number of the FR(s) they contain using Attachment 13. Bidders may need to ask the manufacturer or
material supplier for this information.

Marcia Deegler
Director of Environmental Purchasing
Operational Services Division
One Ashburton Place, Room 1017
Boston, MA 02108-1552
617-720-3356, 617-727-4527 fax
marcia.deegler@state.ma.us
Visit the EPP Website at www.mass.gov/epp

2. King County, WA - Model Environmentally Preferable Products Policy: King County, Washington
established a model policy to encourage and increase the procurement of recycled and other
environmentally preferable products by municipal agencies and contractors. As the County indicates,
"The model calls upon purchasers in all agencies to use recycled and other environmentally preferable
products whenever possible, while recognizing that their principal requirements must be product
performance and fiscal responsibility."

Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3WC21)
Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax: 215-814-3163
giuranna.mike@epa.gov

3. Most environmental specs for furniture include some chemical emissions requirements. The original
IAQ criteria were developed for the State of Washington and USEPA purchasing specifications for office
furniture (cubicles and private office case goods). These specs have been rolled into the GREENGUARD
Certification Program (www.greenguard.org). GREENGUARD Certification is the basis for LEED EQ Credit
4.5 for furniture and it should be required for all office furniture.

California's CHPS program for schools and the Green Guide for Healthcare (www.gghc.org) reference
GREENGUARD's more specialized Children and Schools Standard. GREENGUARD Children and Schools
                                                                                                        122
Certification should be a requirement for healthcare and educational furniture.

Best Regards,
Scott Steady
Air Quality Sciences, Inc.
(678) 444-4056




                                                                                  123
                               Green Janitorial Services specs, July 2008
4 Posts

Original post:
Hi, We are working on developing a new janitorial services contract for one of our offices. I would really
like to incorporate as many environmental criteria as possible. Does anyone have any sample language
for the RFP? So far, I have found the Green SOW from the Fairchild Air Force Base. Thanks for your
input! Have a great day,

Johanna
Johanna Kertesz
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Specialist
Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
(651) 297-5518
johanna.kertesz@state.mn.us
www.greenguardian.com/government/eppg
www.pca.state.mn.us/epp

Responses:
1. Johanna, Hennepin County Environmentally Preferable Cleaning Standards HERE
or
http://www.co.hennepin.mn.us/images/HCInternet/EPandT/Environment/Green%20Government/Env
%20Preferable%20Cleaning%20Section%20of%20HC%20Janitorial%20Specs.pdf

In the beginning of the spec, there is mention of: "Upright Vacuums, backpack vacuums and canister
vacuums must be Green Label Approved by the Carpet and Rug Institute. A list of Green Label Approved
vacuums can be found at www.carpet-rug.com."

The bulk of the language relating to your question is closer to the end of the document.

Our Headquarters facility used the following “Environmental language” in our most recent RFQQ for
Janitorial:

GENERAL CLEANING SUPPLIES:
 The Contractor will provide the following specific cleaning Chemicals and /or supplies for use on this
site. All chemicals shall be packaged to allow exact mixing without measurement. All chemicals shall be
stored and dispensed into containers that are factory color coded to allow visual identification of the
contents.
         o General Purpose Detergent. This product will be used by Vendors staff and supplies will also be
         maintained in each coffee bar for Agency staff to use in their personal work areas.
         o The staff supply will be maintained in hand pump spray bottles in the central coffee bars (19
         ea) and checked nightly for re-stocking. The Vendor will also maintain a stock of Agency provided
         cleaning rags for staff use at these locations.
         o Liquid hand soap, IE; EnviroCare liquid Hand Soap (Manufactured by Rochester Midland Corp.)
         or approved equal.
         o Micro fiber rags for dusting. These rags to be laundered by vendor as needed.
         o 2 compartment mop bucket equipment to maintain separation of clean and dirty mop water.


                                                                                                        124
  The Contractor will have in place over the performance period a low impact environmental cleaning
 policy addressing:
       o Sustainable cleaning systems.
       o Use of sustainable cleaning products.
       o Use of chemical concentrates and appropriate dilution systems.
       o Use of Color coded chemical distribution system.
       o Proper training of personnel in the hazards, use, maintenance and disposal of cleaning
           chemicals, dispensing equipment and packaging.
       o Use of cleaning equipment that reduces impacts on IAQ.

The Contractor will provide submittals for agency approval, on all products they wish to use at the
facility. To include but not be limited to Floor strippers, Floor Sealers, Glass Cleaners, All-Purpose
cleaners, etc. The following criteria should be considered for all products prior to submittals.
         All cleaning chemicals must be listed on the Green Seal –Industrial & Institutional cleaners (GS-
        37), as a prerequisite for submittal to the AGENCY for consideration for use in the facility.
         Provide a Manufacturers product specification sheet and an MSDS sheet on all supplies before
        bringing them to the facility. All cleaning supplies and/or chemicals must be pre-approved by the
        Facility Manager.

The Agency will provide all Toilet Paper, Paper Towels, Seat Covers, Waxed Liners, Plastic Trash Liners,
and Hand Soap for all automated dispensers. These supplies will be ordered monthly based on
Inventories supplied by the Contractor.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

EQUIPMENT:
      Contractor will provide and maintain on site, new or like new (upon approval) condition
     equipment at the beginning of the contract period. Contractor is responsible for all maintenance
     repairs, including replacement of filters on contractor’s equipment. Broken, ill repaired, ill
     functioning or unapproved equipment is not allowed on premises.

         An inventory of all equipment will be provided to the Agency’s representative, and all listed
        equipment will remain exclusively on site for the duration of the contract term. Transport and use
        of said equipment to any other work site will be considered a violation of this contract.

         “HEPA Filter”, for the purposes of this contract, the definition of “HEPA Filter” is as follows: the
        Institute of Environmental Sciences (IES) defines a HEPA filter as "a throw-away extended-media
        dry-type filter in a rigid frame, having minimum particle-collection efficiency of 99.97% for 0.3
        micrometer (micron) thermally-generated dioctyl phthalate (DOP) particles or specified alternative
        aerosol, and a maximum clean-filter pressure drop of ... 1.0 in w.g. when tested at rated air flow
        capacity."

         All Vacuums must be certified under the Carpet & Rug Institute’s Green Label program in
        addition to having “HEPA Filters” as specified above.

         Contractor shall provide and Maintain on site a small portable, quiet, HEPA filtered vacuum
        (such as the Euroclean HipVac, Model #UZ964-P or equal) for use by Day Custodian staff and
        others as needed.

                                                                                                            125
        Contractor shall clean/replace all filter bags at the beginning of each work day. All filters must
       meet HEPA requirements defined above.

         Contractor shall maintain/replace Filter Media as directed by equipment manufacturer.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________

EXHIBIT C BIDDERS PROPOSAL FORM
Failure to respond to the items below shall result in the proposal being declared as a non-responsive and
the proposal will not be considered. Provide responses in a separate bound or stapled packet organized
in the order listed below. Responses are a part of the bid proposals and shall become a part of the
contract entered into between the Contractor and the Agency.

 1.   Cleaning Practices - Describe the Low Environmental Impact cleaning practices to be used on this
contract site. The program should consider Environmentally Preferable Products*, services and cleaning
practices such as Energy Star designated devices, Green Seal (Standard GS-37) Certified cleaning
products, locally manufactured materials, high recycle content products, products with an end of life
reclaim/recycle option, inventory management, worker training, etc.

Describe any structured programs your company follows or subscribes to including certifications or
training. If your firm has an in house developed program for training please provide an outline of the
subjects covered.

Provide or describe your firm’s quality control process and how it conforms to the quality control
requirements of this specification.

Describe in general the approach your firm will use to clean the facility.
 *Environmentally Preferable Products: means products or services that have a lesser or reduced negative
effect on human health and the environment when compared with competing products or services that serve
the same purpose. This comparison may include raw material acquisition, production, manufacturing,
packaging, distribution, reuse, operation, maintenance, and end-of-life management. (EPA definition)
.2.    List the Manufacturer and model of required equipment:
 3.    Workers Compensation Package– Describe your workers compensation package beyond salaries.
Include all benefits and methods used to retain workers:
 4.    Contractor Resources and Organization –Describe your resources for providing staffing for the
project. Include plans for coverage of staff not reporting for work or on leave. Provide a description of
your company’s organization with names and titles of managing positions that will be involved with this
contract. Provide résumé’s of proposed supervisors and floor care technicians involved with this
contract.
 5.    Sustainable Practices – Describe the company’s experience and policies pertaining to sustainability
practices and environmentally preferable efforts:

Steven P. Strope
Ecology Headquarters
Facility Manager
407-6089

2. I’m currently traveling, but the standard language for green cleaning chemicals that a lot of folks are
using is:

                                                                                                         126
“All cleaning products must be certified by EcoLogo or Green Seal or provide demonstrable proof of
meeting the EcoLogo or Green Seal standards.”

New York, New Jersey and others specify EcoLogo or Green Seal. Illinois is now specifying EcoLogo or
Green Seal certification, but is also accepting DfE registration.

Hope that helps.
      - Scot
 Scot Case
Responsible Sourcing Solutions
29 North Carolina Avenue
Reading, PA 19608
(w) 610 779-3770
(c) 610 781-1684
scot.case@responsiblesourcing.net

3. Hi, You can find sample janitorial cleaning specifications in the StopWaste.Org fact sheet listed,
http://www.stopwaste.org/docs/janitorial_cleaning_products.pdf. The specifications have been updated
since 2006 but are not yet on the website. Email me directly if you would like a copy.

Thanks,
Beth Eckl
EPE Consulting
Danville, CA 94526
(925) 838-2731




                                                                                                        127
            Refuse/recycling contracts: focus on waste reduction, recycling, August 2008
3 Posts

Original post:
We've had a successful contract for refuse and recycling services servicing county facilities for the past
four years, but are looking for ways to improve our program when our contract comes up for rebid next
year.

Any model contract language or specifications that focus on engagement with hauler/recycling team to
achieve lowered waste generation and increased recycling would be most helpful.

Thanks,
Molly Chidsey
Program Development Specialist
Multnomah County Sustainability Program
(503) 988-4094
www.co.multnomah.or.us/sustainability

Responses:
1. My coworker here at the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency is working on Resource Management
Contracting. Here is some info from her...her contact info is at the bottom of the message:

Minnesota is in the midst of gathering data from some demonstration projects that used alternative
contracting language for lessened waste generation and developing some template RFP and contract
language for a "second generation" of resource management contracts, but we're not finished just yet.

Model RFP language from our first generation of demonstration projects can be found at:
http://www.pca.state.mn.us/oea/lc/rmcontracting.cfm

We are finding that the engagement piece is hard to write into contracts in detail and works better as part
of a workplan, but the RFPs & contracts can make clear the expectation of engagement. One county wrote
this: "...In short, with the Resource management elements below, the County is looking for a more
responsive and engaged Contractor to assist them in managing waste according to the solid waste
hierarchy (eliminate, reduce, recycle and process as a last resort). In the text proposal address the
following:

General: Describe your vision of a RM program for the County and identify what resources that you will
devote to the County RM program. Include how your staff will interact with or utilize County
resource/expertise (include communication protocols or other resources you may provide that will
benefit the County). Discuss the relationship(s) that you plan to establish with different County
facilities. Include in your discussion, where applicable, the relationships you propose to establish with
County contacts, such as staff and janitorial personnel."

An expectation of quarterly meetings can be easily written into contracts as well. Another area that
we've found is critical (which helps but doesn't get to the heart of your "engagement" question) is to
specify the monthly and quarterly reporting requirements very specifically so that the customer gets
accurate weights/volumes for each facility for each pertinent waste stream.


                                                                                                         128
If you'd like more details or would like to know when our template contract and RFP language is
complete, feel free to contact Madalyn Cioci, MN Pollution Control Agency, 651-297-3955,
madalyn.cioci@pca.state.mn.us.

Johanna Kertesz
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Specialist
Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
(651) 297-5518
johanna.kertesz@state.mn.us
www.greenguardian.com/government/eppg
www.pca.state.mn.us/epp

2.   http://www.dep.state.pa.us/dep/deputate/airwaste/wm/recycle/Market/docs/contracts.htm

Georgia Kagle, PADEP
Chief, Recycling Markets Program
Harrisburg, PA 717-787-7382




                                                                                                  129
                                    Defining low VOC, August 2008
4 Posts

Original post:
Good afternoon – The Commonwealth of Massachusetts is working on a contract for a variety of coating
products for buildings (non-slip coatings for steps and ramps), marine applications (coatings for
submerged parts of boats) and insides of tanks and pipelines. We would like to specify that these
coatings be low or no-VOC. Are there specific standards we can reference that establish VOC content for
“low-VOC” and “no-VOC” products?

Thank you for your help!

Dmitriy Nikolayev, Procurement Manager
Facilities and Environmental Services
Operational Services Division
Commonwealth of Massachusetts
One Ashburton Place, Room 1017
Boston, MA 02108
Phone: 617-720-3351
Fax: 617-727-4527
dmitriy.nikolayev@state.ma.us
Visit the Environmental Purchasing Program’s website at http://www.mass.gov/epp

Responses:
1. Try the South Coast Air Quality Management District’s Rule 1113:
http://www.arb.ca.gov/DRDB/SC/CURHTML/R1113.PDF (Or, if that one doesn’t work, perhaps they
have another good standard that would work for you.)

You could also reference the Bay Area Air Quality Management District’s Regulation 8 standards:
http://www.baaqmd.gov/dst/regulations/index.htm#reg8 (Architectural coatings are Rule 3, Adhesives
and Sealants are Rule 51, etc.)

Also check out Green Seal for architectural coatings (recently updated GS-11 for Paints & Coatings) (I
don’t think you’ll find the industrial coatings there, but look around)
http://www.greenseal.org/certification/environmental.cfm.

Good luck!
Katie
Katie Jensen, LEED®AP
Austin Energy Green Building
Multi-Family Program Coordinator
Physical Address: 811 Barton Springs Rd, Suite 300
Mailing Address: 721 Barton Springs Rd
Austin, TX 78704
P 512-482-5407       F 512-482-5441
katie.jensen@austinenergy.com

2. Dmitriy – EcoLogo has 120 standards, including one for marine coatings. The marine coating standard
(CCD-50) includes the following language regarding VOC limits:
                                                                                                         130
To be authorized to carry the EcoLogo all marine foul release coatings must:
(a) not contain VOCs in excess of 120 g/L as determined by ASTM test method D3960
Standard Practice for Determining Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content of Paints and Related
Coatings;
(b) not be formulated or manufactured with aromatic solvents in excess of 2% by weight, as calculated
from records of the amounts of constituents used to make the product;
(c) not be formulated or manufactured with halogenated solvents;
(d) not be formulated or manufactured with formaldehyde;
(e) not be formulated or manufactured with benzene;
(f) not be formulated or manufactured with mercury, lead, cadmium, hexavalent chromium,
tin, copper or their compounds or other biocides; and
(g) include instructions for safe and proper application and removal of the product, and
disposal of unused product and packaging.

You can see the full standard at www.ecologo.org. Hope this helps.
      - Scot
Scot Case, Vice President
TerraChoice Environmental Marketing Inc.
29 North Carolina Avenue
Reading, PA 19608
office: 800 478-0399 x245
direct: 610 779-3770
cell: 610 781-1684
scase@terrachoice.com

3. Dear Dmitriy, In addition to SCAQMD Rule 1113, you can also use California Air Resources Board
Suggested Control Measure limits, which has categories for several product types including industrial
maintenance coatings: http://www.arb.ca.gov/coatings/arch/Approved_2007_SCM.pdf.

Here is a link to the California Coatings rule, which may be useful as well.
http://www.arb.ca.gov/coatings/coatingsrules.htm.

Traditionally VOCs are measured by EPA Method 24, but it is not exact at lower VOC levels, therefore
"zero-VOC" are typically <10 g/L. In Green Seal's recent GS-11 Paint and Coatings revision, issued May
2008, we are using a more direct measurement (GC/MS) ASTM D6886 or comparable ISO method, which
provide more accurate results and we are looking to incorporate this methodology into our GS-47 Stains
and Finishes standard under development. We are also developing a "zero-VOC" claim for certified
products, which will be measured by this direct methodology. In the long term, this might be something
to consider. I hope this is helpful. Feel free to get in touch if you have any other questions.

Sincerely,
Christine Chase, Green Seal, Inc.
1001 Connecticut Avenue NW, Suite 827
Washington, DC 20036
ph: 202.872.6400
fax: 202.872.4324
cchase@greenseal.org
www.greenseal.org

                                                                                                        131
Fly Ash in Curb Construction, August 2008
3 Posts

Original post:
Hi, for a city in Northern CA, I am looking for specifications that allow a percentage of fly ash in curb ramp
construction (and perhaps other road materials). Does anyone have specs to offer?

Thanks,
Beth
Beth Eckl
Consultant
Danville, CA
(925) 838-2731
eckl@sbcglobal.net

Responses:
1. Hello Beth, I’m not sure if this is relevant to your particular case or not. According to the Climate
Action Program at Caltrans, December 2006, pages 13-14:
“The typical Department concrete mix is about 25 percent fly ash, generally with no other cement
substitutions. This has produced 25 percent less greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from cement
production statewide. The Department objective is to increase concrete mixes with up to 60 percent fly
ash and 50 percent slag, thereby improving GHG emissions saving from the 25 percent currently specified
to 50 percent or better. The Department received the U.S. EPA Award for the use of recycled ash from
burned coal in concrete for the construction of the new Bay Bridge. This project will use 450,000 cubic
yards of concrete, and based on the new concrete mixed will save 0.75 MMT of CO2 in the construction
process.

“Further reduction can be achieved by including interground limestone up to 2.5 percent without loss in
concrete performance. The Department has changed its specification to allow 2.5 percent limestone
concrete mix in future cement use. Consequently, an additional 0.3 MMT of CO2 will be removed from
cement production in California based on the 2004 production level, or 1.2 MMT and 4.2 MMT by 2010
and 2020 respectively assuming constant level of production. The Department is reducing its share of
CO2 by 0.036 MMT annually.”

Here is a link to the full Caltrans report: http://www.dot.ca.gov/docs/ClimateReport.pdf.

Hope this helps. Best regards,
Mark
Mark S. Rentschler, Ph.D.
Director of Institutional Greening Programs
Green Seal, Inc.
1001 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 827
Washington, D.C. USA 20036
tel. +1 202 872-6400
fax +1 202 872-4324
mrentschler@greenseal.org
www.greenseal.org


                                                                                                          132
2. To reach Penndot Specifications for Flyash use in:
Cement Concrete
ftp://ftp.dot.state.pa.us/public/Bureaus/design/Pub408/Change9/Pub408Change9/Section700/Section
704.pdf

Concrete Pozzolan
ftp://ftp.dot.state.pa.us/public/Bureaus/design/Pub408/Change9/Pub408Change9/Section700/Section
724.pdf

Flowable Fill
ftp://ftp.dot.state.pa.us/public/Bureaus/design/Pub408/Change9/Pub408Change9/Section200/SECTIO
N220.pdf

Georgia Kagle, PADEP
Chief, Recycling Markets Program
Harrisburg PA
7177870119




                                                                                            133
                               EPP training for purchasers, August 2008
3 Posts

Original post:
Hi, My agency is considering developing an in-house training tool for new purchasers (or potentially all
staff) on how to make environmentally sound purchases on a regular basis. I assume some of you have
something like this in place already. Would you mind sharing?

We are thinking this training would help the new employee learn to incorporate environmental criteria
into their normal purchasing process. Thanks for your help! Have a nice weekend,

Johanna
Johanna Kertesz
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Specialist
Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
(651) 297-5518
johanna.kertesz@state.mn.us
www.greenguardian.com/government/eppg
www.pca.state.mn.us/epp

Responses:
1. Go to http://www.epa.gov/epp/pubs/index.htm, and also see Green Purchasing Resources for
Businesses NOW AVAILABLE!

The Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. (NERC) has recently published a sequence of webpages designed to
assist businesses in their green purchasing programs. By clicking on Green Purchasing Resources for
Business (http://www.nerc.org/GreenPurchasing/greenpurchasingresources.html), businesses will be
able to identify:
 Easy to follow steps in developing a green purchasing program, and
 Purchasing self-assessment tools to help quantify the impact of a green purchasing program and other
    related resources

The most impressive feature of this website is the Web-based Directories, which provide easy access to
thousands of green vendor websites for ordering their products and services. Each directory (Green
Products, Green Services, Green Products through State Contracts and Materials Exchanges) is
categorized by different products to help businesses find that specific product! Or they can browse
through a variety of different products and services.

For more information, contact Mary Ann Remolador (maryann@nerc.org) of NERC.
Johanna --

2. I'm happy to share my training materials. I even put together a train-the-trainer kit a few years ago that
still has some relevant materials. It's too big to e-mail, but I'm happy to burn it onto a CD and send it to
you.

There are also a few video clips available: http://das.gse.iowa.gov/greenbuyer/index.html

NIGP also has some webinars recorded with green purchasing training:
http://www.nigp.org/educate/outline/Webinar.htm
                                                                                                         134
       Scot
Scot Case
Vice President
TerraChoice Environmental Marketing
800 478-0399 x245
610 779-3770 (direct)
610 781-1684 (cell)
scase@terrachoice.com




                                      135
                             Polystyrene trays at schools, September 2008
3 Posts

Original post:
Does anyone know of an elementary school that has found an alternative to the polystyrene trays? the
kind that have the sectioned areas so foods don't mix with each other. Would like to find a reusable kind
that does not have bis-A in it. Even a paper/cardboard based alternative would be considered. Anybody
know of a manufacturer or a school where one is used? Thanks in advance. Peter Cooke

Peter Cooke
Pollution Prevention Program Manager
Maine Department of Environmental Protection
312 Canco Road
Portland, ME 04103
(207) 791-8101
(207) 822-6303 fax
peter.cooke@maine.gov

Responses:
1. I believe compostable food trays are used in several schools in the Twin Cities Metro area here in
Minnesota. If you are interested in getting in touch with the school programs, let me know.

You can view Litin Eco's compostable tray offerings here:
http://www.litin.com/litineco/shop/index.php?cPath=24_37

You can view Chinet's molded fiber tray offerings here:
http://www.us.huhtamaki.com/Websites.nsf/index/1FE6E5E10DF7FB79862573B8007AD5AA/$FILE/R
ough_Catalog3-07.pdf

These are just a couple of the places I have found compartment trays.

Johanna Kertesz
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Specialist
Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
(651) 297-5518
johanna.kertesz@state.mn.us
www.greenguardian.com/government/eppg
www.pca.state.mn.us/epp

2. The September 15th edition of FoodService Director's feature article highlights schools that have gone
"trayless" and the savings and other environmental benefits they've reaped. I cannot provide a link to the
article, but schools mentioned include:
*St. Paul's School in Concord, NH
*San Diego State University
*New York University
*Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA

The article also highlights other places have tried it without success. Worth reading, if you can get a copy
of the article.
                                                                                                         136
Marie Kulick
Senior Policy Analyst, Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy
Co-Coordinator, Health Care Without Harm Purchasing Work Group
2105 First Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55404
612-870-3422
mkulick@iatp.org




                                                                    137
           Multi-stream Recycling to Single Stream Recycling Conversion, September 2008
3 Posts

Original post:
Hello Everyone, Could someone comment on their organizational conversion from a multi-stream
recycling program (typically the three can cluster of 'trash', 'bottles, cans, plastic', and 'paper, newsprint,
magazines, cardboard').

Rutgers is currently drafting our new RFP for waste management and we currently have the three cluster
concept internally (inside our buildings) and externally (outside dumpsters). I should tell you that
Rutgers has a population of 60,000 faculty, staff and students and over 906 buildings so a conversion to
new containers would be a major task. We may keep what we have and just education and slowly change
the internal containers ... but any insights you have would be welcomed.

Any RFPs that you would be willing to share for single stream recycling would be a huge help as well.

Kevin
Kevin Lyons, Ph.D.
Director, Purchasing Department
Research Professor, Supply Chain Environmental Archeology
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Administrative Services Building III
3 Rutgers Plaza
New Brunswick, NJ 08903
732-932-4375 ext. 2301
732-932-4390 (fax)
klyons@rci.rutgers.edu

Responses:
1. Hi Kevin, I just joined Waste Management's Healthcare Solutions group after working for 20 years
either in hospitals directly or for NGO's. Anyway, I recently visited the Neward single-stream MRF and
it's pretty amazing. We're working with a couple of hospitals in the city and at first I was pushing for a
dual stream - paper/fibers and beverage containers. I thought a dual stream would provide a clearer dos
and don'ts list. I also thought that while it makes sense for curbside, not sure it did for
institutional processes. But after conferring with colleagues, single stream is the way of the future and
particularly where it's happening in communities, it'll start getting mixed together anyway. So we just
need to figure it out and education is key so that folks don't think EVERYTHING GOES IN THERE because
it's all sorted anyway. And it is but we obviously don't want people's trash... The staff at the facilities are
thrilled that we ultimately recommended this solution.

And BTW, the Newark MRF takes all plastics #1-#7 with narrow neck/screw tops -- probably a bigger
deal in hospitals where we have lots of #5 bottles. One problem though -- they don't like plastic bags
because they get caught in the machines. We're trying to figure out how to minimize their use. If you
haven't visited, you should.

Good luck.
Laura Brannen
Director of Customer Sustainability
WM Healthcare Solutions
                                                                                                            138
(713) 248-0723 (cell)
lbrannen@wm.com

2. Here's an RFP I saved from a previous list serve discussion on Denver's SS program: Denver, CO
Recycles Program - RFP and Addendum for Recyclables Processing and Marketing (PDF). Denver,
Colorado developed a Request for Proposals leading to the hiring of a contractor to process and market
their single stream recyclable materials. The City's RFP outlines service expectations, revenue-based
incentives and pricing terms, and provides a detailed description of the incoming recyclables to be
processed. The addendum shows questions raised by potential bidders and the City's responses. We
have some examples available online at: http://www.p2pays.org/epp/collcontract.asp and
http://www.p2pays.org/localgov/pubs/rfp.asp. If I can provide further assistance, please don't hesitate
to contact me.

Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3LC40)
Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3163
giuranna.mike@epa.gov




                                                                                                    139
Encouraging use of green products, October 2008
2 Posts

Original post:
Hello, we are in the process of developing plans to promote the purchase of green products and services
throughout our county departments. While we currently have a policy in place, we will soon be
distributing resources to help educate employees about what to look for in a product.

I'm curious to hear what others have done to encourage green purchasing. Has anyone tried giving away
or subsidizing the cost of particular products? Any other suggestions?

Thanks,
Kat
Kat McCarthy
Waste Reduction and Recycling Specialist
Tompkins County Solid Waste
122 Commercial Avenue
Ithaca, NY 14850
(p) 607-273-6632
(f) 607-275-0000

Responses:
Hi Kat, Hennepin County has had tremendous success with the Lead by Example Incentive Fund. You can
learn more about the Lead by Example Incentive Fund by visiting the Hennepin County Green
Government website HERE or www.hennepin.us/greengovernment

 Goal
 The goal of this funding program is to provide an incentive or startup funding to Hennepin County
 departments for innovative projects that meet county and regional solid waste master plan
 outcomes. We would strongly encourage applicants to submit project proposals that meet the
 following outcomes. Proposed projects that are consistent with these outcomes will receive strong
 consideration.
 Outcomes:
 1.    Reduce waste requiring disposal from Hennepin County facilities.
 Priority will be given to projects that reduce office paper, packaging or organic materials.
 2.    Reduce the amount of hazardous chemicals used in Hennepin County operations.
 3.    Increase the procurement of environmentally preferable products and services that have a solid
 waste component to their preferable attributes.
 Priority will be given to projects that focus on a product or service that has been identified as a
 “priority green purchasing opportunity” at a previous Green Purchasing Workshop.




                                                                                                     140
                      Funding for green building - public projects, October 2008
6 Posts

Original post:
Hello! Does anyone have examples from the public sector regarding setting up an internal fund to help
your own departments with green building projects (new, retrofit, upgrades, etc.) that entail more
upfront capital costs than a non-green option? Perhaps a fund that receives money from the operational
savings resulting from green projects (e.g. energy), but then can be used to help with upfront costs on
other "green" projects?

Or related examples of integrating up-front capital costs/budgets to operational costs/budgets when they
are handled by different departments?

Thank you,
-Stacey
Stacey Foreman
City of Portland, Oregon, Bureau of Purchases

Responses:
1. Stacey, Harvard University has been capitalizing the "greening" of their campus and out-performing
the investment returns of the general endowment fund. The savings are reinvested in the fund and they
are making exceptional progress.
http://www.greencampus.harvard.edu/gclf/
http://www.greencampus.harvard.edu/

Ron Smith
Ohio EPA, Office of Compliance Assistance & Pollution Prevention
614-644-2813
614-644-2807 fax
ron.smith@epa.state.oh.us
http://www.epa.state.oh.us/ocapp/ocapp.html

2. The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency made a 3 year commitment to purchase wind power (through
our electricity provider) for a certain percentage of our electricity usage. Since the wind power ended up
being cheaper than expected, we are considering putting the money into an internal "green
improvement" type fund. This is still being discussed, but I can get back to you on details if/when we
move ahead.

Johanna Kertesz
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Specialist
Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
(651) 297-5518
johanna.kertesz@state.mn.us
www.greenguardian.com/government/eppg
www.pca.state.mn.us/epp

3. In Vermont: http://www.bgs.vermont.gov/adminpolicies/policy33 State Resource Management
Revolving Fund. As I understand it, this fund has been underutilized. An outreach component is critical
to a fund’s success. Happy to answer questions.
                                                                                                       141
Marci Young

4. Hello, The City of Seattle developed the Green Building Revolving Fund this year. This Fund is
available to departments to improve the energy efficiency of largely existing buildings, but may also be
used for funding incremental costs associated with installing more energy efficient systems in new
construction buildings. Because it is a revolving fund, it is replenished by utility savings (and if well
documented, maintenance savings can be incorporated into the payback period).

Let me know if you would like additional or more specific information on the Green Building Revolving
Fund.

Cheers,
Sarah
Sarah Calvillo Hoffman
Resource Conservation Advisor
Seattle Fleets and Facilities Department
700 Fifth Ave, Suite 5200
Seattle, WA 98104
sarah.calvillo-hoffman@seattle.gov
T: 206.233.5104
C: 206.255.0196

5.  Stacy - there are a number of revolving or just plain loan funds that are designed to fund green
building and/or energy projects that require up front capital but have good paybacks over the project life.
The Texas Energy Office has a very significant program, and your own State of Oregon does as well.
Harvard University's Green Campus Initiative also has a revolving loan fund that has proved very
effective. Our own Leading by Example program has received some capital dollars this year to fund
smaller energy reduction projects at various agencies and we are in the process of developing guidelines
and a list of targeted technologies.

Also in Massachusetts, we are looking at ways to develop such a revolving loan fund mechanism that
would sustain itself after initial funding and I'd be happy to talk off line about what we are thinking and
some of the potential roadblocks. With regard to life cycle costing, our Division of Capital Asset
Management, which manages all large green building projects has received a capital budget line item to
help fund some of the more costly upgrades that will result in both economic and energy savings over the
longer term. They also are required by Executive Order to meet a certain energy standard for all large
projects and as a result are forced to look at newer technologies and techniques and use life cycle costing
estimate.

Hope this helps.
Eric Friedman, Director
Leading by Example Program
Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs
100 Cambridge Street, #1020
Boston, MA 02114
617-626-1034
617-626-1181 fax
eric.friedman@state.ma.us
http://www.mass.gov/envir/leadingbyexample
                                                                                                        142
143
                                        Task Chairs, October 2008
2 Posts

Original post:
Hello! Does anyone have specifications for office task chairs that include environmental and/or
ergonomic criteria? I'm particularly interested in criteria regarding indoor air quality, recyclability, and
less-toxic (or zero) flame retardants.

Thank you.
-Stacey
Stacey Foreman
City of Portland, Oregon, Bureau of Purchases

Response:
These two companies seem to have the majority of sustainable office furnishings:
Steel case: http://store.steelcase.com/go/products/
Herman Miller: http://www.hermanmillerseating.com/asp/show_content.asp?CpID=846




                                                                                                         144
                          30% post-consumer content paper, November 2008
4 Posts

Original post:
Is there a way to determine the benefit to the environment by using 3000 reams of 30% pc paper vs.
using virgin paper. A coefficient? A calculation? anything?

Responses:
1. Check out the Environmental Defense "Environmental Paper Calculator." It is easily found via Google
and is also available on one of the White House websites at www.ofee.gov
-Scot

2. There most certifiably is. A little Googling results in the following links.
http://recycling.stanford.edu/5r/recycledpaper.html
http://www.foe.co.uk/resource/briefings/paper_recycling.html
http://www.wrap.org.uk/downloads/Is_Recycled_better_than_virgin_3.4beb5491.3143.pdf

On average, when comparing the manufacture of 100% recycled content paper to virgin paper, 1 ton of
recycled paper can save 1.32 tons of CO2 equivalent. This considers the complete life cycle.

Now your question was for 30% recycled content, which does not specify post-consumer waste/recycled
content in the mix, so the amount of savings would naturally be less than using 100% recycled paper.

It is not clear from your question if you’re aware of the forest stewardship council web site
http://www.fsc.org/about-fsc.html where you can find a wealth of information.

Here is an excerpt: If the paper is both FSC-certified and recycled. Yes, we can get the best of both worlds.
The FSC has three labels: 100 percent, recycled, and mixed sources. The 100 percent label indicates that
all involved forests are FSC-certified (handy when buying lumber and lumber products). The mixed label
indicates a blend of wood fibers from recycled material, FSC-certified forests, and "controlled sources"
[PDF], involving forests with certain less stringent guidelines than the FSC-certified variety.

*Daniel Hoviss PEC Putney Energy Committee

3. Hi, in response to an earlier question, GHG and energy benefits from recycled paper (and other
recycled products) can also be calculated through EPA's ReCon Tool. Through this tool, StopWaste.Org
created a metric: One metric ton of CO2 equivalent is eliminated under the following purchasing
scenarios:
* For every 30 cases of 30% postconsumer recycled content paper
* For every 6 cases of 100% postconsumer paper

Beth Eckl
EPE Consulting
Danville, CA
(925) 838-2731




                                                                                                          145
                             Microfiber towels for bathing, November 2008
2 Posts

Original post:
Can anyone point me to any resources (i.e. links, mfg. cut sheets, studies, etc.) to assist with writing a
specification for micro fiber cloth towels for personal care use for bathing ??

I’m working on potentially modifying a State towel contract that currently specifies bleached cotton fiber
cloths including thread counts. The towels in the existing contract are used for a variety of purposes but
mostly for “personal” -such as for use to oneself off from a shower rather than janitorial cleaning. Has
anyone experience where they have been used for this? Our existing contract serves the Dept. of
Corrections. If there is any crossover it would be good to know since there may be opportunity to build
markets through this use.

My hope is that there is post-consumer recycled content in the micro fiber cloths but the labels reviewed
do not list any PC content.
http://www.bonakemi.com/shop/shopexd.asp?id=29
http://www.brilexsolutions.com/microfiberproducts.html

Toni Stein
State of California
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
Department of General Services, Procurement Division
707 3rd Street, 2nd Floor, West Sacramento, CA 95605
(916) 375-4460
(650)-823-7662 cell
Antoinette.stein@dgs.ca.gov
http://www.green.ca.gov/EPP/default.htm

Response:
Go to: http://www.norwex.com/norwex/
s




                                                                                                             146
                                          Deicers, November 2008
3 Posts

Original post:
Hi, I'm researching EPP deicers and would appreciate any information/experience you could share --
particularly technical specifications and supporting documents such as case studies, pilot programs or
reports about the effects of various products on water and soil.

I'm trying to get a sense of which chlorides or blends are most preferable, and how these products
compare to products with agricultural ingredients.

Thanks!
Paula Levin
Delta Institute - WMSPC administrator
Associate
53 W Jackson Blvd | Suite 230 | Chicago, IL 60604
plevin@delta-institute.org
T: 312.554.0900x17 W: www.wmspc.org

Responses:
1. Here's a file I have on deicers from 2 years ago.

De-Icing Alternatives
1. We are looking into using an organic natural ice melter that is environmentally friendly, Mountain
Organic Natural IceMelter. This product is safe on concrete, effective in temperatures of -4 degrees
Fahrenheit, safe on vegetation, harmless to groundwater systems, and is safe to handle. Unfortunately, I
cannot attest to the effectiveness of this product, as it has yet to be tried. If you are interested there is a
website to visit for further information:
http://www.xynyth.com

2. I once had a sidewalk replaced with one with heating elements in it. Worked great! – Sam

3. Here is a site to check out http://www.plantops.umich.edu/grounds/winter_alternatives.html

4. I don't have a guide, but 1 minute using Google™ turns up a bunch of environmentally friendly
alternatives to salt http://www.cryotech.com/products/pdf/CMAfacts.pdf Just an example.

5. You could use one of the non-salt based products or install heater elements under the sidewalks as
some people do their driveways. Problem with the latter is increased use of electricity. Good luck.

6. These sites discuss the alternatives well but are dated.
http://www.oseh.umich.edu//salt.html
http://www.madsci.org/posts/archives/nov98/910675052.Ch.r.html

Other resources: http://www.enviroliteracy.org/article.php/709.html

EPA Guidance 1999: http://www.epa.gov/npdes/pubs/ice.pdf
Hotel guidance: http://www.vtgreenhotels.org/articles/deice.htm

                                                                                                             147
7. Maryland Department of Environment - Facts about winter weathers, chemical deicers and the
Chesapeake Bay http://www.mde.state.md.us/assets/document/WINTER_2.pdf

Environment Canada - BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR SALT USE ON PRIVATE ROADS, PARKING
LOTS AND SIDEWALKS http://www.ec.gc.ca/nopp/roadsalt/reports/ParkingLot/EN/p5.cfm

University of Michigan - Winter Maintenance: Snow and Ice Removal
http://www.oseh.umich.edu//salt.html

8. I would think a greens keeper at a resort might have some good ideas. The City of Frankenmuth in our
county installed heated sidewalks a few years back. I'm sure they would be able to give you more
information on the cost effectiveness which apparently is comparable to labor and materials used in
repeated salting & shoveling. You can contact them at 240 W. Genesee, Frankenmuth, MI 48734 or call
City Manager Charles Graham at 989-652-9901.

9. Both Potassium Chloride (KCL) and Calcium Chloride (CaCL) will do what he seeks. KCL is also a low
yield fertilizer, making the nearby grass turn green quickly in the spring. Although both make low yield
acids when mixed with water, neither KHCL nor CaHCl has sufficient strength to damage plants. In fact,
those plants which like acid soils thrive with either added to their roots. Notable example in Michigan is
the Azalea, it loves both acids and their blooms look better when run-off water from sidewalks and
driveways contains diluted KHCL and CaHCl.

10. This resource doesn't directly address the question below but has some useful thoughts and
information you might want to pass along:
http://www.grist.org/biz/tp/2005/11/01/greenclean/index.html

11. Don't know if this will help but on a smaller scale using Alfalfa meal on residential sidewalks and
porch helps melt the ice. It is safe for the lawn, concrete, and pets. I originally heard of this through a pet
store. The paragraph below is from a recycling newsletter in Spokane Washington with some "winter
tips".

Melting Ice: Try alfalfa meal instead of using salt on your porch and sidewalk. This completely natural
fertilizer contains nitrogen to promote ice melting and has a texture to provide traction while it works.
Alfalfa meal will not leave grass and perennials brown or eat away at concrete. Traction Helpers: For just
plain traction, cover ice with wood ashes, coal cinders, sand, or cat litter. Slip Stoppers: Invest in some
non-slip stair treads for your slippery steps.

12. See the Salt Institute document on salt and the environment, and sensible salting practices, available
at http://www.saltinstitute.org/saltandenvironment-english.pdf

The DEQ does not have a compiled list of alternatives. However, the American Public Works Association
has a list of alternative salts and equipment vendors at
http://www.apwa.net/About/PET/Transportation/Winter-Maint/index.asp?mode=links

In addition, go to www.carbohydrateeconomy.org, word search for "deicer" to find information
companies that make/sell these alternative products for both ice control. Site is part of the Institute for
Local Self-Reliance.

Remind the facility if they have 5 tons or more of salt, they would be subject to the Part 5 rules
                                                                                                            148
13. Here is a great reference from the University of Minnesota....
http://www.extension.umn.edu/projects/yardandgarden/ygbriefs/h456de-icer.html

Our program has been looking at the environmental impacts and possible specifications for deicers.
Based on our analysis of the products available on the market, we found that while many of the products
may offer a significant reduction in the amount of chlorides released into the environment (through using
chlorides other than sodium chloride, "activating" sodium chloride with other chemicals or completely
replacing chlorides as active ingredients), many of the chemicals come with environmental concerns of
their own.

While sodium chloride is a fairly pure chemical, a lot of the alternative deicing products may include a
broad range of impurities, including heavy metals and significant concentrations of phosphorus and
nitrogen. In addition, many of the smaller product manufacturers and marketers may have difficulty
supplying products with consistent chemical composition, because the organics they get as byproducts of
the food industry, for example, will vary in concentrations of copper, zinc and other metals batch to batch.

This is not to say that there are no good alternative deicing products out there. Those products definitely
exist. At the same time, the fact that a product has a lower chloride concentration or has "all natural"
components in it does not make it green.

I would suggest using the chemical specifications established by the Pacific Northwest Snowfighters
(PNS) Association as the minimum standard for the deicing chemicals that you are buying. The
Association includes state departments of transportation from Washington, Montana, Idaho and others.
Here is the link to their website: http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/partners/pns/

There are a couple of issues with the standard, most notably, the limit for phosphorus (in some states it
may be considered high) and the lack of a limit for nitrogen. At the same time, the standard definitely
takes into account many other variables and has been successfully used by several states for many years.

The PNS standard is well known in the industry today. If you are concerned about the issues I noted
above, consider setting additional, more stringent, specifications above and beyond that standard. One of
the ideas we had here in MA was to set the PNS standard as a minimum specification and then mark
products that comply with the set of more stringent specifications (which I will be happy to send you)
with the "green" rating.

In summary, we should continue looking at deicing products and technologies and possibly agree on
some common standards to use. I think the PNS standard is an excellent starting point for anyone who is
interested in buying alternative deicers.

Dmitriy Nikolayev, Procurement Manager
Facilities and Environmental Services
Operational Services Division
Commonwealth of Massachusetts
One Ashburton Place, Room 1017
Boston, MA 02108
Phone: 617-720-3351 Fax: 617-727-4527
dmitriy.nikolayev@osd.state.ma.us

                                                                                                        149
2. The Pollution Prevention Resource Center completed a rapid response on this topic in Dec 2006.
Please see http://pprc.org/research/epp/RoadwayDe-icers.pdf for more info.

Michelle Gaither, PPRC




                                                                                                    150
                          All ‘n One Cleaners & Disinfectants, December 2008
2 Posts

Original post:
Hi, I welcome input on the question whether or not it’s safer/greener/etc. to use an all-in-one cleaner
containing a hydrogen peroxide-base that can be diluted to different strengths to act as a disinfectant,
glass cleaner, multi-purpose cleaner, hard floor cleaner, carpet extractor, carpet shampoo and spot
cleaner – as opposed to using hydrogen peroxide-based products that are not registered as a
disinfectant. I assume it might be simply the strength of the hydrogen-peroxide…

Thanks,
Beth
Beth Eckl
EPE Consulting
52 Saint Timothy Court
Danville, CA 94526
(925) 838-2731

Response:
Hi Beth, I don’t believe the issue is “safety” when comparing a hydrogen peroxide based cleaner to one
that is registered as a disinfectant/sanitizer since they are likely to have the same amount of hydrogen
peroxide.

To me the real issue is liability. If a facility is using a hydrogen peroxide based product that is NOT
registered with the EPA as a disinfectant (and more likely it is just a sanitizer) if there is some kind of
illness outbreak that leads to a lawsuit, it would be hard for them to defend that they were taking prudent
precautions, whether or not the product might have the same actives as a similarly formulated but
“registered” product. This is simply because it is a violation of federal law to make these types of claims if
the product is not registered.

But with having said all of this, using an “all-in-one” cleaner has lots of advantages over a combination of
products, but only if training is adequate. We see far too many organizations purchasing products where
different dilutions are used for different applications, but the reality is that they use the same dilution for
everything, and thus all the benefits are wasted.

So this is all a long way of saying that there are many benefits to “all-in-one” cleaners as long as the
cleaning personnel are trained properly on the correct dilutions and use --- but the benefits really are
NOT related to product safety if they are the same basic formulation.

Hope this helps,
Steve
Stephen P. Ashkin, President
The Ashkin Group, LLC - The Green Cleaning Experts
3644 Tamarron Drive Bloomington, IN 47408
Voice: 812/332-7950 Fax: 812/332-7965
Email: SteveAshkin@AshkinGroup.com
Visit us at: www.AshkinGroup.com


                                                                                                            151
                            Looking for decision making tools, January 2009
4 Posts

Original post:
Hello; I'm looking for tools or approaches that can be used to prioritize the various categories of goods
and services that we purchase so we can begin work on green/sustainable procurement specifications for
them. So far the best I have come up with is Grid Analysis.

Does anyone on the list have any decision making tools that they could recommend or share that might
help us do this ?

Lynda Rankin
Nova Scotia Environment
Box 442, Halifax Nova Scotia
B3J 2P8
Tel: (902) 424-2578
email: rankinlx@gov.ns.ca

Response:
Here are some good links for reference. Most state web sites have some statements regarding
sustainable/green purchasing. But watch out for green washing. Check www.rateitgreen.com some of the
products listed there will actually have comments-ratings of the various products. I just completed my
first course in Sustainable Design at Boston Architectural College and (maybe a little information will
make me dangerous!) I would suggest that you come up with your working definition of sustainability. I
am sure there are under grad and grad students that would love a project.

http://www.buildinggreen.com/ There is all kinds of information here; great people

http://www.ungm.org/SustainableProcurement/Global

http://www.buyeranalytics.com/purchasingblogs/2008/1/28/defining-sustainable-procurement.html

http://www.sustainableprocurement.net/

http://www.oregon.gov/DAS/SSD/SPO/sustain-menu.shtml example State of Oregon

There is just tons of information out the www.usgbc.org US Green Building Council

Cheers!
Deborah

2. http://www.c2e2.org/videoconference/UOGPurchSection1.4issue1.pdf
From the UK but filled with good information.

3. I can't think of a prioritization tool per se but you might want to prioritize based on either purchasing
volume and/or environmental impact. Computers and related electronics, for example would be a top
priority because they have major energy and hazardous waste impacts and are also big ticket
items. Local environmental concerns should also be factored in. (For example, if you are in a drought-
prone area, water conservation would be a priority).
                                                                                                          152
EPA'S EPP Database at http://www.epa.gov/epp uses one categorization scheme and this Web
site provides a world of information) that will be helpful.

Judy Usherson
Senior Manager
ERG
judy.usherson@erg.com
703-841-0503
703-841-1440 (fax)




                                                                                           153
                                  Dining service policies, January 2009
4 Posts

Original post:
My name is Christina and I work for the Center for a New American Dream. We are an environmental
non-profit based in Takoma Park, Maryland. RPN is a member based sect of New Dream and we write
purchasing guides on product areas that cause environmental concerns. Currently we are writing a guide
on Dining Services and will incorporate a number of policies into our publication. Is anyone familiar with
any policies that harness sustainable food procurement by mandating the purchase of organic or local
foods in dining facilities?

Christina Moretti, RPN Fellow
Responsible Purchasing Network
Center for New American Dream
christina@newdream.org
301.891.3683 ext. 102
www.responsiblepurchasing.org

Responses:
1. Hi Christina, NY State is working on a green hospitality program and in my work on it I have come
across State programs that will certify restaurants as "green", and usually local or organic sourcing is part
of the certification. Maine has a workbook for restaurants interested in obtaining green certification from
the State. My understanding is that RPN targets "institutional" purchasers - is your Dining Services guide
intended for state/local government food procurement?

You might want to get in touch with the Green Restaurant Association (www.dinegreen.com) and/or
Chefs Collaborative (www.chefscollaborative.org), both non-profits based in Boston. I am not sure if their
work includes dealing with government procurement in addition to the private sector, but if not, they'd
probably be able to refer you to a good source.

Regards,
Ashley
Ashley Wilson
NYSDEC - Pollution Prevention
625 Broadway, 4th Floor
Albany, NY 12233-1750
E-mail: alwilson@gw.dec.state.ny.us
P: 518.402.9175
F: 518.402.9168

2. Christina; Check with Judy Wicks of the white Dog Cafe, in Philadelphia. See
http://www.whitedog.com/ and http://www.judywicks.com/

Judy Wicks, Owner and Founder
White Dog Cafe
3420 Sansom St. Philadelphia, PA 19104
www.whitedog.com
www.blackcatshop.com
(215) 386-9224
                                                                                                         154
Judy Wicks is owner and founder of Philadelphia’s 23-year-old White Dog Cafe, and is a national leader in
the local, living economies movement. She is co-founder and co-chair of both the national Business
Alliance for Local Living Economies (BALLE), and the local Sustainable Business Network of Greater
Philadelphia (SBN). She is also president of the White Dog Cafe Foundation, dedicated to building a local
living economy in the Philadelphia region.

The Cafe sources all produce in season from local organic family farms. All meat and poultry is humanely
raised, and fish and seafood are sourced from sustainable fisheries. The Cafe has helped lead campaigns
to ban the sale of endangered fish and the use of GMO products. One hundred percent of electricity is
generated by wind power, the first business in Pennsylvania to do so. Entry-level employees make a
minimum “living wage.” Twenty percent of profits are contributed to the White Dog Cafe Foundation and
other non-profits. Foundation projects include Fair Food, which connects local family farms with urban
markets; the PIG Alliance, which supports pastured pig farming as an alternative to confinement pork
production; and the Sustainable Business Network of Greater Philadelphia, which supports independent
local businesses committed to building a local living economy....

Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3LC40)
Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3163
giuranna.mike@epa.gov

3. Christina, One component we should include in the guide is a form for dining service managers to
assess the environmental and economical aspects of durable versus disposable dishware. We used such a
form to do such an assessment at the U.S. Department of Energy Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.
The study was done 10 years ago and showed that purchasing durable dishes and a dishwasher would
amortize itself in fewer than 12 months. The calculation included paying staff to scrape and load dishes.

Look forward to the guide on dining services----Sandra
Sandra Cannon, Technical Support
U.S. Department of Energy Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
Tel. 509-529-1535




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                            An Ideal Green Company Profile, January 2009
5 Posts

Original post:
I'm putting together a 1.5 hour session for suppliers. The session will inform suppliers how they can help
government purchasers with EPP. The session will serve as a forecast of emerging needs for the suppliers
and help them establish goals. I'd appreciate any ideas you may have. The list so far of what they would
provide for us includes
    Detailed sales reports about who bought what.
    Tagging of Green Products in catalogs and prompts that steer buyers to green products.
    Companies would declare what standards they are complying with or in what way a product is
       EPP.
    Third-party verification in place. Companies would establish third-party auditing and verification
       of green products for product groups.
    The company would be involved with efforts to reduce waste and lower their carbon footprint.
    Company would be involved with greening their supply chain.
    Company would work with industry and government partners to develop common solutions for
       common problems.
    Company would have take-back provisions for all products for which it is feasible to recycle, and
       would be researching additional ways to increase recycling.
    Companies would use reusable totes and other means for eliminating or reducing packaging
    Companies would be actively researching and implementing ways to reduce the amount of plastic
       waste in their products.
    Adherence to RoHS and other European Standards. Companies would be voluntarily complying to
       the strictest level of standards

Greg Hopkins
State of Oregon

Responses:
I found this site to be very helpful http://www.rethinkrecycling.com/for-
government & http://www.responsiblepurchasing.org/ and the other link is an Environmental Policy
Statement from the Bay Area http://www.madegreensf.com/policy_statement.html Rate It Green is
another resource to look up products and services and many of them have been rated by the end user.
www.RateItGreen.com

As a manufacturer of recycled products I want my customers to know that our mission is to practice
sustainability in our processes. When you purchase eco-friendly products it is important that there is no
Green Washing taking place.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=16754919#16755401. Where are products
sourced from is something that many people do not investigate. The US company may sell a 100%
recycled product however may have been manufactured in another country; that is not a sustainable
practice-excess CO2 emissions and jobs leaving the US.

Cheers!
Deborah

2. It'd be nice if the company profile include that these companies would commit to detailed MSDS
consistent with the international Global Harmonizations System (GHS), which the US still has to
                                                                                                       156
implement. Even though "green" and certified, these companies will still be using chemicals and a chain
of supply that needs documentation that is easy for all consumers to read and understand. Labels just
don't do it.

3. Hi Greg, I came across this EPA website that has a number of resources for vendors that sell EPP to the
government: http://www.epa.gov/epp/pubs/vendors.htm

Information for Vendors. Vendors can help the Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program meet its
program goals by increasing their sales of green products to the government, as well as by building their
environmentally preferable product lines. The Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program provides
a number of resources focused on helping vendors sell their environmentally preferable products to the
federal government.

Greening Your Products: Good for the Environment, Good for Your Bottom Line. This guidance document
highlights opportunities to help vendors reduce their impact on the environment, while saving you
money. The document focuses on two approaches for improvement - product improvement and process
improvement.

Environmental Marketing Claims. A message to vendors from the EPA and the Federal Trade
Commission about making "green" claims, and information about the Federal Trade Commission's Guides
to the Use of Environmental Marketing Claims.

Federal Trade Commission's Guides to the Use of Environmental Marketing Claims (Green Guides). The
Green Guides, revised in May 1998, are intended to reduce consumer confusion and prevent false or
misleading use of environmental terms in product advertising and labeling. The Green Guides indicate
how the Federal Trade Commission will apply Section 5 of the Federal Trade Commission Act, which
prohibits unfair or deceptive acts or practices, in environmental marketing claims. The Green Guides
apply to all forms of product and service marketing to the public, including advertisements, labels,
package inserts, promotional materials, and electronic media.

Selling Environmental Products to the Federal Government. Information to facilitate vendor access to the
Federal marketplace and thereby increase the availability of environmental products to the Federal
government.

Federal Procurement Opportunities for Green Vendors. Authored by the federal Buy Bio Program, this
brief guide for vendors is intended to facilitate access to federal government procurement opportunities,
promote knowledge of government contracting initiatives, and make it easier to conduct business with
the federal government.

EPA's Environmental Technology Verification Program (ETV) Program. The ETV Program develops
testing protocols and verifies the performance of innovative technologies that have the potential to
improve protection of human health and the environment. ETV was created to accelerate the entrance of
new environmental technologies into the domestic and international marketplace.

Private Sector Pioneers: How Companies Are Incorporating Environmentally Preferable Purchasing. This
report highlights some of the initial efforts of private sector companies to "buy green."

Eco-promising: Communicating the Environmental Credentials of Your Products and Services. Forum for
the Future and Business for Social Responsibility (BSR) published this report as a how-to guide for
                                                                                                       157
companies wanting to make environmental claims about their products and services.

Hope these are helpful!

Ashley
Ashley Wilson
NYSDEC - Pollution Prevention
625 Broadway, 4th Floor
Albany, NY 12233-1750
E-mail: alwilson@gw.dec.state.ny.us
P: 518.402.9175
F: 518.402.9168

4. Greg, You can look at the Responsible Purchasing Network website to get some ideas on green
procurement. We work with governments on the local, state and federal level. Our guides consist of a
comprehensive overview of the different steps needed green your institutions procurement policy. Our
guides are for members only, but we have two that are welcome to the public. Please take a look at the
Bottled Water and Cleaners guide at responsiblepurchasing.org. Let me know if you would like to speak
further.
-Christina Moretti




                                                                                                     158
                                Consolidated Deliveries, January 2009
4 Posts

Original post:
Has anyone looked into (or implemented) a process for consolidating, or limiting the number of weekly
deliveries of office supplies and/or requiring the reuse or take back of boxes or containers for office
supplies? In concert with our current office supplies contract vendor, MA is proposing to pilot these
initiatives within a defined region of the state. Any feedback from others who may have gone through this
already (successful or not) are welcome. Thank you.

Marcia Deegler
Director of Environmental Purchasing
Operational Services Division
One Ashburton Place, Room 1017
Boston, MA 02108-1552
617-720-3356, 617-727-4527 fax
marcia.deegler@state.ma.us
Visit the EPP Website at www.mass.gov/epp

Responses:
1. Marcia, Office Depot, Hennepin County's office supplies supplier has a program that limits the number
of deliveries throughout the week. Agencies that set the delivery limits up also receive a rebate from
Office Depot at the end of the year.

Office Depot saves resources and it makes agencies more efficient and save money through a rebate.
Contact them to be set up with this service (that is free).

2. Marcia, The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory worked with our office supply vendor to take back
the pallets they were delivering our office products on. It saved us dealing with pallets and returned
pallets to the vendor who reused them for the next shipment. This system only works if the delivery
truck belongs to the vendor.
---Sandra
Sandra Cannon, Technical Support
U.S. Department of Energy Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
Tel. 509-529-1535

3. Good morning Marcia. Thanks for your advice in helping us develop our first green specs. Following
is language from our computer spec. http://www.ogs.state.ny.us/EO4/pdf/Finals/Computers.pdf

Bulk Delivery and Alternate Packaging: New York State encourages the use of innovative packaging that
reduces the weight of packaging and the generation of packaging waste. Bidders/contractors are
encouraged to use reusable materials and containers and to utilize packaging configurations that take
advantage of storage containers designed to be part of the product for the shipment of multi-unit
purchases. New York State recognizes that these packaging methods are in the development stage and
may not be currently available. Companies are urged to consider more of these options, and state
contractors are urged to offer these services as part of their contract price list. Authorized users are
urged to inquire about these programs when purchasing computers and determine the best solution for
their needs.

                                                                                                     159
                                     EPP Preference, February 2009
5 Posts

Original post:
The city of West Sacramento, California is considering giving preference to environmentally preferable
products in our purchasing policy. I am looking for other government agencies (hopefully some in
California) that also do this and whether or not the amount of the preference is defined (for example, a
5% preference).

Thank you,
Paulina Rosenthal
City of West Sacramento
Refuse & Recycling Division
1110 W Capitol Ave
West Sacramento, CA 95691
(916) 617-4590 - phone
(916) 373-9006 – fax

Responses:
1. Paulina, Check out our green 101 page. There are a list of polices that give preference to
environmentally preferable products in their purchasing programs. There are quite a few from California.
http://www.responsiblepurchasing.org/purchasing_guides/all/policies/

Christina Moretti, RPN Fellow
Responsible Purchasing Network
Center for New American Dream
christina@newdream.org
301.891.3683 ext. 102
www.responsiblepurchasing.org

2. You might also check out this CEC report on green purchasing policies. It identifies several policies that
include price preferences -- http://www.cec.org/files/PDF//NAGPI%20Policy%20Paper2e.pdf

             - Scot
Scot Case, Vice President
TerraChoice Environmental Marketing, Inc.
29 N. Carolina Avenue
Reading, PA 19608
800 478-0399 x245
610 779-3770
scase@terrachoice.com

3.  Since Mario Cuomo was Governor, New York State has allowed for a 10% price preference for
vendors selling "Reused," "Recyclable" and "Recycled" products, or 15% if the product bidding has more
than 50% of its recycled content coming from NY sources. Unfortunately, even though it's been in place, it
is very difficult to use. At first, to assure vendors were being honest we were requiring certification of
each product (for some paper mills, for example, this could represent 20 different product lines!) by the
state's Dept. of Environmental Conservation. This process was way too cumbersome and took a very long
time.
                                                                                                         160
So, even though the price preference has been in place, I am not sure how effective it's been in terms of
assuring that state and local agencies would buy recycled.

Instead, what New York is doing now is re-writing the specifications for 36 goods and services each year
to make them environmentally-preferable. If the requirement is built into the specification than all
bidders will have to provide "greener" commodities. Brenda G

Brenda Grober
Environmental Services Unit
Empire State Development
30 South Pearl Street
Albany, NY 12245
(518) 292-5342 / FAX (518) 292-5886
bgrober@empire.state.ny.us

4. The State of Minnesota allows up to a 10% price premium for products containing recycled
content. For every 10% recycled content, a 1% price premium is allowed, so a product containing 100%
recycled content is given a 10% price premium. This allows the recycled content products to remain
cost-competitive even if the cost is slightly higher.

Johanna Kertesz
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Specialist
Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
(651) 757-2489
johanna.kertesz@state.mn.us
www.rethinkrecycling.com/government/eppg
www.pca.state.mn.us/epp




                                                                                                        161
                              Recycled Content for Carts, February 2009
2 Posts

Original post:
Does anyone have information on what the standard percentage is for post-consumer recycled content
for wheeled carts? Massachusetts will be going out to bid this spring for recycling carts/bins/etc. and we
would like to incorporate language in the contract that supports a higher content than the 20% that is
currently required. Does anyone know what the industry standard is and if increasing the recycled
content renders the carts structurally inferior? Are there any other issues MassDEP should
be concerned with? Can anyone suggest contract language that may be appropriate? We are in the very
early research phase for the contract and any feedback from others who may have already
researched this is welcome. Thank you.

Brian W. LaValle
BWP - Consumer Programs
MassDEP
1 Winter St.
Boston, MA 02108
617-348-4076

Response:
A reply from the Jobs through Recycling listserv network:

From Adam Schlachter
Southeast Sales Coordinator
Norseman Plastics, an ORBIS Company

Depending on the manufacturer....the content can be as high as 50%. We tried to spec out 100% at one
point and many of the manufacturers don't like to respond (even though it can be done) because the
plastic is brittle and they cannot warranty it for the 10 years that is normally required for recycling
bins. If you have specific carts/bins in mind please let me know and I can get you the Norseman
Plastics/ORBIS Corporation content specifications.

So - Brian - let me (gaithermj@quidnunc.net) know if you want Adam's email address.

Michelle Gaither
Technical Research Coordinator
Pollution Prevention Resource Center
www.pprc.org




                                                                                                       162
                           Food Service Greening Language, February 2009
2 Posts

Original post:
The Indiana Government Center is in the process of reviewing its contract terms for our campus food
service vendor and we are in the process of modifying the language regarding greening or sustainability.
We are looking for language that has already been crafted for a large industrial operation in either the
public or private sector. If you have had experience with this in the past could you offer suggestions?
Thank you.

Phillip Giddens, Director
Indiana Greening the Government Program
Indiana Department of Administration
402 W. Washington St., Rm. W-478
Indianapolis, IN 46204
Phone: 317-232-7658; Fax: 317-232-3154; Email: pgiddens@idoa.IN.gov

Response:
Hi Phillip: Green Seal began developing an environmental standard for restaurants and food service
operations last March. The goal of the standard is to provide a comprehensive framework to reduce the
environmental and health impacts associated with the operational aspects (the products, equipment,
processes, and procedures) of the food service industry.

The scope of the standard covers full-service, limited-service (e.g. fast-food, quick-casual), non-
commercial (which would include college/university foodservice operations), and catering operations.
During this process Green Seal conducted some original life cycle research to better understand the
significant environmental impacts of the operational aspects of food services. Some of the areas of impact
being considered in the standard are food production (the biggest source of impacts), energy and water
use (usually the next source of impacts), waste management and operational support (cleaning,
purchasing, company policies, company procedures, employee training, communication).

The standard is expected to be finalized and available for certification in the next few months. In the
meantime you can find more information about this project, including all of the supporting documents, at:
http://www.greenseal.org/certification/gs46_food_service_operations.cfm. Although the standard isn’t
final yet, you should find some useful information to use in your contract language. I hope this is helpful,

Mark
Mark T. Petruzzi, Vice President of Certification
Green Seal, Inc.
tel. 336-956-2211 (NC office)
mpetruzzi@greenseal.org
www.greenseal.org




                                                                                                        163
                            Vehicle Maintenance Products, February 2009
3 Posts

Original post:
Hi, I am researching alternatives to a few products used in a county highway department fleet
maintenance shop. I am interested in finding effective, environmentally preferable alternatives to the
following:
 - Brake cleaner (current product is Penray Brake Cleaner)
 - A product used for: penetrating oil, clean carbon from carburetors, moisture displacement (the current
product is SeaFoam Deep Creep)
 - Glass cleaner effective to -5 degrees F (current product is Green Tree Light Force and is in an aerosol
can; the users like this b/c they keep individual bottles in their vehicles and the aerosols don't leak)
 - Pumice-like hand cleaner (current product is Zep Cherry Bomb)

I am interested in products with reduced toxicity, products that come in environmentally preferable
forms (i.e. non-aerosol), non-petroleum based products, etc. I am also particularly interested in any
firsthand experiences folks may have had with alternatives (good AND bad!).

Thanks for any feedback you may have. Have a great afternoon, Johanna

Johanna Kertesz
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Specialist
Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
(651) 757-2489
johanna.kertesz@state.mn.us
www.rethinkrecycling.com/government/eppg
www.pca.state.mn.us/epp

Responses:
1. Your second bullet point…penetrating oil resource list at USDA
http://www.biopreferred.gov/Catalog.aspx

Left-hand column. Then Industrial Supplies, then Lubricants, then Penetrating Lubricants.

Doug, Douglas Reed, Purchasing Agent
Department of Administrative Services (DAS)
Hoover State Office Building, Level A
Des Moines, IA 50319-0105
doug.reed@iowa.gov
Phone: (515) 242-6151 Fax: 515-725-0120 direct

2. The CT DEP fact sheets about Preventing Pollution in the Vehicle Services Industry might have some of
the information you are looking for: http://www.ct.gov/dep/lib/dep/p2/vehicle/vehsp2intro.pdf




                                                                                                        164
                                      Green IT Policy, March 2009
6 Posts

Original post:
Does anyone out there have a Green IT policy that they could share with us? We have had a few
accomplishments in that area, but no comprehensive policy.

Thanks.

Karen Hamilton
Environmental Purchasing Program
King County Procurement and Contract Services
401 5th Avenue, 3rd Floor
Seattle, WA 98104
(206)263-9294
E-mail: karen.hamilton@kingcounty.gov
Website: www.kingcounty.gov/procurement/green

Responses:
1. Karen - Massachusetts last fall issued a computer power management standard, which requires all
state agencies to establish power down protocols for all (except certain exempted machines) desktops.
We estimate our savings to be $2 million or more per year. You can find the standard at the state's
Information Technology Division (ITD) website and the specific link is:
http://www.mass.gov/anf/research-and-tech/oversight-agencies/itd/

We're also establishing other standards for EPEAT certified machines through our contracts. Not sure is
this is what you're looking for, but hope it helps.
Eric

2. You could also look at the Federal Electronics Challenge - http://federalelectronicschallenge.net/

3. One thing I would encourage all purchasers to do is to ask for proof of the environmental claims
electronic products (anything with a plug) are making.

As we all know, the Energy Star program is a self-registration program. Manufacturers determine which
products meet the standard. No one from EPA or DOE tests the products before they can call a product
Energy Star compliant.

Two U.S. Senators -- Jeff Bingaman (D-N.M.) and Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) -- are considering
introducing legislation to require EPA and DOE to test products and verify they meet the Energy Star
standard before manufacturers can use the Energy Star label. This is legislation I strongly support.
A "friend" of mine recently purchased a $2,500 refrigerator he thought was Energy Star compliant. He
learned after the purchase that the manufacturer lied. The product actually uses twice as much electricity
as the manufacturer claimed. It does not even come close to meeting the Energy Star standard.

And...the manufacturer refuses to give him his money back.

If you want to learn more about my "friend," check out www.lgfridgefury.org

                                                                                                        165
Always ask for certification, verification, or other proof of any environmental claim. Individual consumers
(like my "friend") aren't able to get companies to provide proof, but large purchasing organizations can
demand proof.

- Scot
Scot Case
Responsible Sourcing Solutions
29 North Carolina Avenue
Reading, PA 19608
610 779-3770
610 781-1684 (cell)

4. Consumer Reports did an interesting article on why Energy Star certification is meaningless for
refrigerators.
http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/home-garden/resource-center/energy-star-has-lost-some-
luster/overview/energy-star-ov.htm

5. There is more information on potential improvements to the Energy Star program and the challenges
with growing numbers of fake labels in today's Wall Street Journal (4/2/09). (Personal Plug -- I was
quoted.)

Check out -- http://online.wsj.com/article/SB123862823846680371.html

The article mentions that even the Department of Energy thinks third party
verification of Energy Star claims might be necessary. This is great news and I'm still trying to
independently verify it.

Until manufacturers are required to provide proof and have it verified, I would encourage purchasers to
ask for proof of the claims. The company's must have it or they shouldn't be making the claims. Asking for
it should be a very reasonable request.

- Scot




                                                                                                       166
                                     EPP Model Policy, March 2009
3 Posts

Original post:
I’m looking for model environmental purchasing policies useful to primary & secondary schools. Also,
more specific guidance from other schools regarding what brands or strategies were helpful to them.
Thanks.
Charen Fegard, Environmental Health Programs Manager
Association of Vermont Recyclers
43 State Street; Suite 8
Montpelier, VT 05601
802.224.1000
techassist@vtrecyclers.org
www.vtrecyclers.org

Responses:
1. Charen, New York has an outstanding Healthy Schools Network with a wealth of green purchasing
resources. http://www.healthyschools.org/ny_program.html; http://www.healthyschools.org/

Ron Smith
Ohio EPA, Office of Compliance Assistance & Pollution Prevention
614-644-2813
614-644-2807 fax
ron.smith@epa.state.oh.us
http://www.epa.state.oh.us/ocapp/ocapp.html

2. I believe that the best program for schools is actually from the Healthy Schools Campaign (which is
different from New York’s Healthy Schools Network).

The Healthy Schools Campaign has developed the Quick & Easy Guide to Green Cleaning in Schools which
contains a CD with over 300 pages of information. The info includes purchasing strategies, board
policies, training requirements for custodians and more. And they have the endorsement of almost every
major school organization you can think of. Plus, they distribute it for FREE!

Information on the Quick & Easy Guide to Green Cleaning in Schools can be found at
http://www.healthyschoolscampaign.org/publications/greencleaning/

Hope this helps, Steve

P.S. As an interesting side note --- the Quick & Easy Guide was initially developed around a project for the
Chicago Public Schools (CPS). And I’m sure you know that Arne Duncan from CPS is now Secretary of
Education, so it wouldn’t surprise me if the work from the Healthy Schools Campaign gets extra legs….

Stephen P. Ashkin, President
The Ashkin Group, LLC
3644 Tamarron Drive Bloomington, IN 47408
Voice: 812/332-7950 Fax: 812/332-7965
Email: SteveAshkin@AshkinGroup.com
Visit us at: www.AshkinGroup.com
                                                                                                         167
                                       Idling Policies, March 2009
3 Posts

Original post:
Hello, does anyone have examples of internal idling policies for their fleet vehicles that prescribe best
practices for turning off the engine, etc.?
Thank you!

-Stacey
Stacey Foreman
City of Portland, Oregon, Bureau of Purchases

Responses:
1. Stacey, The City of Cleveland established this policy back in 2006, as one of the first programs
instituted by the newly hired "Sustainability Program Manager"
http://www.earthdaycoalition.org/documents/IdleReductCleveland.pdf. For detailed info on the
internal policy, here is his contact information-

Andrew C. Watterson, LEED-AP
Manager, Sustainability Program
Department of Utilities
1201 Lakeside Avenue Cleveland, Ohio 44114
P: (216) 664-2444 Ext. 5582
F: (216) 664-2378
E: andrew_watterson@clevelandwater.com
http://www.city.cleveland.oh.us/government/departments/pubutil/sustainability/index1.html

2. Stacey, Hennepin County has a fairly straight to the point policy HERE. It is at the bottom of the
webpage. You could use it as model.

NY State has a law that includes trucks and taxis:
“…State law (2007) already restricts bus and truck idling to no more than five consecutive minutes. This
legislation authorizes the Commissioner of Education to require that school buses to be turned off while
waiting for passengers to load or unload on school grounds or in front of schools, unless idling is
necessary for heating, mechanical or emergency
conditions. http://www.state.ny.us/governor/press/0907072.html

“… A new law (2009) seeks to cut that pollution by giving vehicles just 60 seconds to idle in a school zone.

The measure signed into law this month cuts the allowed idling time from three minutes to one minute
around schools, and gives more city agencies the power to issue violations. It also requires an annual
violations report so officials can track enforcement….”

USEPA Sample Idling Policy: http://epa.gov/cleanschoolbus/antiidling.htm

Think about setting a time limit, a distance from children zones, exemptions, etc.

Best,

                                                                                                            168
Toni Stein
State of California
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
Department of General Services, Procurement Division
707 3rd Street, 2nd Floor, West Sacramento, CA 95605
(916) 375-4460
(650)-823-7662 cell
Antoinette.stein@dgs.ca.gov
http://www.green.ca.gov/EPP/default.htm




                                                       169
                                  EPP custodial products, April 2009
2 Posts

Original post:
Missouri's Office of Administration Division of Purchasing & Materials Management is developing a bid
solicitation for Missouri Vocational Enterprises (a vocational training program for offenders within the
Department of Corrections). The solicitation seeks both green custodial chemicals for manufacture, and
related marketing services. The goal of the solicitation is two-fold: the successful vendor will supply MVE
with EPP chemicals to be used in manufacturing a line of "green" custodial products that MVE will sell to
its state and political subdivision customers. Additionally, the successful vendor will mentor MVE to
responsibly market its green products line. Since MVE's primary goal is to provide on-the- job-skills
development to offenders, an emphasis will be placed on the degree to which the successful vendor
exposes MVE to all levels of the manufacturing, production, and marketing aspects of establishing and
running a line of EPP custodial products.

Can anyone refer us to suppliers of raw materials to produce EPP custodial products or who advise
regarding the development of EPP lines of product? Vendors may contact Liz Palazzolo with the State of
Missouri's Commodities Procurement section @ 573-751-4885 or Liz.Palazzolo@oa.mo.gov
Thank you,
Rob Didriksen
Coordinator, Missouri State Recycling Program
573-751-3384

Response:
The State of Minnesota’s MINNCOR program sounds similar to the MVE program. MINNCOR has several
industries, one of which is cleaning products. They market and sell green products from Northland
Chemical, and the products are featured on our state contract for cleaning products.

You can learn more about the program by visiting their website: http://www.minncor.com/default.htm

Johanna Kertesz
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Specialist
Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
(651) 757-2489
johanna.kertesz@state.mn.us
www.rethinkrecycling.com/government/eppg
www.pca.state.mn.us/epp




                                                                                                       170
              Paper Policy Questions: Reduction & Environmental Qualities, April 2009
3 Posts

Original post:
I have a couple of questions related to paper policies we are looking at. Responses to one or all questions
would be appreciated, as well as any paper use policies you can share. If you mandate the default on
printers and copiers to be duplex, how do you implement and monitor it?

If you mandate that new copiers be equipped with scanning capabilities, have you had challenges with
departments pushing back due to cost or other reasons?

If you mandate 100% recycled content and/or process chlorine free/totally chlorine free (pcf/tcf) for
copy paper and janitorial papers, have you had challenges in your bidding process with getting enough
quality products and are they at competitive prices?

Thanks for your time and your thoughts.

Karen Cook
Alameda County Sustainability Program
510-208-9754

Responses:
1. Karen, Lots of info... If you mandate the default on printers and copiers to be duplex, how do you
implement and monitor it?

County IT and County Library IT sets up PCs to print duplex from remote locations. This reduces costs to
have someone from IT go to EVERY PC and set up the default. There are a handful of PCs that are exempt
from having duplex printing as the default... some are in the Service Center (registration forms), etc.

County IT and County Library IT sent out emails as sections (depts) within the county were switching to
default printing to educate users on what’s going on. They also gave simple instructions and a screen
snap of how to override the default setting for one time printing. After overriding the default for one time
printing, it simply goes back to the normal duplex printing feature. That is the checks and balances to
make sure that duplexing is enabled permanently. Only IT can change it. We (IT and Environmental
Services) wanted it that way) to ensure compliance.

If you mandate that new copiers be equipped with scanning capabilities, have you had challenges with
departments pushing back due to cost or other reasons?

Nope. We use Ricoh multifunction machines (printers, scanners, copiers, fax, etc.). We receive excellent
prices for these machines from the U.S. Communities Contract. We also purchase some multifunction
printers (and PCs) from the WSCA Contract. On occasion, IT has purchased printers and other equipment
through TechDept through the U.S. Communities Contract. It all depends on where we will receive the
best price. One thing to note that I don't hear of many people doing for PC purchasing... We have found
tremendous savings in purchasing PCs in bulk packaging. You can learn more about it HERE.

If you mandate 100% recycled content and/or process chlorine free/totally chlorine free (pcf/tcf) for
copy paper and janitorial papers, have you had challenges in your bidding process with getting enough
quality products and are they at competitive prices?
                                                                                                        171
We used 100% RC paper for a limited time in all county facilities. The price jumped up .15 cents per 500
sheets and decided to go back to 30%PC for most locations. Environmental Services is one of the only
locations that has been using 100%PC for years and still does. We set up several mandates for
purchasing recycled content and adhere to them. Copier Paper (and all papers), toilet paper, paper
towels have recycled content standards that we follow. To reach this internal mandate, we simply
purchase our supplies where we receive good prices and good service. We still purchase 100%PC
envelopes.

We purchase some papers through the U.S. Communities/Office Depot contract. Most of our everyday
copy paper is purchased through a State of MN- Anchor Paper in St. Paul, MN. Our paper towels and
tissue is purchased through a State of MN Contract from Apache Group of MN, Inc.

We have been able to hold our prices down for all office supplies and increase green purchasing in this
area by implementing the Green Products Initiative: Office Supplies Program. You can learn more about
it HERE.

From an earlier EPPNET email (If you’re interested in GHG Emissions and paper)... 11/7/08

Hi, In response to an earlier question, GHG and energy benefits from recycled paper (and other recycled
products) can also be calculated through EPA's ReCon Tool. Through this tool, StopWaste.Org created a
metric:

One metric ton of CO2 equivalent is eliminated under the following purchasing scenarios:
* For every 30 cases of 30% postconsumer recycled content paper
* For every 6 cases of 100% postconsumer paper

Beth Eckl
EPE Consulting
Danville, CA
(925) 838-2731

2. Question 3. Yes. Our agency purchased a significant amount of the 100 % recycled /chlorine free
supply... Procurement contracting accepted lower % as alternatives. As market develops, we expect more
to be produced. Costs for large purchases, (truckload) were stated to be similar.

In Red Below:

Doug
Douglas Reed, Purchasing Agent
Department of Administrative Services (DAS)
Hoover State Office Building, Level A
Des Moines, IA 50319-0105
doug.reed@iowa.gov
Phone: (515) 242-6151

-----Original Message-----
From: EPPnet
Sent: Monday, April 06, 2009 7:55 PM
                                                                                                          172
To: Reed, Doug [DAS]
Subject: [eppnet] Paper Policy Questions: Reduction and Environmental Qualities

I have a couple of questions related to paper policies we are looking at. Responses to one or all questions
would be appreciated, as well as any paper use policies you can share.

If you mandate the default on printers and copiers to be duplex, how do you implement and monitor it?
Until recent economic events it was not closely monitored. Close monitoring came with the last round of
budget cuts. It started with the Director of Administrative Services own printer/copier, and now every
division is following his example. All are set to default duplex and Black and White versus single-sided
or color and usage has been down about 50% since the boss initiated it. Lease Reporting can tell bosses
which of our co-workers might be abusing the mandate. There are programs also to do that reporting if
the copier/printer is not on a lease, but rather purchased. I wish I could say the response was solely for
environmental reasons; but economics has been the major reason for success. Now it should become
standard operating procedure.

If you mandate that new copiers be equipped with scanning capabilities, have you had challenges with
departments pushing back due to cost or other reasons? We have not mandated scanners; just
recommend it highly. I think we have set a good example. I started out many years ago with a small
single-page scanner I rescued out of a storage room, along with printing and sending all bid documents
through the US Mail. We now have a good combination printer/copier/scanner with a document-feeder
scanner and today ‘printing and mailing’ a bid is truly a rare exception. Scanning has been such a success
that we have recently purchased a dedicated scanner. The only drawback of a combination machine is
that while either the printer or copier function is not working; it can keep you from scanning documents
until the repair person comes. We are so dependent upon the scanner function now that we can justify a
separate, dedicated scanner so work can always go on. We need to make one more progress step and
that is to be able to accept electronic signatures/electronic bids from our vendors. We have
experimented with totally electronic bidding; but we have not made a complete transition yet.

If you mandate 100% recycled content and/or process chlorine free/totally chlorine free (pcf/tcf) for
copy paper and janitorial papers, have you had challenges in your bidding process with getting enough
quality products and are they at competitive prices? We don’t mandate either 100% RC or pcf/tcf.




                                                                                                       173
                         Alternative Food Service Ware Success, April 2009
17 Posts

Original post:
Has anyone implemented a switch to greener food service products like bowls, plates, cups, and trays?
(e.g. Styrofoam to reusables or Styrofoam to paper products)?
         From a performance and environmental standpoint, which types of products (reusables, paper,
            other compostables, recyclables) which are better than others?
         Has anyone chosen not to use reusables for particular reasons?
         Which products shouldn’t even be considered, if any?

I’m also trying to get a sense as to the justification for the higher initial price tag.
     Choosing alternatives usually means an increase in purchasing costs, but are their ways that these
       products reduce operating costs, say in places like waste management?

Any insight from those who have investigated, piloted, or implemented these types of products would be
much appreciated.

Thanks,
Mary Jo Snavely
Mary Jo Snavely, Program Manager
The Center for a New American Dream
Responsible Purchasing Network
301.891.3683 x.110 w
maryjo@newdream.org
6930 Carroll Avenue, Suite 900
Takoma Park, MD 20912
http://consciousconsumer.org
www.ResponsiblePurchasing.org

Responses:
1. MaryJo, The cafeteria in our (21 story) building uses virtually all biodegradable food service ware.
However, they say they went through four companies to find the quality product they needed. I will speak
with them and get some particulars on that to share. They recently estimated the cost premium at about
15% (I have not seen any supporting data on that though). Unfortunately, we do not have a composting
program for them yet, which to my knowledge is perhaps the only way to realize some cost savings in
waste reduction benefits– but others my know more on that. There are also still some (hot) food
temperature issues with the utensils.

I will also forward this message to the Sustainability Coordinator at one of our UMASS campuses; she has
several years’ direct experience.

Marcia Deegler
Director of Environmental Purchasing
Operational Services Division
One Ashburton Place, Room 1017
Boston, MA 02108-1552
617-720-3356, 617-727-4527 fax

                                                                                                     174
marcia.deegler@state.ma.us
Visit the EPP Website at www.mass.gov/epp

2. Perry Plumart, of the "Greening the Capitol" initiative in Washington, DC, recently discussed this at the
EPA RCC meeting in Crystal City, VA in late March 2009. You can see his PowerPoint at
http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/rcc/resources/meetings/rcc-2009/plumart-food.pdf
Perry can be emailed at perry.plumart@mail.house.gov

Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3LC40)
Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3163
giuranna.mike@epa.gov

3. Hi Mary Jo, Over the last year, Steelcase -- a member of the West Michigan Sustainable Purchasing
Consortium (www.wmspc.org) -- has been purchasing compostable food ware AND composting it.
They’ve really done some great work there which we hope to build off of for a future consortium
purchase as well as educational opportunities to our members.

I’ll get in touch with my contact there to see if she can answer some of your questions in more detail.

-Paula
Paula Levin
Delta Institute
Associate
53 W Jackson Blvd | Suite 230 | Chicago, IL 60604
plevin @ delta-institute.org
t 312.554.0900x17 f 312.554.0193 w delta-institute.org

4. Hello Mary Jo and EPPnetters, The City of Santa Monica introduced an ordinance a couple of years ago
that banned non-recyclable disposable food containers from city facilities as well as all food
establishments in the city. The ordinance basically allows products that are recyclable or compostable.
All our information and distributors can be found at www.smepd.org/container.

To answer your questions:
 Has anyone implemented a switch to greener food service products like bowls, plates, cups, and trays?
(e.g. Styrofoam to reusables or Styrofoam to paper products)? Yes
     From a performance and environmental standpoint, which types of products (reusables, paper,
        other compostables, recyclables) which are better than others? Obviously the reusables are the
        best way to go and we try to advocate for this. It’s much easier to accomplish for smaller meetings
        (10-20 persons or less) than large events where hundreds of people will be attending. As far as the
        environment, it is relative. The main reason we banned expanded polystyrene is because of the
        impact it has on our marine environment. Performance really depends on the type of food and
        how much a particular group wants to complain about the performance. Definitely be aware that
        you need to know if hot or cold drinks and foods will be served. The clear compostable containers
        do not work for hot foods or drinks, but are great for sandwiches, salads, cold drinks and such.
        Paper products can weep if liquidity food is put in them, so quality is important. It is also
        important to think about how containers are disposed. If you don’t plan to collect compostables,
                                                                                                          175
       such as PLA containers for composting, you might not want to buy them. Buy paper or recyclable
       plastic.
      Has anyone chosen not to use reusables for particular reasons? Again when selling this to staff, the
       reality is that most people should accept the reusables as long as they have a kitchen and someone
       willing to wash a finite numbers of dirty dishes…this can actually be a challenge.
      Which products shouldn’t even be considered, if any? We are still trying to determine this, but
       many entities that have required recyclables and compostable containers will tell you that you
       should only allow compostable containers certified to ASTM D6400. There are some sketchy
       containers coming in from other countries.

I’m also trying to get a sense as to the justification for the higher initial price tag.
        Choosing alternatives usually means an increase in purchasing costs, but are their ways that
           these products reduce operating costs, say in places like waste management?

Any insight from those who have investigated, piloted, or implemented these types of products would be
much appreciated.
Karl Bruskotter
310-458-2255
www.smepd.org

5. Mary Jo: Hi! I recently worked on parts of the specifications for “disposables”. We awarded two new
contracts recently (bulleted below). Attached also is a draft summary of the different products awarded
in the new contract. Links to the product manufacturer’s websites is in the write up. You can access our
contract and download our specification through our new e-procurement system and you can search for
other State or local contracts that may be posted.
         In November 2008 a one year contract was awarded for Plates, Bowls, Trays, Containers,
           Utensils, Lunch Boxes, and Wrapping Materials, Y with a January 2009 start date. This contract
           (1-08-73-02A) can be downloaded:
http://www.bidsync.com/DPX?ac=agencycontview&contid=4003

        In February 2009 a one year contract was awarded for Cups, Lids, Containers and
         Napkins with a March 2009 start date. This contract (1-09-73-02C) can be downloaded:
http://www.bidsync.com/DPX?ac=agencycontview&contid=8321

          Both of these contracts were awarded to San Joaquin Distributors, which is a “California
           based Small Business” specializing in disposable food containers.

I am continuing to follow up with the Department that uses this contract to encourage them to institute
composting along with the use of these products. The following website is
excellent and very useful: http://www.cool2012.com/

Best,
Toni Stein
State of California
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
Department of General Services, Procurement Division
707 3rd Street, 2nd Floor, West Sacramento, CA 95605
(916) 375-4460
(650)-823-7662 cell
                                                                                                         176
Antoinette.stein@dgs.ca.gov
http://www.green.ca.gov/EPP/default.htm

6. Hi Karl, Thanks for sharing that information. I know there are a lot of recyclable plastic container
options out there, but I’m wondering: Are you actually able to recycle the food ware containers?

My impression is that often times recyclable containers do not actually get recycled because
1) a recycling facility doesn’t accept them, OR
2) cafeterias and restaurants do not have the space or capacity to thoroughly clean the items (to avoid
    food contamination in the recycling stream) before putting them in a recycling bin

thanks,
Paula
Paula Levin
Delta Institute
Associate
53 W Jackson Blvd | Suite 230 | Chicago, IL 60604
plevin @ delta-institute.org
t 312.554.0900x17 f 312.554.0193 w delta-institute.org

7. A recycling company wouldn’t want this type of material in their load, since when it is mixed with the
PET and HDPE, it creates a very breakable end product. It is not a good end product for new water or pop
bottles.

The compostable plastics are supposed to be composted in a specific facility that takes this material;
composting it at a specific temperature. If put in a windrow outside with the regular composted yard
waste, it can’t break down properly. There could be possible contamination from chemicals found in this
dishware. More research needs to be done.

This material is making composting and recycling difficult in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Business wants to be
Green and do the right thing but currently, this material makes it difficult to do the correct thing.

We are always looking for more information regarding this topic. Businesses look to us for the answers
and I am still learning about this topic. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

Sincerely,
Lisa Perschke
Business Recycling Coordinator
Recycle Ann Arbor
2420 S. Industrial Hwy.
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
734.662.6288 (113) OFFICE
734.320.9492 MOBILE
734.662.7749 FAX

8. If you'd like to learn more about these types of materials, you should contact the Biodegradable
Products Institute, go to http://www.bpiworld.org/

Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
                                                                                                          177
EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3LC40)
Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3163
giuranna.mike@epa.gov

9. The Department of Ecology just received a large donation of reusable dishes from a local artist. We also
have commercial dishwashers in place. Moving towards reusable dishes and utensils seems to be the
most sustainable option for small meetings and we will be trying them out at our Earth Day event for 100
next week.

Karin Kraft
Interagency Sustainability Coordinator
WA State Department of Ecology
PO Box 47600
Olympia, WA 98504-7600
(360) 407-6693
http://www.ecy.wa.gov/beyondwaste/epp.html

10. As I see it, we are facing a number of challenges related to compostable food ware. To name a few:
    Just because a product is compostable does not mean it is actually being composted…While people
   get really excited about compostable products as an environmentally preferable option, they may
   become disillusioned/frustrated/confused when they realize that the products are often being sent to
   a landfill rather than a composting facility or windrow (where temperature and other conditions are
   closely monitored).
    Compostable plastics should not enter into the recycling stream since their organic content can
   contaminate the recycling process and weaken the end product. This would not be such a problem if
   compostable plastics were easily identifiable and therefore easily separated out from other materials.
   However, compostable plastics often look like non-compostable plastics! And since compostable
   plastics are labeled with #7 for “other” -- a category which also includes a medley of petroleum-based
   plastic resins –even an attentive user/consumer would not be able to tell the difference and would
   likely toss the bottle into a recycling bin if one were available. It would be great if there was a unique
   number assigned to compostables rather than having them lumped into “other.”
    The term “recyclable” is often used interchangeably with “compostable” when it really should not
   be. Compostable items should be composted, not recycled (see #2 above). We should only say that
   compostable materials are being recycled if they are going into a stream consisting only of other
   compostable materials. And even then, we should be sure to qualify our statement to avoid confusion.
   For instance, Green Planet Bottling is a company in Chicago that sells bottled water in compostable
   bottles (made from Ingeo resin). Since commercial composting is not currently available in Chicago,
   Green Planet picks up its bottles from buildings that sell them, and they recycle the resin to make it
   into more bottles. In other words, the recycling process for their compostable plastics is entirely
   separate from the process for petroleum-based plastics. So, until composting facilities and services
   are more widely available, the challenge is to separate compostable plastics from traditional plastics.
   The beauty of Steelcase’s program is that they use all compostable food ware. This means that all the
   food ware and food waste can be put into one bin. The only items that have to be separated out are
   glass, aluminum and plastic bottles. Ketchup packets and the like would need to be separated out if
   they became a problem, but their composting facility accepts a certain amount of contamination.
    Disposable food ware is challenging overall. Why? Because whether it is recyclable or
   compostable, it often ends up in a landfill….And that’s the question I was asking Karl in my email,
                                                                                                         178
   below. Just as buying a compostable product doesn’t ensure that it gets composted, buying a
   recyclable product does not ensure that it gets recycled… My impression is that food ware made from
   recyclable plastic only gets recycled if it’s a bottle or container since recycling facilities don’t want
   food contamination entering the recycling stream. So, for instance, a plastic plate will not get recycled.
   I’m not certain if a plastic clamshell will get recycled. Under the City of Chicago’s blue cart program, I
   believe the clamshell would be collected and recycled since the program accepts plastic “bottles and
   containers” except for #6.

It would be great to hear more from people that have implemented programs to increase the recycling
rates of plastic food ware. What kind of training did you roll out? Do the materials need to be cleaned
before they’re hauled away? Etc.

Another question: does anybody have any reports or studies that compare the life cycles of compostable
and traditional products when they both end up in a landfill? In other words, what are some of the
environmental benefits of compostable products besides the fact that they can be composted? For
instance, most are made from renewable resources rather than petroleum. What other factors should we
be considering and what resources are out there to make apples to apples comparisons so that we can
make the best decisions?
Thanks!
Paula
Paula Levin
Delta Institute
Associate
53 W Jackson Blvd | Suite 230 | Chicago, IL 60604
plevin @ delta-institute.org
t 312.554.0900x17 f 312.554.0193 w delta-institute.org

11. The State of Minnesota recently awarded a contract for compostable bags to three vendors (we
required all bags to pass real-life performance testing AND to be BPI-certified). We are currently
working on a request for proposal for compostable food service items that will be used primarily by
schools with organics collection programs. We will be subjecting all proposed food service items to
performance testing.

I would be happy to share the results of the request for proposal we submit once the process is complete.

As I mentioned, these products are intended for use in facilities with organics collection programs. The
reason for developing a state contract is to leverage purchasing power to obtain better pricing. At this
point, cost is a barrier for using compostables.

Johanna Kertesz
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Specialist
Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
(651) 757-2489
johanna.kertesz@state.mn.us
www.rethinkrecycling.com/government/eppg
www.pca.state.mn.us/epp

12. RE: “Another question: does anybody have any reports or studies that compare the life cycles of
compostable and traditional products when they both end up in a landfill? In other words, what are some
                                                                                                          179
of the environmental benefits of compostable products besides the fact that they can be composted? For
instance, most are made from renewable resources rather than petroleum. What other factors should we
be considering and what resources are out there to make apples to apples comparisons so that we can
make the best decisions?”

We are having life cycle analyses run on several different products. He will be giving us life cycle
assessments for two scenarios: landfilled vs. composted/recycled. Our life cycle analyst is telling us that
transportation of these products will have the greatest footprint in terms of emissions.

Mary Jo Snavely, Program Manager
The Center for a New American Dream
Responsible Purchasing Network
301.891.3683 x.110 w
maryjo@newdream.org
6930 Carroll Avenue, Suite 900
Takoma Park, MD 20912
http://consciousconsumer.org
www.ResponsiblePurchasing.org

13. If you are buying for correctional facilities; you need to consider the additional factor that
compostable service ware also needs to be soft enough so it cannot be sharpened into weapons. There is
probably a play on words about life cycle in this somewhere; but I’m not going there.

Doug
Douglas Reed, Purchasing Agent
Department of Administrative Services (DAS)
Hoover State Office Building, Level A
Des Moines, IA 50319-0105
doug.reed@iowa.gov
Phone: (515) 242-6151

14. Hey Mary Jo, You may want to contact someone at the Sustainable Packaging Coalition. I believe they
have conducted a life cycle analysis of disposable food containers. Not sure if they will give it to you or
charge you for it or what?
Karl
Karl Bruskotter
310-458-2255
www.smepd.org

15. My big concern about these items is that the users are assuming that they readily compose in a landfill
and the vendors are not doing a very good job of educating them about how and when these products will
actually compost. In our Green Lodging program, we rarely let hotels get credit for using these items,
because in most cases, they do not have access to a commercial composting facility, nor are they source
separating the materials.

Peter
Peter Goren
Program Director
Florida Green Lodging
                                                                                                              180
Florida Department of Environmental Protection
3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, MS 30
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000
Direct Line (850)245-2136 Fax (850)245-2159
peter.goren@dep.state.fl.us
www.FloridaGreenLodging.org

16. Hi Pete, I agree that vendors are not quick to highlight the nuances about compostable products. In
some cases they may not be aware of the dilemma and in other cases they don't want to discourage a sale.

I definitely think that people need to better understand what is and is not being composted.

However, I also wonder if there are other benefits to these compostable products that should be
highlighted. For instance, many of them are made from renewable resources rather than petroleum.

So, if we assume that both the petroleum-based container and the bio-based container are going in the
landfill (which is often, though not always the case) some important questions to answer include:
1) Is there any difference in methane emitted or chemicals leached from the products in the landfill?
2) What are the differences in energy use, water use, resource use BEFORE disposal, and how might these
factors affect a purchasers decision on which product is most EPP?
3) Are there differences in impacts on human health between eating out of one versus another?

Paula Levin
Delta Institute
Associate
53 W Jackson Blvd | Suite 230 | Chicago, IL 60604
plevin @ delta-institute.org
t 312.554.0900x17 f 312.554.0193 w delta-institute.org




                                                                                                          181
EPP Product Information: Disposable Food Containers, April 2009: Alternative Food Service Ware
                                         Discussion

Background:
The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation is the primary Department that orders and
uses Disposable Food Service Supplies in their facilities. The following product categories were in the
prior contract:
        Styrofoam cups, lids, and containers ($150K)
        Styrofoam Food Trays – hinged, 3 & 5 compartments ($300K)

The DGS Acquisitions Team including PD Acquisition specialists, Engineering and Environmentally
Preferable Purchasing Program staff, revised the mandatory statewide contract bid specification toward
“greener” products. The team made amendments in the bid specification to move away from food
containers made of non-compostable materials such as all of the Styrofoam containers.
To do so, the following steps were taken:
        Request for Information – gathered information from supplies
        Gathered product samples from suppliers
        Tested the product samples at different State Institutions
        Standardized the products list

Then the specification was amended significantly and included the following new provisions (with some
minor exceptions for the hot cups/lids):
       Processed Chlorine free
       Bio-based material
       Compostable
       Bio-degradable
       Recycled Content

In November 2008 a one year contract was awarded for Plates, Bowls, Trays, Containers, Utensils, Lunch
Boxes, and Wrapping Materials, with a January 2009 start date. This contract (1-08-73-02A) can be
downloaded, http://www.bidsync.com/DPX?ac=agencycontview&contid=4003 . In February 2009 a one
year contract was awarded for Cups, Lids, Containers and Napkins with a March 2009 start date. This
contract (1-09-73-02C) can be downloaded
http://www.bidsync.com/DPX?ac=agencycontview&contid=8321 . Both of these contracts were awarded
to San Joaquin Distributors, which is a “California based Small Business” specializing in disposable food
containers. The bid specification will be revisited next year to add and improve criteria as the technology
and measurement methods are further developed, for example there may be upgrades in coatings and
updates in the ASTM standards for composting as they are under development along with the many new
municipal and commercial composting equipment and facilities are being implemented in CA and
throughout the US.

The new contract includes the following green products:




                                                                                                       182
Plates and bowls:
This contract includes 6” and 10” inch round bio-based plates and 12 ounce bio-based bowls that are
compostable, biodegradable, and chlorine free and they are liquid & grease resistant. The bowls are oil
and water resistant up to 190 ºF. The plates and bowl are manufactured by Bridge-Gate Alliance Group,
http://bridge-gate.com/ and are made out of molded sugarcane (bagasse) and wheat fiber. These items
are third party certified to meet the ASTM D6400 requirements by the Biodegradable Products Institute
(BPI)/US Composting Council eco logo program, http://www.bpiworld.org/BPI-
Public/Approved/2.html.

Trays and Clamshell containers:
This contract includes two sizes of food trays : a six compartment tray (9" x 12") and a five compartment
tray (8" x 10"). The contract also includes a three compartment takeout style clamshell hinged container
(9"W x 9"L x 3"D). These products are all compostable, biodegradable, and processed chlorine free and
are manufactured by Bridge-Gate Alliance Group, http://bridge-gate.com/. They are made out of molded
sugarcane (bagasse) and wheat fiber and are third party certified to meet the ASTM D6400 requirements
by the Biodegradable Products Institute (BPI)/US Composting Council eco logo program,
http://www.bpiworld.org/BPI-Public/Approved/2.html. These products are rated to stand hot foods up
to 190 ºF, as well as oil and grease

Knife Fork, Spoon, and Straws
This contract includes bio-based, compostable, biodegradable utensils and straws. They are made out of
bio-plastics derived from corn starch. The knife spoons and forks are manufactured by World Centric,
http://worldcentric.org/. The utensils are heat resistant up to 190ºF, impermeable, shatter proof (will
not splinter), and have a minimum of a 1-year shelf life in dry storage. World Centric tests these bio-
plastics and assures that they are not made with any GMOs. The straws are also bio-plastic derived from
corn starch. They are manufactured by Eco Products,
http://www.ecoproducts.com/cms/category/44.html

Napkins
 This contract includes four styles of paper napkins. The contract includes a single ply tall fold napkin (7"
x 13-1/2"), a single ply dainty-low fold napkin (10" x 12"), a single ply 1/4 fold luncheon napkin (12-1/8"
x 13-1/2"), a double ply 1/8 fold dinner napkin (15" x 17"). They are all made with 100% recycled
content and from processes that include 100% bleach-free processing. The tall fold napkins are
natural-colored and made with 90% post consumer recycled content paper. All of the napkins are
manufactured by Tork SCA http://www.tork.us/ps/index.php?product=D3056A and they have all been
third party certified to meet EcoLogo’s environmental Table Napkins Standard CCD-084,
http://www.ecologo.org/common/assets/criterias/CCD-084.pdf .

Paper Lunch Boxes
This contract includes a automatic self-locking cardboard Lunch Box (9” x 5” x 4.5”). It is constructed out
of sturdy cardboard (0.020 inch thick) material and contains 100% recycled content of which 50% are
post consumer recycled content exceeding CA SABRC paper minimum. The boxes are manufactured by
the Los Angeles Paper Box & Board Mills, http://www.lapb.com/

Cups and Cup Sleeves
All of the cold cups, small containers, and cup sleeves are compostable and biodegradable. The cold cups
are dry wax coated paper manufactured by Solo. The small hot/cold containers are made from sugarcane
fiber (bagasse leftover after juice extraction) by World Centric,
http://worldcentric.org/biocompostables/bagasse. The hot cup sleeves are unbleached manufactured
                                                                                                          183
with 80% post consumer recycled content waste paper by World Centric,
http://worldcentric.org/biocompostables/paper/cupsleeves.

Note that some of the hot cups or lids are bio-based but are not compostable. Some of the hot cups are
manufactured with a polyethylene coated paper and the lids are made of polystyrene.

Packaging
Additionally, all of the paper based packaging used to deliver the disposable food containers in these
contracts meet the State’s SABRC 30% Post Consumer Recycled Content minimum.
For more info:

Toni Stein
State of California
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
Department of General Services, Procurement Division
707 3rd Street, 2nd Floor, West Sacramento, CA 95605
(916) 375-4460 (650)-823-7662 cell
Antoinette.stein@dgs.ca.gov http://www.green.ca.gov/EPP/default.htm




                                                                                                         184
                          Contract for refilling toner cartridges, April 2009
2 Posts

Original post:
Hello! Has anyone established a contract/contract language for toner refill services? Or does anyone
have first-hand experience using toner refill services for office equipment cartridges? We have some staff
interested in using toner refill services as an alternative to remanufactured or OEM cartridges (for laser
and ink jet).

Thank you.
-Stacey
Stacey Foreman
Sustainable Procurement Program Coordinator
City of Portland, Oregon, Bureau of Purchases

Response:
Stacey – The Commonwealth of Massachusetts has a contract for remanufactured toner cartridges. I
would caution you from treating this as a “refilling service” for cartridges as there is more to
remanufacturing than that – reputable vendors basically reuse the plastic shell of the cartridge, but
replace most other elements, especially the cartridge drum. In our contract, in addition to specific steps
that the vendor has to take in the remanufacturing process, we also have requirements for testing
remanufactured cartridges, collecting empty cartridges once they are empty, free equipment service if
equipment malfunctions due to a defective cartridge. For more information, I would refer you to my
most under-appreciated work – the remanufactured cartridge Q&A developed for the Responsible
Purchasing Network:
 http://www.responsiblepurchasing.org/forum/user_messages.php?config[com_global][discussion_uid]=
6&config[com_global][thread_uid]=23

RPN also has a guide for remanufactured toner cartridges with additional information (I believe it
includes our specifications). I would encourage you to give preference to vendors who have obtained
STMC certification by the International Imaging Technology Council: http://www.i-
itc.org/stmcompanies.htm

Dmitriy Nikolayev
Procurement Manager
Facilities and Environmental Services
Operational Services Division
Commonwealth of Massachusetts
One Ashburton Place, Room 1017
Boston, MA 02108
Phone: 617-720-3351
Fax: 617-727-4527
dmitriy.nikolayev@state.ma.us




                                                                                                      185
                                   Air Conditioning Filters, April 2009
2 Posts

Original post:
Greetings, Does anyone know of contract specifications, sustainable criteria, or 'green' options when it
comes to Air Filters? Filters must meet the minimum performance requirements based on the American
Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE).

Are there products that are more sustainable than others. I have not heard of any firms offering green
alternatives for these products. This is for Municipal offices and a contract in the range of $40,000 per
year.

Best regards,
Aiden
Aiden M. Cohen
Sustainability Senior Buyer
City of Austin
Financial & Administrative Services Dept.
Central Purchasing Office
PO Box 1088
Austin TX 78767
512-972-4008 (Office)
512-972-4015 (Fax)
aiden.cohen@ci.austin.tx.us

Response:
I know of a company that claims to take back the filters and reconditions or recycle them at a comparable
price when considering disposal diversion:
Edward G. Magee, President
Delta M
tmagee@deltaminc.com
www.deltaminc.com
(888) 511.9983

Peter
Peter Goren
Program Director
Florida Green Lodging
Florida Department of Environmental Protection
3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, MS 30
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000
Direct Line (850)245-2136 Fax (850)245-2159
peter.goren@dep.state.fl.us
www.FloridaGreenLodging.org




                                                                                                            186
                                Federal EPP Requirements, April 2009
11 Posts

Original post:
Does anyone know if entities receiving more than $10,000 in federal monies still have to purchase
recycled content paper?

Responses:
1. The EPA's Comprehensive Procurement Guidelines state that, "Procuring agencies include all federal
agencies, and any state or local government agencies or government contractors that use appropriated
federal funds to purchase the designated items. If your agency spends more than $10,000 per year on a
product designated in the CPG, you are required to purchase it with the highest recycled-content level
practicable." (p. 2 of Product Resource Guides). CPG home page -->
http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/conserve/tools/cpg/index.htm

Product Resource Guides --> http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/conserve/tools/cpg/factshts.htm

Rob Didriksen
Coordinator, Missouri State Recycling Program

2. The Executive Order that was based on has been revoked and replaced with 13423 which appears to
only address federal government purchases.

Becky M. Jayne
Office of Pollution Prevention
IL Environmental Protection Agency
P. O. Box 19276
Springfield, IL 62794-9276
Phone: 217-524-9642 Fax: 217-557-2125
Becky.Jayne@illinois.gov

3. Rob's information is accurate. Recycled content purchasing requirements are covered by the
Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976. Any organization spending a single Federal dollar
comes under the requirement to give preference to the CPG designated recycled content products. The
executive orders have no effect on this requirement.

This is not the case for other designated products: biobased, ENERGY STAR/FEMP qualified, EPEAT
registered electronic equipment, WaterSense labeled, ozone depleting alternatives, and low standby
power devices. Those are governed by other acts of Congress (Farm Security and Rural Investment Act
for biobased and a series of Energy Policy acts for the others), which only require Federal agencies to
comply but offer an opportunity for other organizations to take advantage of available standards and
avoid green wash.

Sandra Cannon, Technical Support
U.S. Department of Energy Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
Tel. 509-529-1535



                                                                                                      187
4. Do you know if there is anything that stipulates where the recycled products come from? Recycled
content and manufacturing from another country a deciding factor?
Thanks

5. There are no stipulations concerning source of recycled content.

Sandra Cannon, Technical Support
U.S. Department of Energy Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
Tel. 509-529-1535

6. Sandra: The F.A.R. stipulations governing Trade Agreements does restricts purchases to those
countries that are recognized in the Trade Agreements Act. This would also include recycled content
products.

Martin A. Prince
Environmental Specialist (QSDABA)(R02)
GSA Northeast and Caribbean Region
Phone 212-264-7883
Fax 212-264-3574

7. Martin, Interesting but doesn't that cover just the product and not all the ingredients of the product or
is this a nuance I am not aware of--say the recycled content comes from a non-trade agreement country
but the product itself comes from a trade agreement country? Always learning---Sandra

Sandra Cannon, Technical Support
U.S. Department of Energy Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
Tel. 509-529-1535

8. A follow-up question: Does this mean that our contractors receiving federal stimulus money or being
paid by FEMA for emergency work are required to comply with recycled-content purchasing
requirements? Does this type of spending fall under "appropriated funds"?

Dmitriy Nikolayev
Procurement Manager
Facilities and Environmental Services
Operational Services Division
Commonwealth of Massachusetts
One Ashburton Place, Room 1017
Boston, MA 02108
Phone: 617-720-3351
Fax: 617-727-4527
dmitriy.nikolayev@state.ma.us

9. Sandra: That is a conundrum involving the Trade Agreements Act. However, at this point in time we
have not had opportunity to deal with the scenario. Specifically, no vendors to date have approached us
at GSA regarding the acquisition of base materials from restricted countries. Not to say that the scenario
is not happening, we just haven't had occasion to deal with the question to date.

Martin A. Prince
                                                                                                         188
Environmental Specialist (QSDABA)(R02)
GSA Northeast and Caribbean Region
Phone 212-264-7883
Fax 212-264-3574

10. Dmitriy, Good question. It is my understanding they would unless they have obtained an exemption,
but we need a voice of authority to answer that question--Marlene RedDoor, responsible for the CPG
Program at EPA who I am copying on this e-mail.

Marlene, please see the question below concerning whether the contractors receiving federal stimulus
money or are being paid by FEMA for emergency work need to comply with the CPG.
Appreciate your help---Sandra

Sandra Cannon, Technical Support
U.S. Department of Energy Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
Tel. 509-529-1535




                                                                                                       189
                                 EPP Hospital Case Studies, April 2009
3 Posts

Original post:
Hi folks, We are searching for hospitals or other healthcare facilities that have used EPP to reduce
targeted toxics within their facilities, and that would be interested in presenting their Case Study on an
EPP in Hospitals/Healthcare webinar.

We'd be most grateful for any hospitals to contact us about EPP work they are doing or any referrals to
hospitals!

Thanks.
Debra Taevs | deputy director
8040 SE 51st Ave | Portland, OR 97206
T 503.336.1256| C 503.889.6488| www.pprc.org
Pacific Northwest Pollution Prevention Resource Center

Responses:
1. Practice Greenhealth has a number of case studies. http://www.practicegreenhealth.org/

   Bruce Maine
   Sustainable Design Consultant
   LEED Accredited Professional
   Professional Associate
   HDR Architecture
   402.399.1198
   bmaine@hdrinc.com
   http://www.hdrgreen.com

2. Green Cleaners HERE
Formalin HERE
Source Separated Organics- no case study yet.
Greenwashing HERE




                                                                                                         190
                                  LED Traffic Light Policies, May 2009
3 Posts

Original post:
Hi all, I was wondering if anyone was aware of City/County/State policies such as a mayoral directive or
executive order pertaining to the use of LEDs in Traffic Signals? Thanks!

-Vincent
Vincent Kitira
RPN Manager
Responsible Purchasing Network
The Center for a New American Dream
6930 Carroll Avenue, Suite 900
Takoma Park, MD 20912
Phone (301) 891-3683 ext. 113
Fax (301) 891-3684
www.ResponsiblePurchasing.org

Responses:
1. See page 11. http://www.ci.portland.me.us/clmateactionplan.pdf
   See page 13. http://www.portlandmaine.gov/planning/sustainableportlandreportdraft.pdf

Plenty of contacts at the city of Portland in the beginning of both documents

Peter Cooke
Pollution Prevention Program Manager
Maine Department of Environmental Protection
312 Canco Road
Portland, ME 04103
(207) 791-8101
(207) 822-6303 fax
peter.cooke@maine.gov
www.state.me.us/dep

2. The "other" Portland has also installed LED's.
http://www.portlandonline.com/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=111737

Debra Taevs |deputy director
8040 SE 51st Ave | Portland, OR 97206
T 503.336.1256| C 503.889.6488|www.pprc.org
Pacific Northwest Pollution Prevention Resource Center




                                                                                                      191
                         Graffiti Removal Sustainable Specifications, June 2009
2 Posts

Original post:
Good Morning, Does anyone have contract specifications for Graffiti Removal Services that incorporate
green products, equipment, and best practices?

Ideas of sustainable criteria that should be part of a solicitation for Graffiti Removal Services to be
performed in various locations in the City of Austin would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Aiden
Aiden M. Cohen
Sustainability Senior Buyer
City of Austin
Financial & Administrative Services Dept.
Central Purchasing Office
PO Box 1088
Austin, TX 78767
512-972-4008 (Office)
512-972-4015 (Fax)
aiden.cohen@ci.austin.tx.us

Response:
Responsible Purchasing Network's Graffiti Remover Case Study provides a good starting point:
http://www.responsiblepurchasing.org/purchasing_guides/graffiti/index.php

Paula Levin
Delta Institute
Associate
53 W Jackson Blvd | Suite 230 | Chicago, IL 60604
plevin @ delta-institute.org
t 312.554.0900x17 f 312.554.0193 w delta-institute.org
 s




                                                                                                          192
Greenwashing stories to share? June 2009
3 Posts

Original post:
Got any greenwashing stories to share? Marketplace story coming up. Yes, I know, it's a pet peeve of
mine. That's why I don't feel terrible for cross-listing. Apologies to those I offend by doing so.
http://www.publicradio.org/applications/formbuilder/user/form_display.php?isPIJ=Y&form_code=9d1
5e8029aa6

From the input form:
Seen any greenwash lately? The idea of greenwash is kind of a moving target: as environmental
awareness increases in the U.S., companies and organizations respond, and greenwash that once was
blatant might be much more subtle today. In your local area or in your field, how have
companies/governments/organizations changed their approach to environmental issues in the last year
or so? If you see greenwash, is it taking a different shape than it used to? Share your observations with
Marketplace here.

From the email:
Seen any greenwash lately?
What's greenwash? The dissemination of misleading information by an organization to conceal its abuse
of the environment in order to present a positive public image. (from Dictionary.com)
If you've encountered greenwash, click here to share what you've observed with Marketplace.
A bottled water company that claims "green" even though its water is shipped across the planet...Food
producers that can't quite claim "organic" put "natural" on their labels....eco-friendly 5,000 sq. feet
homes... Have you encountered anything like these -- or more subtle examples -- in your local area or
field?

Be our eyes and ears in your field and in your community. Click here to share your observations.
Thank you for being a source for us -- and please pass this note along to anyone else you know who might
be interested in sharing their experience.
Cheers,
Jo
Joellen Easton
Analyst, Public Insight Journalism
Blogger, The Trading Floor
Marketplace | American Public Media
jeaston@marketplace.org

Richard Yoder, PE
Director, P2ric.org
University of Nebraska at Omaha
6001 Dodge Street, RH308
Omaha, NE 68182
vox: 402-554-6251
fax: 402-554-6260

http://www.p2ric.org/


                                                                                                       193
Responses:
1. Greetings EPPnet Family – I saw Rich’s e-mail about greenwashing and had to jump in. It’s really
gotten out of hand. I’ve been griping about it for years and just this week had the opportunity to gripe
about it at a Congressional hearing. If you’re interested, check out
http://energycommerce.house.gov/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1650&catid=129&
Itemid=70. My testimony is online. My Congressional rant about greenwashing begins at the 7:55 mark
on the video.

-     Scot
Scot Case
Vice President, TerraChoice
29 N Carolina Avenue
Reading, PA 19608
610 779-3770
scase@terrachoice.com

2. http://www.greenwashingindex.com/index.php

Ashley Wilson
NYSDEC - Pollution Prevention
625 Broadway, 4th Floor
Albany, NY 12233-1750
E-mail: alwilson@gw.dec.state.ny.us
P: 518.402.9175
F: 518.402.9168




                                                                                                     194
                      Paper calculator that includes sanitary papers, June 2009
6 Posts

Original post:
Hello; Does anyone know of a calculator or some data that I could use to calculate the impact of switching
our toilet paper and paper towel from virgin fiber paper to various levels of post-consumer recycled fiber
paper ?

I have searched the EPA sites and EDF calculator but had no luck. The impacts that I am interested in are
toxic use reduction, ghg reduction, and waste reduction.

Thanks in advance for any help you can provide,

Lynda
Lynda Rankin, Sustainable Procurement Specialist
Nova Scotia Environment and Nova Scotia Economic and Rural Development
Box 442, Halifax Nova Scotia
B3J 2P8
email: rankinlx@gov.ns.ca

Responses:
1. Hi Lynda, This unfortunately doesn't have all the information you're looking for, but Greenpeace came
out with a Recycled Tissue and Toilet Paper Guide, for what it's worth:
http://www.greenpeace.org/usa/campaigns/forests/tissueguide

best,
Valerie -

2. Lynda; I'd suggest you contact Seventh Generation or Scott Naturals or ?
http://www.nerecycles.org/kickbutt.htm or http://www.stopwaste.org/janitorial2.html the makers of
recycled content paper towels and toilet paper, they should have the numbers you're looking for.

Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3LC40)
Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3163
giuranna.mike@epa.gov

3. I'd stay away from Scott Naturals because, according to the Greenpeace tissue guide, they're bleached
with chlorine compounds (including ECF), which create super-toxic chemicals known to cause cancer.
-David
Eco-Cycle
P.O. Box 19006
Boulder, CO 80308
303.444.6634 office
720.641.1377 cell
www.ecocycle.org

                                                                                                       195
4. Lynda, I would check out the information at Conservatree
http://www.conservatree.org/learn/Essential Issues/EIOverview.shtml
These folks have been working on paper related environmental issues for over 13 years.
http://www.conservatree.org/about/Who.shtml

Ron Smith
Ohio EPA, Office of Compliance Assistance & Pollution Prevention
614-644-2813
614-644-2807 fax
ron.smith@epa.state.oh.us
http://www.epa.state.oh.us/ocapp/ocapp.html

5. Have you tried asking a recycled tissue paper producer like Marcal
http://www.marcalpaper.com/
Doug
Douglas Reed, Purchasing Agent
Department of Administrative Services (DAS)
Hoover State Office Building, Level A
Des Moines, IA 50319-0105
doug.reed@iowa.gov
Phone: (515) 242-6151




                                                                                         196
              State Agency employee travel/preference for "green" facilities, June 2009
3 Posts

Original post:
Hi all, Does anyone have any sample contract or procurement language they could share regarding State
or Federal Agency employee travel and preference for staying at hotels or having conferences at facilities
identified as "green" according to the Agency's specifications? I am aware only of Florida's policy
(http://www.dep.state.fl.us/greenlodging/stateagency_faq.htm) which only applies to
meetings/conferences.

[Green Lodging PROGRAM – Section 286.29, “The Energy, Climate Change, And Economic Security Act Of
2008” states:
“Effective July 1, 2008, state agencies shall contract for meeting and conference space only with hotels or
conference facilities that have received the "Green Lodging" designation from the Department of
Environmental Protection for best practices in water, energy, and waste efficiency standards, unless the
responsible state agency head makes a determination that no other viable alternative exists.” ]

Thanks,
Ashley
Ashley Wilson
NYSDEC - Pollution Prevention
625 Broadway, 4th Floor
Albany, NY 12233-1750
E-mail: alwilson@gw.dec.state.ny.us
P: 518.402.9175
F: 518.402.9168

Responses:
1. At the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, we recently revised our green meetings/events guidance.
The guidance document is posted on our intranet, but I can send you the word document if you'd like.

Johanna Kertesz
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Specialist
Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
(651) 757-2489
johanna.kertesz@state.mn.us
www.rethinkrecycling.com/government/eppg
www.pca.state.mn.us/epp

2. California's Green Lodging Program website has a "Resources for Hotels" page that might be helpful:
http://www.travel.dgs.ca.gov/Lodging/GreenHosts.htm




                                                                                                        197
                                        Green Savings, July 2009
4 Posts

Original post:
Good morning Jill and fellow EPPnetters, As Scot so generously points out, King County has documented
annual cost savings in our reports. We primarily highlight the products that save us money up front, or
are more durable. We are just starting to better highlight the environmental impacts of our decisions by
using environmental "calculators" that helps us quantify water, energy and greenhouse gas savings.

Here is the excerpt from our 2008 report that documents savings:

Savings Summary
In 2008, the county saved 837,000 dollars by purchasing recycled and other environmentally preferable
materials. The Environmental Purchasing Program has helped agencies identify opportunities to
purchase environmentally preferable products that not only perform well, but also save money. In some
cases, the product simply costs less and in other cases savings are found in avoided purchase costs
because the alternative product is more durable. For example: the cost of a remanufactured toner
cartridge is less than one-half the cost of a new cartridge, plastic lumber avoids the consumption of virgin
timber or old growth lumber, and it costs half as much to retread a worn tire as to buy a new one.

The table below represents estimated cost savings based on purchase price only, or avoided purchase
cost, and does not reflect savings in maintenance and installation. Additional examples of savings can be
found in Section IV, "Environmental Initiatives of County Agencies," of this report.

Commodity 2008 Savings
Aggregates 300,000
Toner Cartridges 250,000
Tire Retreading 250,000
Antifreeze 27,000
Plastic Lumber 10,000
Total Dollars: 837,000

Please go to our website for more of the report at: www.kingcounty.gov/procurement/green

Karen Hamilton
Environmental Purchasing Program
King County Procurement and Contract Services
401 5th Avenue, 3rd Floor
Seattle, WA 98104
(206)263-9294
E-mail: karen.hamilton@kingcounty.gov
Website: www.kingcounty.gov/procurement/green

Responses:
1. Hi all, The State of Massachusetts has achieved savings from their EPP program as well:
Purchases of EPPs saved the Commonwealth of Massachusetts at least $544,362 in Fiscal Year 2001,
representing more than three times the cost of managing the EPP program.

EPP Report:
                                                                                                         198
http://www.mass.gov/Aosd/docs/EPP/EPP%20Program%20Assessment%20Final%20Report%20Dec0
2.doc

-Vincent

2. The City of San Jose has utilized various environmental benefits calculators to quantify savings.
Calculators include the one on EPEAT.net to calculate savings associated with IT purchases; we've used
paper calculators to quantify the benefits of buying 100% pcw paper as well as one to calculate savings
from our biodiesel purchases (we found them by Googling). The Responsible Purchasing Network lists
several calculators on their website that could help. They are included in the Purchasing Guidelines
they've done for various products such as bottled water, janitorial products, lighting, paint, toner
cartridges, etc. However, I believe that you have to be a member of the RPN to be able to access them.

Linden Skjeie
City of San Jose
Environmental Services Dept.
EP3 Co-Chair

3. Actually, the calculators on the RPN site are free and open to the public! You can find them listed at:
http://www.responsiblepurchasing.org/purchasing_guides/all/calculator/

-Vincent
Vincent Kitira
RPN Manager
Responsible Purchasing Network
The Center for a New American Dream
6930 Carroll Avenue, Suite 900
Takoma Park, MD 20912
Phone (301) 891-3683 ext. 113
Fax (301) 891-3684
www.ResponsiblePurchasing.org




                                                                                                             199
                                     Water Saving Device, July 2009
4 Posts

Original post:
Are there eco-certification programs for water saving devices? (sort of like EnergyStar? but for water?)

Thanks.
Michelle Gaither | environmental engineer
1402 Third Ave, Suite 1420 | Seattle, WA 98101
T 206.352.2050 | F 206.352.2049| www.pprc.org
Pacific Northwest Pollution Prevention Resource Center

Responses:
1. Hi Michelle, Yes EPA also has a program for water devices: http://www.epa.gov/watersense/. Not
sure if it’s run in the same manner as EnergyStar (i.e. 1st party verification)…

best, Valerie

2. You should definitely check out the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s WaterSense program –
http://www.epa.gov/watersense/.

It is kind of like Energy Star for water efficiency, EXCEPT WaterSense is an actual certification
program. Manufacturers do not get to use the WaterSense label unless an independent, third-party
certifies that the product actually meets the WaterSense criteria.

This is an important difference that can prevent manufacturers from falsely claiming to meet the criteria.

Scot

PS: Yes, I’m still bitter that LG Electronics (thru Sears) sold me a refrigerator that falsely claimed to meet
the Energy Star standard when it actually uses twice the amount of electricity they claimed. It would have
been much more difficult for them to do so if Energy Star included a certification requirement similar to
the one WaterSense requires.

3. Apart from WaterSense, you might also be interested to look at these two water labels from the UK
and Australia (respectively). http://ecolabelling.org/ecolabel/waterwise-marque and
http://www.ecolabelling.org/search/apachesolr_search/water.

Cheers
Anastasia
Anastasia O'Rourke
Co- Founder, Big Room Inc.
www.ecolabelling.org




                                                                                                          200
                         LEED requirements in furniture contracts, July 2009
3 Posts

Original post:
Hello, Does anyone have examples of the following within a systems furniture or task chair
solicitation/contract?
1) LEED-EBOM reporting requirements (e.g. required data and format)
2) Furniture recyclability requirements (e.g. did you specify a minimum % recyclability or other related
requirements such as labeled plastics or no glues/adhesives?)

Thank you!
-Stacey
Stacey Foreman
Sustainable Procurement Program Coordinator
City of Portland, Oregon, Bureau of Purchases

Responses:
1. Hi Stacey, We’re working on a model environmental specification that the City can use in future
solicitations for furniture. We haven’t quite addressed the LEED elements yet (we’re working on that and
plan to have procedures to submit to the USGBC next month), but our furniture recyclability
requirements include labeling major plastic pieces and avoidance of glues and adhesives. We haven’t
specified how much of the product needs to be recyclable yet. But when we do, it will be by weight. We
have been working with Gene Lisa on this specification. He’s a green furniture consultant from
Florida. He’s been very helpful. Really knows the industry.

Sorry I don’t yet have more to share with you. Good luck.
Linden Skjeie, M.S.
Urban Environmental Accords Coordinator
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing
Legislative Analysis and Advocacy
Office of Sustainability
Environmental Services Department
200 E. Santa Clara Street, Tenth Floor
San Jose, CA 95113
408.975.2577
Linden.Skjeie@sanjoseca.gov

2. Regarding indoor air quality (IAQ) requirements for furniture, it may be of interest to look at the IAQ
Submittal Requirements for the following. These specifications include meeting LEED criteria AND
meeting the chronic reference exposure limits set by the California Environmental Protection Agency’s
Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) including but not limited to formaldehyde,
acetaldehyde, and benzene:
     State of CA’s furniture specification (http://www.cal-
        iaq.org/VOC/IAQ_Spec_from_080303143243710.pdf) section 5.7.
     The Low Emitting Furniture criteria in the Business and Institutional Furniture Manufacturers
        Association’s (BIFMA’s) sustainability Standard (called “Level” )
        http://bifma.org/public/SusFurnStdArchive/Draft/2009-02-20%20e3.pdf all of the indoor
        environmental quality criteria (7.6.1 and 7.6.2)

                                                                                                        201
      The Low Emitting Furniture criteria EQ 2.2.5 in the CHPS 2009 Indoor Environmental Quality
       criteria (http://www.chps.net/manual/documents/Criteria/CA_CHPS_Criteria_III_2009.pdf) page
       139 of 162.

In the State of CA bid Laboratory report of the chamber test was required to be submitted and data in a
workbook showing that the offered open office panel system met the exposure limits was
required. BIFMA has specific information that they require to be in the Laboratory Report.

Let me know if you have any further questions.
Antoinette Stein, PhD
Associate Procurement Engineer, (R09 PECG)
State of California
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
Department of General Services, Procurement Division
707 3rd Street, 2nd Floor, West Sacramento, CA 95605
(916) 375-4460
(916)-375-4505 fax
(650)-823-7662 cell
Antoinette.stein@dgs.ca.gov




                                                                                                      202
                           Amount of material sent to landfills, August 2009
6 Posts

Original post:
I would like to know where to look online to find out how much material is sent to the landfills in the U.S.
each year? Do I have to look at each state? Is there some other source that tracks this for the nation as a
whole? Any help will be appreciated.

Barb Day

Responses:
1. Try this link to EPA's municipal solid waste info:
http://www.epa.gov/waste/nonhaz/municipal/msw99.htm

Georgiana Ball
Virginia Department of General Services
(804) 236-3665
FAX: (804) 236-3671
georgiana.ball@dgs.virginia.gov

2. Barb: It appears that each state has what is allowed to be land filled. For example in my state of New
York scrap tires cannot be land filled however there are states in which it is legal. There are also
sustainable cities:
 http://www.planetizen.com/node/20006
http://www.epa.gov/waste/nonhaz/municipal/landfill.htm
http://www.epa.gov/waste/nonhaz/municipal/index.htm
http://www.zerowasteamerica.org/Landfills.htm

I personally would like to see a national initiative to Green-Up the USA!
Best regards,
Deborah
Deborah A. Robbins
VP Business Development & Sustainability
Plant: 75 Michigan Street
Lockport, NY 14094-2629
Office #: 716-478-0404 X303
Fax #: 716-478-0408
Cell #: 716-474-1303
Toll Free #:866-424-6981
mailto:Deborah@RubberForm.com
www.RubberForm.com

3. Barb, This group may have already done the research you’re looking for:
http://www.wasterecyclingnews.com/rankings/landfills_ton2008.html

Best,
Valerie Kao
Environmental Sustainability Branch
California Public Utilities Commission
                                                                                                         203
415.703.1341
vuk@cpuc.ca.gov

4. Barb, EPA data can be found in its annual Waste Characterization survey – the most recent is at
http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/nonhaz/municipal/msw99.htm. EPA data covers MSW. BioCycle
Magazine publishes an annual survey – Garbage in America – which summarizes the amount of waste
disposed in Subtitle D landfills and waste-to-energy facilities in the 50 states. The most recent survey,
from the December 2008 issue, survey can be found
at: http://www.jgpress.com/archives/_free/001782.html. The 50 states define waste differently, which
makes state-by-state comparisons futile. Nonetheless, the higher disposal number in the BioCycle survey
gives a more accurate picture of solid waste (municipal solid waste, construction and demolition debris,
non-hazardous industrial waste) landfill in the United States than the more limited EPA study of just
municipal solid waste.

Feel free to call me if you have any questions at 202-364-3742.
Chaz Miller
Director, State Programs
National Solid Wastes Management Association

5. Barb; See Table 3 in BioCycle's State of Garbage report which is on line at
http://www.jgpress.com/images/art/0812/sog08_tables.pdf. The amount of material landfilled,
recycled and going to WTE facilities is broken down by State and totaled for the USA at the bottom of the
chart.

Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3LC40)
Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3163
giuranna.mike@epa.gov




                                                                                                       204
                                   Sample carpet RFQs, August 2009
3 Posts

Original post:
Does anyone have a sample carpet RFQ? Ultimately we will specify:
non-pvc backing
recyclable fiber
take back of tiles, etc.

Thanks
Peter Cooke
Pollution Prevention Program Manager
Maine Department of Environmental Protection
312 Canco Road
Portland, ME 04103
(207) 791-8101
(207) 822-6303 fax
peter.cooke@maine.gov

Responses:
1.      CARPET INSTALLATION AND REPAIR CONTRACT
Existing Language in Contract:
Vendor is to remove all carpet / vinyl waste and dispose of it off-site (preferably through a recycling
system). Current recycling options are available by visiting the Carpet America
Recovery Effort (CARE) web site at www.carpetrecovery.org . Vendor is also encouraged to meet the
Carpet and Rug Institute’s recommended Indoor Air Quality Standards for installation, application and
removal of adhesives, and carpet removal at www.carpet-rug.com. The vendor shall supply MSDS sheets
to the Building Manager prior to start of work.

New Language in Contract (3rd DRAFT):
ENVIRONMENTALLY PREFERABLE PURCHASING AND END OF LIFE MANAGEMENT
The objective of this environmental requirement in regards to the carpet installation and repair contract
is to produce a building and/or project which enhances the health and well-being of its occupants, while
minimizing exposure to materials or products which may be harmful to the installers and occupants.
Another objective is to minimize any environmental burdens throughout the life cycle of the products
being used in this project.

This requirement does not replace technical product specifications, but merely provides an
environmental specification in which to adhere to or exceed.

This requirement must apply to all modular (carpet tile), broadloom carpet, vinyl flooring, rubber
flooring, carpet pad, and flooring adhesives purchases for new construction, renovation, and
replacement, whether purchased through construction contracts, leases, or other procurement methods.
Patching and repairing within an existing field of carpet is exempt from this requirement when it is not
possible to match existing patterns with carpet meeting the environmentally preferable criteria.

Recycling and Quality Assurance


                                                                                                       205
A.     Vendor must use a carpet recycling agency for all used carpet waste. Carpet scraps from the
carpet installation must also be recycled. Traditional practices, such as landfilling or burning at a waste-
to-energy plant are not an option for disposal or recycling.
B.     Contractor must notify in writing which carpet recycling agency will be used.
C.     Contractor must comply with all applicable hauling and disposal regulations.
D.     Contractor must certify in writing that used carpet was recycled through a certified carpet
recycling agency.

Carpet Recycling Options
There are several agencies that recycle carpet. This list may not be exhaustive of all recycling companies.
It is merely provided for guidance. For a complete listing of recycling requirements and instructions
contractor should contact the selected carpet recycling agency for more specific guidelines.

A.       Bro-Tex Carpet Recycling Program
         Bro-Tex Carpet Preparation Requirements Below:
        Accepts rolled carpet (nylon 6 and nylon 6,6). Does not accept carpet tile.

B.       Interface Carpet Recycling Program
        Accepts carpet tile and rolled carpet (nylon 6, nylon 6,6).

C.       DuPont Carpet Reclamation Program
        Accepts carpet tile and rolled carpet (nylon 6).

D.       Tandus http://www.tandus.com/floore.html
        Accepts all vinyl backed tile and rolled goods.

E.       Shaw Carpet Recycling Program
        Refer to Bro-Tex Recycling Program above.

F.      Current recycling options are available by visiting the Carpet America Recovery Effort (CARE) web
site at www.carpetrecovery.org.

Carpet Recycling Contacts and Other Information
Hennepin County has compiled information to assist contractors for recycling carpets. For more
information follow the internet instructions below. www.hennepin.us (keyword search, EPP Carpet)

Adhesives
Contractor must meet the Carpet and Rug Institute’s (CRI) recommended Green Label Plus™
Indoor Air Quality Standards for adhesives, as well as CRI’s recommended methods for installation,
application and removal of adhesives, and carpet removal at www.carpet-rug.com.

Contractor must supply MSDS Sheets for adhesives, cleaners, and other products that will be used with
the installation of the carpet.

Contractor must use water-based, low VOC adhesives, and/or other environmentally preferable types as
expressly made or recommended by the carpet manufacturer for with the particular carpet material,
substrates, and application condition.

Contractor must comply with the manufacturer’s instructions and recommendations for installation.
                                                                                                          206
“No-glue grid” method of installation is preferred if feasible.
1.      Dry Adhesive Method or Peel and Stick Method (Low/No VOC’s)-Used for installation of some
rolled carpet and all carpet tile.

Adhesives Defined
1.      Carpet Pad Installation Adhesive is any adhesive intended by the manufacturer for the installation
on a floor or comparable surface of carpet pad (or cushion), which is used beneath a carpet.
2.      Cove Base Installation Adhesive is any adhesive intended by the manufacturer for the installation
of cove base (or wall base), which is generally made of vinyl or rubber, on a wall or vertical surface at
floor level.
3.      Indoor Floor Covering Installation Adhesive is any adhesive intended by the manufacturer for the
installation of carpet, resilient tile, vinyl tile, vinyl backed carpet, resilient sheet and roll, or artificial grass
that is in an enclosure and is not exposed to ambient weather conditions during normal use. Ceramic tile
installation and the installation of perimeter bonded sheet flooring with vinyl backing onto a non-porous
substrate, such as flexible vinyl are excluded from this category.

Carpet and Carpet Tiles
A.      Carpet must contain at least 10 percent postconsumer content.
B.      Contractor must provide a listing of all the carpet systems that will be used in the project area,
and a copy of 3rd party certification indicating that they meet the California Gold Sustainable Carpet
Standard. This includes a requirement to meet the CRI’s Green Label Plus™ Indoor Air Quality test
program. For more information on the California Gold Sustainable Carpet Standard and carpet products
certified go to
www.green.ca.gov/EPP/standards.htm.
C.      The use of carpet tiles is desirable compared to 12 foot rolled goods. Using carpet tiles aids in spot
replacements and longer carpet life, thus reducing waste and extending life of the carpet.
D.      Contractor must unroll and air out rolled carpets in a warehouse before bringing them into the
building/project area. Tests indicate carpet emissions will dissipate within 48 to 72 hours with proper
ventilation.

Carpet Pad
If applicable, such as with rolled goods, contractor must use a carpet pad with at least 15% minimum
post-consumer content.

Contractor must provide a listing of all the carpet pads, when used, which will be used in the project area,
and a written statement that they meet the current VOC limits of CRI’s Green Label Plus™ Indoor Air
Quality Test Program.

Carpet and Rug Institute’s Green Label/Green Label Plus Program:
Green Label™ is an independent testing program that identifies carpets, adhesives, and related products
with very low emissions of VOCs and other toxins to help improve indoor air quality.

Green Label Plus™ expands on California’s Section 01350 in several respects, including annual tests for
the specific chemicals, a chain of custody process and an annual audit of the testing laboratory. Section
01350 can be found at www.carpet-rug.com.

Carpet products are tested for emission levels for seven chemicals as required by California’s Section
01350, plus six additional chemicals.
                                                                                                                  207
Adhesive products are tested for emission levels for 10 chemicals as required by California’s Section
01350, plus five additional chemicals.

Carpet Alternatives
Floor coverings other than carpet can be a good environmental choice. The best environmental choice
could be to use carpet only where necessary, and maintain and clean it properly with minimal
environmentally preferable cleaning chemicals and methods to extend its life. Some manufacturers
recommend hot water steam cleaning with only spot cleaning as the best method.

Other flooring options include: natural linoleum, bamboo, natural carpets, recycled-content tile, ceramic
tile, rubber, sustainably-harvested wood and more.

Warranty
All carpets and pads used must come with a minimum 10 (or 15) year non-prorated warranty.

Definitions
“VOC’s” (Low VOC’s)- a lower VOC content of a product meant for indoor use has been positively
correlated with better indoor air quality which is especially important for sensitive individuals.

“Post-consumer content”- materials in a recycled product that are derived from businesses or consumers
after giving served their original intended use, and which have been separated or diverted from solid
waste for the purpose of collection, recycling and disposition.

“Recyclability”- the ability of a product or materials to be recovered from or otherwise diverted from the
solid waste stream for the purpose of recycling.

“Virgin products”- made with 100 percent new/raw materials containing no recycled content.

“California Gold Sustainable Carpet Standard”- is built on NSF-140
(www.nsf.org/business/standards_and_publications/pdf/NSF_140-05-DS.pdf), a national standard
currently going through the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) review process as a draft
standard. NSF-140 addresses many issues such as:
              Safe for Public Health and Environment
              Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency
              Recycled Content or Biobased Materials
              Facility or Company Based Practices
              Reclamation, Sustainable Reuse, and End of Life Management
The California Gold Sustainable Carpet Standard takes the NSF-140 national standard further by adding
14 additional prerequisites in areas important to California and a full 100 percent audit by a third party
certification organization, as well as at least 52 credits overall from all categories. California Platinum
certification requires all prerequisites and at least 71 credits overall from all categories. Additionally,
California Gold only recognizes and accepts products that meet these highest two levels: California Gold
and California Platinum. The additional prerequisites added include requirements for:
       Carpet must contain at least 10 percent postconsumer content
       Carpet must meet the low emission requirements of the Carpet and Rug Institute's Green Label
Plus™ program or California's Section 01350 specification
       Carpet must not contain polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants

                                                                                                         208
    Manufacturer must have completed a life cycle assessment (LCA) process for the product category.
    Carpet manufacturer must meet the Carpet America Recovery Effort (CARE) goals.
www.carpetrecovery.org.

2.     We have not issued an RFQ, but have begun research into environmental criteria to consider in
setting a purchasing standard for our organization. I have attached the overview document that has been
developed. I look forward to incorporating ideas generated through this discussion. To access the
attachment, go to the EPPnet listserv archives at http://www.nerc.org/eppnet/index.html.

Karen Cook
Alameda County




                                                                                                    209
                         How Should Suppliers Market to Us? September 2009
3 Posts

Original post:
I'm speaking at a small business conference. Many of the suppliers have green products or services. Our
procurement system isn't really set up for suppliers to market directly to us, and even if they do this can
be a poor way for them to get business.

What do you advise businesses to do to make procurement people aware of their products? Vendor
shows are good, but only happen occasionally a year for most

Gregory.p.hopkins@state.or.us

Responses:
1. Good Morning, The City of Austin struggles with similar challenges. Particularly, how do you best
incentivize small, local, and minority-owned businesses so that they offer innovative and sustainable
products and services and adopt environmentally responsible best practices?

We continue to refine our approach and implementation strategy. Basically, we are focusing on business
community outreach, using the new NIGP "green commodity family codes" to highlight green products or
services, and identifying a purchasing single-point of contact (SPOC) to meet with vendors who are
offering innovative green products or services. The purchasing SPOC can evaluate the offering, triage as
necessary, and pull in the specific subject matter experts as appropriate.

Our procurement process does not allow direct purchase either. We are constantly battling the need to
produce contracts quickly and the need to take the time needed to investigate market offerings to ensure
we are developing the highest quality specifications.

Using best value contracts, request for proposals, or otherwise opening your contract specifications up to
include goods or services outside of the traditionally strict specifications can also encourage creativity
and alternate proposals form the vendor community. These proposals may responsibly satisfy the needs
of the user department in ways that they never envisioned.

I hope this helps. We are also developing a Green Products Expo for City employees only to give
registered vendors with green solutions an opportunity to present their offerings to City employees. As
you stated, this would only occur annually.

Best regards and good luck!
Aiden
Aiden M. Cohen
Sustainability Senior Buyer
Green Purchasing Program Coordinator
City of Austin
Financial & Administrative Services Dept.
Central Purchasing Office
PO Box 1088
Austin, TX 78767
512-972-4008 (Office)

                                                                                                         210
512-972-4015 (Fax)
aiden.cohen@ci.austin.tx.us

2. There is a California-based non-profit, Green Technology, which has started to develop a "green"
vendor database (please see below copied message), which I believe is currently in testing phase. It is
specifically intended for a government buyer audience, so while the procurement process is still an issue
this is at least a central point for vendors to advertise to government agencies. While I believe this
database may be geared primarily toward California, I'm certain they would be interested in rolling this
out nationwide.
best regards,

Valerie Kao
Environmental Sustainability Branch
California Public Utilities Commission
415.703.1341
vuk@cpuc.ca.gov




                                                                                                      211
                    Effective anti-mold cleaners for locker rooms, September 2009
2 Posts

Original post:
Hello! Has anyone overcome an issue with mold/mildew in locker rooms (floors/walls) at community
pools using a "green" cleaner? Our custodial contractor has tried a few different products with no luck
and our project manager would like to go back to using bleach. We have brought up the possibility of
other contributing factors (ventilation, product application, etc.), but are still looking for other "green"
products to try. Any product suggestions/insights would be appreciated.

Thank you.
-Stacey
Stacey Foreman
City of Portland, Oregon, Bureau of Purchases
Ph: 503-823-3508

Response:
Hello Stacey and everyone, Our custodial staff has had much success with a Hillyard product called C2
Suprox Concentrate Green Select. I think designing showers and bathrooms with minimal or no grout or
perhaps darker colored grout is the way to go in the long term, but I know that is difficult for existing
buildings.

Good luck.

Karl
Karl Bruskotter
310-458-2255
www.sustainablesm.org/buygreen




                                                                                                               212
                           Responding to product vendors, September 2009
2 Posts

Original post:
Hello! How do you respond to suppliers who want to market their products to your agency? I've been
contacted by a supplier of compostable trash bags, a battery recycler, someone who has an EPP film that
can protect finishes from vandalism, etc.

I can and do encourage them to register in our e-procurement system. But in terms of them creating
awareness of their products or services, our procurement system isn't set up for suppliers to market
directly to us. Sometimes it would help us to know about their products, even if we don't have a
solicitation on the street that applies to them.

What do you advise businesses to do to make procurement people aware of their products? Vendor
shows are good, but only happen occasionally a year for most
Gregory.p.hopkins@state.or.us
Greg Hopkins
7870 SW Bond St
Tigard OR 97224
(503) 746-4645

Response:
Hi Greg, I also encourage them to register with our State’s e-procurement, but if their product is
susceptible to purchase for our agency, I will direct them to a couple of end users within the Agency. If
their product does not seem like a good fit, I ask them to send information and I will forward it to
possible end users.

Thank you,
Thomas Duval, C.P.M.
Purchasing Manager
Arizona Game And Fish Department
5000 West Carefree Highway
Phoenix, AZ 85086
Phone (623) 236-7457
Fax (623) 236-7922




                                                                                                        213
                                  Recycling Old Car Seats, October 2009
4 Posts

Original post:
Our state dept. of transportation replaces obsolete child car/safety seats and has to get rid of them
because they are no longer safe to use. Does anyone know of a recycling program for obsolete car
seats? IDOT asked EvenFlo (a car seat manufacturer) and they haven’t responded. I’m taking that as they
don’t want to take responsibility.

Becky M. Jayne
Office of Pollution Prevention
IL Environmental Protection Agency
P. O. Box 19276
Springfield, IL 62794-9276
Phone: 217-524-9642 Fax: 217-557-2125
Becky.Jayne@illinois.gov

Responses:
1. Some Reuse Options in the Reuse Tips Area in the right column HERE.
http://www.brighthub.com/environment/green-living/articles/30766.aspx Here is a link but Google car
seat recycling and various states have links. I would call your local plastic recycler as that plastic material
could be used in new product manufacturing. We just got some crushed computer boards to mix with our
recycled rubber to manufacture products.

Best regards,
Deborah
Deborah A. Robbins
VP Marketing & Sustainability

2. Have you contacted your local Children’s Hospital to see if they have a car seat recycling
program? The Phoenix Children’s Hospital started such a program this year with volunteers helping
breaking down the car seats.

Here’s their event flyer: http://www.phoenixchildrens.com/about/press-
media/Current/Car_Seat_Recycle_release.pdf

Miranda Riojas, Procurement Specialist
Arizona Department of Environmental Quality
Contracts and Procurement
1110 W. Washington St.
Phoenix, AZ 85007
Phone: (602) 771-7672
Fax: (602) 771-4439

3.   Some Reuse Options in the Reuse Tips Area in the right column HERE.




                                                                                                           214
                     Suggestions Needed for EPP Exercise Room Wipes, October 2009
5 Posts

Original post:
Hi All, EPA Region 1 is moving to a new location in December, which includes an employee run exercise
center. I've been asked to recommend environmentally preferable wipes for the equipment. The purpose
of the wipes are to remove the sweat from workout machines and equipment (an act of thoughtful
civility), not to disinfect the equipment. The standard practice is to provide a blast of cleaner from a spray
bottle, followed with a quick mopping from a paper towel (which gets thrown away). Green alternatives
could include an EPP cleaner, recycled wipes, or, perhaps, cloth towels that get laundered (although life-
cycle comparisons of paper towels vs. clothe towels gets tricky).

Any suggestions would be most appreciated.

Thanks,
Rob
Robert Guillemin
Office of Assistance and Pollution Prevention
US EPA, Region 1 (SPP)
One Congress Street, Suite 1100
Boston, MA 02114-2023
Phone: 617-918-1814
Fax: 617-918-0814
Email: guillemin.robert@epa.gov
Visit the EPA New England P2 Web Page at:
http://www.epa.gov/region1/assistance/p2/index.html

Responses:
4. Rob, The Responsible Purchasing Network (RPN) has a purchasing guide on green cleaners that is
available to the public. It covers the environmental costs of traditional cleaners, best practices for
integrating environmentally preferable cleaners, outlines standards (EcoLogo, Green Seal, etc.), and
includes several sample specifications and a product database. The PDF link to download a copy can be
found here http://www.responsiblepurchasing.org/purchasing_guides/cleaners/purchasing_guide.pdf
Alternatively, it can be viewed online, here
http://www.responsiblepurchasing.org/purchasing_guides/cleaners/

I hope this helps.
Best,
Phillip Kobernick
RPN Fellow

5. Dear Rob, I would recommend the use of microfiber cloths instead of wipes. The
microfiber removes between 95 -99% of microbes, so is good for infection control as well as general
cleaning. Some of the microfiber is made with recycled content. It can be laundered hundreds of times
(500 - 1500) depending on the manufacturer. Another thing that I think would work well in gyms as well
as child care centers is the ActiveIon. This uses tap water and electrolysis it via rechargeable batteries. It
is an EPA registered sanitizer and uses no chemicals. I would think you would be planning on something
for infection control and the ActiveIon is much better than a disinfectant. http://www.activeion.com/.
TURI just did some testing for them. I haven't seen the results yet, but I heard they were positive.
                                                                                                           215
Best,
Carol Westinghouse
Informed Green Solutions, Inc.
Cleaning for Health
Program Manager
westies@ecoisp.com
802-626-8643

6.  Dear Rob, On closer investigation, the microfiber cloths that were labeled as recycled content do not
actually contain recycled content. I'm sorry to say I was taken in by green washing. I've made sure they
are not labeling the products that way anymore. I think all the companies are working on it, but not there
yet.

Thanks for the DfE information.

Best,
Carol Westinghouse
President
Informed Green Solutions, Inc.
Cleaning for Health
Program Manager
westies@ecoisp.com
802-626-8643

7.  Hello Rob, I've been working out in gyms for 25 years and I've never used wipes. I would aim to set
precedence for either providing workout towels for guests or requiring them to bring their own. Then
you just lay or sit on the towel and use it to clean equipment. Laundering is responsibility of employees
or done in house. Good luck. I know how people can be.

Karl
Karl Bruskotter
310-458-2255
www.sustainablesm.org/buygreen




                                                                                                        216
                          Pro’s & Con’s - EPA's DfE Program, November 2009
6 Posts

Original post:
As you may know, New York State's Office of General Services (OGS) is amending its Guidelines and
criteria for "environmentally-sensitive cleaning and maintenance products" that will be used in New York
schools, state agencies and public authorities. Unfortunately, their draft does NOT accept DfE products
making it unnecessarily difficult for DfE partners to supply products to these entities and reduces options
for purchasers.

Over the past number of months, DfE has completed some important changes that now make it an
acceptable standard to help purchase environmental preferable (green) cleaning products. These
changes include:
DfE now has a clear and transparent standard which is at least equal to other ecolabels in its ability to
reduce exposures to children and other vulnerable populations, as well as to the environment. One
specific example is the DfE screening process eliminates ingredients that are known asthmagens and
sensitizers.

DfE now has a system for product verification which we believe is at least equal to the other eco-labelers
and uses independent third-parties to do the verification. This assures that the manufacturers are doing
what they promise.

DfE now includes very specific product performance requirements that at least equal to other eco-
labeling programs insuring that the products work.

DfE now includes specific product labeling requirements and training on correct product usage, which is
critical for creating healthy buildings.

Additionally, I think it may be advantageous to point out some of the following:

There is a precedent set by other States to include DfE along with the other eco-labelers for meeting the
requirements of Green Cleaning in Schools legislation (i.e. Illinois and Missouri).

The inclusion of DfE would help eliminate the need for some manufacturers to have to rely upon the use
of the "alternative self-certification" provision as currently contained within the NYS Guidelines which
would make it easier, faster and more cost effective for the State of New York to determine if the product
meets the requirements.

The inclusion of DfE would add another compliance path and thus create more competition, which could
help reduce the costs for cleaning products for New York State schools, state agencies and public
authorities.

Thus, I am asking that you send a letter or email to NYS OGS suggesting that they include DfE in their
program.

The NYS OGS Guidelines can be found at:
https://greencleaning.ny.gov/DraftGuidelines.asp

Comments can be sent by email to: nysogsesu@ogs.state.ny.us
                                                                                                            217
Written comments can be sent to:
New York State Office of General Services
Environmental Services Unit
39th Floor, Corning Tower
Empire State Plaza
Albany, NY 12242

Information must be submitted by November 20th, 2009 with a final decision made by NYS OGS on
November 30th, 2009 --- so please don't delay.

Thank you very much for your attention to this. Getting New York State to include DfE would be very
valuable to help us expand DfE's adoption in the marketplace which would help us accelerate the
adoption of Green Cleaning and improve the health of children and staff in our schools and other
buildings, and the environment. If you have any questions, please let me and if you email OGS, please copy
me on the email --- my complete contact
info is below.
Thanks again,
Steve
Stephen P. Ashkin, President
The Ashkin Group, LLC - The Green Cleaning Experts
3644 Tamarron Drive Bloomington, IN 47408
Voice: 812/332-7950 Fax: 812/332-7965
Email: SteveAshkin@AshkinGroup.com
Visit us at: www.AshkinGroup.com

Responses:
1. EPPnet, I personally find this means of announcing new (alleged) developments in the DfE labeling
process to be unproductive and not very credible - particularly for a respected organization like the EPA
and the Ashkin Group. In fact it smacks of a couple of Scot Case's "Six Sins of Greenwashing."

This email to the listserv makes a lot of claims, but offers no substantiation of those claims. It appears the
author(s) want readers not only to take their word for it but also to put the readers' own credibility on
the line and call NY to complain. What hard data do we have to believe that DfE is now "an acceptable
standard?" The last we heard it wasn't even a standard, but actually a technical assistance program that
assists product manufacturers in reformulating their products to contain safer ingredients. The last
communication we received from DfE was an admission of its own shortcomings and a promise to
change.

If something substantial has changed in recent months, I would expect DfE to provide those new
developments in an open forum and accompany those announcements with the appropriate
documentation. Had the email about the changes in DfE come from anyone else, I am sure Steve himself
would have encouraged us to question it. For example, if DfE is a transparent standard, when was the last
time it was open for public comment and where can I get a copy of the newly "acceptable" standard?
Without access to information like that, how can I decide for myself if it is really "at least equal" to other
ecolabels?

In regards to the email's call to action, let me provide a snippet of additional information that may
influence your decision about contacting NYS. NY is one of five states that recently awarded a contract for
                                                                                                           218
green cleaning products and a green cleaning program that provides comprehensive training to help
agencies and others transition to these products. The other states include NH, VT, CT and MA, who was
the lead. The decision to require that most products on the contract be third-party certified by either
Green Seal or EcoLogo was not made lightly - but after several months of research it was unanimous. Part
of that research included attending a webinar conducted by DfE. Lots of questions were raised by the
participants and frankly, DfE acknowledged at that time that they were not equal to the two
aforementioned standards, but they were "working on it."

In an effort to be completely fair to any standard that may be developed during the course of the contract
period, MA and the four states included language in the contract that specifically states: "As new products
and environmental standards become available, the PMT [procurement management team] reserves the
right to consider these alternatives..."

Therefore, if something substantive has developed at DfE, tell the world in an open and inclusive process,
just like Green Seal and EcoLogo are expected to. To do anything less, simply proves you have not yet
reached your goal and that you need to keep working on it.

Thank you.
Marcia Deegler (and State Purchasing colleague Dmitriy Nikolayev)
Director of Environmental Purchasing
Operational Services Division
One Ashburton Place, Room 1017
Boston, MA 02108-1552
617-720-3356, 617-727-4527 fax
marcia.deegler@state.ma.us
Visit the EPP Website at www.mass.gov/epp

2. Hi Marcia, Thanks for the response and you make some very good points. A lot has changed with
EPA's DfE program since you developed your program earlier this year, and which I believe was once
again groundbreaking.

When your program was introduced, DfE had only begun its process for documenting its
standard/process so that it would be clear and transparent. When your program was introduced, DfE
hadn't even begun working on its verification program. And I could go on.

The bottom-line is that when you introduced your program back in April, DfE was NOT appropriate for
inclusion because there were still too many unanswered questions and no guarantee that they would
correct what we considered were deficiencies in their program.

But this has changed --- or at least let me clarify, this is changing. DfE has completed all the elements that
I think is necessary for purchasers to be able to use it to buy greener products with confidence. These
documents are available and I did NOT get into this level of detail in my first post because I thought I was
being respectful to everyone by not making the email too long. I now wish that I had provided this detail.

DfE's standard is available at the following URL:
http://www.epa.gov/dfe/pubs/projects/formulat/dfe_criteria_for_cleaning_products_10_09.pdf. And if
you want the other documents, I would encourage you to talk directly to Clive Davies or David Difiore at
DfE.

                                                                                                           219
Furthermore, my email asking people to send letters to NYS OGS was NOT based on a criticism of the
program you launched in April or of New York. Rather, NYS OGS recently published a request for
comments that closes on November 20th. Thus, I wish that DfE had completed everything --- that every
"I" was dotted and every "T" was crossed. But I am confident that because the information is up for
Federal Registry notification, I believe that it is really happening and should happen in the next couple of
weeks. And what I have seen (what has been posted) is the "real McCoy" and it won't be changed before
the FR posting, and from my experience with standard setting, there won't be any major changes based
on the comments that would make it an unacceptable program. (Yes, I know anything is possible, but my
experience tells me that at this stage of development, only minor changes ever take place and this is true
for EPA, as well as any other standard development process). The reason I sent the personal appeal for
support for DfE was because the closing for comments to the NYS OGS program is on November 20th, so
if we don't include it this year, it may be excluded for many years to come. And if NYS OGS chooses to
exclude it, I am afraid that it will continue to send the old and incorrect message to purchasers, especially
in the public sector that DfE still hasn't changed which could adversely affect others decisions to include
it as well.

So I guess I did ask you to trust me and take my word on it. Marcia, you who know me and we have
worked together on this specific issue for almost 15 years now --- so I believe you know that I take this
issue very, very seriously and haven't made this request without understanding how important it is to
maintain the integrity of environmentally preferable purchasing and to do the right thing.

And beyond just asking that you trust me -- please review the new documents from DfE and while their
process differs from Green Seal and EcoLogo, I think that it is a very sophisticated program that meets
purchasing requirements and our goals of reducing negative impacts on both human health and the
environment when compared to traditional cleaning products.

Steve
Stephen P. Ashkin, President
The Ashkin Group, LLC - The Green Cleaning Experts
3644 Tamarron Drive Bloomington, IN 47408
Voice: 812/332-7950 Fax: 812/332-7965
Email: SteveAshkin@AshkinGroup.com
Visit us at: www.AshkinGroup.com

3. Thanks Steve for the clarification of the earlier email. The added details concerning the DfE
process and progress to date is very helpful. I look forward to reviewing the data when they go public.

Marcia Deegler
Director of Environmental Purchasing
Operational Services Division
One Ashburton Place Room 1017
Boston, MA 02108
Ph: 617-720-3356; FX: 617-727-4527
marcia.deegler@state.ma.us

4. Marcia, I’m glad to try and help. A couple of things that might make it easier for everyone to check out
what DfE is doing and to comment. I just learned that they (DfE) have already posted their program for
public review and comments (which are due the end of this month) which can be found at:

                                                                                                          220
http://news.bna.com/deln/?date=20091110&mode=hi&lf=eml&emc=deln:deln:110. And ALL of DfE’s
info on this program can be found at: http://www.epa.gov/dfe/enhancements_to_dfe_criteria.html

Finally, I saw Robert Guillemin’s post this morning about NEWMOA hosting a forum that will allow DfE to
answer questions from states regarding its labeling program. For call-in information, send an email to
tgoldberg@newmoa.org.

In closing I hope you and others will forgive me if I sound like I am being “heavy handed”, pushy or
coming on too strong about DfE. I just see a small window of opportunity to respond to NYS OGS’s
request for comments and am just trying to help get things done.

Steve
Stephen P. Ashkin, President
The Ashkin Group, LLC - The Green Cleaning Experts
3644 Tamarron Drive Bloomington, IN 47408
Voice: 812/332-7950 Fax: 812/332-7965
Email: SteveAshkin@AshkinGroup.com
Visit us at: www.AshkinGroup.com

5. Last week I sent a note asking for comments to be sent to NYS OGS due to their upcoming deadline
which is again, November 20th. Perhaps lost in the discussion was that EPA’s Design for the Environment
Program is also taking comments on their proposed changes which are due by November 30th.

While I believe the DfE program has made many technical improvements there is at least one
improvement that can be made that I think will help purchasers. If you agree, I hope you’ll consider
submitting it along with your other comments.

I will be suggesting that DfE requires approved products to identify the date on which they were
approved (“approval date”). My thinking is that this will create additional transparency and give
purchasers the opportunity to more easily compare products. This could be helpful because in the early
years of the DfE program there was no performance requirement or verification. And while this is NOT to
say that products approved during that period didn’t perform well or that the manufacturers weren’t
doing what was promised, but it does make comparing “apples to apples” difficult, if not impossible.

Thus an “approval date” will give purchasers the opportunity to stipulate in the RFP that the products
shall be approved by DfE after July 1, 2009 (just an example) which would result in products approved
under the new program with all the improvements that to me is what finally makes it an acceptable
program. This simple addition (approval date) will provide purchasers with a greater degree of
confidence that products were using the same minimum performance and other criteria when making
purchases ---- in essence to help purchasers insure that they are getting the verification and other
components that makes DfE an acceptable program.

Whether or not you include this additional labeling requirement (approval date) along with your other
comments, just keep in mind that comments to EPA are due November 30th. For your convenience this is
the link to the DfE Criteria and a thorough discussion of the proposed changes to the DfE Criteria can be
found online at: http://www.epa.gov/dfe/enhancements_to_dfe_criteria.html.



                                                                                                       221
And to make it easy to get your comments included, I recommend you send it directly to David Difiore
(difiori.david@epa.gov) as the government site is virtually impossible to figure out… And DfE has
assured me that sending it to David will be “officially” included in the public comments.

Thanks for your consideration and let me know if you have any comments,
Steve
Stephen P. Ashkin, President
The Ashkin Group, LLC - The Green Cleaning Experts
3644 Tamarron Drive Bloomington, IN 47408
Voice: 812/332-7950 Fax: 812/332-7965
Email: SteveAshkin@AshkinGroup.com
Visit us at: www.AshkinGroup.com




                                                                                                       222
                               EPP Scorecard & Report, November 2009
2 Posts

Original post:
Hello Everyone, Does anyone have a sample scorecard of what you are using to measure either their
internal practices regarding green purchasing as well as supplier performance in this area?

On a different note, we recently released our 'RU Greenwashing' evaluation sheet for all suppliers. We
were having issues with suppliers trying to enter Rutgers through the 'green' door so we put a lock on it
... now, in addition to registering as a vendor we have our 'RU Greenwashing' evaluation form ... we also
developed an evaluation process as well.

Any help you can provide would be great!

Thanks,
K
Kevin Lyons, Ph.D.
Chief Procurement Officer/Executive Director, Purchasing Department
Research Professor, Supply Chain Environmental Archeology
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Administrative Services Building III
3 Rutgers Plaza
New Brunswick, NJ 08903
732-932-4375 ext. 2301
732-932-4390 (fax)
klyons@rci.rutgers.edu
Check Out our Green Purchasing Page!

Response:
Here's a score sheet I put together for a NASPO conference for suppliers. Its high level, but each attribute
can be made much more granular. Hope this helps. Should be a pretty good framework to start from
Marcia Deegler and Stacey Foreman, among others, reviewed this and added comments.




                                                                                                         223
                                 Profile of an Ideal “Green” Company
                 Positioning your company to respond to emerging needs of government
           Rate your company’s progress towards the following criteria. Use this rating scale:
             NA = Doesn’t apply to my products or services
             0 = We haven’t even thought about implementing this
             1 = We’ve kicked the idea around but don’t have a concrete plan
             2 = We have a plan and we’ve taken steps
             3 = We’re all over this—it’s how we do things

Score        Criteria
                              Information Available for Government Agencies
  Sales data. Ability to report how many environmentally preferable products (EPP) were sold, what
  they were, what agencies bought them, total dollar amounts, and profiles of historical data in order to
  extract trends. Sales data on-line and available to government agencies much like on-line banking.
  Green products tagged. Environmentally preferable goods marked with icons, put in a separate section,
  or otherwise noted. Catalogs set up to block non-EPP products or roll over an order of a non-preferred
  product to one that is preferable.
  Published green criteria. Companies would declare what standards they are complying with or in what
  way a product is EPP.
  No greenwashing. Third-party auditing and verification of green practices and criteria.
                                               Business Practices
  Green internal operations. Actions that reduce waste, energy, and total carbon footprint in place.
  Green supply chain. Criteria like Wal-Mart’s packaging reduction scorecard and requirements that
  drive supplier sustainability efforts established.
  Shipping. Researching and implementing ways to consolidate shipments and reduce the number of
  deliveries to customer locations. Companies might collaborate to efficiently move goods to customer
  locations.
  Support of local economies. Utilization of contractors, subcontractors, or local partnerships whenever
  possible. “Local” would need to be defined per each project.
  Underutilized businesses. Active steps to engage historically underutilized businesses and emerging
  small businesses.
  Sweatshop labor. No sourcing of products produced in exploitive and unfair labor conditions.
  Adherence to RoHS and European Standards. Voluntary compliance with the strictest level of
  standards and published information related to this compliance.
  Working on solutions. Actively working with industry and government partners to develop common
  solutions for common problems. EPEAT is a stellar example of this.
                                               Product Criteria
                                 (See Guidelines for Green Products handout)
  Reduction of packaging. Reusable totes and other means for eliminating or reducing packaging and use
  of less harmful packaging products.
  Plastic reduction. Actively implementing ways to reduce plastic waste in products.
  Design for the environment. Product/service reflects cradle-to-cradle or design-for-the-environment
  principles.




                                                                                                     224
                                  Mattress Recyclers, November 2009
4 Posts

Original post:
Hello, Does anyone use, or have any information on, mattress recyclers in the general vicinity of New
Jersey? I have a list from ISPA (International Sleep Products Association) that shows our neighbors in
Massachusetts (Hi Marci) being the closest. I also understand that a Canadian company has set up shop in
Maryland. I've done some research and read a couple of reports from Oregon and Minnesota, but I'd love
to know what's happening in our backyard. Any information or words of wisdom/warning in this
commodity would be very helpful! Thank you,

Magda Comeau
Green Purchasing Manager
Purchasing Department
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
3 Rutgers Plaza, 2nd Floor
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
732.932.4375 x2320
732.932.4390 (fax)
http://purchasing.rutgers.edu/green

Responses:
1. One suggestion is to check with the military bases near you. I have heard some of them are looking at
mattress recycling.
A. Georgiana Ball
Virginia Department of General Services
(804) 236-3665
FAX: (804) 236-3663
georgiana.ball@dgs.virginia.gov

2. If there was it would be on the NJ Recycling Materials Index at
http://www.state.nj.us/dep/dshw/recycling/materialsinfo.htm
Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3LC40)
Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3163
giuranna.mike@epa.gov

3. There is a company from Ohio that has collected mattresses from far eastern PA. They work to recycle
mattresses specifically from universities, and may be of help to you:
Chuck Brickman, President
Ohio Mattress Recovery & Recycling
Willoughby, Ohio 44094
Phone: 440-856-3685
www.ohiomattressrecovery.com



                                                                                                     225
              Anyone familiar with Grenk remanufactured cartridges, November 2009
3 Posts

Original post:
I was wondering if anyone is familiar with or uses grenk remanufactured cartridges and has any feedback
- positive or negative.

They claim to have a lot of "green" practices in addition to supplying a "green" product - they say that
nothing goes to landfill in the process, they have the only onsite water treatment plant in industry etc,
takeback of spent cartridges etc...

thank you
Julia Fraser
Assistant Program Specialist - Sustainable Procurement
City of Portland, Oregon
Procurement Services
Ph (503) 823-6882

Responses:
1. Julia, it is critical to know their quality control process and whether they have a
system for returning spent cartridges to them. You can find the US Department of Energy's protocol for
selecting quality remanufactured cartridges at
http://www.hss.doe.gov/pp/epp/library/ap-toner-cartridge-protocol.pdf

Sandra Cannon, Technical Support
U.S. Department of Energy Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
Tel. 509-529-1535

2.  I am not familiar with Grenk – but the claim of not sending any material to a landfill needs to be more
fully described. For example in CT where 63% of the MSW generated is burned at waste-to-energy
facilities (RRFs) – we could make the claim for the whole state that only about 12% of our MSW is
landfilled and the other 78% is diverted from landfills. But that would be misleading – since only about
25% (or 30% accounting for unreported recycling tonnages) is actually recycled.

Judy Belaval
CT DEP Office of Source Reduction and Recycling
(860) 424-3237




                                                                                                            226
                           EPP & Cost Savings, November – December 2009
3 Posts

Original Posting:
All, The Responsible Purchasing Network (RPN) is in the early stages of drafting a guide about
environmentally preferable products that can yield cost savings. The purpose of the guide is to help
organizations develop their EPP programs, even in the current economic climate, since significant steps
can be made to make environmentally and socially responsible procurements that can improve an
organization’s bottom line. We would like the help of the EPPnet community in identifying
organizations that have achieved cost savings through their EPP programs. These organizations will
be interviewed and highlighted in the forthcoming guide.

Some questions we’ll be asking include:
-      Which products achieved cost savings?
-      How were these products purchased? (Open bid, group contact, etc.)
-      What was the payback time on initial upfront costs?
-      Did you receive special funding (government, etc.) to purchase these products?
-      What types of “hidden costs” have you encountered with these products?
Additionally, if anyone would like to share their own experiences about saving money by making
environmentally preferable purchases, I would also be interested in discussing this with you. Please feel
free to email or call me directly at the number below. Thank you.

Phillip Kobernick
RPN Fellow
Responsible Purchasing Network
The Center for a New American Dream
6930 Carroll Avenue, Suite 900
Takoma Park, MD 20912
Phone (301) 891-3683 ext. 118
Fax (301) 891-3684
www.ResponsiblePurchasing.org

Responses:
1. Hi Phillip, I have been checking around with people to see what we could submit. I had knee surgery in
November so I’ve been slowed down some. I’m wondering what kind of a timeline you have on this. I
think the way we applied life cycle costing to the purchase of a hybrid (this justifying the purchase of a
higher cost car) would fit what you’re looking for.

Thanks,
Linden Skjeie, M.S.
Urban Environmental Accords Coordinator
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing
Legislative Analysis and Advocacy
Office of Sustainability
Environmental Services Department
200 E. Santa Clara Street, Tenth Floor
San Jose, CA 95113
408.975.2577
Linden.Skjeie@sanjoseca.gov
                                                                                                       227
2. Linden, that would be great. We are very much eager to see how people are applying life-cycle
assessments and the types of case studies they have created. The timeline is not set in stone, but we are
planning on publishing within a couple of months. Any insight or experience with these types of EPPs
would be very much appreciated! Thank you.
Best,
Phillip




                                                                                                       228
            Specs for green product substitution in office supply contracts, January 2010
5 Posts

Original post:
Hi, We’re looking for specifications to include in a county’s Office Supply RFP that would require the
vendor to provide a Green Product Substitution option (like Office Depot offers some clients) or at least a
notification of a green product alternative when a purchaser selects a non-green item. Does anyone have
a spec for this?

Thanks! Have a nice day, Johanna
Johanna Kertesz
Local Government Assistance
Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
(651) 757-2489
johanna.kertesz@state.mn.us
www.pca.state.mn.us/epp
www.rethinkrecycling.com/government/eppg

Responses:
1. This is a work in progress that we haven’t begun implementing yet, but we are beginning the process
internally. Our current office supplier is Staples. This doesn’t cover computers because we buy those
separately. If it did include them, the extra rule would be to replace non-EPEAT with EPEAT computers
when EPEAT is available.

Universal Prohibitions - Prohibit these from appearing in catalog search:
-    Styrofoam
-    Bottled water
-    PVC containing materials

Substitutions - Prohibit the conventional option from appearing when there is a preferable alternative:
-     Replace OEM ink and toner with remains
-     Replace non-rechargeable batteries with rechargeables
-     Replace non-recycled content product with recycled content product

Universal Preferences
This will be a combination of prohibiting conventional options when alternatives exist and rank ordering
more preferable options ahead of less preferable (but allowable) options such as putting 100%PCW
paper ahead of 30% PCW paper (this last one is up for debate, we may prohibit other options when 100%
PCW is available):
-     Ecoeasy (Staples house green system)
-     Energy Star
-     FSC
-     Green Seal
-     EcoLogo
-     CFPA
-     GreenGuard
-     Remains that also have recycled content (i.e. put these ahead of remains with no recycled content
but allow both).

                                                                                                        229
Chris O'Brien
Director of Sustainability
American University
Office of Sustainability
3201 New Mexico Ave. NW
Suite 255
Washington, D.C. 20016-8033
202.885.3278 (fax)
202.885.2682 (ph)
www.american.edu/sustainability
www.twitter.com/GreenAU

2. Johanna, Have you checked out OFEE's "Green Products Compilation" at:
http://www.fedcenter.gov/Documents/index.cfm?id=11767
or other possible resources at FedCenter's Acquisition web page:
http://www.fedcenter.gov/programs/buygreen/

Steve Luzzi
FedCenter Manager

3. I don't know if anyone from NYS has replied yet, but we've got a very ambitious re-write of all
specifications for goods and services procured by the State through our Office of General Services going
on in response to Governor Paterson's Executive Order #4, which was enacted in Spring, 2008. The
objective of the EO is to "green" all state agency (and affiliates) operations via measurable waste
prevention, increased recycling and the purchase of environmentally-preferable products. The EO calls
for the review of at least 3 general categories of product/services each year, with modification/re-write
of 36 actual specifications annually.

Information about the EO can be found at http://www.ogs.state.ny.us/EO/4/Default.asp

To review the changes to our specifications that have been accomplished thus far, scroll down the page to
the bulleted items under "Procurement Subcommittee." The group has done some excellent work to
review and convert specifications for products/services we buy to make them "greener." It's been a very
time-consuming yet interesting process that has reps from several key agencies, including OGS, but also
State Dept. of Environmental Conservation, Transportation, Parks, Recreation & Historic Preservation,
Economic Development, NYSERDA (energy authority), Comptroller's Office, etc., sitting at the same table
discussing the revisions and coming to terms that are acceptable to all. Hope this helps, BG

Brenda Grober
Environmental Services Unit
Empire State Development
30 South Pearl Street
Albany, NY 12245
(518) 292-5342 / FAX (518) 292-5886
bgrober@empire.state.ny.us

4. Under Universal Preferences you should include EPA EPP CPP http://www.epa.gov/epp/ and
GreenSpec listed products http://www.buildinggreen.com/menus/

                                                                                                       230
Also I know I have brought this up before but where are the various “recycled” products sourced North
America v off-shore?

Thanks

Deborah




                                                                                                    231
                  Tracking & Reporting on Sustainable Purchasing, February 2010
10 Posts

Original post:
I’m very interested in practices anyone follows related to tracking and measuring sustainable purchases.
How are you all measuring the success or even progress of your sustainable purchasing initiatives?

Thanks,
Janna E. Allgood
Sustainable Purchasing Coordinator
NWSA AmeriCorps Member
503-988-5111 x 25906 (office)
503-988-3252 (fax)
703-587-0992 (mobile)

Responses
1. Hi, We build in a certain amount of reporting by vendors into our agreements with vendor. Depending
on the product there are online calculators for environmental attributes. Very often we have to develop
our own metrics. We're located in the Great Lakes region so we like to try and i.e. our env benefits to GL
issues such as mercury. An inexact science and often easier said than done. Feel free to call to discuss.
Best,
Abby Corso
Delta Institute

2. Hello –e many calculators out there now – the one I work with the most addresses electronics/IT
equipment. You can use the Electronics Environmental Benefits Calculator - at
http://isse.utk.edu/ccp/projects/benefitscalculator/elecbenecalc.html to calculate the first year and life
cycle benefits related to purchase of EPEAT rated green IT products, the benefits that accrue from
enabling energy management features, and the benefits from reusing and recycling hardware. The
calculator can also assess benefits of cell phone reuse and recycling.

Sarah O'Brien
EPEAT Outreach and Communications
sarah.obrien@greenelectronicscouncil.org
+1(802) 479-0317
www.epeat.net

3. Dear Janna and any other interested EPPnet-ers, To aid the efforts of those calculating monetary and
environmental benefits from green purchasing, the Responsible Purchasing Network (RPN) has collected
12 green purchasing calculators, for which are available for free at this link:
http://www.responsiblepurchasing.org/purchasing_guides/all/calculator/

In addition, we’ll be releasing a Model Annual Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Report.
 -Vincent
Vincent Kitira
RPN Manager

4. Most tracking has been done by requiring (green record keeping and reporting) by the
vendor. Hopefully you’ll also hear from others with successful in-house tracking systems.
                                                                                                        232
 Tracking is a challenge when different state agencies (or divisions within a company) are not using the
same electronic accounting systems, or that they do not use the same commodity coding to identify
purchases. Even if agencies are on the same recording system; if employees do not take care to correctly
assign a commodity code to the product purchase then you cannot distinguish at the end of the reporting
period whether you bought a virgin material pencil or a pencil with some recycled content (or the
percentage of recycled content).

NIGP has been working on a solution for identification:
http://govpro.com/green/content/planting_seeds_green/index.html
Doug
Douglas Reed, Purchasing Agent
Department of Administrative Services (DAS)
Hoover State Office Building, Level A
Des Moines, IA 50319-0105
doug.reed@iowa.gov
Phone: (515) 242-6151
Fax: 515-725-0120 direct

5. I am very interested in locating a reliable resource that can calculate how much of each type of natural
resources (for example; barrels of oil, BTUs of energy, gallons of water, landfill space) are saved when we
recycle 1 ton of #1 and #2 plastic bottles. The EPA website had something similar to this calculation
regarding the recycling of 1 ton of paper, which saves 17 trees, etc…

Does anyone have any recommended resources that I could use to estimate the amount of natural
resources that are saved by recycling any type of containers plastics, glass, steel, aluminum (basic
curbside collected containers) and aseptic containers. Thank you for any assistance with this effort.
Sincerely,
Lisa Perschke
Business Recycling Coordinator
Recycle Ann Arbor
2420 S. Industrial Hwy.
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
734.662.6288 (113) OFFICE
734.320.9492 MOBILE
734.662.7749 FAX

6. Good Morning: Here are a few calculation tools that can be used to measure your organizations GHG
emissions and waste stream to help build reports on your sustainability activities and benefits of
recycling and alternative disposal of materials.

   The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Calculation Tools - www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/all-
    tools - work in conjunction with the Corporate Accounting and Reporting Standard for calculating a
    GHG inventory.

   The Carbonfund.org business calculator - www.carbonfund.org/business/calculator - measures
    office emissions based on utility bills, number of employees, or office space.

   The EPA’s Waste Reduction Model (WARM) -
    http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/wycd/waste/calculators/Warm_Form.html
                                                                                                        233
I have found #3, EPA’s Model, to be the most comprehensive when dealing with alternative waste
disposal options.

Best regards,
Aiden
Aiden M. Cohen
Sustainability Senior Buyer
Responsible (Green) Purchasing Program
City of Austin
Financial & Administrative Services Dept.
Central Purchasing Office
PO Box 1088
Austin, TX 78767
512-972-4008 (Office)
512-972-4015 (Fax)
aiden.cohen@ci.austin.tx.us

7. In Massachusetts, our feeling was that there were too many calculators all focused on different product
types and producing results in different units of measure (and using different equivalents in making
those results understandable). So, we designed our own calculator, mostly based on the WARM Model
and the Energy Star calculators, to produce consolidated reports for most of our purchases. Our goal
was to have one calculator for almost everything… and I think we got fairly close:
    The calculator is flexible – you can enter pretty much any recycled-content product, and create
       additional products in the Energy Star section as well.
    You enter data in purchasing units (e.g. cases of paper, not tons).
    The calculator already contains a lot of pre-set products - only enter quantity and you will get a
       benefits report
    No matter how many product types and individual products you enter (one or one thousand), the
       calculator reports things by product type and by benefit type
    It also provides one consolidated report for benefits of all your purchases.

The tool is called EnviroCalc and is available from the Massachusetts EPP Program website at
http://www.mass.gov/Eoaf/docs/osd/epp/envirocalc_main_page.doc

Limitations: the EnergyStar section is limited to CFLs, Copiers, Monitors and Fax Machines (although
within those categories, you can enter pretty much any product). There is less information on the
reduction in the use of toxic chemicals than other calculators may offer.

Thank you,

Dmitriy Nikolayev
Procurement Manager
Facilities and Environmental Services
Operational Services Division
Commonwealth of Massachusetts
One Ashburton Place, Room 1017
Boston, MA 02108
Phone: 617-720-3351
Fax: 617-727-4527
                                                                                                       234
dmitriy.nikolayev@state.ma.us

8. It seems that many calculators provide savings measured in Btus or kilowatt/hours. While these can
produce some impressive numbers, we decided to convert these Btu / Kwh figures into more meaningful
estimates. We now convert the Kwh figure (generated by the environmental calculator) to show how
many homes in Missouri would be powered for a year. Here’s how we arrived at this figure for our most
recent reporting period.

To determine the average energy consumed by a household in Missouri we used this table
http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/recs/recs2005/hc2005_tables/c&e/pdf/tableus1part1.pdf MO is in the
West North Central region and the average annual energy consumption for a home is 104,600,000 Btus.

The environmental calculator estimated that 1,625,383 Kwh of energy was saved by purchasing recycled-
content paper last year. To convert this figure to Btus we multiplied by 3,413 (3413 Btu = 1 Kwh).

Here’s the math …
1,625,383 Kwh X 3413 = 5,547,432,179 Btu
5,547,432,179 Btu / 104,600,000 Btu = 53
53 = Number of homes that could be powered for a year in Missouri
Rob Didriksen
Coordinator, Missouri State Recycling Program

9. I've seen many great suggestions on this today. I like the social math aspect in Rob exhibits when
reporting what he measures in a way that better conveys the magnitude of the results. It's very
important to reach the audience in a way that makes in understandable, absolutely.

But the provocateur in me wonders if that is the most "meaningful" approach.

The measures indicate a presumed savings, i.e., how many Btus or KWh or tons CO2e or whatever. But
they don't indicate how that amount compares to the amount spent in previous years or months or per
square foot or unit of product, i.e., a relative change from some previous condition. Doing so would help
to prevent savings being transferred to some other resource consuming activities (stories of home energy
savings going towards purchase of big screen plasma TVs, for instance).

But even a relative improvement doesn't reflect the even more important question of whether there is an
absolute improvement - is energy saved and the energy generated by renewable sources enough to offset
increasing demand AND depleting or foreign sources? If we are only doing better (relative measure) are
we doing enough (absolute measure)?

If our tracking and reporting doesn't reflect absolute changes, then I don't think it's sustainable
purchasing we're talking about. It's "changing the slope on the un-sustainability curve"
purchasing. Hmmm, there's gotta be a better name than that - I think that's a little awkward.

thoughts?
Rick
Richard Yoder, PE
Director, P2ric.org
University of Nebraska at Omaha
6001 Dodge Street, RH308
                                                                                                        235
Omaha, NE 68182
vox: 402-554-6257
fax: 402-554-6260
http://www.p2ric.org/




                        236
              Looking for service vendor sustainability questionnaire, February 2010
2 Posts

Original post:
Hello EPPers; Would anyone have, and be willing to share, any vendor sustainability questionnaire that
they are currently using ?

We are beginning to develop one for our vendors who provide training and consulting services but at the
moment I'm looking for any and all examples to give us a starting point.

thanks, Lynda
Lynda Rankin, Manager, Sustainable Procurement Integration
Economic and Rural Development
PO Box 787
Halifax Nova Scotia
B3J 2V2
email: rankinlx@gov.ns.ca

Response:
You might start with Wal-Mart’s 15 questions.
Which are:

Supplier Sustainability Assessment: 15 Questions for Suppliers - Energy and Climate: Reducing Energy

Costs and Greenhouse Gas Emissions
1. Have you measured your corporate greenhouse gas emissions?
2. Have you opted to report your greenhouse gas emissions to the Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP)?
3. What is your total annual greenhouse gas emissions reported in the most recent year measured?
4. Have you set publicly available greenhouse gas reduction targets? If yes, what are those targets?

Material Efficiency: Reducing Waste and Enhancing Quality
1. If measured, please report the total amount of solid waste generated from the facilities that produce
your product(s) for Wal-Mart for the most recent year measured.
2. Have you set publicly available solid waste reduction targets? If yes, what are those targets?
3. If measured, please report total water use from facilities that produce your product(s) for Wal-Mart for
the most recent year measured.
4. Have you set publicly available water use reduction targets? If yes, what are those targets?
Natural Resources: Producing High Quality, Responsibly Sourced Raw

Materials
1. Have you established publicly available sustainability purchasing guidelines for your direct suppliers
that address issues such as environmental compliance, employment practices and product/ingredient
safety?
2. Have you obtained 3rd party certifications for any of the products that you sell to Wal-Mart?
People and Community: Ensuring Responsible and Ethical Production
1. Do you know the location of 100 percent of the facilities that produce your product(s)?
2. Before beginning a business relationship with a manufacturing facility, do you evaluate the quality of,
and capacity for, production?
3. Do you have a process for managing social compliance at the manufacturing level?
                                                                                                        237
4. Do you work with your supply base to resolve issues found during social compliance evaluations and
also document specific corrections and improvements?
5. Do you invest in community development activities in the markets you source from and/or operate
within?

Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3LC40)
Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3163
giuranna.mike@epa.gov




                                                                                                    238
                              Recycling food service gloves, February 2010
3 Posts

Original post:
Does anyone know of programs for recycling food service gloves? I would guess this may be the same as
medical gloves. . .
thanks - Jeri

Responses:
1. Don't know of any programs which recycle them but had this electronic file on alternatives:

The Sustainable Hospitals Project has spent a lot of time looking at environmentally preferable
alternatives to gloves, particularly non-PVC gloves. They list non-latex, non-PVC gloves appropriate for
patient exam and surgery on their website. (Go to http://www.sustainablehospitals.org and click on
gloves.)

Catherine Galligan at the Project also would probably be able to provide you with more specific
information about food service gloves if you contact her directly at shp@uml.edu or 978-934-3386.

Lara Sutherland
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing
Health Care Without Harm
ph: 303-377-7048
fax: 303-377-7049
LSutherland@hcwh.org

2. So far I haven't seen any reference to recycling latex gloves, but it is probably just over the horizon.
Rutgers’s University announced in March of this year that they have developed a process for recycling
latex paint. They mix it into plastics and the results are sometime even better than plastic without latex. If
you start thinking about how many latex gloves are being sent to the landfill, it is probably just a short
while before they start looking at the gloves as an additional source of latex for their plastics formula.
Hospitals, dentists, hair dressers, a lot of manufacturers, first responders at accidents, police
investigators, laboratory workers.......that's a lot of latex.

Source(s):
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070321093327.htm

Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3LC40)
Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3163
giuranna.mike@epa.gov




                                                                                                          239
                             CD Mailers - looking for guidance, March 2010
5 Posts

Original post:
I work for Department of Ecology for the state of Washington. I’m looking to purchase 500 CD mailers
that are recyclable and made in the USA. I’ve researched the web and I’m having a hard time trying to find
both criteria. I did find a company that has both but I have to order $500 or more. Do you have any
suggestions, websites, or companies that I can contact?
Thanks,
Vanessa O'Daniel
Department of Ecology
Hazardous Waste and Toxics Reduction
(360)407-6700

Responses:
1. Hello Vanessa, Yes, I can help you find the RECYCLED CD covers that you are looking for. Also,
consider joining Environmental Preservation Solutions GREEN PURCHASING PROGRAM that provides
information on where to find recycled products, E-Waste Collections, Contract Language, Green
Purchasing and much, much more. Please give me a call at 303-875-7733.
Regards,
Gilbert L. Bailey
303-875-7733
President

2. Hello, Vanessa and EPPNetters: Try this Seattle-based company for CD covers.
http://www.rebinder.com/

By the way, I believe you (Ecology) can use a City of Seattle office supplies contract to order these if you
wish – get in touch with me directly to follow up.

Shirli Axelrod
Waste Prevention and Green Purchasing
Seattle Public Utilities
PO Box 34018
700 Fifth Avenue, Suite 4900
Seattle, WA 98124-4018
Phone: 206-684-7804
E-mail: shirli.axelrod@seattle.gov

3. The US Postal Service offers ReadyPost CD mailers that are Cradle-to-Cradle certified (which I assume
means recycled content among other attributes), and are made in the USA. But they're pricey--$1.99 each.
Product code: 93140002

Gretchen Brewer

4. You might search the Canopy Ecopaper database (http://canopyplanet.org/EPD/index.php) because
they have listings for the heavier paper grades…under ‘Paper Type’ enter a filter for say “envelopes” or
“packaging”. You didn’t mention if you were looking for a lightweight 24# paper grade envelope mailer
or a heavier grade of protecting stock like a paperboard product.
                                                                                                           240
Doug
Douglas Reed, CPPB, Purchasing Agent
Department of Administrative Services (DAS)
Hoover State Office Building, Level A
Des Moines, IA 50319-0105
doug.reed@iowa.gov
Phone: (515) 242-6151
Fax: 515-725-0120 direct




                                              241
                        Solar powered waste handling equipment, March 2010
4 Posts

Original post:
Does anyone have any experience with solar powered waste handling equipment?
Thanks,
Steve
Stephen P. Ashkin, President
The Ashkin Group LLC - The Green Cleaning Experts
3644 Tamarron Drive Bloomington, IN 47408
Phone: (812) 332-7950 Fax: (812) 332-7965
Email: SteveAshkin@AshkinGroup.com
Visit us at: www.AshkinGroup.com

Responses:
1. We’re considering one of these at American University: http://www.bigbellysolar.com/products/
I believe they have a couple already in place at George Washington University.

2. City of Boston bought 50 a couple years ago and they love them. Our Dept. of Conservation and
recreation use them as well. MA has found them to be a great company and a great product.

Marcia Deegler, Director of Environmental Purchasing
Operational Services Division
One Ashburton Place, Room 1017
Boston, MA 02108-1552
617-720-3356, 617-727-4527 fax
marcia.deegler@state.ma.us
Visit the EPP Website at www.mass.gov/epp

3. Big Belly has several hundred units installed in Philadelphia with documented significant savings in
labor, fuel and disposal costs. I believe two hundred more units are going in shortly. Philadelphia is also
actively using the compactors’ wireless communication functionality to focus staff on servicing units that
are full.

Dmitriy Nikolayev, Procurement Manager
Facilities and Environmental Services
Operational Services Division
Commonwealth of Massachusetts
One Ashburton Place, Room 1017
Boston, MA 02108
Phone: 617-720-3351
Fax: 617-727-4527
dmitriy.nikolayev@state.ma.us




                                                                                                        242
                    Fragrance free institutional bathroom deodorizer, March 2010
6 Posts

Original post:
I’m looking for an environmentally friendly, institutional bathroom deodorizer for use in a law
enforcement intake facility. We have a toxics reduction policy, so anything that has a fragrance will not
pass. Scented might be OK if it’s a natural scent but fragrance is out. Got any ideas?

Janna E. Allgood
Sustainable Purchasing Coordinator
NWSA AmeriCorps Member
503-988-5111 x 25906 (office)
503-988-3252 (fax)
703-587-0992 (mobile)

Responses:
1. Here is a wiki on air fresheners - in case helpful. Produced by P2Rx.
http://lib.wmrc.uiuc.edu/p2rx-wiki/index.php/Air_fresheners

2.  Two all-natural, inexpensive deodorizers are baking soda or vinegar. Use in flat, wide containers to
absorb the odor. Baking soda has no scent, and vinegar's scent (not a fragrance) is natural, but not
appealing. Cleanliness in a bathroom is the best deodorizer. A black light is helpful in finding where bad
smells (urine, semen, etc.) are so they can be removed through cleaning. Most commercial deodorizers
are simply trying to cover a bad smell with a more powerful, synthetic smell, and most stink worse than
the odor you're trying to cover. Pg

3.   Try https://greencleaning.ny.gov/

4.  Janna, I’m not sure if this list will travel well over the list serve, but I’m trying it. There are five
vendors on our state contract with odor control products that are EcoLogo certified. I cannot say that I
personally familiar with any of them as our office does not purchase these products directly. Hopefully
one or more of them may meet your specifications. I provided the emails for the vendors so you can check
it out. Please let me know if something works out. Also let me know if you do not receive the list and I will
email it as an attachment independently from the listserv.




                                                                                                         243
                                                                                                Prod
                                                                                                 uct
                                                                       Tot              Volu    Liste
                                                             Packag
     Produc                              Certifica                      al    Dilutio   me %    d on Vend
Vend          Manufact                             Packag      ing
     t Type /                 Product      tion                        Gal       n      Disco   GS or or
 or             urer                                 ing      Cost                                              Vendor Email
     Applica                   Name      Obtaine                        in    Factor/    unt     CCD Cont
Name           Name                                 Size     Deliver
       tion                                  d                         Pkg      Qrt      (if    websi act
                                                               ed
                                                                       Size             any)     te?
                                                                                                Yes/
                                                                                                  No
Allsto                        Breakdow
n                             n #43                                                                   Bob
Suppl    Odor                 Command              2 X 1.5                                            Cohe    bcohen@allstonsup
y Co.    Control   Butcher    Center     CCD 115   Gallon    $150.74 3        40        0%      Yes   n       ply.com
                              #43 G
                              Force                                    3                              Craig
Casey    Odor                 Breakdow             (2) 1.5   $ 12      gallo                          Smit    craigs@caseyemi.co
EMI      Control   Butchers   n Clear    Ecologo   Gallon    4.83      ns    10         0%      Yes   h       m
Simpl
ex                                      ECP-                                                          Charl
Janito   Odor      Enviro    ES58 Odor CCD-        2 x 1.25 $ 17                                      es    crice@simplexjanit
rial     Control   Solutions Eliminator Other      gal.     4.25       2.5    1 to 8    0%      Yes   Rice orial.com
                   M.D.      Product
MD                 Stetson   Central               4 x .5                                             Andr
Stetso   Odor      Company, 121 Pro-               gallon/   $ 30                                     ea      andrea.glass@mdst
n        Control   Inc.      Zyme       Ecologo    case      0.00      2      0.06      0%      Yes   Glass   etson.com
Zep                ZEP       GREENLI
Sales              SALES     NK
&                  AND       ODORSTR                                                                  Chris
Servic   Odor      SERVICE, OYER                         $    7                                       Colle   Chris.collette@zep.c
e        Control   INC.      EXTRA      CD-110     QUART 0.12          12     RTU       0%      YES   tte     om



                                                                                                                                 244
Zep                ZEP        GREENLI
Sales              SALES      NK
&                  AND        ODORSTR
Servic   Odor      SERVICE,   OYER               GALLO   $    9
e        Control   INC.       EXTRA     CD-110   N       3.12     4    RTU      0%   YES
Zep                ZEP        GREENLI
Sales              SALES      NK
&                  AND        ODORSTR
Servic   Odor      SERVICE,   OYER                       $    7
e        Control   INC.       EXTRA     CD-110   PAIL    6.10     5    RTU      0%   YES
Zep                ZEP        GREENLI
Sales              SALES      NK
&                  AND        ODORSTR
Servic   Odor      SERVICE,   OYER                       $ 32
e        Control   INC.       EXTRA     CD-110   DRUM    5.60     20   RTU      0%   YES
Zep                ZEP        GREENLI
Sales              SALES      NK
&                  AND        ODORSTR
Servic   Odor      SERVICE,   OYER                       $ 77
e        Control   INC.       EXTRA     CD-110   DRUM    4.40     55   RTU      0%   YES
Zep                ZEP
Sales              SALES
&                  AND
Servic   Odor      SERVICE,   GREENLI   CCD-             $    7        23/OZ/
e        Control   INC.       NK LBA    113      PAIL    2.60     5    DAY      0%   YES
                              GREENLI
                   ZEP
Zep                           NK BIO
                   SALES
Sales                         MULIT-
                   AND
&                             PURPOSE                                  4-12
                   SERVICE,
Servic Odor                   DRAIN     CCD-     GALLO   $    7        OZ/WE
                   INC.
e      Control                CARE      113      N       9.76     4    EK       0%   YES




                                                                                           245
                              GREENLI
                   ZEP
Zep                           NK BIO
                   SALES
Sales                         MULIT-
                   AND
&                             PURPOSE                                  4-12
                   SERVICE,
Servic   Odor                 DRAIN       CCD-           $    9        OZ/WE
                   INC.
e        Control              CARE        113    PAIL    4.20     5    EK      0%   YES
Zep                ZEP
Sales              SALES      GREENLI
&                  AND        NK ZEP-O-
Servic   Odor      SERVICE,   ZYME      CCD-             $ 10
e        Control   INC.       POWDER 113         1 LB    8.04     12   5       0%   YES
Zep                ZEP
Sales              SALES      GREENLI
&                  AND        NK ZEP-O-
Servic   Odor      SERVICE,   ZYME        CCD-           $ 16
e        Control   INC.       POWDER      113    DRUM    0.00     25   5       0%   YES
Zep                ZEP        GREENLI
Sales              SALES      NK
&                  AND        ODORSTR
Servic   Odor      SERVICE,   OYER        CCD-         $    7
e        Control   INC.       EXTRA       113    QUART 0.12       12   RTU     0%   YES
Zep                ZEP        GREENLI
Sales              SALES      NK
&                  AND        ODORSTR
Servic   Odor      SERVICE,   OYER        CCD-   GALLO   $    9
e        Control   INC.       EXTRA       113    N       3.12     4    RTU     0%   YES
Zep                ZEP        GREENLI
Sales              SALES      NK
&                  AND        ODORSTR
Servic   Odor      SERVICE,   OYER        CCD-           $    7
e        Control   INC.       EXTRA       113    PAIL    6.10     5    RTU     0%   YES
Zep                ZEP        GREENLI
Sales              SALES      NK
&                  AND        ODORSTR
Servic   Odor      SERVICE,   OYER        CCD-           $ 32
e        Control   INC.       EXTRA       113    DRUM    5.60     20   RTU     0%   YES
                                                                                          246
Zep                ZEP         GREENLI
Sales              SALES       NK
&                  AND         ODORSTR
Servic Odor        SERVICE,    OYER         CCD-                 $ 77
e      Control     INC.        EXTRA        113        DRUM      4.40      55     RTU       0%       YES

Marcia Deegler
Director of Environmental Purchasing
Operational Services Division
One Ashburton Place, Room 1017
Boston, MA 02108-1552

5. Another cost effective approach is to ensure good ventilation in the restrooms and not use any deodorizer. Unfortunately, the advertising
industry has us trained to think the chemical smell of deodorizers is healthier than the natural smell of body processes.

Sandra Cannon, Technical Support
U.S. Department of Energy Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
Tel. 509-529-1535




                                                                                                                                         247
                                    Swimming Pool Solutions, March 2010
   3 Posts

   Original post:
   Hello everyone. I'm an intern with Allegheny County, PA assisting the purchasing department with
   creating specs for a swimming pool chemicals bid. I am looking for environmentally preferable solutions
   for the county's public pools. Thank you in advance for your consideration and assistance.

   Karen V. Abrams
   Slippery Rock University, Graduate Assistant
   Master of Science in Sustainable Systems (MS3)
   kva6281@sru.edu (email)
   724 738 4585 (office)
   917 549 1988 (mobile)

   Responses:
   1. Hello, Karen. Here are "Green" Hotels Association recommendations. Please do let me know your
   findings. Patty Griffin 713/789-888

           SWIMMING POOL, Alternatives to Chlorine
          Aqua-Flo, aqua-flo.com, 951/667-2000, pumps for the leisure water industry
           Chlor-Free, chlorfree.com, 011/506/2665-0896 (Costa Rica). The ChlorFree-AquaSmarter
           Ionizing Capsule lasts for 12 Months and does not require the need for Electricity, Constant
           Maintenance or Special Plumbing.
          Zodiac Pool Care, Inc., zodiac.com, 800/822-7933, Nature2 canister filter said to trap
           bacteria, algae and viruses and releases minute amounts of silver (bactericide) and copper
           (kills algae) into the pool water to reduce need for chlorine.
          Pool Solutions, links to alternative chemistry and equipment,
           www.poolsolutions.com/link/prod_alt_chem.html
           Ozone cleaning systems keep water naturally sanitized without chlorine; effectively used in
           Europe for over 30 years.
          SunshinePool.com, 801/825-4523, manufacturer of environmentally friendly pool and spa
           sanitizers
           OzonePureWater.com, 800/633-8469, Ozone Pure Water eliminates provides ozone
           systems that remove iron, sulfur, manganese, bacteria, taste and odor.

Mineral treatments: Minerals such as silver and copper destroy bacteria and algae reducing the amount of
chlorine needed by about 90%. www.Nature2.com

We use ozone to treat our two pools at American University. It comes from this company:
http://www.delozone.com.

The person here who manages it tells me: "We currently use ozone in both pools, but maintain a chlorine
residual value of .5 to 1 pp. This residual is required by the health department, since ozone does not have a
residual that can be measured."

Hope this helps,
Chris O'Brien

                                                                                                            248
Director of Sustainability
American University

2. Hi Karen, Any technology- whether its ozone or ionization or alternative chems will also require chlorine
as per your state requirement for public pools or pools that the public can access- like YMCAs, health clubs,
hotels etc. Here in Maine we have a 2 ppm requirement. Salt chlorine generators are a great alternative
technology because they generate their own chlorine which a more pure form of chlorine w/ out the
additives etc. That to me is the preferred way to go, but can be pricey.

We just finished a pilot project using Orenda products in addition to chlorine. Orenda makes a food grade
enzyme that is added to the pool to knock out phosphates in the water which minimize the chlorine's
effectiveness. If you can make sure the chlorine is working effectively, you will use less chlorine. One hotel
here in Portland and the Portland YMCA are using the Orenda products (which my program supplied them
with for the pilot) in addition to their chlorine and they are now using 1/3 to 1/2 less chlorine to maintain
the state required 2 ppm. Both of these pools are really liking the water quality, the indoor air quality and
many swimmers have asked what is different about the water in a favorable manner.

Also- you should make sure no pool is using "stabilized" chlorine in an indoor pool as the stabilizer (cyanuric
acid) will not be broken down without UV rays. This is for outdoor pools. A build up in stabilizer will also
occupy the chlorine and render it ineffective despite accurate chlorine readings. I found several hotel pools
using stabilized chlorine (trichlor or dichlor)with indoor pools. This is a lawsuit waiting to happen.

Let me know if you have any other questions. I'd be happy to advise...
Peter Cooke
Pollution Prevention Program Manager
Maine Department of Environmental Protection
312 Canco Road
Portland, ME 04103
(207) 791-8101
(207) 822-6303 fax
peter.cooke@maine.gov
www.state.me.us/dep




                                                                                                             249
                                   Business Card Printing, April 2010
3 Posts

Original post:
Good Morning EPPnet, I am in the process of developing a specification for environmentally friendly
business cards. If anyone has any specs readily available, I'd love to take a peak.

Thanks,
Jonathan
Jonathan Rifkin, Special Assistant to the Director
Office of Contracting and Procurement
One Judiciary Square, 441 4th St, NW, Suite 700S
Washington, DC 20001
Ph: 202-724-3676
E-Mail: Jonathan.rifkin@dc.gov

Responses:
1. I went on the PA Recycled Products Guide at
http://www.dep.state.pa.us/wm_apps/recycledproducts/ and found the following three companies that
make recycled content business cards:
Can Alta Bindery Corp.
8445 Davies Rd
Edmonton, AB T6E 4N3
(780) 466-9973
sales@canaltabindery.com
Recycled Product: Business Cards
Total Recycled Content: 100% Total Recycled Content
Post-Consumer Recycled Content: 100% Post-Consumer PET

Stephens Solutions
10847 Midwest Industrial Blvd
Saint Louis, MO 63132
(314) 423-6554
mike@stephenssolutions.com
http://www.stephensolutions.com
Recycled Product: Business Cards
Total Recycled Content: Up to 100% Total Recycled Content
Post-Consumer Recycled Content: 20-100% Post-Consumer Paper

Pre-Cycled
P.O. Box 341
Brewster, NY 10509
(845) 278-7611, (888) 38-COLOR
info@pre-cycled.com
http://www.pre-cycled.com
Recycled Product: Business Cards
Total Recycled Content: 50% Total Recycled Content
Post-Consumer Recycled Content: 10% Post-Consumer Paper

                                                                                                      250
Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3LC40)
Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3163
giuranna.mike@epa.gov

2. Here at GSA we utilize the services of an Ability One workshop (handicapped workers) for printing
business cards with recycled content and bio based inks. They are Envision located in Wichita Kansas.
Contact: Fred Cabala at 316-267-2244

Martin A. Prince
Environmental Specialist (QSDJ)(R02)
GSA Northeast and Caribbean Region
Phone 212-264-7883
Fax 212-264-3574




                                                                                                        251
                  Compostable Food Service Ware In Jails and Hospitals, April 2010
4 Posts

Original post:
I'm looking for leads to hospital and jail facilities that are successfully using compostable food service
ware - e.g. cups, bowls, plates, utensils, trays. All leads and contacts appreciated!

Susan Kinsella

Responses:
1. Here's a list of companies offering compostable foodware. They're all Ally Members of "Green" Hotels
Assn. The listing can be found at greenhotels.com/appvvnd.php.
Patty Griffin

Bamboo Studio, Barry Hermanson, Owner, ALLY MEMBER, 31878 Del Obispo Street, Bldg. 118-336, San
Juan Capistrano, CA 92675, 949/582-3190, Fax 949/582-3198, Internet: WWW Home Page, Bamboo
Studio is a revolutionary all-occasion dinnerware that is both disposable and reusable. Handcrafted from
the sheath of the emerging bamboo plant, these dynamic new serving pieces are elegant, strong and
environmentally friendly. Strong and leak resistant. Handcrafted from bamboo sheath. No harsh
chemicals or bleaches are used. Requires little energy to make, and bamboo is 100% biodegradable.

Foodservice & Packaging Institute, Inc., 703/538-2800, fpi.org

Genpak LLC, Jeff Cole, ALLY MEMBER, 68Warren Street, Glen Falls, New York 12801, 518/798-9511,
Internet: WWW Home Page The Harvest Collection® from Genpak is an exciting line of biodegradable
food containers produced from naturally occurring, annually renewable resources such as corn, rice and
wheat that will completely compost and biodegrade when placed into a commercially run composting
facility.

G.E.T. Enterprises, Inc., Audrey Copeland, Sustainable Products Manager, ALLY MEMBER, 1515 West Sam
Houston Parkway North, Houston, TX 77043, 713/467-9394, Fax 713/467-9396, Internet: WWW Home
Page, Eco-Takeouts is a green alternative to disposable containers. Reduce waste and our environmental
impact by purchasing reusable products. Break-resistant and designed for use in commercial dishwasher,
Eco-Takeouts will also cut supply costs through reuse. It is made of recyclable, 100% BPA free
polypropylene and is microwave safe for reheating.

Innoware Plastic, Inc., Ginger Green, Marketing Coordinator, ALLY MEMBER, 30000 Mill Creek Avenue,
Suite 400, Alpharetta, Georgia 30022, dir 678/690-5144, C 770/924-1250, 678/690-5100, Fax 678/690-
5103, Internet: WWW Home Page. We manufacture premium plastic and paper disposable products,
including earth-friendly material options, for the foodservice and retail industriesInnoWare Plastic, Inc. is
a leading manufacturer of upscale foodservice packaging. Well known for delivering innovative designs
and reliable functionality, InnoWare is an ally of foodservice operators looking for earth-friendly
containers that make a green statement with designer appeal.

Mansfield Paper Company, Inc., Scott Parent, President, ALLY MEMBER, 380 Union Street, P. O. Box 1070,
West Springfield, MA 01089, 800/225-4641, 413/781-2000, Fax 413/734-9666, Internet: WWW Home
Page, Conserve the Earth's natural resources using eco-friendly products. Mansfield Paper is proud to
feature biodegradable, compostable and recyclable tableware and accessories. We have in stock cutlery,
cups, containers, cleaners and more. Let us help you conserve the Earth's natural resources by supplying
                                                                                                             252
eco-friendly merchandise.

Total Packaging Solutions LLC, Wayne Cunningham, President, ALLY MEMBER, P. O. Box 1083, South
Windsor, CT 06074, 860/644-6994, Fax 860/432-0183, Internet: WWW Home Page, E-mail:
wayne@totalpackagingsolutions.net,

Ultra Green LLC, Cal Krupa, President, ALLY MEMBER, 171 Cheshire Lane North, Suite 500, Minneapolis,
MN 55441, 612/518-2240, Fax 763/746-3345, Internet: WWW Home Page, E-mail:
cal@ultragreenhome.com, We make Earth-friendly products using cutting-edge ecological discoveries.
We've gone beyond recycling. Our premiere Tree Free paper products are made from sugarcane fiber.
After the sugar is squeezed from the cane, historically, the crushed stalk was burned or discarded. No
longer. We've done away with the environmental nightmare of petroleum-based plastics that take
hundreds of years to break down, contaminate our soil, groundwater and oceans. Ultra Green cups and
utensils are made from cornstarch. All of our products are 100% biodegradable, compostable and
sustainable.

2. I think the main thing tipping the scale towards environmental preferability of compostable service
ware is that it is composted. And unless the facility is doing so, it is generally unlikely - though not
impossible - that the trash or usual recycling collection system is sorting these to a composting
operation. If that doesn't happen, then that environmental benefit does not occur.

Alas - too often in EPP, purchasers buy the promise of "green" without ensuring the benefit. Which is
why hundreds of vendors have sprung up to spread this potentially unlawful consumer misdirection.

Time for an updated Green Guide from the FTC, I'd say. They got it right with their recycling guidance,
i.e., you can't say recyclable unless there's an accessible recycling operation. And composting is a subset
of recycling, so I suggest it applies. Now all that is needed is a test case.

regards,
Rick
Richard Yoder, PE
Director, P2ric.org
University of Nebraska at Omaha
6001 Dodge Street, RH308
Omaha, NE 68182
vox: 402-554-6257
fax: 402-554-6260
http://www.p2ric.org/

3. Here is an example of one biodegradable product, that actually does NOT degrade in one NW
composter's process. (scroll down past glass 'letter').
http://www.portlandonline.com/bps/index.cfm?a=266020&c=41682




                                                                                                           253
                       10,000 lb. Hotel Bed and Bath Linens to Donate, April 2010
2 Posts

Original post:
A winter Colorado resort replaces all of their bed and bath linens each year, and are anxious to donate
this past year's linens for reuse by a non-profit. (Haiti seems like the perfect destination at this point.) If
you have ideas how these linens can be put to good use this year or in future years, please respond to:

Lyn Halliday in Steamboat Springs, CO, 970/879-6323, lhalliday@environmentalsolutionllc.com

Patty Griffin, "Green" Hotels Assn, 713/789-8889

Response:
Here's a list of companies offering compostable foodware. They're all Ally Members of "Green" Hotels
Convoy of Hope is a disaster relief organization doing work in Haiti and Chile.
http://www.convoyofhope.org/go/contact

The Red Cross may want them for use here or elsewhere.
http://www.redcross.org/portal/site/en/menuitem.d229a5f06620c6052b1ecfbf43181aa0/?vgnextoid=
07001b655eb3b110VgnVCM10000089f0870aRCRD&cpsextcurrchannel=1

World Vision accepts product donations. They have missions in the US and world-wide. The web address
for product donation is http://www.worldvision.org/content.nsf/give/gik-
contactus?Open&lpos=lft_txt_Contact-Us




                                                                                                             254
                             Recycling pharmaceutical bottles, April 2010
6 Posts

Original post:
Can anyone help this pharmacist? I have an old file (2001) which has some outlets for recycling pill
bottles, but am not sure if they're good anymore.

Common item: HDPE2 pharmaceutical bottles. I am a pharmacist/manager with an endless supply. My
research says easy to recycle HDPE (#)2 but pharmaceutical bottles deemed contaminated. True? I've
contacted legislators. Can you help?

email: zangara5@comcast.net

Here's what I had:

One Person Can Make a Difference: Target Worker Helps Pharmacy Stop Being a Pill
Lily Askue noticed the plastic stock bottles, dispensers and pill bottles were getting trashed rather than
recycled at her place of work, the Target Pharmacy. To a girl raised on reuse and recycling, she was
distressed to see the all that could be recycled simply heading to the landfill. So, she asked her team to
start setting aside the plastics and she would take them home for recycling weekly. It took a while, but
once people were used to a new system, the pharmacy started generating a couple of trash bags full each
week. Lily and her boss now share the task of transporting the recycling.

The story gets better. Target is now reportedly working with recycling companies to determine how best
recycle pharmacy plastics nationwide. They may have to make adjustments in production dyes and
adhesives for best results. Way to go Target. And, thanks, Lily! Thanks all for stepping up to the plate,
Polly Sattler & Montine Blank
GreenPlate, Inc.

Responses:
1. A few years ago, when I attempted this, we ran into a few challenges:
-Some people feel their medicines are highly confidential, or were highly controlled substances, so they
were reluctant to give up bottles that had their name, Doctor's name, prescription number, drug name,
dosage frequency, etc. If we could get the patient to remove the old label (if it could be removed) that
solved that problem.
--The problem of residual medicine in the bottles was another concern. If we could get the patient to
return their bottles for refill that would take care of that concern. The patient would have to wait while
the pharmacist filled scripts for other patient's already in line, or return later when completed.
---Reading the very small plastic recycling symbols was not easy for a centralized, manual sorting system.
Returning bottles to the pharmacy where purchased can reduce those problems, since a single
pharmacist generally buys from a single supplier.

A plastic processor that has an automated sorting system, where exposure of workers to pharmaceutical
residue could be handled safely, would be the best bet. A return/reuse system for refilling ongoing
prescriptions, would reduce (but not eliminate) this waste.
Doug
Douglas Reed
Department of General Services
Hoover State Office Building, Level A
                                                                                                       255
2. Mike - in case helpful:
PPRC did a bit of WA state research on this a few years ago - as part of our support to Washington's
Medicine Return Program. Probably not helpful outside WA state - we found only a few solid waste
recyclers would accept Rx bottles, but no one mentioned they wouldn't take them because they were
"contaminated." (Possibly the volume/outlets was behind the "don't accept" policy?) An aside - the City
of Seattle does not allow residents to put them in recycling.

So, speaking of medicine return programs - seems these folks would be good resources to inquire further.

At a minimum, you could ask the same question to the Teleosis group in Berkeley: They're working on
prescrip drug return/waste reduction, so they may be working this side-issue, too. Teleosis FAQ on
household medicine return sites
http://www.teleosis.org/pdf/Green%20Pharmacy/GPP_FAQ.pdf says some
take-back locations will recycle prescrip bottles and to check with local site
to confirm.

Google search turns up a SF Bay Area pharmacy chain that does accept prescrip bottles for recycling:
http://www.elephantpharm.com/greenpharmacy

Product Stewardship Institute website says the Northeast Recycling Council
is interested in recycling as BMP for Rx containers; implies they're
working on having the practice approved/adopted broadly. Scroll down this
page to NERC reference & link:
http://www.productstewardship.net/productsPharmaceuticalsNGOPrograms.htm

Finally - this blog from 2007
http://www.aboutmyplanet.com/daily-green-tips/recycle-prescription/ lists 27 ways to re-use prescrip
bottles, and at end says, " Most pharmacies don't recycle prescription bottles because in some cases
pharmacies don't have the equipment or manpower to do it. Prescription bottles have to be cleaned and
sanitized before they are reused." See reader comments @ end for more on the bottle recycling topic.
One references a kid in W. VA who recycles empty prescrip bottles for re-use at a local medical clinic.
http://waste-not-want-not.tripod.com/id14.html

Response compiled by Cathy Buller, PPRC

Michelle Gaither | environmental engineer
1402 Third Ave, Suite 1420 | Seattle, WA 98101
T 206.352.2050 | F 206.352.2049| www.pprc.org

3. In western Mass small prescription bottles are not acceptable because the small bottles can fall
through the machinery at the recycling facility.

4. NERC has a report on this - look under "Managing Plastic Medication Containers" at this site.
http://www.nerc.org/topic_areas/unwanted_medications_collections.html

Hope this helps!
Laurie
Laurie Tenace
                                                                                                       256
Environmental Specialist
Waste Reduction Section
Florida Department of Environmental Protection
2600 Blair Stone Rd., MS 4555
Tallahassee FL 32399-2400
P: 850.245.8759
F: 850.245.8811
Laurie.Tenace@dep.state.fl.us

5. Hi - I just wanted to provide an update to one of the suggestions below:
Elephant Pharmacy actually closed all of their stores (Northern CA) so I'm not sure why their website is
still up. http://www.elephantpharm.com/closed

"February 3, 2009
It is with a heavy heart that we post this notice: Elephant Pharm, which has served over 1 million
customers in four Bay Area markets, has closed indefinitely. As a small business, we've been hurt by the
terrible turn the economy has taken and the tightening of the credit market. It's been a very special six
years since we started this drugstore revolution, and we certainly couldn't have made it as far as we did
without you, our customers.

We hope that you will continue your pursuit of a good, long life, well lived."

-Sue




                                                                                                       257
                         Elevator purchase, install, maintenance, April 2010
3 Posts

Original post:
Hello, Does anyone have example “green” specifications for the purchase of new elevators for an existing
building? Also, any example “green” specifications for elevator installation and maintenance?
Thank you,
-Stacey
Stacey Foreman
City of Portland, Oregon, Procurement Services
stacey.foreman@portlandoregon.gov

Responses:
1. Stacey, The Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Lab specified biobased hydraulic fluid in
their new elevators a few years ago. Contact information is Tom McGeachen, tmcgeachen@pppl.gov

Sandra Cannon, Technical Support
U.S. Department of Energy Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
Tel. 509-529-1535

2. Stacey, For elevators, consider mercury containing parts and lighting. Require any/all mercury
containing parts be removed from service during the term of the contract and replaced with mercury-free
parts whenever possible. Also that the removed parts be recycled. Any parts installed containing
mercury should be labeled. Require replacement of mercury-containing lighting be replaced with LEDs.

Also, as Sandra mentioned, replace petroleum-based ingredients with Biobased. Let me know if you want
details.

Beth
Beth Eckl
Director, Environmental Purchasing Program
Practice Greenhealth
(866) 598-2240
beckl@practicegreenhealth.org




                                                                                                      258
                               History of Recycling Collection, April 2010
2 Posts

Original post:
Does anyone have a good resource that describes the evolution of the US recycling collection
infrastructure?

Mary Ann Remolador, Assistant Director
Northeast Recycling Council, Inc.
139 Main Street, Suite 401
Brattleboro, Vermont 05301
Tel: 802-254-3636; Fax: 802-254-5870
www.nerc.org

Response:
Mary Ann, The Complete Handbook of Solid Waste Collection and Transfer by H. Lanier Hickman, Jr. has
a chapter on the evolution of solid waste collection, including recycling, in Chapter 1 (pages 17-33). I have
a copy of the book.

Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3LC40)
Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3163
giuranna.mike@epa.gov




                                                                                                         259
                               Wanted: Info Life Cycle Costing, May 2010
3 Posts

Original post:
Do any of you perform life cycle costing in your procurement processes? I am developing training
materials for departmental buyers on this topic. I need to help them transition their thought processes
from “low bidder” to “best overall value.”

Does anyone have a tool, a set of guidelines or anything that they have found useful for this purpose?

As well, when and how are you performing LCC today? In what types of procurements and at what point
in the procurement process?

Thanks in advance and enjoy your weekend!
Janna E. Allgood
Multnomah County Purchasing
Sustainable Purchasing Coordinator
NWSA AmeriCorps Member
503-988-5111 x 25906 (office)
503-988-3252 (fax)
703-587-0992 (mobile)

Responses:
1. We are expected to do as much Life Cycle Cost analysis (LCC) as possible. Challenges arise in finding
independent, reliable, third party authority references that can be used for measurable comparison
purposes.

We have done an abbreviated LCC of light duty vehicles such as cars and pickups for years. It factors in
the Initial Purchase Price, Fuel Efficiency, Time Value of Money, and Residual Value at the end of 60
months or 75,000 miles. We keep vehicles much longer than that; but that used to be about as far out as
the estimated residual value was available. If I had the right reference source; I would add repair costs to
the equation. We reference today the USA D.O.E. Fuel Economy Guides for fuel efficiency and the residual
values come from Black Book. Note: since there is nearly a straight line equivalence between fuel
consumed and tailpipe CO2 produced, you can draw some conclusions regarding greenhouse gas
reductions even though a dollar value has not been established for CO2…which we’ll need to establish
that for ‘Cap and Trade’.

Eco-labeling organizations can make the purchasing agents’ job much easier. Our management has
accepted Energy Star certification as an abbreviated form of LCC. I say abbreviated form because
basically Energy Star only addresses energy efficiency; not environmental attributes or byproducts (as
EPEAT addresses). I have asked to automatically accept EPEAT certifications, which incorporates Energy
Star; but have not heard back.

NIGP and NASPO have LCC training courses and resources you could recommend to your co-workers. If
you wish a copy of LCC bid terminology; see the NIGP resource library, or I can send you a copy of my
vehicles RFB mentioned above.

If you wish to get deeper into LCC and valuation of socio-economic attributes, see:
http://www.epa.gov/nrmrl/std/sab/lca/index.html
                                                                                                          260
http://www.epa.gov/ORD/NRMRL/lcaccess/resources.html
http://www.epa.gov/ORD/NRMRL/lcaccess/lca101.html

Doug
Douglas Reed, CPPB, Purchasing Agent
Department of Administrative Services (DAS)
Hoover State Office Building, Level A
Des Moines, IA 50319-0105
doug.reed@iowa.gov
Phone: (515) 242-6151
Fax: 515-725-0120 direct

2. Hi Janna: In Nova Scotia we have a new (August 2009) Sustainable Procurement Policy which
requires us to look at best value instead of LCB and we are staring to use a life cycle costing and
environmental impact analysis to look at options for some types of purchases (various types of lighting,
computers and multifunction devices etc.) We haven't nailed down a good process yet to capture the
social side impacts yet but I see one of the other posters has provided some references that may give us
some new ideas on that front.

In our sustainable procurement training we are advising staff to consider using LCC (even in a simplified
form) for purchase of anything that will be used for a period time, that will have maintenance
requirements, that uses energy and/or uses consumable supplies. In the classroom this year I've been
using desk top computer and traffic light examples - there is good data, the costs and environmental
impact reductions can be quite substantial and they are categories that everyone can relate to. We also
have a small guidance document on our internal website.

I suspect attachments are not allowed so feel free to contact me off-list and I'd be happy to share what we
do have.

Lynda
Lynda Rankin, Manager, Sustainable Procurement Integration
Economic and Rural Development
PO Box 787
Halifax Nova Scotia
B3J 2V2
email: rankinlx@gov.ns.ca




                                                                                                        261
                            Chemical do not use list - construction, May 2010
4 Posts

Original post:
Hello, Has anyone put together a “do not use” chemical list for construction/tenant improvement
projects? I realize there are a lot of material/product specific chemical prohibitions/limits (e.g. for latex
paint, plywood, finishes, various LEED criteria, etc.), but has anyone put together an over-arching
prohibited list for use in contract documents?
Thank you.
-Stacey
Stacey Foreman
Sustainable Procurement Coordinator
City of Portland, Oregon, Procurement Services
stacey.foreman@portlandoregon.gov

Responses:
1. Checkout Environmental Building News Volume 19, Number 3 March 2010.

2. In the Build a Green Walla Walla project, we list chemicals to avoid are formaldehyde and other
volatile organic compounds. We also suggest avoiding PVC in any form but that is a material not a
chemical---Sandra

Sandra Cannon, Lead
Build a Green Walla Walla Project
Walla Walla Area Resource Conservation Committee
Tel. 509-525-8849

3. I recall Nike creating an "X-List" several years ago, but I don't know offhand whether it's a
procurement practice they still have in place.

Molly Chidsey
Sustainability Coordinator
Metro
503-797-1690
molly.chidsey@oregonmetro.gov




                                                                                                           262
                           Post-consumer content for paper bags, May 2010
3 Posts
Original post:
I am seeking examples of post-consumer content (PCC) that appears in specifications or in bid documents
for paper bags. If you know of any, please let me know. In California we have a 30% PCC for paper bags
and I am wondering if others have something similar or perhaps higher. Thanks very much,

Kathleen Frevert
Senior Specialist, Product Stewardship and Environmentally Preferable Purchasing
Dept. of Resources Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle)
1001 I Street, PO Box 4025, MS 13A
Sacramento, CA 95812-4025
Phone: 916-341-6476; Fax: 916-319-7246
Kathy.Frevert@CalRecycle.ca.gov
www.CalRecycle.ca.gov
Responses:
1. Kathy; EPA has a Comprehensive Procurement Guideline Specification for Paper Bags at
http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/conserve/tools/cpg/products/paperbrd.htm
(Scroll down to the table for EPA's Recommended Recovered Fiber Content Levels for Paperboard and
Packaging Products).

This was written back in 1996 and specifies 5-20% Postconsumer fiber and 5-40% recovered fibers for
Brown paper (e.g. wrapping paper and bags) see
http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/conserve/tools/cpg/paprman.htm for more details.

Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
Office of Materials Management, EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3LC40)
Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3163
giuranna.mike@epa.gov
2. Having been involved in the development of the paper procurement guidelines and RMAN way back
then, my recollection is that there is a limit to the amount of postconsumer fiber that can be incorporated
into the type of paper (i.e., Kraft) used for these end use applications, because recovered fiber, being
shorter, is inherently less strong. A paper bag needs to be able to accommodate significant weight
without tearing. The Kraft pulping process is designed to render strong paper (in fact, Kraft means
strong in German). So, functionality/performance is a key consideration in recycled-content levels for
any paper grade.
Judy Usherson, Senior Analyst
ERG
judy.usherson@erg.com
703-841-0503




                                                                                                        263
                 Green specifications for toilets, standard & composting, June 2010
2 Posts

Original post:
Good afternoon: Does anyone have specifications or green purchasing guidelines for toilets both
"standard" and composting? Thanks for your help,

Kathy

Response:
Kathy, We have evaluations of waterless urinals we would be glad to share. Should they be of interest,
please send your e-mail address---Sandra

Sandra Cannon, Technical Support
U.S. Department of Energy Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
Tel. 509-529-1535




                                                                                                         264
                        Sustainable criteria for home compost bins, June 2010
2 Posts

Original post:
Metro purchases backyard home composting bins at bulk volume and sells them to residents of the
Portland metro region at a discount. We are interested in integrating some sustainable procurement
criteria into our next contract, beyond recycled content.

Any thoughts or examples of other public contracts that have been successful in doing this?
Please contact me directly via email. Thanks,

Molly Chidsey
Sustainability Coordinator
Metro
molly.chidsey@oregonmetro.gov
www.oregonmetro.gov

Response:
If it is an RFP; you might want to add some extra points for ‘Local’ or ‘fast fill order’ attributes. When a
program requires a change out of garbage or recycling containers, or compost bins…then storage during
dispersal can become a real problem with these bulky items. They don’t need to be in covered storage;
but even storing them outside (for instance in floodwater catchment areas) kills the grass, they blow
around, are subject to theft and vandalism, etc. Add this benefit on top of the environmental savings by
reducing transportation pollution.

In other words reward the vendor if you can use their existing storage, or if they are local and can deliver
‘as needed’.

Doug
Douglas Reed, CPPB, Purchasing Agent
Department of Administrative Services (DAS)
Hoover State Office Building, Level A
Des Moines, IA 50319-0105
doug.reed@iowa.gov
Phone: (515) 242-6151
Fax: 515-725-0120 direct




                                                                                                          265
                                    Paint certifications, June 2010
2 Posts

Original post:
Hello, Has anyone written up a recent comparison between Green Seal’s G-11 paint standard and the MPI
Green Performance Standards (GPS-1-08 and GPS-2-08), including the new MPI Extreme Green
standard? I am interested in a comparison that looks at environmental, performance, and testing
requirements as well as how the standards are developed/enforced.

Thank you.
-Stacey
Stacey Foreman
City of Portland, Oregon, Procurement Services
stacey.foreman@portlandoregon.gov

Response:
You’ve probably already seen RPN’s Responsible Purchasing Guide for Paint, but in case you haven’t, it is
available online here: http://www.responsiblepurchasing.org/purchasing_guides/paint/index.php.

The guide includes a standards comparison matrix on green standards for paint, which I have attached.
(Excel document).

According to the MPI standard (http://www.paintinfo.com/GPS/GPS-01-
08%20_July%202008%20revision_%20and%20GPS-2-08.pdf), “the new Green Seal Standard for
Recycled Paint … requires MPI listing approval based upon testing to MPI’s performance standards, and
auditing both by Green Seal and by MPI.”

Sandra Cannon, Technical Support
U.S. Department of Energy Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
Tel. 509-529-1535




                                                                                                      266
                                                                                              PAINT CERTIFICATIONS

                                                                                                                                               Scientific
                                                           Green Seal             EcoLogo (Environmental Choice)        GREENGUARD            Certification
                                                                                                                                                Systems
                                                                                                       CCD-048
                                                   GS-11         GS-43             CCD-047                             Indoor Air Quality    SCS-EC10.2-2007
                                                                                                    Recycled Water-
CRITERIA                                           Latex    Recycled-Content     Architectural                             Certified        Indoor Advantage
                                                                                                     borne Surface
                                                   Paint       Latex Paint     Surface Coatings                       Paints and Coatings         Gold
                                                                                                       Coatings
Environmental & Human Health
Heavy Metals                                        ü               ü                 ü                   ü
Persistent, Bioaccumualtive Toxins (PBTs, POPs)     ü               ü                 ü                   ü
Endocrine Disruptors                                ü               ü                 ü                   ü
Toxicity to Aquatic Life                                                              ü                   ü
Other Hazardous Substances (e.g. carcinogens,
reproductive toxins, chlorinated compounds)         ü               ü                 ü                   ü                   ü                    ü
Aromatic Compounds                                  ü               ü                 ü                   ü                   ü
VOCs (see also Air)                                 ü               ü                 ü                   ü                   ü                    ü
Acute Toxicity
Combustibility                                                                        ü                   ü
Energy
Renewable Energy
Embodied Energy
Energy Efficiency
Land
Habitat Alteration
Air
Air Emissions (Photochemical Smog)
Indoor Air Quality                                  ü               ü                 ü                   ü                   ü                    ü
Smog (tropospheric ozone; nitrogen oxides; VOCs;
peroxyacl nitrates; aldehydes)                      ü               ü                 ü                   ü                                        ü
Particulates
Global Warming

                                                                                                                                                          267
Acidification
Stratospheric Ozone Depletion                 ü   ü   ü   ü
Water
Water Conservation
Water Efficiency
Water Emissions
Ocean Acidification
Eutrophication
Materials
Material Reduction
Durability, Reliability & Performance         ü   ü
Renewable feedstock
Regionally Sourced
Recycled Content                                  ü       ü
Reliance on Petroleum Derived Products
Bio-based Materials
Manufacturing & Retailing
ISO 9000+ Good Manufacturing Process                          ü
ISO 14000+ Environmental Management Systems   ü
Packaging                                     ü   ü
Labeling                                          ü   ü   ü
Shipping, Distribution, Advertising & Sales           ü   ü
Training
End of Life & New Life
Recyclability vs. Downcyclability                 ü
Material Take Back
Material Reuse                                    ü
Biodegradable
Disposal                                          ü   ü   ü
Social Responsibility
SA8000 approved workplace
Environmental Justice

                                                                  268
Employee Health and Safety Management
Extended Social Responsibility Expectations into
Supply Chain
Community Outreach/Involvement
Performance Standards
ASTM, AATCC, CSPA, CRI, ISO, IIRC, MPI, more       ü   ü   ü   ü




                                                                   269
                                Sustainable Printing Policies, July 2010
5 Posts, 2 Attachments

Original Post:
Hello All: I was wondering if anyone has taken steps to develop a Sustainable Printing Policy? We are
looking into this here at the Regional Technology Program in State College, PA but are at the first stages
of this.

We are looking for some pushes in the right directions. All I can find of any substance is to do with
companies who themselves provide sustainable printing services.

Thank you,
Hillary Pasch
Technical Support Specialist
Borough of State College I.T. Department
hpasch@statecollegepa.us

Responses:
1. Hello Hillary, Here is a file that may be of some help. Included at end of Postings: Attachment 1:
Printing/Bindery Green Team Services

Jeff Wylde, CPPB
State of Colorado
Department of Personnel & Administration
State Purchasing Office
633 17th Street, Suite 1520
Denver, CO 80202
T 303.866.6191
F 303.866.6016

2. You might want to check out:
Waterless Printing Association: http://www.waterless.org/
Sustainable Green Printing Partnership -
https://www.sgppartnership.org/index.php?PageID=15&LinkID=55
Green Press Initiative: http://www.greenpressinitiative.org/
Judy Belaval
CT DEP Office of Source Reduction and Recycling
(860) 424-3237

3. Hi Hillary: We don't have a sustainable printing policy in the NS Government but the attached tip
sheet (See: Sustainable Printing for Trainers) that covers many of the key issues involved in printing.
When developing it we learned from the local printers that some of the things we had initially
considered including in our requirements would have had unintended consequences that did not
support our goals (e.g., requiring the use of veggie inks or specialty papers - if not handled
properly in specifications/policy these requirements can create quite a lot of additional waste).
Based on our experience, I'd encourage you to run a draft of your new policy by some of the
more environmentally friendly or sustainable printers in your area and get their feedback on it before
you implement.

                                                                                                          270
B.T.W starting this fall the trainers on our Standing Offer will be required to follow these tips when
developing materials for delivery to provincial government staff.

Hope this help out,
Lynda
Lynda Rankin,
Manager, Sustainable Procurement Integration
Economic and Rural Development
PO Box 787
Halifax Nova Scotia
B3J 2V2
email: rankinlx@gov.ns.ca

4.  IEEE and EPEAT are in the process of developing an environmental performance standard for
Imaging Equipment. The standard is currently slated to be completed and available for use with
conforming products listed on the EPEAT Product Registry by next summer. I'd recommend asking for
purchase or lease of EPEAT registered products which meet the upcoming IEEE 1680.3 Standard for the
Environmental Assessment of Imaging Equipment in any policy pertaining to printing. The standard will
be going out for ballot by the end of this summer, and information on how to join the balloting group will
be shared with this listserv.

Sincerely,
Holly Elwood
USEPA
The Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
USEPA Headquarters, MC 7409-M
EPA East Building
1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20460
Email: elwood.holly@epa.gov
Ph: 202-564-8854
Fx: 202-564-8901
www.epa.gov/oppt/epp




                                                                                                         271
                      Attachment 1: PRINTING/BINDERY SERVICES GREEN TEAM

PRINTING/BINDERY SERVICES GREEN TEAM
Users:
Judicial, Higher Education, Department of Corrections, Division of Wildlife, Department of Public Health
and Environment, Department of Revenue
Baseline:
FY08 and FY09 YTD solicitation information was gathered from State of Colorado BIDS. Awards from
FY08 in the Printing/Bindery Services category were in excess of $2.1 million and mid FY09 awards were
approximately $1.0 million
Team:
Lisa Barkley, Director of Marketing, UNC
Farrah Bustamante, Purchasing Agent, CSU
Vickki Klingman, Purchasing Director, UNC
Kathy Phifer, Director of Communications and Creative Services, CSU

Goal:
The main goal is to reduce/reuse/recycle the materials used for printing/bindery services as well as to
select materials and processes that are as environmentally friendly as possible.

Policy:
This policy is recommended in order to strengthen environmental outcomes through purchasing
decisions that cause less pollution and waste, conserve resources and habitats, minimize local and global
climate impact, and contribute to sustainable economic growth within the State of Colorado.

Standards/Specifications:
Consider Design Elements
One of the first things that can be done to achieve greener printing tactics is to use design elements that
are free of bleeding and large ink areas. If this is not possible, then reduce the size of the project to reduce
the amount of waste created during the printing process. Projects will print faster and cost less. In
addition, consider reducing margin widths and font size.

Reducing page count will not only create more cost-effective printings, but it is also greener since there is
less waste produced. There are numerous ways to reduce page count - use smaller margins, smaller font
sizes, and print on both sides of the page to maximize the use of your materials.

Good to know: Although custom/original sizes of projects may add creativity to a project, the unusual size
can cause excess paper waste, longer press times, and increased postage rates.

Examine Paper Options
Recycled paper is healthier for the environment – it saves trees, reduces the use of toxic chemicals and
uses less energy to produce than virgin paper. Additionally, the use of virgin paper contributes to the loss
of natural forests, which results in serious environmental consequences such as species extinction, loss of
biodiversity and erosion.

It’s important that those who purchase paper keep in mind the environmental impact of their paper
selections. With the variety and competitive cost of recycled paper, printing and writing paper should
contain no less than 30% post-consumer recycled fibers. When possible, a higher post-consumer recycled
fiber should be used.
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As much as possible, use paper that has been processed chlorine free. Chlorine bleaching of paper used to
be widespread in the U.S. However, since chlorine bleaching releases cancer-causing dioxin into the
atmosphere, most paper is now elemental chlorine free in order to meet Environmental Protection
Agency rules. ECF paper is made from chlorine derivates that reduce but not eliminate dioxin pollution.
Unlike PCF paper that has been bleached with oxygen-based compounds and provides a better option.
Use paper that is not dyed, except for light or pastel colors, because fluorescent and dark colors make
paper harder to recycle.

For some projects, consider the use of tree-free paper, which can be made from crops such as cotton,
soybeans and wheat. This paper is acid free and requires fewer chemicals and less energy to produce
than paper from tree pulp. Unfortunately, it is more expensive and often needs to be imported.
If the use of virgin paper is unavoidable, be sure that it is certified by the Forest Stewardship Council.
Consult printers as to how to maximize parent sheets of paper to ensure that there is minimal waste.

Good to know: The EPA guidelines for recycled paper are 30% post consumer-recycled fiber (PCRF) for
uncoated sheets and 10% PCRF for coated sheets. However, when considering the environment, the post
consumer waste (PCW) content is a more important number because that is what impacts our landfills.
Good to know: Keep in mind that recycled papers may require a longer lead time when ordering.

Soy or Vegetable Based Inks Respond
Not only do soy and vegetable based inks come from renewable resources, unlike petroleum based inks,
they are also better for the environment. They do not contain the toxins and carcinogens that petroleum-
based inks do. In addition, they break down faster and are easier to remove during the recycling process.
These inks have earned an industry wide reputation for their outstanding press performance, forgiving
nature, and consistently accurate color reproduction. Drying time and prevailing conditions play an
integral role in the type of ink that produces successful results.

Good to know: Colors made with heavy metals such as lead, cadmium, mercury, and hexavalent chrome are
toxic to the environment. Consult your printer on less toxic inks.

Utilize Bio-degradable Coatings
For projects that require a coating on the finished product, such as book covers and brochures, look for
bio-degradable coatings. These are gentler on the environment and easier to recycle. Use non-catalytic
cured, water-based lacquer coatings.

Good to know: Embossing, instead of foil stamping, reduces waste.

Explore Recycled Binding Options
Glue and adhesives often used for perfect binding can be toxic and cannot be recycled. Explore more
sustainable mechanical binding methods such as uncoated wire-o, GBC made from PVC plastic, as well as
plastic coil. Three-ring binders can be used/recycled and are a good option for handbooks and reports.

Good to know: Look for recycled plastic coil. These usually come in dark neutral colors and can contain as
much as 80% post-consumer waste plastic, making it a green alternative to other binding options.




                                                                                                             273
Know the Numbers
When trying to incorporate greener printing, it is helpful to print only the exact number of copies needed.
Wait to print materials onsite when you know exactly how many copies are needed and print employee
handouts and forms on an as-needed basis, eliminating waste and reducing cost.

Good to know: Using less paper and making fewer copies saves energy and reduces air
pollution. Photocopiers use more toxic ink and produce more volatile organic compounds.

Printing Chemicals
Chemicals used on the press can also include VOCs. However, there are now press chemicals that contain
a low VOC content.

Good to know: Ask your printer about what chemicals he or she uses.

Digital Printing
For low quantity jobs (up to 1,000) consider high speed digital printing. Digital printing uses a direct to
paper process eliminating pre-press work and press set-up and often offers a quicker turn-around time
than offset printing. It can provide a high-quality copy on the first page, reducing paper waste. It also
works well for on-demand printing eliminating the need for storing large quantities of documents.
However, with digital printing there are limited paper and finishing choices available as well as a limited
selection of material sizes, styles, and formats.

Good to know: Use high speed digital printing for quantities less than 1000.

Multicolor Printing
There may be times when traditional lithographic process will work best for your project. However, as
you design your project, keep in mind this process generates a higher amount of wasted press plates, ink,
cleaning solutions, and paper. A full color photo in a printed page will require the use of four press plates,
four different ink colors, clean-up on four printing units, and the additional paper waste to set the ink
color registration and balance.

Good to know: By using smart design techniques you can minimize the waste the project will generate.

Electronic Publishing
When developing a project consider publishing the document on the Internet. This could eliminate the
need for printing as well as save money. Another option would be to print part of the document and
publish part of it on the Internet. You can then use the printed piece to drive users to the web. This could
reduce the size and cost of your printed piece. Both options work well especially when the information
frequently needs to be updated.

Good to know: Print part of the document and publish part of it on the Internet. This is best for documents
which need updating.

Selecting a Printer
To the extent you can, work with printers who are aware of their impact on the environment and take
deliberate steps to minimize that impact. This includes reducing harmful air emission and air toxics,
decreasing chemical use and discharges to sewers, cutting printing and paper waste, being in compliance
with environmental and health and safety regulations and minimizing the shop’s energy consumption.

                                                                                                           274
Good to know: If you are contracted with printers who do not have strong environmental practices, let them
know that in future bids it is something you will be requesting.

Packaging
When developing a project consider what impact your packaging options have on the environment.
Consider packaging products that reduce overall waste and use fewer resources. Assess your packaging
options using the “waste hierarchy” (reduce, reuse, recycle). In order to reduce your packaging, favor
zero packaging or less material where appropriate. Try to reuse packaging that cannot be avoided or
reduced but favor packaging that is or can be reused (e.g. containers picked up by supplier). Try to
recycle where reuse is impracticable. For example, favor packaging that is made from recycled material
and/or material that can be easily recycled (e.g. packaging made from a single recyclable material rather
than multiple materials), look for the recycling symbol, the plastics coding symbol (on plastic packaging
only), a “do the right thing” anti-litter symbol, use items that are less likely to result in litter (loose-fill
foam packing should be avoided, if possible) and look for companies that document additional
environmental benefits of their products or superior performance of their companies (Documentation
could include environmental management systems certified to ISO 14001, public environmental
reporting, etc.).

Good to know: Assess your packaging options using the “waste hierarchy” (reduce, reuse, recycle).

Film Retention/Disposal
There are a lot of chemicals associated with the use of films for printing publications. When working
with a vendor, give consideration to if the printer will retain the films made for your publication or
supply them to you for retention.

Good to know: Consider using printers who use direct-to-plate technology.

Glues
When planning your project, try to specify glues which emit no VOCs in the process and ones which are
able to be recycled. Water based, non-chlorinated glues are a good example. Use glues with fewer
solvents to reduce problems with recycling.

Good to know: Consider printing mailing information directly on envelopes or brochures.

Greening your Promotional Items
If you order promotional items for your department, there are several lines of recycled products
available. To qualify as eco-friendly, a product must be recycled, sustainable, non-polluting or organic.
Items made of recycled materials include bags and totes, which are also classified as reusable.
Other reusable products are sport bottles, cups and mugs, some of which are now being processed from
recycled post-industrial plastics. The recycled content is first-use industrial regrind and has no post-
consumer content. This meets all household product guidelines. New technology has created methods for
more consistency in colors other than black. Now plastic bottles and cups are available in dark blue, dark
green, tan, and gray, although some slight variations will occur.

Travel mugs made from stainless steel are recyclable after they have served their original purpose of a
reusable item.
    Bamboo is a highly renewable resource and is replacing the use of wood in products such as
       cheese boards and the handles on grilling tools.

                                                                                                             275
      Other eco-friendly items offer sustainable and non-polluting energy. Flashlights powered by either
       cranking or pumping operate without the use of batteries. Solar panels allow for daytime charging
       on flashlights and radios.
      Another idea to promote environmental awareness is to encourage individual organic practices by
       giving away gardening products.
      One environmentally-minded company practices Carbon-Free Shipping, or net neutral shipping.
       This follows the Carbonfund.org program of using carbon offsets equivalent to the CO2 produced
       as a byproduct of deliveries in North America.

Good to know: To qualify as eco-friendly, a product must be recycled, sustainable, non-polluting or organic.
Good to know: Research companies which provide carbon-free shipping.

Best Practices:
    If Federal funds are used for a project, then Federal guidelines must be followed
          o http://www.acquisition.gov/FAR/current/pdf/FAR.pdf.
    Update mailing lists and delete duplicates.
    Advocate “passing it on,” i.e. pass a reduced number of documents around rather than printing for
      everyone in an office/area.
    Encourage readers to find out how to properly recycle the published piece when they are done
      with it.
    Use local printers to yield a lower carbon footprint.
    To ensure wastes are being properly managed and reduced investigate using water-based
      adhesives instead of solvent-based. This can reduce air emissions.
    Labeling options will vary depending on the paper stock and intended use. Ask about options
      which minimize adhesives and solvent based glues.
    Design multifunctional projects, e.g. selfmailer/program combos to economize when using more
      expensive paper.
    Combine projects.
Resources:
    http://www.p2pays.org/ref%5C07/06762/#50
    From “Commercial Printing Industry – Compliance & Pollution Prevention Workbook” Chapter 5
      ‘Identifying & Implementing Best Management Practices & Pollution Prevention Opportunities’
      Post-Press http://www.pprc.org/pubs/workbook/print5.pdf
    From “The Blue Ribbon Task Force Print Buyer Guidelines”
      http://www.p2pays.org/ref%5C07/06762/#50
    From
      http://www.environment.gov.au/settlements/publications/government/purchasing/pubs/printi
      ng.pdf
    Gipper’s guide: http://www.pmac.ca/PDF/gipper.pdf -
    From U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
      http://yosemite1.epa.gov/oppt/eppstand2.nsf/Pages/ListTables.html?Open&Services%20Store&
      Printing%20Services&Type=A

Contract Language:
“All departments, offices and agencies shall, whenever cost effective and to the extent reasonably
practicable, use and require their contractors to use environmentally preferred products in the
performance of their contracts with the State.”

                                                                                                          276
                                                                            Revised: June, 2010




                          Designing Sustainable Learning Resources



Departments are now required to consider sustainability criteria in all procurement decisions.
Departments must to the best of their ability, use the sustainable criteria outlined in this tip
sheet in their procurement decisions.

SOCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES
Learning service providers design and print hundreds of item s every year, from brochures and
guides to workbooks, and reports. The amount of energy and materials used in the printing of
these documents has implications for air and water quality, waste disposal and energy use.
These im pacts can all be reduced by printing only what you need and by designing and
specifying sustainable print jobs.

BEST PRACTICES FOR FACILITATORS AND LEARNING SERVICE PROVIDERS
•    Consider whether documents need to be printed at all. Online documents are easy to
     update and can be more convenient to file and use over time.
•    Project or post the agenda in the room rather than printing it
•    Print only the resources that will actually be used during an event (e.g., worksheets,
     case studies etc.) post other resources and reference material on line or distribute
     electronically.
•    Consider electronic formats such as thumb drives or m ini CDs for large documents.
•    Avoid printing slide decks and note pages - advise participants that they will be posted on
      line.
•    Project rather than print working documents during meetings and edit in real-tim e.

Photocopied and D igitally Printed Resources

Digital printing typically has a fast turnaround time, allow s you to print on demand and to
custom ize your m aterials for different audiences. Digital printing also allow s for easy double-
sided printing (duplexing) and collation. Consider digital printing when you m ay require m
ultiple print runs. The follow ing tips w ill help m ake your print job m ore sustainable:

•     Request copy paper that is certified as having com e from a responsibly m anaged
      fibre source. Copy paper certified by FSC or SFI is readily available from Nova Scotia
      paper distributors.
•     If certified paper is unavailable, request that the copy paper used has at least 30% post
      consum er recycled content. Note: The best choice is paper that is both certified and
      contains post consum er fibre but it can be m ore difficult to find.
•     Choose uncoated paper document covers that can be recycled.
•     If bindings are needed, choose staples or bindings that can be rem oved for
      docum ent recycling.
                                                                                                  277
Commercially Printed Resources
Planning the Job

Commercial offset printing is typically used for larger print jobs that include one or m ore
colour inks. How ever, m any publications becom e out-dated quickly. W hile a few thousand
extra copies add m inim al cost to the job they often end up as w aste. To m ake your print job
m ore sustainable;
•     estim ate quantities for print jobs accurately, and
•      if you plan to print in bulk consider w hat inform ation is likely to becom e dated and
       look at alternative ways that this inform ation can be provided (insert, w ebsite
       reference etc.).

Design Considerations
•      Design docum ents to be double sided and where practical reduce m argin size and
unnecessary w hite space.
•      Design docum ents to fit standard paper sizes w henever possible.
•      Avoid bleeds in both colour and black and white docum ents. A “bleed” is w hen the
       ink is printed up to the edge of the paper. Bleeds require trim m ing to produce a final
       copy, w hich creates ink and paper w aste.
•      Request the m inim um am ount of ink coverage on docum ent covers and graphics.
•      If choice of specific ink colour is not critical to your design, choose standard colours over
m ixed (Pantone)
       colours w henever possible.
•      Ask for PDF proofs rather than printed proofs.

Production and Assem bly
•      Use FSC C ertified paper and ask for paper w ith that has post consum er recycled content w
hen possible.
•      Use FSC certified printers w hen possible (see Term s and Definitions below for m ore
inform ation).
•      Request the low est paper w eight that is suitable for the printed product. Using lighter w
       eight papers conserves resources and can cut shipping costs.
•      Talk to your printer about using agri or vegetable-based inks. Both standard and Pantone
colours are available.
•      Ask your printer if recycled black ink is available.
•      Choose uncoated paper docum ent covers that can be recycled.
•      If bindings are needed, choose staples or bindings that can be rem oved for docum ent
recycling.
•      If adhesives are needed, request w ater-based non-chlorinated glues.
•      Ask for m inim al packaging for shipping and elim inate shrink w rapping w here possible.

TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
Post-consum er recycled paper - contains m aterials that have been reclaim ed from the hom e
or com m ercial w aste stream , such as recycled office paper and then used as a substitute for
raw m aterials in a m anufacturing process. Recycled paper - paper that is sim ply identified as
“recycled paper” or m ade from “recycled fibers” is usually m ade from paper that has been
recovered during the m anufacturing process before it reaches the consum er. This includes
trim w astes and wastes from pulp and paper m ills. M any com m ercially available papers
                                                                                                   278
contain both types of recycled paper. The exact fibre content is typically stated on the
packaging.

Third Party Certified Paper - W here possible ensure that the paper used in printed docum ents
is sourced from sustainably m anaged forests w hich are certified by independent, third party,
forestry certification program s such as the Forestry Stew ardship Council (FSC) and the
Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI). Printers can be certified by FSC as
w ell. To print the FSC logo on a printed docum ent, the docum ent m ust be printed on FSC
certified paper and m ust be printed by a printer that has an FSC C hain of Custody Certification.
For a list of FSC certified printers in Nova Scotia see w w w .fsccanada.o rg/F SCPrinters.htm

GOVERNMENT TAKING ACTION
The governm ent of Nova Scotia purchases over 10,000 cartons of w hite letter size copy paper
each year for use in all departm ents. The specification for this paper requires that, at a m inim
um , this paper be 3 rd party certified by FSC or SFI and com e from responsibly m anaged
forests. In addition, The Queens Printer (the Governm ent in-house print shop) is a FSC Chain
of Custody Certified printer. W hen requested the Queens Printer can produce FSC certified
print jobs bearing the FSC logo.




                                                                                                     279
                  Energy Saving Vending Machine Services Contract Ideas, July 2010
3 Posts
Original Posting:
Hi folks- I'd like to hear implementation feedback from agencies that have included environmental
specifications for vending machine services for large, multi-machine type (drink and food) service
contracts. We are considering including Energy Star requirements for cold beverage machines and having
all machines delivered without lamps. We have considered allowing vendors to reduce energy with
external devices like Vending Misers, but feel there is too much potential for them to be disconnected,
thus negating the energy saving potential.

I have two specific questions for those who have included these requirements:
1) We currently use a number of small local vending companies to service approximately 50 facilities
located in 8 cities across the County. Has the smaller vendors’ ability to provide Energy Star machines
(whether built to Energy Star or refurbished) been a problem for other agencies and are they readily
available at reasonable cost?
2) Beyond some grumbling, has there been any negative outcome from having no lamps in your vending
machines (i.e. smaller sales volume due to customers thinking machine is broken). Have you
implemented the lamping requirement differently based on whether the public has access to it or done
anything else to try to mitigate possible impacts?

I’d appreciate seeing your contract language and hearing about your implementation strategies and
experiences. Also, if you achieved energy savings through other means not listed above (including
through energy misers or snack misers), that would be great to hear. Thanks!
Karen Cook | Sustainability Project Manager, LEED AP
County of Alameda, General Services Agency
(510) 208-9754 | www.acsustain.org

Responses:
1. Possible idea? VendingMiser® uses a Passive Infrared Sensor to:
   a. Power down the machine when the surrounding area is vacant
   b. Monitor the room's temperature
   c. Automatically repower the cooling system at one- to three-hour
   d. intervals, independent of sales
   e. Ensure the product stays cold
2. Our snack machines have LED lights. Our beverage machines were recently replaced with Energy Star
labeled machines that have energy saving technology built in that is similar to the VendingMiser retrofit.
The new machines will turn off the lights and the refrigeration after a certain amount of time of inactivity.
They are purported to learn patterns so that eventually they will know to shut down and restart on a
schedule that it learns from user behavior. We have yet to see how this works out in practice.
Chris O'Brien, Director of Sustainability
Office of Sustainability
American University
202.885.2682 (ph)
www.american.edu/sustainability
www.twitter.com/GreenAU



                                                                                                         280
                                   Cooperatively Bid RFPs, August 2010
2 Posts
Original Posting:
Hi Folks - Does anyone have bid or contract documents they can share of a cooperatively bid request for
proposal? Our purchasing division is preparing a solicitation on behalf of several other agencies in the
region (including our own) for electric vehicles and would like to see examples to model as they have
little experience in managing cooperative bids. Please send them to me at karen.cook(at)acgov.org.
Thanks!
Karen Cook
Sustainability Project Manager
Alameda County, General Services Agency
510-208-9754
Response:
Here’s an approach to cooperative procurement that may work in your situation. The State of Missouri
maintains a list of eligible cooperative procurement organizations – usually tax-supported entities. I
believe a cooperative procurement clause is contained in most RFPs issued by the state. For additional
info or clarification please contact Liz.Palazzolo@oa.mo.gov or 573-751-4885

From a Buyer's perspective, we open up the opportunity to the vendor who can say yes/no about extending
the contract to co-ops. From there on out it's usually invisible to the Buyer although with the fleet vehicles
contracts, the Buyer fields a lot of questions from co-ops.

Cooperative Procurement Program: If the contractor has indicated agreement on the Pricing Page with
participation in the Cooperative Procurement Program, the contractor shall provide {name the
commodity/service being procured} as described herein under the terms and conditions, requirements and
specifications of the contract, including prices, to other government entities in accordance with the
Technical Services Act (section 67.360, RSMo, which is available on the internet
at: http://www.moga.mo.gov/statutes/c000-099/0670000360.htm.) The contractor shall further
understand and agree that participation by other governmental entities is discretionary on the part of that
governmental entity and the State of Missouri bears no financial responsibility for any payments due the
contractor by such governmental entities.

Local Government Use (Cooperative Procurement): The bidder should indicate agreement/disagreement to
participate in the State of Missouri's Cooperative Procurement Program as described herein.
Yes    No

Rob Didriksen, Coordinator, Missouri State Recycling Program
Office of Administration
PO Box 809, Jefferson City MO 65102
http://www.oa.mo.gov/purch/recypro.html
phone: 573-751-3384 fax: 573-526-9815




                                                                                                            281
                 Health care provided to the employees of your vendors, August 2010
2 Posts

Original Posting:
We are implementing our newly launched Sustainable Purchasing Policy and so far things are going well.

We now have an interest in raising the bar a bit on the social equity aspect of it. Has anyone included in
their solicitations a question about the health care provided by the vendor to its employees? If so, how
did you phrase the question and how did you evaluate the answers you got?

Today is my last day at Multnomah County, so sending answers to our Purchasing Manager, Brian Smith,
[brian.r.smith@co.multnomah.or.us] would be appreciated.

Thanks to all and it’s been great getting all these epp.net emails full of incredibly valuable information.

Janna E. Allgood
Multnomah County Purchasing
Sustainable Purchasing Coordinator
NWSA AmeriCorps Member
503-988-5111 x 25906 (office)
503-988-3252 (fax)
703-587-0992 (mobile)

Response:
Janna, The City of Portland has an “Equal Benefits” requirement for its contractors. More information at:
http://www.portlandonline.com/omf/index.cfm?c=43774&. While it does not mandate health care
coverage, it does require that if a company makes benefits available to an employee’s spouse, then they
have to make it available to an employee’s domestic partner.
-Stacey
City of Portland, Oregon




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                                   Trade show displays, August 2010
2 Posts

Original Posting:
Hello, Has anyone sourced “green” trade show displays? Recycled content, recyclable, less-toxic inks,
etc. What have you found?
Thanks,
-Stacey Foreman
City of Portland, Oregon, Procurement Services
stacey.foreman@portlandoregon.gov

Response:
Hi Stacey, I had saved this from an EPPNet posting from 2004:
Perhaps your need for information only affects displays, but should you be organizing the trade show, for
the U.S. Department of Energy Pollution Prevention conferences, we have incorporated EPP in our
contracts for facilities in which we held DOE trade shows and conferences and in the contracts with
vendors leasing space. This affects the types of products vendors are allowed to display and handouts
they might be giving away, all food being served in durable (not disposable) containers, .... Building EPP
into the contract up front is the key. Good luck!

Sandra Cannon, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Technical Assistance for the U.S.
Department of Energy
Tel. 509-529-1535

Thank you Sandra,
We are working to green the events as well.... this particular tradeshow decorator is positioning itself as
the first 'green' service provider in their industry. They don't organize the events, all they can do is
provide what they provide in a green manner. I'm thinking they want to partner with a company that
makes eco-friendly displays so they can then package that together when working with conference
organizers.

Thanks to everyone for all of the great information! I love eppnet ;)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmentally Preferable Purchasing (EPP) program has a
"green" booth. As I recall, the booth also includes a sign explaining some of the environmentally
preferable features. For additional info, try contacting Holly Elwood elwood.holly@epa.gov or Julie
Shannon shannon.julie@epa.gov

I believe the booth was designed by ERG, a government contracting firm where I worked for years and
where I still do some consulting. ERG does tons of different things, including communications work. They
have designed several EPA booths. Try contacting Linda Cook linda.cook@erg.com, the head of the
graphics department. She might have some recommendations. Hope this helps.
Scot Case, Director of Procurement Strategies
Center for a New American Dream
505 Penn Street, Suite 306
Reading, PA 19601
610 373-7703
scot@newdream.org www.newdream.org/procure
                                                                                                         283
Biobased cleaners, August 2010
4 Posts

Original Posting:
Hi, We are looking for reliable sources of information on biobased commercial janitorial cleaners as
opposed to non-biobased. Does anyone have resources or studies addressing their preferability in the
marketplace? Thanks,
Beth
Beth Eckl
Director, Environmental Purchasing Program
Practice Greenhealth
(866) 598-2240
beckl@practicegreenhealth.org

Responses:
1. It is my understanding that a company called Spartan purposefully chose to offer biobased cleaning
products as their green cleaning strategy. I would perhaps look them up and call to inquire.
Karl

2. Spartan does make a line of products called BioPreffered and have national distribution which would
make it easy for purchasers regardless of what part of the country you may be in.

Just keep in mind that while being biobased may be preferable because it is made from renewable
resources, but as you know that doesn’t mean that they are necessarily safe for either human health or
the environment. So make sure that you check it out thoroughly.

Steve
Stephen P. Ashkin, President
The Ashkin Group LLC - The Green Cleaning Experts
3644 Tamarron Drive Bloomington, IN 47408
Phone: (812) 332-7950 Fax: (812) 332-7965
Email: SteveAshkin@AshkinGroup.com
Visit us at: www.AshkinGroup.com

3. We sponsored a life cycle assessment study on a few different types of general purpose cleaning
products, including a biobased product, several years ago. You can contact me directly if you would like a
copy. In terms of identifying specific biobased products, you can go to the catalog at USDA's BioPreferred
Web site to find products that qualify for USDA's BioPreferred program
(http://www.catalog.biopreferred.gov/bioPreferredCatalog/faces/jsp/catalogLanding.jsp).
Jim Darr, Chemist
US EPA
Pollution Prevention Division
darr.james@epa.gov




                                                                                                         284
                 Contract language for inclusion in EPA EPP Database, August 2010
2 Posts

Original Posting:
The US EPA is updating the contract language portion of the Database of Environmental Information for
Products and Services (EPP Database) on our EPP website http://yosemite1.epa.gov/oppt/eppstand2.nsf
or navigate from www.epa.gov/epp) and is interested in reviewing current contract language being used
by government agencies (federal, state, or local) to solicit and contract for environmentally preferable
goods and services. If you have such language to share via the Internet, please send the link to me. Please
keep in mind that any information posted on the EPA EPP website is freely available to the public.

Thanks,
Jim Darr, Chemist
US EPA
Pollution Prevention Division
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program
Darr.james@epa.gov
202-564-8841

Response:
See http://www.ogs.state.ny.us/EO/4/ApprovedSpecs.asp.




                                                                                                       285
                     Carpet & Resilient Flooring Specifications, September 2010
3 Posts

Original Posting:
Hi all, We are rebidding our Carpet and Resilient Flooring contract and would like to strengthen the
environmental specifications used in the previous contract . We will be addressing recycled content, VOC
content, and end-of-life management. Any examples of environmental specifications used to bid
successful contracts would be very helpful! My contact information is listed below. Thanks! Have a great
day,
Johanna
Johanna Kertesz
Integrated Solid Waste Management Unit
Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
(651) 757-2489
johanna.kertesz@state.mn.us
www.pca.state.mn.us/epp
www.rethinkrecycling.com/government/eppg

Responses:
1. A note about wording that we learned: If you want “recycled content” to be content from carpet fiber,
as opposed to recycled content from other products (such as pop bottles or pvc backing), do be explicit.
You might, for example, state “recycled carpet fiber content”… Or you might provide separate criteria for
“recycled content from carpet fiber”, “recycled content from carpet”, “recycled content regardless of
source,” etc.

Shirli Axelrod
Waste Prevention and Green Purchasing
Seattle Public Utilities
PO Box 34018
700 Fifth Avenue, Suite 4900
Seattle, WA 98124-4018
Phone: 206-684-7804
E-mail: shirli.axelrod@seattle.gov

2. Johanna, There are new NSF/ANSI sustainability assessment standards for both carpet & resilient floor
coverings. These standards address a number of environmental impact areas such as energy and
materials use (including recycled content), end-of-life management, hazardous chemicals use, and VOC
emissions. The standards have multiple levels of achievement, i.e. silver, gold, platinum. I think that the
state of California is now specifying "NSF 140 Platinum" for their carpet purchases. Brief descriptions of
the standards from the ANSI website are shown below. The documents themselves are copyrighted, so I
can't just send you copies, but I participated on the committees that developed these standards and will
be glad to answer questions or provide more details to you.
Darr James, EPA




                                                                                                         286
              Manufacturers for Trash Liners with 10% or 20% PCRC, September 2010
2 Posts

Original Posting:
Hello All, I'm looking for some manufacturers who sell trash liners with either 10% or 20% PCRC. Any
suggestions?

Thanks,
Jonathan
Jonathan Rifkin, Special Assistant to the Director
Office of Contracting and Procurement
One Judiciary Square, 441 4th St, NW, Suite 700S
Washington, DC 20001
Ph: 202-724-3676
E-Mail: Jonathan.rifkin@dc.gov

Response:
EPA list 29 suppliers of recycled content plastic trash bags on our CPG web page go to
http://cpg.epa.tms.icfi.com/user/cpg_list.cfm the select Product, scroll down to Plastic Trash Bags and
click on Search at the bottom of the page. Also Check page 17 of the Recycled Product Guide on line at
http://www.recycleminnesota.org/images/RecProdCon.pdf

Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
Office of Materials Management, EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3LC40)
Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3163
giuranna.mike@epa.gov




                                                                                                       287
                               Green hand soap packaging, October 2010
3 Posts

Original Posting:
Hello, Does anyone currently use a Green Seal or EcoLogo certified hand soap (for restrooms and break
rooms) that minimizes packaging through bulk refills (non-individually packaged refills)?

AND/OR

Does anyone have any data on which would be preferable from an overall waste reduction viewpoint?
1 – individual refills packaged in recyclable rigid containers
2 – individual refills packaged in non-recyclable “pouch” containers (but uses less plastic than rigid
containers per Green Seal/EcoLogo requirements)

Thank you in advance.
-Stacey
Stacey Foreman
Sustainable Procurement Coordinator
City of Portland, Oregon, Procurement Services
stacey.foreman@portlandoregon.gov

Responses:
1. Stacey, soap dispensers that allow you to refill from gallon-or-more containers of liquid soap allowing
you to purchase from Wal-Mart of whoever you choose are by far the best choice. See
greenhotels.com/catalog/misc.php.

Patty Griffin, "Green" Hotels Assn

2. Some data which I have seen indicates that bacteria can grow inside a bulk hand soap dispenser. And
from personal observations, I have seen all kinds of “nasty” stuff inside a bulk hand soap dispenser upon
opening to refill them such as bugs (i.e. flies) and cigarette butts. In my opinion, bulk soap dispensers are
preferable as long as they are removed from the wall or counter and thoroughly cleaned, which should be
done at least monthly. And I really do mean “cleaned”, not merely emptied and refilled.

In my opinion, bulk soap dispensers certainly are less expensive if we only consider the cost of the
soap. But “closed” systems reduce the overall cost associated with cleaning the dispensers (i.e. labor
cost) and reduce risks to occupants and guests from exposure to contaminated soaps.

For anyone looking for more specific data on this, trying “Googling” Dr. Charles Gerba at the University of
Arizona. He has done a lot or research on this.

Steve




                                                                                                          288
    Environmentally "Best” disposable cups for Bottled water cooler/dispenser, October 2010
2 Posts

Original Posting:
Can anyone recommend the "best' disposable cups (recycled content/compostable/paper, etc.) for a
bottled water cooler/dispenser in the fitness center in our building. They were using Styrofoam cups and
reusable cups were suggested, which some bring but a lot of people don't so we need to buy some
reasonably priced paper cups, hopefully with recycled content.

Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
Office of Materials Management, EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3LC40)
Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3163
giuranna.mike@epa.gov

Response:
http://www.freshwatersystems.com/c-429-water-cups.aspx?gclid=CP7HnJz-zaQCFQNM5Qodc2cAjA
These coned shaped cups are small and sure you can purchase in bulk

Best regards,
Deborah
Deborah Robbins,
VP Business Development & Sustainability
Headquarters and Main Plant:
75 Michigan Street
Lockport, NY 14094-2629 - USA
Office #: 716-478-0404 - Ext #303
Fax #: 716-478-0408
Cell #: 716-474-1303
Toll Free #:866-424-6981
mailto:Deborah@RubberForm.com




                                                                                                     289
                          Seeking alternative deicing products, October 2010
5 Posts

Original Posting:
I have been extensively researching both the issues and product alternatives for snow and ice deicers and
anti-icing agents. I am seeking products for use on new concrete as well as for the parking lot.

Since there are no third party certifications for these products, I am at a loss at how to select the
alternatives available since there are so many pros and cons. I am seeking this information for both a city
agency and a state agency. Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated.

Lynn Rose
3 McClelland Farm Road, Deerfield, MA 01342
Phone and Fax (call first): 1-413-774-6540
Cell: 1-413-522-5525
Email: lynnfaith@comcast.net

Responses:
1. Check this out-supposed to be very "Green" http://www.magicsalt.info/Magic%20Salt.htm

Regards,
Deborah
Deborah Robbins,
VP Business Development & Sustainability
Headquarters and Main Plant:
75 Michigan Street
Lockport, NY 14094-2629 - USA
Office #: 716-478-0404 - Ext #303
Fax #: 716-478-0408
Cell #: 716-474-1303
Toll Free #:866-424-6981
mailto:Deborah@RubberForm.com

2. Thanks, I have the product MSDS and it has sodium chloride in it which has been processed to reduce
its environmental impacts and work more effectively. It is still a salt based product so I was unsure about
it. I am open to discussion.

Lynn Rose
3 McClelland Farm Road, Deerfield, MA 01342
Phone and Fax (call first): 1-413-774-6540
Cell: 1-413-522-5525
Email: lynnfaith@comcast.net

3. I use it at work and home. My friend who has a landscaping/plowing business swears by it.
Regards,
Deborah

4. MA has a contract for alternative deicers. At the moment it is limited, but we hope to re-open. In an
effort to use an independent standard that includes environmental criteria (as well as performance) in
                                                                                                           290
their review process we referenced the Pacific Northwest Snow Fighters (PNS) specifications. We said
that the product must appear on their approved list that is posted on their website:
http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/partners/pns/.

Marcia Deegler
Director of Environmental Purchasing
Operational Services Division
One Ashburton Place, Room 1017
Boston, MA 02108-1552
617-720-3356, 617-727-4527 fax
marcia.deegler@state.ma.us
Visit the EPP Website at www.mass.gov/epp




                                                                                                       291
                 City of Portland Posts Green Specification Examples, October 2010

Hello, The City of Portland, Oregon now has example “green” specifications from City solicitation
documents on the City’s website.
http://www.portlandonline.com/omf/index.cfm?c=53454& (or go to
www.portlandonline.com/buygreen and click on “Buying Green Example Specifications”)

Procurement professionals looking for commodity-specific ITB or RFP “green” specifications can now
download example language used by the City of Portland. The following examples are currently posted;
we will post more examples as we continue to issue solicitations with “green” specifications.

      Chairs - Task Intensive
      Construction - emissions & waste reduction
      Diesel Emission Retrofit Devices
      Ecoroofs
      Food Waste & Recycling Containers
      Hauling - Stormwater Residuals
      Laundry and Uniform Services
      LED Modules for Traffic Signals
      Paper & Business Envelopes (Misc.)
      Promotional Items
      Resource Management Services

Please contact me with any questions and feedback. Thank you!

-Stacey
Stacey Foreman, LEED Green Assoc.
Sustainable Procurement Coordinator
City of Portland, Oregon, Procurement Services
stacey.foreman@portlandoregon.gov
www.portlandonline.com/buygreen




                                                                                                    292
                           Accelerated hydrogen peroxide, November 2010
2 Posts

Original Posting:
Maryland's State Parks are using green cleaning supplies whenever possible, but have not yet found a
good green substitute for chlorine bleach as a disinfectant. They tried an accelerated hydrogen peroxide
(AHP) product, but found that in their situation it left a film they deemed unacceptable.

Can anyone offer a lead on a green replacement for bleach as a disinfectant? Is there much variety in AHP
products, or are they all pretty much the same? Thanks!

Rich Norling
Office for a Sustainable Future
Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources
410-260-8124
http://www.dnr.maryland.gov/sustainability/

Response:
I'm not real familiar with the AHP products, but I would expect that there may be some differences in the
other components of the formulation (surfactants, chelating agents, etc.) among different products.
Cleaning efficacy can at times be very specific to the surface being cleaned, i.e. certain types of
formulations work better on certain surfaces. Different types of products sometimes require different
work practices for optimal results, as well. Two of the major trade associations for cleaning products,
ISSA (www.issa.com) and The American Cleaning Institute (www.cleaninginstitute.org), have active
green cleaning programs and may be able to make some recommendations for your specific needs.

Jim Darr, Chemist
US EPA
Pollution Prevention Division
202-564-8841




                                                                                                      293
    The Curious Case of the TerraChoice 2010 Greenwashing Report & EPEAT, November 2010
2 Posts

Original Posting:
Hi Everybody, Thought you might be interested in my blog piece on the latest TerraChoice Greenwashing
Report and EPEAT.

TerraChoice Environmental Marketing recently released the latest in their series of Sins of Greenwashing
http://sinsofgreenwashing.org reports. Their TerraChoice Greenwashing Report 2010
http://sinsofgreenwashing.org/findings/greenwashing-report-2010 finds that 95 percent of green
product claims are misleading. There is good evidence that the report itself has become an example of
conflict of interest and greenwashing, especially in its omission of the green IT brand, EPEAT.

Find it at: The Curious Case of the TerraChoice 2010 Greenwashing Report and EPEAT
http://blog.techsoup.org/node/1502

-Jim
Jim Lynch
TechSoup Global
Director, Computer Recycling & Reuse Programs
Co-director, GreenTech Program
+1.415.633.9308 (office phone)   435 Brannan St. Suite 100
+1.415.633.9400 (fax)           San Francisco, CA 94107 USA
jlynch@techsoupglobal.org        www.techsoup.org/recycle www.techsoup.org/greentech

Response:
Jim – The labels included in TerraChoice's Sins of Greenwashing report www.sinsofgreenwashing.org)
are identified as consumer facing brands. The TerraChoice researchers did not find the EPEAT label
among any of the more than 5,000 products they found in any of the 24 stores they visited, which
included several well-known computer and monitor retailers.

Had TerraChoice focused on institutional buyers rather than consumers, EPEAT would have been
included. As for any potential conflicts of interest regarding the relationship between TerraChoice and
UL Environment, that relationship is fully disclosed in each edition of the Sins of Greenwashing report.
Any accusations that the decision to include or not include particular certification programs based on a
perceived conflict of interest are groundless and without merit.
       - Scot
Scot Case, Market Development Director
UL Environment
(e): scot.case@ulenvironment.com
(c): 610 781-1684




                                                                                                       294
                               Recycling at State Parks, December 2010
2 Posts

Original Post:
Good Morning, CT is getting ready to send out an RFB for recycling at the state parks. Our current
program has encountered a myriad of issues – mostly revolving around unacceptable levels of
contamination of the recyclables. We would really appreciate hearing about any park recycling
programs that have achieved a level of success in both participation rates and quality of recyclables
recovered. Are there any case studies out there that you could share?

Thank you,
Judy
Judy Belaval
CT DEP Office of Source Reduction and Recycling
(860) 424-3237

Response:
Judy, This question was asked on the JTR list serve last year, here are the responses:

Hi Everyone!! It's been a while since I posted on JTRnet! Hope everyone is doing well. I have a state
colleague who has contacted us asking for help identifying good examples of state park recycling
programs. If your state has a good program providing a contact or web
link would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

Pam Swingle, Manager, Office of Pollution Prevention and Innovation
EPA Region 4
61 Forsyth Street SW
Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Phone: (404) 562-8482 Email:
swingle.pamela@epa.gov

Since the Spring of 2008, all NYS agencies have been told to set the example, and establish and implement
programs that reduce waste created by 10% per year, recycle and buy environmentally-preferable goods.
To accomplish the goals of our Executive Order #4 (http://www.ogs.state.ny.us/EO/4/Default.asp ), each
agency was required to name a Sustainability Coordinator, who would develop that agency's
Sustainability Plan. The Sustainability Coordinator for the NYS Dept. of Parks, Recreation and Historic
Preservation is Rich Schiafo. I do not know how much headway he's been able to make within his
organization, but he's dedicated, energetic and creative and may have some good examples to share.
Happy Thanksgiving! Brenda G.

Rich Schiafo, Sustainability Coordinator
NYS Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation
Empire State Plaza
Agency Building 1
Albany, NY 12238 518-473-2163

Hi Pam, We are very interested in developing and promoting sustainability for the tourism industry in
North Carolina. One facet of our project will involve promoting sustainable state parks. NC DPPEA is
partnering with the Center for Sustainable Tourism at East Carolina University to assist parks and other
tourism-related facilities in becoming greener. Please share any information you gather with us. Thanks.
                                                                                                        295
Tom Rhodes, Environmental Specialist
NC Division of Pollution Prevention & Environmental Assistance
1639 Mail Service Center
Raleigh, NC 27699-1639
(919) 715-6516

Unilever Corp is working with 55 National Parks on a recycling project. Information about this project is
on their web site at: http://www.nationalparks.org/proudpartners/partner_unilever_rw.shtml
http://www.unilevernationalparks.com/
http://www.unilever.com/ourvalues/environmentandsociety/casestudies/Employees/usa_national_par
ks.asp

Region 8 did something with recycling at National Parks which is on their web site at
http://www.epa.gov/region08/conservation_recycling/natlpk.html

Over the past two years our state parks have been working on an initiative to implement biodiesel use in
all diesel powered equipment. The project has been very successful - I would be happy to discuss, feel
free to give me a call.

If interested here is a link to some of the green initiatives being undertaken at Michigan's state parks.
http://www.michigan.gov/dnr/0,1607,7-153-10365_37783---,00.html

Karen Edlin, Program Manager
Pollution Prevention and Compliance Assistance Section
Environmental Science and Services Division
Michigan Department of Environmental Quality
P.O. Box 30457
Lansing, MI 48909-7957
Phone: (517) 373-0604 Fax: (517) 241-7966 E-Mail: edlink@michigan.gov

Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
Office of Materials Management, EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3LC40)
Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3163
giuranna.mike@epa.gov




                                                                                                            296
                Recommend a good retail bag for use by an art gallery, December 2010
4 Posts

Original Post:
Hello - I am looking for suggestions for some type of eco-bag that an art gallery could use (selling
products from very light-weight to 20 pounds).

I have read about mold growth in reusable bags, lead content in some types, life cycle analysis on paper
vs. plastic, etc. Seems like there are a lot of different criteria and variables for a 'green bag', just a few of
which might be:
1 - will customers re-use?
2 - is it easily compostable/recyclable?
3 - post-consumer recycled content
4 - least toxic to environment (production and disposal)
5 - least toxic to customers (release lead, grow mold in the bag, what's in the ink, etc.)
6 - additional life cycle considerations (energy to produce, extraction of materials, disposal)

Anyway, amidst multiple selection parameters, can anyone recommend cloth, vs. reusable plastic, vs.
paper vs. plastic?

Does anyone know the types of bags that have been found with lead? (is it the shiny plastic type? and/or
- is the lead found in the ink or the plastic?)

Thanks in advance for any input.
Michelle Gaither | environmental engineer
1402 Third Ave, Suite 1420 | Seattle, WA 98101
T 206.352.2050 | F 206.352.2049| www.pprc.org
Twitter: twitter.com/PacNW_PPRC
LinkedIn Group: linkd.in/hjKoi3
Facebook Page: facebook.com/PacNW.PPRC
Pacific Northwest Pollution Prevention Resource Center (PPRC)

Responses:
1. Hi Michelle: We buy a number of bags as well and since the recent recalls I've also working my way
through the issue so I would be interested to hear what you find out.

No LCA data but here's what I've learned related to a couple of the questions in your email

Will consumers re-use - Re-usable bag campaigns were a common thing in both the public and private
sector for the last few years here in Nova Scotia. The bags played a prominent part in a couple of solid
waste reduction campaigns and we have a had a couple of local retailers "ban" and/or charge for
plastic bags.

How much use the bags got seems to depend on both the bag and the consumer. Anecdotally, I see more
use/re-use of cotton or nylon bags especially those that fold into a tiny pocket ( e.g., of the type below - no
endorsement of brand implied) ) than I do of larger heavier plastic/vinyl etc. bags that don't fold as well.

Additionally the cotton or nylon ones and even the recycled PET ones (basically a polyester cloth) can be
thrown in the washing machine to deal with food safety concerns whereas the heavier, plastic ones can't
                                                                                                               297
easily. That said - if the bags are washed frequently, the screen printing on cotton or canvas seems to
hold up to washing better than it does on the nylon and PET.

Lead (the recall issue)
The bags from the recalls (in Canada anyway) are a shiny plastic rather than a cloth like ag. Lead can
potentially arise from two sources - the screen printing inks used to apply the logos etc. and the plastic
bag itself (lead is used as a plasticizer in some types of processes). Not sure which was the actual source
in the recalled bags.

You can also get bags made from recycled PET (up to 100% I believe). I haven't been able to find out if
lead is ever used in this manufacturing process.

A final thought - A lot of promotional products are ordered pre-printed. You can specify the lower toxicity
inks but this may be difficult to verify if the bag is not being manufactured and screen printed
locally. One way around this is to source a suitable un-printed bag and it screen printed locally where
you can have more control over the printing process. We have used local screen printers and in some
cases local adult service centers (e.g., sheltered workshops to use the older term) to do some of
our screen printing to achieve a more sustainable product.

Hope this helps a bit anyway,
Lynda
Lynda Rankin, Manager, Sustainable Procurement Integration
Economic and Rural Development
PO Box 787
Halifax Nova Scotia
B3J 2V2
email: rankinlx@gov.ns.ca

2. Hi Michelle-This response is a little delayed, but just to add to what Lynda said below (that’s a lot of
great information) – my co-worker who has done some testing of reusable bags (for lead) said: The lead
issues with reusable bags have been not very widespread and variable. Sometimes it’s the ink, sometimes
the plastic. It means that it's hard to give good advice. We would always be happy to test a bag sample if
that would be helpful.

Her personal choice would be to go for organic cotton or recycled paper. Or reusable plastic that's made
from recycled plastic, but check it for lead. Again, if you are interested in testing a particular bag for lead,
you could send it to us.

Regards,     -Sue
Sue Chiang
Pollution Prevention Director
Center for Environmental Health
Office #: 510.655.3900 x311

3. The Toxics in Packaging in Clearinghouse (TPCH) and member states have been testing packaging for
a few years. TPCH was formed in 1992 to promote the Model Toxics in Packaging Legislation. This
model legislation was originally drafted in 1989. It was developed in an effort to reduce the amount of
heavy metals in packaging and packaging components that are sold or distributed throughout the United
States. Currently 19 states have toxics in packaging legislation. 10 of those states belong to TPCH.
                                                                                                              298
Packaging is tested for the four restricted metals in the model toxics in packaging legislation. If bags
made from recycled PVC are used, you will also need to check for cadmium.

One thing to consider is the country of origin. Most of the problems we’ve seen in the TPCH projects are
with imported packaging. TPCH publishes reports of its testing projects. Below is a summary of results of
samples with greater than 100 ppm of the restricted heavy metals. The latest report is at
http://www.toxicsinpackaging.org/docs/assessment_of_heavy_metals_in_packaging_09_update.pdf

See below.

 Table 4: Summary of          Samples        Mean       Median Range          Comments
 Results >100 ppm by          with >100      (ppm)      (ppm) (ppm)
 Restricted Heavy Metal       ppm
 Restricted                   Detected
 Metal
 Cadmium                      39             364        358       137 -       All samples were flexible
                                                                  687         PVC; at least 36 of the
                                                                              samples were imported
 Lead                         19             9,642      450       122 –       Found in inks, flexible PVC,
                                                                  150,388     and solder.
 Mercury                      2              214        214       170 –       Both samples were ink.
                                                                  258
 Chromium1                    14             1,002      318       131–   Most samples were inks on
                                                                  6,706  plastic, paper, or glass.
                                                                         Chromium was detected in
                                                                         only one glass (blue)
                                                                         sample.2
1 XRF measures total chromium, not hexavalent chromium (Cr+6), which is the regulated metal.
2 Chromium is most likely chromium oxide (Cr2O3).

Becky Jayne
Illinois Environmental Protection Agency
Office of Pollution Prevention
1021 N. Grand Ave East
Springfield, Illinois 62794
Becky.Jayne@illinois.gov
Phone: (217) 524-9642
Fax: (217) 557-2125




                                                                                                           299
                              Nontoxic railroad cross ties, January 2011
3 Posts

Original Posting:
Hello, Does anyone have an AREMA compliant specification for railroad cross ties that incorporates any
of the following? If so, would you please send a copy my way? Thank you.
1 – Least-toxic treatment/chemical for wooden ties (or prohibits certain kinds of chemical treatments)
2 – Treated-wood alternative (e.g. TimberSIL or composite ties)
3 – Specifications that incorporate sourcing wood from non-endangered forests (or FSC certified)

Thank you in advance,
-Stacey
Stacey Foreman, LEED Green Assoc.
Sustainable Procurement Coordinator
City of Portland, Oregon, Procurement Services
Ph: 503-823-3508
stacey.foreman@portlandoregon.gov
www.portlandonline.com/buygreen

Response:
1. “Green” Railroad Ties. Dynamic Composites LLC, a unit of Steel Dynamics, Inc. (SDI), has shipped the
first production order of its "green" composite railroad ties to BNSF Railway Co. After testing evaluation
quantities of these ties, BNSF placed an order for 4,000 units, the Columbia City, Indiana, based company
said. Nine railcar loads of ties were shipped to Texas. The ties are made from a variety of recycled
materials, including steel, rubber, and plastics. They are produced at a plant near SDI's Structural and
Rail mill.

The composite tie employs a core made of flat-rolled steel (provided by SDI's Flat Roll division) filled
with concrete, which in turn is encapsulated by a tough skin consisting of a blend of shredded tires and
recycled plastics. The company estimates the composite ties have a life-span of 60 years, offsetting the
cost difference of wood ties.

N. American Technologies sees improved third quarter
Aug. 18 -- North American Technologies Group Inc., which manufactures railroad ties from recycled
material, saw improved performance during its fiscal third quarter on more efficient operations and
better sales. The company reported a net income of $272,802, or 2 cents per diluted share, on revenue of
$8.1 million, for the quarter ended June 29, compared with a net loss of $1.8 million, or 20 cents per
diluted share, on revenue of $5.8 million for the third quarter of 2007.

"We believe that our customers are beginning to recognize the value proposition of our ties," said Rod
Wallace, president and CEO.

Irving, Texas-based North American Technologies Group produces railroad ties and other products
through its wholly owned subsidiary, TieTek, using recycled plastic and tires.

Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist, Office of Materials Management,
EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3LC40) Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3114 giuranna.mike@epa.gov
                                                                                                         300
2. Hello Stacey, Would your Agency consider the Rutgers patented plastic railroad ties that we have been
installing at military bases and Conrail (if so, we can send you the specs):
http://amipp.rutgers.edu/html/group_member_nosker_thomas.html (Tom is a colleague of mine and the
researcher behind the technology)
http://news.rutgers.edu/focus/issue.2009-02-02.4357742289/article.2009-02-02.6065738797
http://amipp.rutgers.edu/assets/documents/scholarlypubs/PerformanceBasedApproachPlasticCrosstie.
pdf

Here are some videos:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0hE-ymdio44&feature=related (bridge video)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3dD3ml_t77Y&playnext=1&list=PL2F6D8AE86D03E631&index=28
(railroad video)

Here is the company that we have transferred the license to: http://www.axionintl.com/
http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20110104005743/en/Axion-International-Announces-
Successful-Completion-Morocco-Rail
http://www.railresource.com/content/?p=949

Tom can give you a few Army Contract and Engineer contacts as well.

I conduct the supply chain and economic analysis research on these projects.

K
Kevin Lyons, Ph.D.
Chief Procurement Officer/Executive Director, Procurement and Contracting
Research Professor, Supply Chain Environmental Archeology, Rutgers Business School
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Administrative Services Building III
3 Rutgers Plaza
New Brunswick, NJ 08903
732-932-4375 ext. 2301
732-932-4390 (fax)
klyons@rci.rutgers.edu




                                                                                                     301
                                Cleaning Railroad Yards, January 2011
3 Posts

Original post:
We are working to clean up 12 hazardous waste sites at an active 150 acre railroad yard and to
implement P2 alternatives wherever possible. I would appreciate any information not included in this
email that you have on alternatives that I could present to the RR.
Thank you for your time.

Lynn Rose
3 McClelland Farm Road, Deerfield, MA 01342
Phone and Fax (call first): 1-413-774-6540
Cell: 1-413-522-5525
Email: lynnfaith@comcast.net

Responses:
1. Hi Lynn- If you haven’t checked out USEPA’s website on greener site remediation
http://www.clu-in.org/greenremediation/

Delta has developed a short guide for greener site remediation based on EPA and other info. A version is
on our website at: http://delta-institute.org/greeneconomy

Best, Abby
Abigail Corso, P.E.
Delta Institute
53 W Jackson Blvd | Suite 230 | Chicago, IL 60604
acorso@delta-institute.org
t 312.554.0900 x25 f 312.554.0193 w delta-institute.org

2. Also, NYS DEC has a new green remediation policy see
http://www.dec.ny.gov/docs/remediation_hudson_pdf/der31.pdf

It was developed by my colleague Kevin Carpenter, who has agreed to share his contact information with
the group:
Kevin Carpenter, P.E.
Agency Sustainability Coordinator
Division of Environmental Remediation
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
Phone: 518-402-9799
Fax:     518-402-9595
Address: 625 Broadway, 11th floor,
Albany, NY 12233-7020




                                                                                                       302
                             Integrated pest management, January 2011
2 Posts

Original Posting:
Hi! The PDF of our pest management spec, requiring IPM for indoor environments, is attached, and is also
available at: http://www.ogs.state.ny.us/EO/4/Docs/Finals/PestManagement.pdf. The contract referred
to in the specs, which contains detailed instructions regarding IPM practices, has many associated
documents which are posted on the OGS website, including a checklist for practitioners. One place to
start accessing these documents is here
http://www.ogs.state.ny.us/purchase/snt/awardnotes/7101001510can.HTM. You can also search the
OGS website or Google OGS NYS Group 71010 contract.

You should also know that our outdoor turf and ornamental management spec requires non-chemical
pest management. That is available on the OGS website at
http://www.ogs.state.ny.us/EO/4/Docs/Finals/Turf.pdf

Hope this is helpful!
Elizabeth E. Meer
Special Assistant
Commissioner's Policy Office
NYS Department of Environmental Conservation
625 Broadway, 14th Floor
Albany, NY 12233
518-402-2796 Telephone
518-402-8541 Fax

Response:
http://www.green.ca.gov/EPP/Grounds/LandscapeIPM.htm

This is what I know of on-line. Kathy




                                                                                                     303
                  Remanufactured Toner Cartridges for HP 5550DN, January 2011
8 Posts

Original post:
Is anyone using the HP 5550DN color laser printer? If you are, have you found a quality remanufactured
toner cartridge vendor? Please advise.

Gabriel G. Adams, REM
Environmental Compliance Specialist
DynMcDermott Petroleum Operations Company
M&O Contractor for U.S. DOE SPR
Office: 504-734-4503
Fax: 504-818-5503

Responses:
1. I buy mine from Super Media Store. I don’t have the same model. I’m happy with the
performance. Here’s a link to remanufactured HP cartridges for HP 5550 printers:
http://www.supermediastore.com/product/search?search=hp+5550+toner+%23Type%3A%27Remanu
factured%27. The price is only $105/cartridge. New HP cartridges are over $1,100.

2. I’ve not used them but it is my understanding that Cartridge World does a good job.

Lynn Leavitt
Recycling Coordinator, Westbrook
lleavitt@westbrook.me.us
(207) 591-8135

3. Jayne, In looking at the Super Media Store website, it appears the manufacturer of the cartridges listed
is Hewlett Packard. HP does not remanufacture cartridges so we are a bit confused as to whether these
are remanufactured cartridges or not.

All , The US Department of Energy has done extensive testing of remanufactured cartridges since the late
1990s. We have a protocol on our website that you may find helpful in selecting quality remanufactured
cartridges (http://www.hss.doe.gov/pp/epp/library/ap-toner-cartridge-protocol.pdf)---Sandra

Sandra Cannon, Technical Support
U.S. Department of Energy Sustainable Acquisition Program
Tel. 509-529-1535

4.Sandra - I checked my invoices. The description is the same as what is currently online. The HP in the
cartridge description just identifies which printer brand the cartridges are for.

Regards,
Becky

5. I’ve been told by a cartridge remanufacturer that the industry hasn’t yet developed a reliable option for
the HP 5550DN. Here’s an excerpt from the email I received from the rep:


                                                                                                        304
It has very unique characteristics that have created multiple layers of challenge to allowing a quality
remanufactured alternative. At this time I recommend users staying with the original branded product
unless they are content with a minimum 6% or greater defect rate.

Just something to consider!

Johanna Kertesz
Integrated Solid Waste Management Unit
Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
(651) 757-2489
johanna.kertesz@state.mn.us
www.pca.state.mn.us/epp
www.rethinkrecycling.com/government/eppg

6. Johanna, What you describe is a problem with the industry. We have told printer manufacturers that if
their printers preclude or hinder the use of remanufactured cartridges, we will not purchase that printer
model. The new EPEAT standard coming out for printers also precludes such a hindrance.

A good source for valid information is the International Imaging Technology Council (http://www.i-
itc.org/stmcompanies.htm, 702-838-4279). While one remanufacturer may not have the technology to
overcome the hindrances, there are others that do.

Hope this helps---Sandra
Sandra Cannon, Technical Support
U.S. Department of Energy Sustainable Acquisition Program
Tel. 509-529-1535

7. Sandra, Thank you so much for the DOE protocol for selecting quality remanufactured cartridges and
also the info on the International Imaging Technology Council's list of reputable (STMC) certified
remanufacturing companies. Any idea if there's a resource out there that lists printers (like the HP
5550DN) that have very difficult to refill or remanufacture toner or ink cartridges? From the
conversation so far, it sounds like there may not be - because some remanufacturers are clever at reverse
engineering or resetting the smart chips on cartridges that are designed to make them non-refillable.

However, knowing which printers have readily refillable cartridges is one of the top criteria for
purchasing printers to lower TOC, and I've found little or no info on that.

-Jim
Jim Lynch, Co-Director GreenTech
& Electronics Recycling & Reuse Programs
+1-415-633-9308 (office phone)
jlynch@techsoupglobal.org
435 Brannan St. Suite 100
San Francisco, CA 94107 USA
www.techsoup.org/greentech
www.techsoupglobal.org



                                                                                                          305
                         Portable recycling stations-containers, January 2011
4 Posts

Original Posting:
Hello, I am looking for recommendations on portable recycling containers that can be easily
packed/stowed for transport between locations. These would be used for collecting indoor
recycling/compost/waste from meetings at locations where there isn’t standard recycling available. If
anyone has suggestions on a brand or style that has worked well for them, I would appreciate it.
Thank you.

-Stacey
Stacey Foreman, LEED Green Assoc.
Sustainable Procurement Coordinator
City of Portland, Oregon, Procurement Services

Responses:
1. We use Toter Inc. For our curbside pickup program we typically use the 64 gallon size but they also
have a 32 gallon option which is quite study and has a lid and wheels. The 64 gallon containers nest
inside each other but the 32 gallon contains have to be stacked.

L.
Lynn Leavitt
Recycling Coordinator, Westbrook
lleavitt@westbrook.me.us
(207) 591-8135

2. We have used the ClearStream recycling containers for outdoor events for several years. They are very
portable, user friendly and don’t require much space for storage. I believe there is a government entity in
Oregon that has a program where ClearStream containers can be borrowed. Here’s a link with more info:
http://www.clearstreamrecycler.com/

Rob Didriksen
Coordinator, Missouri State Recycling Program

3. We also use the ClearStream system, and it's good for many purposes. We are a nonprofit that
manages a community lending system where the City financed the bins. For more details on this
program, Leigh Cushing is the Eco-Cycle staffer in charge of that.

Eric Lombardi
Eco-Cycle
Boulder, CO
www.ecocycle.org




                                                                                                         306
                                 Durable Delivery Totes, January 2011
4 Posts

Original Posting:
Does anyone have any recommendations for durable delivery totes? Our libraries are looking for
alternative solutions to the plastic delivery totes they have been using to distribute books to branch
locations and to other agencies. Currently they are using 16 and 20 quart plastic totes, which crack a lot.
While they do recycle the broken ones, they would prefer to use a product that lasts longer. Does anyone
have any recommendations for durable delivery totes? They are considering corrugated plastic totes
(like USPS); does anyone have any experience with these - positive or negative?

They need to be durable and weatherproof (with detachable lids), and able to withstand multiple
deliveries of books. Must be recyclable and we would prefer they are made from recycled content.

Thank you,
Julia Fraser, Sustainable Purchasing Coordinator
Multnomah County Purchasing
501 SE Hawthorne Blvd., Suite 400, Portland, Oregon 97214
Phone: 503-988-5111 x22651
Email: julia.fraser@multco.us
Website: http://web.multco.us/sustainability/sustainable-purchasing

Responses:
1. Julia, while we don’t own any reusable totes, we use them in partnership with OfficeMax. Our Central
Services team delivers goods to about 20 buildings accommodating roughly 1,000 staff and the reusable
totes have been great. They seem to withstand serious handling and collapse well.

Ronda Chapman-Duer
Sustainability Coordinator
Washington County
155 N. 1st Ave, Suite 270
Hillsboro, OR 97124
503-846-8857

2. Ronda, The question was not concerning reusable totes. The question was whether the totes are
manufactured with recycled plastic content. Thanks---Sandra

Sandra Cannon, Technical Support
U.S. Department of Energy Sustainable Acquisition Program
Tel. 509-529-1535

3. Thank you, the question was concerning more durable reusable totes. Sorry if that was not clear.
Thanks.
Julia




                                                                                                        307
          Dealing with product claims in the absence of 3rd party certification, January 2011
4 Posts

Original Post:
Hi all; We have a couple of categories of purchases in which we'd like to ask vendors if their products
meet certain criteria related to the chemicals used in the manufacturing process and the recycled content
of the products. There are currently no third party certifications that cover the issues that we are
interested in.

My question is, given we can't ask for certification, does anyone have any thoughts on how we can ask the
vendors to verify that their products do in fact meet our criteria. Has anyone asked used signed
declarations for this purpose? Other ideas?

I'd love to hear how others have approached this.

Thanks in advance for the help,
Lynda
Lynda Rankin, Manager, Sustainable Procurement Integration
Economic and Rural Development and Tourism
PO Box 787
Halifax Nova Scotia
B3J 2V2
email: rankinlx@gov.ns.ca

Responses:
1. Hi, Lynda and all, Some years ago we required suppliers to provide us specific chemical information in
order to be considered for a contract. We gave them the option to either identify to us chemicals that fell
within a set of health/environmental criteria or provide documentation from an accredited independent
lab, signed by a qualified individual. Admittedly this is not a foolproof method. However, we did get data
we felt was relatively reliable, and it gave us a consistent requirement we could apply to the submittals.

It has been a while since we did this, but I can provide the language we used if you wish. Feel free to
contact me directly if you want more detail.

Shirli
Shirli Axelrod
Waste Prevention and Green Purchasing
Seattle Public Utilities
PO Box 34018
700 Fifth Avenue, Suite 4900
Seattle, WA 98124-4018
Phone: 206-684-7804
E-mail: shirli.axelrod@seattle.gov

2. We have used two approaches:
    For recycled content claims, we ask for Scientific Certification Systems recycled content
     certification.


                                                                                                          308
      For other claims (i.e. chemicals), we ask the vendors to sign a declaration indicating that their
       product is free of that material. This is obviously not perfect, but the vendor would be in violation
       of the contracts terms if this is violated.

Johanna Kertesz
Integrated Solid Waste Management Unit
Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
(651) 757-2489
johanna.kertesz@state.mn.us

3. I wonder if anyone has included in their contract an agreement that if a user can provide an analysis
from a certified lab that showed the presence of the forbidden material at or above a certain level that the
supplier in advance agrees to a specific remedy? Such as, pay a penalty upon receipt of a copy of such
test, that the contract is ended or suspended, or the supplier must immediately provide conforming
replacements at no cost. This sort of thing would make enforcement of such contract terms vastly
simpler and help chill any thoughts of false declaration. The supplier may wish to add some other
clauses, such as that they have to right to demand a retest, to use a second certified lab of their choosing,
or receive assurances of a chain-of-custody. I wonder if anyone has gone down this road?

Rick Reibstein
MA Office of Technical Assistance
Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs
9th floor, 100 Cambridge Street
Boston, MA 02114
617 626 1062




                                                                                                         309
                             Quieter electric hand dryers, February 2011
2 Posts

Original Posting:
Hello, Has anyone found a high-performance electric hand dryer (maximum 1,600 watts, less than 15
seconds drying time) that is also relatively quiet? I have seen the GreenSpec listings and am looking for
real-world experience from folks that are happy with their choice of electric hand dryer. We have pilot-
tested the Xlerator and the Dyson Airblade and found that they may be too loud for the acoustics of the
targeted restrooms.
Thanks in advance,

-Stacey
 Stacey Foreman, LEED Green Assoc.
City of Portland, Oregon, Procurement Services
stacey.foreman@portlandoregon.gov

Response:
We have Dyson Airblades. They do make noise but it seems acceptable to our employees. The drying
time is very good. The sound is different that the Xlerator and other high powered dryers – sounds more
like a high-tech jet engine and is not as shocking.

Jodi Smits Anderson, AIA, LEED AP
DASNY
t: 518-257-3486
e: jsmitsan@dasny.org




                                                                                                       310
                       Green cleaning in correctional facilities, February 2011
3 Posts

Original Posting:
The State of California Prison Industries Authority (PIA) offers two Green Seal Certified cleaning
products: multipurpose and glass cleaner concentrates. These items are viewable at PIA’s on-line
catalog: http://catalog.pia.ca.gov/store.php?t=1297870526.
Charleen Fain-Keslar
Procurement Engineer
Phone 916.375.4454
Fax 916.375.4522
Email charleen.fainkeslar@dgs.ca.gov

Responses:
1. We are working with Department of Justice in Victoria, Australia to reduce the environmental impact
of prison buying so I would be interested in any other examples of work done with prisons in this area.
Thanks.
Hugh
Hugh Wareham, Chief Executive Officer
ECO-Buy Limited
P (03) 9349 0401
Mobile 0417 139 809
E-mail hwareham@ecobuy.org.au
Web www.ecobuy.org.au

2. Hugh: ISSA provides some useful technical information on Green Cleaner procurement. Some of it is
for free if you sign in: http://www.issa.com/?m=showcase. A little old but still
useful: http://www.global-laser.org/cgi/laser/resource.html?mv_arg=120

WAXIE offers information on their green cleaners offered: http://www.waxie.com/WAXIE-GPS-
Portfolio.pdf, http://www.waxie.com/gps_products.html#2

Significant improvements and reductions in health exposure risks by installing closed loop dispenser
systems.

Products that are certified to one of the applicable Green Cleaning Standards are relevant and address a
broad range of human health and environmental concerns worthy of consideration and used in Green
Building Operations:
       ·    Green Seal (GS-37)
       ·    EcoLogo (CCD-146)
       ·    US EPA’s DfE Standard and Criteria for Safer Chemical Ingredients
       http://www.epa.gov/dfe/pubs/projects/gfcp/index.htm
Best,
Antoinette “Toni” Stein PhD
892 Arlington Ave
Berkeley, CA 94707
650-823-7662
tweil@igc.org

                                                                                                       311
                                      Trash can liners, March 2011
5 Posts

Original Post:
Hello EPPnetters! Does anyone have a good (independent) reference/resource for understanding the
different types of plastic resins used for trash can liners and their comparative “green-ness”? I have
received information from vendors about why one type of plastic is better than others (including why
100% virgin of one type resin is still “greener” than recycled content of another type of resin) and I would
like to be check that information against some (recent) independent research. I realize it would be best
to go without the liner, but we still have many applications that call for the use of trash can liners.

Thank you in advance.
 -Stacey
Stacey Foreman
City of Portland, Oregon, Procurement Services
stacey.foreman@portlandoregon.gov

Responses:
1. There's a very nice informed discussion on biodegradable vs. compostable plastic bags going on at:
http://www.greenerpackage.com/discuss/compost_biodegrade/whats_difference_between_biodegradab
le_vs_compostable

The discussion has citations and links to research and other resources. I'm particularly interested in the
spirited debate between oxo-biodegradable plastic vs. hydro-biodegradable plastic.

The trade association for the hydro-biodegradable plastics industry is the Biodegradable Products
Institute http://www.bpiworld.org/. Hydro-biodegradable bags are mostly made from vegetable-based
materials.

The Trade Association for the oxo-biodegradable plastics industry is the Oxo-biodegradable Plastics
Association www.biodeg.org. Oxo-biodegradable bags are mostly made from by-products of oil-refining.

Anyone have a preference?
-Jim
Jim Lynch, Co-Director GreenTech
& Electronics Recycling & Reuse Programs
+1-415-633-9308 (office phone)
jlynch@techsoupglobal.org
435 Brannan St. Suite 100
San Francisco, CA 94107 USA
www.techsoup.org/greentech
www.techsoupglobal.org

2. A quick thought: When comparing trash can liners it is important to look for materials that are
compatible with the waste.

For example, a plastic liner interferes with the recyclability of paper waste. And, for the biodegradable
plastic liners holding food wastes, the can liner should biodegrade readily under the biological and
environmental conditions that exist where the waste is taken.
                                                                                                        312
Tom Barron

3. Hi Stacey, We just did a big project for a client who is a large real estate investment trust (REIT) on
plastic liners and found a company that makes a plastic liner with 70% PCR. We found the bags to be
competitively priced compared to virgin plastic bags with the exception of the small thin bags used for
desk-side trash cans. And rather than keeping the small bags, we developed a “campaign” to eliminate
these small bags altogether, which obviously reduced consumption and costs.

If you’re interested in contacting the company or getting a copy of the “flyer” we developed for the
building owner (it’s basically trying to anticipate and reduce tenant complaints by explaining why we’re
eliminating the bags and NOT asking them to dump their own trash) - just let me know and I would be
happy to share these things with you.

Take care,

Steve

4. Hi Stacey, May I please inquiry about what is your end-use application? Are you using can liners for
municipal organics diversion program? We have a new film material on the market that is industrial
compostable and provides for tough compost bags. We have a customer in your area now offering
compostable bags. How can I help you?

Debra C. Darby
Director of Marketing Communications
t │+1.978.513.1851
m│+1.978.376.8879
ddarby@mirelplastics.com




                                                                                                             313
                                       Paper statistics, March 2011
2 Posts

Original Posting:
Does anyone know statistics on wasted paper by businesses? Also, I’m interested in the amount of paper
wasted for printing (abandoned copies, blank pages, sent to wrong copier). Thank you.

Mary Ann Remolador, Assistant Director
Northeast Recycling Council, Inc.
139 Main Street, Suite 401
Brattleboro, Vermont 05301
tel 802-254-3636; fax 802-254-5870
www.nerc.org

Response:
Hi Mary Ann, Below is some information my co-worker, Stephanie Terrell, pulled together.

We know how much paper ends up in the waste stream locally. About 25% of Seattle’s business waste is
paper that goes to a landfill. In California, business generates 47 percent of the waste stream, and paper
is the second-largest component.

Here’s a good one: Researchers at Xerox found that about half of the documents printed in a typical office
are thrown away within 24 hours.

Source: Hesseldahl, Arik, “The New Push to Get Rid of Paper,” BusinessWeek, May 27, 2008,
www.businessweek.com/technology/content/may2008/tc20080526_370615.htm?link_position=link1

Cost impact: It is estimated that companies will spend about $8 billion this year on paper alone; that
doesn’t include costs for ink and toner, or for running copiers, printers, and fax machines. In the typical
office, for every dollar spent on printing documents, companies incur another $6 in handling and
distribution, according to Xerox.

Here are some other random stats from the Stopwaste.org A Paper Use Reduction Guide for Your
Business:
 In the U.S. alone, it is estimated that the number of paper documents generated is growing at a rate of
   at least 22 percent per year.
 Of the pages handled each day in the average office, 90 percent are merely shuffled.
 The average number of copies made of a document is 19.
 Americans use 50 million tons of paper each year—that’s 850 million trees.

Katie Kennedy, Senior Associate
Cascadia Consulting Group, Inc.
206.449.1121 www.cascadiaconsulting.com




                                                                                                          314
                                   Returnable Packaging, March 2011
5 Posts

Original Post:
Hello, I have a client that is trying to develop a re-usable packaging program for one of its customers and
when he runs the #’s, the return freight keeps getting in the way for this to make sense. The client is in
CT and his customer is in Massachusetts. They use a trucking company, don’t deliver themselves. Do you
have any insight or any companies that I can contact to see how they are doing it. His customer is going
to pay the full costs below, but it isn’t fiscally sound at this point.

Here’s what we see right now:

Current Corrugated packaging costs                40,000
Reusable packaging costs                          48,000 – estimated life 5 years.
Return freight on reusable packaging:             44,200

This doesn’t include the freight costs for shipping the product.

Unless he can get the freight cost down to the 20k level, which in a rising gas price scenario I don’t see
how that happens, this will not make sense for our customer to move in this direction. Even at 20k he
return on investment assuming no damage or loss is still 2+ years.

Any ideas that you have will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Judy Wlodarczyk
CONNSTEP, Inc.
1090 Elm Street Suite 202
Rocky Hill, CT 06067
http://www.connstep.org
Email: jwlodarc@connstep.org
Office: 860-644-9718
Cell: 860-539-4926
Fax: 860-529-5001

Responses:
1. Hi Judy, I found this in my computer files - don’t know anything about this company – but it might be
worth a try to contact them: http://www.reboxcorp.com

2. Typically the best is to build into the purchase contract that the vendor must take back all
packaging. If the amount of the purchase is significant, this stipulation will not be a deterrent. The result
usually is the vendor quickly reduces the packaging to a minimal amount, such as shipping the
deliverables on shrink wrapped pallets. Usually pallets can be reused locally if the vendor finds the
return cost for shipping them back is more than buying new ones.

Sandra Cannon, Technical Support
U.S. Department of Energy Sustainable Acquisition Program
Tel. 509-529-1535

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3. Office Depot delivers to PSU with reusable plastic totes and consolidates departmental shipments and
uses a local bicycle delivery system. They have some other innovative packaging ideas that might be
useful as well.

4. Judy, If your customer might consider bioplastics material for manufacturing new shipping
crates: the crates would be durable and reusable; when the crates break or are no longer useful, the
material can be grounded up and sent to an anaerobic digester for a secondary use - conversion to biogas.

Debra Darby
Debra C. Darby
Director of Marketing Communications
t │+1.978.513.1851
m│+1.978.376.8879
ddarby@mirelplastics.com




                                                                                                      316
                   Recycled content aluminum for sign manufacture, March 2011
2 Posts

Original Post:
Does anyone have a supply source for 80% recycled content aluminum for sign manufacture? This is our
new university standard for campus signage but our best bidder is having trouble finding a supply of
80% recycled content aluminum to manufacturer our signs. Thanks for any suggestions.

Response:
Surprisingly, you might take a look at Rubber Form, Inc. Although they specialize in recycled rubber
products, they should on their website 100% recycled content aluminum signs
(http://www.rubberform.com/products/Parking_Lot_and_Road_Safety/Traffic_Signs).

Good luck!---Sandra
Sandra Cannon, Technical Support
U.S. Department of Energy Sustainable Acquisition Program
Tel. 509-529-1535




                                                                                                       317
                Contract Language for Sourcing Green Office (Copy) Paper, April 2011
4 Posts

Original Post:
Hello Everyone. I'm working with a client who wants to source green office paper. His organization is
very large and has offices throughout the country (including some remote locations). We've looked
through Conservatree, RPN and Green Seal and EcoLogo websites which had very helpful information.
Now, we are interested in looking at examples of specific contract language that requires:
1)at least 30% post-consumer content paper with the possibility of also having the vendor supply paper
that is 50% and 100% post-consumer content;
2)PCF for the recycled pulp and TCF for virgin pulp
3)third party certification for #1 and #2
4)recycled content/recyclable ream wrappers
5)other environmentally beneficial attributes for packaging
6)green supply chain/distribution network, including delivery to remote locations
7)high performance in duplex mode for printing, copying and scanning equipment

Also, has anyone included incentive language for vendors to provide training for users to reduce the use
of paper? One thought is that with the reduction in use of paper, the organization can pay for the higher
priced 100% PC paper, keeping the paper budget neutral.

Any contract language or ideas to meet these requirements would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you!
Eun-Sook Goidel
Full Circle Environmental, Inc.
goidel@fullcircleenvironmental.com
(206)855-2896

Responses:
1. Eun-Sook, Here are the guidelines for paper purchases that I have provided to our Purchasing Office
at the City of Austin. As you can see, I have incorporated a lot of RPN’s recommendations into our
specifications.

I’m not sure if the formatting will come through on the EPPP.net listserv, but if anyone would like a copy,
please send me an email directly.

Thanks,
Aiden
Aiden Cohen
Program Manager, Strategic Initiatives
City of Austin
Phone: 512-974-1929
Email: aiden.cohen@ci.austin.tx.us

2. Hi Eun-Sook, The info sent from the City of Austin was outstanding and I suspect you will receive
others equally as good. But I wanted to ask a question. For the past many years we have basically
defined environmentally preferable paper around two issues --- recycled content and bleaching
processes (or lack thereof), and more recently around forest certification which as we know primarily
                                                                                                        318
applies primarily to virgin fiber. But I wonder about the use of rapidly renewable and/or tree-free fibers
such as the waste from (sustainably grown) sugar cane? I know in America we basically make things from
trees, but what about encouraging paper from other sources? Any thoughts?

Hope all is well,
Steve
Stephen P. Ashkin, President
The Ashkin Group LLC - The Green Cleaning Experts
3644 Tamarron Drive Bloomington, IN 47408
Phone: (812) 332-7950 Fax: (812) 332-7965
Email: SteveAshkin@AshkinGroup.com
Visit us at: www.AshkinGroup.com

3. Under New York's Executive Order #4, which was first instituted under former Governor Paterson but
which has been carried over by Governor Cuomo, all state agencies and affiliates are required to procure
100% post-consumer copy paper. This mandate was written right into the EO. (In addition, each year
since 2008, when EO#4 was put into place, an interagency subcommittee works to redefine and "green"
specifications for up to 36 commodities. You can check out the refined specs, as well as more information
about how EO#4 works and even see the first annual report to the Governor at
http://www.ogs.state.ny.us/EO/4/Default.asp).

The text of EO#4 is at: http://www.ogs.state.ny.us/purchase/spg/pdfdocs/EO4.pdf

Below are links to the current contracts for truckload and less-than-truckloads of 100% recycled paper:
http://www.ogs.state.ny.us/purchase/spg/awards/5021321427CAN.HTM
http://www.ogs.state.ny.us/purchase/spg/awards/5021121239CAN.HTM

FYI - all toilet, tissue and toweling are also to be made with 100% post-consumer recycled content.

Hope this is helpful, Brenda G
Brenda Grober
Environmental Services Unit
Empire State Development
30 South Pearl Street
Albany, NY 12245
(518) 292-5342 / FAX (518) 292-5886
bgrober@empire.state.ny.us

4. Hi, Steve. Great question about tree-free paper. I think there are many opportunities for encouraging
use of both on-purpose crops (kenaf, flax, etc.) and agricultural residues (e.g., wheat straw, coffee plant,
etc.) for paper production. However, it seems that these papers are more for specialty use purposes (e.g.,
letter head) and serve a niche market. I am not aware of such crops and residues being used for copy
paper. Would love to know if they are commercially available so that organizations can try them out, even
on a small scale to help move the market along.

In 2004, Conservatree, in collaboration with others, did an excellent Paper Listening Study that included
a series of questions related to Tree Free Paper.
http://www.conservatree.org/paperlisteningstudy/view.all.html

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It would be great to hear about how the market and infrastructure for tree free paper have evolved since
that time.

Thanks to everyone who have responded with contract language. Would love to see more! Thank you!!

Eun-Sook

5. Some points to add to the mix:
1) There's no TCF virgin pulp available in North America, which is why the only truly chlorine free papers
here are 100% recycled PCF (there may be some TCF virgin pulp in Europe and at one point a small
amount was imported here, but we're not seeing it now; Louisiana-Pacific was the only mill in the U.S.
that made TCF virgin pulp but it sold almost all of it overseas and is now closed),

2) I have been hoping that there would be some mechanical fiber copy paper that could have TCF virgin
pulp along with recycled but we're not seeing that at this point, either,

3) There are some sugar cane fiber copy papers newly becoming available, some from China and one
from South America. They don't, however, have recycled content. Sometimes the China versions claim
some recycled content but it seems to be from bamboo construction debris that has been recycled, not
from recovered fiber. We're still working on learning more about these papers; it's difficult to get info.

Susan
Susan Kinsella
Executive Director
Conservatree
San Francisco, CA
415-883-6264
http://www.conservatree.org




                                                                                                             320
                                Environmentally preferable, April 2011
7 Posts

Original Post:
EPPNetters: Does anyone have experience with specifying environmentally preferable products using
multiple attributes? If so, how did you determine the attributes and how did you evaluate the products?

Thanks
Richard Keller
Manager of Recycling
Maryland Environmental Service
259 Najoles Road | Millersville, MD | 21108
Phone: 410-729-8531 | Fax: 410-729-8383
rkell@menv.com
www.menv.com

Responses:
1. That is a challenging question, Richard. It depends on the product. In a perfect world you would have
access to a common, generally accepted multi-attribute third party certification like Green Seal, Ecologo,
EPEAT (depending on the type of product you are purchasing). If there is no one multi-attribute
certification or standard available, you can try to piece together separate single attribute standards or
certifications. It’s cumbersome but will get you where you need to go. If there are no established clear
standards or certifications for a product it’s probably best to ask around to other jurisdictions and find
specifications for all “hot spot” environmental attributes that you intend to include in your solicitation.

JR
Jonathan Rifkin, Special Assistant to the Director
Office of Contracting and Procurement
One Judiciary Square, 441 4th St, NW, Suite 700S
Washington, DC 20001
Ph: 202-724-3676
E-Mail: Jonathan.rifkin@dc.gov

2. Richard, Here are some things to consider when purchasing environmentally preferable products and
services:
 Minimize                                 Favor
    Heavy metals (e.g. lead, mercury,        Postconsumer recycled
       cadmium)                                 content
    Ozone depleting chlorinated              Reusability/repairability
       compounds (e.g. CFCs)                  Reduction in packaging
    Organic solvents (e.g.                   Energy Efficiency
       chlorinated and aroma-                 Use of renewable energy
       tichydrocarbons                          sources
    Reactivity, corrosiveness,               Biobased products
       flammability, irritation potential     Biodegradability upon
    Carcinogens, mutagens,                     disposal
       teratogens
    Acute and chronic toxicity

                                                                                                         321
      Substances that can
       bioaccumulate
      Volatile organic compounds
       (VOCs)
      Phosphorous

Determining the environmental attributes of a product or service shall very from product to product and
service to service, but there are some simple steps that can be taken and information that is available that
will assist you in achieving your desired goals.

Gilbert L. Bailey
Green Purchasing Consultant
Environmental Preservation Solutions
2323 S. Troy Street Bldg. 5-209
Aurora, Colorado 80014
Phone 303-875-7733
Fax 303-482-1490

3. Hi Richard, I hope you won’t take my comment wrong, but I think a lot of people on this listserv have
years of experience using multiple attributes when specifying environmentally preferable
products. Coincidentally, you may have noticed that there is another discussion going on right now on
eppnet on purchasing paper products. And I mention this because the individual posting the request was
actually the person responsible at EPA back in the early 90’s who wrote much of the work on EPP and the
importance of multiple attributes. If you are curious or want to talk to her, her contact info is:
Eun-Sook Goidel
Full Circle Environmental, Inc.
goidel@fullcircleenvironmental.com
(206)855-2896

Perhaps Eun-Sook can share her wealth of knowledge and historical perspective with you. And Eun-
Sook, I hope you don’t mind me sharing your name and contact info.

Beyond this, my recommendation is to keep it simple. During the late 90’s and early part of this century
many public procurement entities were developing their own EPP specifications. And I think what many
will tell you is that it was very hard, time consuming and expensive to develop appropriate requirements
for each product category --- and then even more difficult, time consuming and expensive to evaluate
proposals and each vendor inevitably sent in information that needed additional clarification or
interpretation and input from technical experts. This is precisely why many purchasers began to rely on
third-parties like Green Seal, TerraChoice’s EcoLogo Program, EPA’s Energy Star program, EPA’s DfE
program, EPEAT, BIFMA’s Level program, etc. Not only did this make purchasing easier because a third-
party did all the evaluations and verification, but because the same third-party standards were being
broadly adopted it also reduced the cost of the actual products because the manufacturers could sell the
same product using the same testing to a larger customer base (as compared to just the entity with the
unique requirements).

So my recommendation is to adopt third-party standards from a credible standard setting organization if
such standards exist for the categories you are concerned about. And if you have questions about what


                                                                                                        322
makes a credible standard, the Green Products Roundtable just released their “Organizational Credibility”
document on this issue that can help you.

I also think individuals such as Eun-Sook or the folks from a number of States such as Marcia Deegler
from Massachusetts and others have lots of info that can help you. And of course, I think the Responsible
Purchasing Network has some good info as well.

Hope this helps,

Steve
Stephen P. Ashkin, President
The Ashkin Group LLC
3644 Tamarron Drive Bloomington, IN 47408
Phone: (812) 332-7950 Fax: (812) 332-7965
Email: SteveAshkin@AshkinGroup.com
Visit us at: www.AshkinGroup.com

4. As the prompter of one of the first efforts to define EPP (for cleaners) on a multi-attribute basis, (the
MA program), I want to mention two thoughts in response to Steve Ashkin’s good advice. One is that it
certainly was a great deal of work, and has been ever since. But it was good work to do. We brought
together many interested stakeholders, which helps to integrate programs that should be collaborating,
and we learned a lot of things we needed to learn.

The second is that you can over-rely on third-party certifications and then lose that internal expertise. In
addition, the dependence on third-party certifications requires that they remain of high quality, and the
chance of that is increased if those who use them remain knowledgeable and up-to-date. So the work is
well worth it.

Rick Reibstein
MA Office of Technical Assistance
Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs
9th floor, 100 Cambridge Street
Boston, MA 02114
617 626 1062

5. Hi Richard, I would qualify Gilbert’s “favor” list with a few qualifiers:
        Increasing post-consumer recycled content typically reduces several environmental impacts of
       a material. However, when comparing dissimilar materials, recycled content does not necessarily
       correlate at all well with reduced environmental impact. So for example, when purchasing mailing
       envelopes, a plastic mailer with higher postconsumer content will typically have lower impacts
       than a mailer made of the same resin with lower postconsumer content. But when comparing it
       against other materials (different resins, paper mailers, or even corrugated boxes), the material
       with higher recycled content will not necessarily have the lowest environmental impacts. See
       http://www.deq.state.or.us/lq/pubs/docs/sw/packaging/life cycleinventorylong.pdf for more
       details.
        “Biobased products” can also have significant impacts, depending on how they’re made. As the
       whole ethanol debate illustrates, one has to be careful and not automatically assume that just
       because something is “made from a plant”, it is inherently and necessarily a good environmental

                                                                                                          323
      choice. Biobased products can be excellent choices, but a lot depends on what they’re made of,
      and how they’re made.
       “Biodegradability upon disposal” is a fine attribute for materials that are likely going to end up
      in water or wastewater, or could cause significant harm if they did (lubricants for example). If
      you’re purchasing a product that you believe will be littered into the open environment, it is also a
      factor worth considering (although I know the State of Maryland isn’t promoting littering of the
      products it purchases!). However, if your product is going to end up in a landfill, or has the
      potential of being recycled, then “biodegradable” has the potential of causing more harm than
      good. In a landfill, biodegradability leads to methane production, and unless the gas capture rate
      at the landfill is exceptionally high, the net result can be an increase in greenhouse gas
      emissions. In the case of materials being recycled into new products, we don’t want to harm the
      viability of recycling and recycled products by introducing feedstocks that biodegrade and cause
      the products to fail prematurely. This is one reason, for example, why Wal-Mart has avoided
      switching over to plastic shopping bags made with “oxodegradable” additives; yes, they are
      “biodegradable upon disposal”, but since some consumers choose to recycle their plastic bags,
      introducing this degradable feedstock has the potential of harming the viability of plastics
      recycling.

Thanks,
David Allaway
Oregon Department of Environmental Quality
811 S.W. Sixth Avenue
Portland, OR 97204
phone: (503) 229-5479
fax: (503) 229-6977




                                                                                                        324
                              Soy-based laser toner cartridges, April 2011
2 Posts
Original Post:
Hello, Has anyone seen an independently researched LCA of soy-based laser toner cartridges vs.
traditional laser toner cartridges? If so, would you please send me a copy of (or a link to) the findings?
Thank you!

-Stacey
Stacey Foreman
City of Portland, Oregon, Procurement Services
stacey.foreman@portlandoregon.gov
www.portlandonline.com/buygreen

Response:
Stacey: I recently gave a presentation on environmental product declarations (EPDs) at a Commercial
Aviation Alternative Fuels Initiative (CAAFI) Workshop and met James Hileman from MIT. He has
developed on grant from Federal FAA an LCA analysis of Bio-fuels that may be of use to you if you are
unable to find a soy ink specific LCA since inks and fuels share much of their core life cycle phases.
Take a look at Table 1 and Table 95 for results in his report
http://web.mit.edu/aeroastro/partner/reports/proj28/partner-proj28-2010-001.pdf
The first 4 columns in Table 95 together with the Land Use Change column will provide you with a rough
comparative LCA estimate between soy and fossil oil based materials. Of course please realize that there
will be different processing values to make an ink than a fuel but the other important LC phases for GHG
impacts will be pretty accurate rough comparisons.
It’s quite interesting to see in Section 7.2.1 shown in Tables 44 and 47 the very high “farming” GHG
emissions collected from data from USDA representing the cultivating diesel equipment! It’s not too
pretty a picture - lots of room for improvement in the future for soybean farming. Plus this LCA does not
look at anything other than GHG emissions.

The report however does importantly highlight that there are other very important negative impacts in
biobased materials outside of GHG emissions for a complete LCA namely the impact on Domestic Water
Resources; it is lightly discussed in Section 8.4 of his report, see the pie charts in Figure 32.
Could you please share with me any specific report on ink that anyone sends you? There is a free LCA
Listserve sponsored by Pre that you could also send your LCA question to
http://www.doka.ch/lca.htm#Lists if you want more.

Best
Antoinette “Toni” Stein PhD
892 Arlington Ave
Berkeley, CA 94707
650-823-7662
tweil@igc.org




                                                                                                             325
                      Sustainable Cleaners for Concrete & Asphalt, April 2011
2 Posts

Original Post:
We are looking for concrete and asphalt cleaners that are environmentally preferable and effective. Do
you have any to recommend? Appreciate your help---Sandra

Sandra Cannon, Technical Support
U.S. Department of Energy Sustainable Acquisition Program
Tel. 509-529-1535

Response:
Our transportation department has used the following soy-based asphalt release agent for several
years: "Maxi-Kreme" by Global Chem Source (http://www.globalchemsourcecorp.com/index.html). We
have a case study about our use of the product:
http://www.portlandonline.com/omf/index.cfm?c=44701&a=157994

-Stacey
Stacey Foreman
City of Portland, Oregon, Procurement Services
stacey.foreman@portlandoregon.gov
www.portlandonline.com/buygreen




                                                                                                     326
                                 EPP Vendor Questionnaires, June 2011
3 Posts

Original Post:
Hello EPPnet, RPN is conducting research into vendor questionnaires as part of the bidding process that
dives into more environmental background information for both specific products (to provide more of an
LCA context) and some of the practices of the vendor (use of LEED buildings, fuel-efficient fleets, etc.).

Some of the categories we are interested in including are:
- Packaging
- Transportation
- Business Practices (including publication of sustainability reports, if possible)
- Product-specific questions regarding sustainable sourcing

At this stage, we are curious to see what other purchasers have developed to draw comparisons. If
you've developed any vendor questionnaires or surveys, I would very much appreciate it if you could
share them with me at phillip@responsiblepurchasing.org.
Thank you!

Phillip Kobernick , RPN Manager
Responsible Purchasing Network
1201 Martin Luther King Jr. Way
Oakland, CA 94612
Phone (510) 547-5475
www.ResponsiblePurchasing.org

Responses:
1. Check out Rutgers University Green website http://procure.rutgers.edu/green/index.html; they have
some very creative tools; have done a great job. Have a “greenwashing” form:
http://procure.rutgers.edu/green/about_us.html

Best regards,
Deborah
Upstate New York USGBC Board of Directors
Deborah Robbins
cell:716-474-1303

2. Hi Phillip, We do not have a questionnaire or survey, but we will sometimes include such questions in
our evaluative criteria in our RFPs. Please check our website for
examples: http://www.portlandonline.com/omf/index.cfm?c=53454&

-Stacey
Stacey Foreman, LEED Green Assoc.
Sustainable Procurement Coordinator
City of Portland, Oregon, Procurement Services
www.portlandonline.com/buygreen



                                                                                                       327
                         Testing laboratories for laser cartridges, July 2011
2 Posts

Original Post:
Hello, Does anyone have information/contacts on independent laboratories that will performance test
laser toner cartridges (both OEM and remanufactured)?
Thanks.

-Stacey
Stacey Foreman, LEED Green Assoc.
Sustainable Procurement Coordinator
City of Portland, Oregon, Procurement Services
stacey.foreman@portlandoregon.gov

Response:
Professionals at RIT’s Remanufacturing Center have done this type of research in the past:




Brenda Grober | Strategic Business Development
Empire State Development
(518) 292-5342: Office
(518) 852-8219: Mobile
www.esd.ny.gov




                                                                                                      328
                              Office supplies contract language, July 2011
3 Posts

Original Post:
Hello EPPnet, I am in the process of developing contract language for an Office Supplies Blanket Purchase
Agreement and Term Contract. I am looking for general language that will establish environmental
guidance for office supplies, i.e., "All paper products shall, at minimum, contain post-consumer recycled
content levels as required by the Comprehensive Procurement Guidelines; paper products shall have
earned SFI or FSC certifications, or other certifications, etc..." Generally, I am looking for anything that
establishes requirements and provides guidance to bidders about what kind of products they should
provide and information that substantiates a green claim. I'm available to discuss if you have information
that you feel requires additional information.

Thank you,
Jonathan Rifkin, Special Assistant to the Director
Office of Contracting and Procurement
One Judiciary Square, 441 4th St, NW, Suite 700S
Washington, DC 20001
Ph: 202-724-3676
E-Mail: Jonathan.rifkin@dc.gov
Responses:
1. Hi, Jonathan and all, City of Seattle has set up office supplies contracts with green criteria. You can
see our 2008 RFP which led to the contracts we currently use:
http://www2.cityofseattle.net/purchasing/vendorcontracts/BVCDetail.asp?rptid=250&SortMode=1&Re
portOption=0&cid=0000002338&sr1=2&sr2=2.

Here is part of the "Purpose" statement from the RFP: "The Seattle Municipal Code, 20.60.200 directs the
City to pursue green products... Office products encompass a wide variety of manufactured goods made
from different materials..., so the environmental impacts from their production, use, and disposal are
equally wide-ranging. Office supplies require raw materials (both renewable and nonrenewable) and
energy for production, generate air and water pollution and solid and hazardous wastes during
manufacturing, are often elaborately packed, consume resources in shipping and transportation to
location, and become solid waste when discarded.

The scope of this contract will therefore include and prioritize green office supply products as a first
priority product list...The City intends the new contract to provide green office supply products as the
first choice in a highly intuitive, easy to use website, where City departments must first select and
purchase if a green product is available

The vendor will initially name the products the vendor considers "green." The product list is to be limited
to products manufactured using recycled content materials that are recycled as part of their product life,
or manufactured with reduced-toxic materials... Over the life of the contract, the City intends to review
the definition and/or the product offerings with the Vendor.... The City plans to review and approve or
reject products and/or definitions of eligible products. A sample of the type criteria the City may use in
the approval review of products is attached. [You'll see this if you go to the link above; can't embed in this
email.]

The City requires on-line ordering in an easy, user-friendly system, and desires an auto-substitute
                                                                                                           329
feature, which automatically proposes a substitute green product for the original traditional product....

The City seeks training and education that the Vendor will design and provide, to help City employees
identify and switch to green products....

The City seeks proposals to reduce packaging and switch to environmentally preferably packaging, such
as reduced packaging and recyclable packing materials. The City seeks proposals for reducing by-
products of transportation, such as biodiesel shipping or combined delivery....

The City invites proposals for unique items that are manufactured locally or regionally with unique
environmentally-preferable characteristics...."

Hope this is useful.
Shirli Axelrod
Waste Prevention and Green Purchasing
Seattle Public Utilities
PO Box 34018
700 Fifth Avenue, Suite 4900
Seattle, WA 98124-4018
Phone: 206-684-7804
E-mail: shirli.axelrod@seattle.gov
2. Jonathan -- I'd encourage you to check out the existing EcoLogo and Green Seal standards. EcoLogo, for
example, has a variety of standards for office supplies, including:
CCD 033 -- Office Furniture
CCD 035 -- Office Machines (including copiers and printers)
CCD 039 -- Remanufactured Printer Cartridges
CCD 077 -- Paper
CCD 080 -- Envelopes
CCD 133 -- Batteries
CCD 168 -- Pens & Pencils
Many of the existing cooperative purchasing agreements through US Communities and WSCA include
contracts with office supply companies that carry EcoLogo certified products. Hope this helps. Give me
a shout if you have any questions.

- Scot
Scot Case
UL Environment
610 781-1684




                                                                                                            330
                             Green professional services contract, July 2011
4 Posts

Original Post:
Greetings ---Stacey Foreman, green purchasing guru from Portland, OR, and I are co-writing a
Government Procurement (GoPro) article on ways to green professional services contracts. We’re not
talking about greening cleaning or pest management services contracts, but other professional services
contracts – contracts for consultants, A/E firms, lawyers, financial or IT services, etc.

Does anyone have any good examples of successful (or not so successful) efforts to green a professional
services contract?

If so, please e-mail me directly at scot.case@ulenvironment.com; spare the entire list. Stacey and I will be
sure to share a copy of the article when it is published.

Thanks in advance for the help.
- Scot
Scot Case
Director, Markets Development
UL Environment
29 N Carolina Ave
Reading, PA 19608
610 779-3770
610 781-1684 (cell)
scot.case@ulenvironment.com

Responses:
1. Hi Scott and all; Actually this is an area of great interest to us in Nova Scotia as we still refining our
processes. Rather than going off-line, I'd love to see what's going on posted to the list (so participants can
follow up if they wish).

For our part - we have a general proponent Sustainability Assessment that is attached to all of our service
RSOs. Then, depending on the type of service, the requesting/contracting department will add additional
project specific requirements. For example for Learning Service Providers there are a whole bunch of
requirements covering everything from catering, print and publication to respectful workplace, privacy
and classroom management/safety (e.g., letting folks know where the first aid supplies, exits and muster
stations are located etc.)

For RFPs we have a section typically valued at 10% of the evaluation that asks the proponent how they
will be delivering the service in a sustainable manner. The questions in this section may be general or
quite specific depending again on the nature of the service being requested.

Love to hear what others are doing ...
Lynda
Lynda Rankin, Manager, Sustainable Procurement Integration
Economic and Rural Development and Tourism
PO Box 787


                                                                                                           331
Halifax Nova Scotia
B3J 2V2
email: rankinlx@gov.ns.ca

2. Lynda: Here is what I suggested to Scot and Stacey: I highly recommend excerpting what you can
that is relevant from EU EMAS particularly the sections and tools for small businesses on their
website. The ISO 14000 Standards (i.e. 14001 etc.) are worthwhile reviewing for this educational project
too.

EU EMAS website
What I’ve found to be very informative for educating people on EMS topics (i.e. ISO 14001) is the
international EU EMAS website http://ec.europa.eu/environment/emas/index_en.htm particularly the
sections and tools for small businesses on their website. It puts the ISO 14001 standard into very plain
English. http://ec.europa.eu/environment/emas/toolkit/

US EPA:
http://www.epa.gov/owm/iso14001/ems2001final.pdf
http://www.epa.gov/compliance/resources/publications/incentives/ems/emstoolsmas.pdf
http://www.epa.gov/dfe/pubs/iems/bulletins/bullet01
http://www.epa.gov/epp/pubs/grn-pur/green-pur-ems.htm
http://www.epa.gov/epp/pubs/grn-pur/green-pur-ems2.htm
http://www.epa.gov/oppt/epp/pubs/grn-pur/green-pur-ems1a3a.pdf
http://www.epa.gov/compliance/resources/publications/incentives/ems/emstoolsmas.pdf

I also have found the Hara website to be useful. http://www.hara.com/solutions_overview.html and
Pablo from Ask Pablo site to be a great resource: http://askpablo.org/
http://www.globalreporting.org/ReportingFramework/G3Guidelines/#5

Below I wrote a “CORPORATE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (EMS) Questionnaire.”
That could be adapted to a service contract. This questionnaire was Beta tested in State of CA
SOLICITATION NO.56659 in 2008 for Towels Washcloths, and Blankets (if interested in a copy of the
complete bid contact Terry Muñoz (916) 376-5482 in acquisitions.
Best
Antoinette “Toni” Stein PhD
892 Arlington Ave
Berkeley, CA 94707
650-823-7662
tweil@igc.org

3. Hi, Scot, Stacey, and all, Seattle has some green provisions that are standard requirements for our
solicitations and contracts, including for consultant contracts. What is considered “professional services”
also can fall under what we buy through goods and services contracts. Here are some examples of
language/boilerplate for our solicitations – at a minimum, the no-idling and paper requirements are
likely to be in all:

Delivery of Products and Services – Idling Prohibited: Vehicles and/or diesel fuel trucks shall not idle at
the time and location of the delivery to the City for more than five minutes. The City requires vendors to
utilize practices that reduce fuel consumption and emission discharge, including turning off trucks and
vehicles during delivery of products to the City. Exceptions to this requirement include when a vehicle is
                                                                                                         332
making deliveries and associated power is necessary; when the engine is used to provide power in
another device, and if required for proper warm-up and cool-down of the engine. Specific examples
include “bucket” trucks that allow a worker to reach wires on telephone poles or tree branches for
trimming; and vehicles with a lift on the back of a truck to move products in and out of the truck. The City
of Seattle has a commitment to reduction of unnecessary fuel emissions. The City intends to improve air
quality by reducing unnecessary air pollution from idling vehicles. Limiting car and truck idling supports
cleaner air, healthier work environments, the efficient use of city resources, the public’s enjoyment of City
properties and programs, conservation of natural resources, and good stewardship practices. A reference
sheet regarding the Anti-Idling provision is attached to provide further background.

Recycled Product Requirements: To promote and encourage environmentally sustainable practices for
companies doing business with the City, the City requires that Contractors under City contract use
environmentally preferable products in production of City work products.

Paper and Paper Product Requirements: The City desires use of 100% PCF (post-consumer recycled
content, chlorine-free) Grays Harbor paper, to comply with the City Executive Order and to encourage
environmentally preferable practices for City business. Such paper is available at City contract prices
from Keeney’s Office Supplies at 425-285-0541.

The City prohibits vinyl binders. The City prefers 100% recycled stock Binders. “Rebinders” are a
product that fit this requirement and are available at City contract prices from Complete Office at 206-
628-0059 or Keeney’s Office Supplies at 425-285-0541. Please do not use binders or plastic folders,
unless essential. Note - Keeney’s is a Women Owned Firm and may be noted on your Outreach Plan.

Contractors shall duplex materials prepared for Seattle under this Contract, whether materials are
printed or copied, except when impracticable due to the nature of the product. This is executed under the
Mayor's Executive Order, issued February 13, 2005.

You might also be interested in the “Environmental” section in the US Communities RFP we just worked
on – this is apart from the specific product specs and services requirements we put in – you’d have to ask
US Communities how much of this if any is boilerplate for them now (I left out the ones that seem to me
irrelevant for professional services):
“Environmental
    1. Provide a brief description of any company environmental initiatives, including any green
       products and certifications to be available through your company.
    2. What is your company’s environmental strategy?
    3. What is your investment in being an environmentally preferable product leader?
    4. Do you have any resources dedicated to your environmental strategy? Please describe.”

Hope this is useful. Looking forward to seeing the article—keep us posted. Thanks.

Shirli Axelrod
Waste Prevention and Green Purchasing
Seattle Public Utilities
PO Box 34018
700 Fifth Avenue, Suite 4900
Seattle, WA 98124-4018
Phone: 206-684-7804
E-mail: shirli.axelrod@seattle.gov
                                                                                                         333
                                             Road salt, July 2011
6 Posts

Original Post:
Hello All, I'm doing some research on environmentally preferable road salt. If anyone has any
specifications or suggestions that identify some products or methods that are environmentally friendly
and effective, that would be much appreciated. Thanks!

Jonathan
Jonathan Rifkin, Special Assistant to the Director
Office of Contracting and Procurement
One Judiciary Square, 441 4th St, NW, Suite 700S
Washington, DC 20001
Ph: 202-724-3676
E-Mail: Jonathan.rifkin@dc.gov

Responses:
1. Jonathan: Hi, Please note that it is important to specify the content of the deice material to ensure that
toxic constituents in the material will not contaminate land, water, or air to cause public health issues.
http://www.observertoday.com/page/content.detail/id/535925.html?nav=5047
Below is info I have in my file on the topic of deicers to share:

De-Icing Alternatives
1) We are looking into using an organic natural ice melter that is environmentally friendly, Mountain
Organic Natural IceMelter. This product is safe on concrete, effective in temperatures of -4 degrees
Fahrenheit, safe on vegetation, harmless to groundwater systems, and is safe to handle. Unfortunately, I
cannot attest to the effectiveness of this product, as it has yet to be tried. If you are interested there is a
website to visit for further information: http://www.xynyth.com

2) I once had a sidewalk replaced with one with heating elements in it. Worked great!

3) Here is a site to check out: http://www.plantops.umich.edu/grounds/winter_alternatives.html

4) I don't have a guide, but 1 minute using Google turns up a bunch of environmentally friendly
alternatives to salt http://www.cryotech.com/products/pdf/CMAfacts.pdf

5) You could use one of the non-salt based products or install heater elements under the sidewalks as
some people do their driveways. Problem with the latter is increased use of electricity.

6) These sites discuss the alternatives well but are dated. http://www.oseh.umich.edu//salt.html
http://www.madsci.org/posts/archives/nov98/910675052.Ch.r.html

Other resources: http://www.enviroliteracy.org/article.php/709.html

EPA Guidance 1999 http://www.epa.gov/npdes/pubs/ice.pdf .

Hotel guidance http://www.vtgreenhotels.org/articles/deice.htm

7) Maryland Department of Environment - Facts about winter weathers, chemical deicers and the
                                                                                                             334
Chesapeake Bay http://www.mde.state.md.us/assets/document/WINTER_2.pdf

Environment Canada - BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR SALT USE ON PRIVATE ROADS, PARKING
LOTS AND SIDEWALKS
http://www.ec.gc.ca/nopp/roadsalt/reports/ParkingLot/EN/p5.cfm

University of Michigan - Winter Maintenance: Snow and Ice Removal
http://www.oseh.umich.edu//salt.html

8) I would think a greens keeper at a resort might have some good ideas. The City of Frankenmuth in our
county installed heated sidewalks a few years back. I'm sure they would be able to give you more
information on the cost effectiveness which apparently is comparable to labor and materials used in
repeated salting & shoveling. You can contact them at 240 W. Genesee, Frankenmuth, MI 48734 or call
City Manager Charles Graham at 989-652-9901.

9) Both Potassium Chloride (KCL) and Calcium Chloride (CaCL) will do what he seeks. KCL is also a low
yield fertilizer, making the nearby grass turn green quickly in the spring. Although both make low yield
acids when mixed with water, neither KHCL nor CaHCL has sufficient strength to damage plants. In fact,
those plants which like acid soils thrive with either added to their roots. Notable example in Michigan is
the Azalea, it loves both acids and their blooms look better when run-off water from sidewalks and
driveways contains
diluted KHCL and CaHCL.

10) This resource doesn't directly address the question below but has some useful thoughts and
information you might want to pass along:
http://www.grist.org/biz/tp/2005/11/01/greenclean/index.html

11) Don't know if this will help but on a smaller scale using Alfalfa meal on residential sidewalks and
porch helps melt the ice. It is safe for the lawn, concrete, and pets. I originally heard of this through a pet
store. The paragraph below is from a recycling newsletter in Spokane Washington with some "winter
tips".

Melting Ice: Try alfalfa meal instead of using salt on your porch and sidewalk. This completely natural
fertilizer contains nitrogen to promote ice melting and has a texture to provide traction while it works.
Alfalfa meal will not leave grass and perennials brown or eat away at concrete. Traction Helpers: For just
plain traction, cover ice with wood ashes, coal cinders, sand, or cat litter. Slip Stoppers: Invest in some
non-slip stair treads for your slippery steps.

12) See the Salt Institute document on salt and the environment, and sensible salting practices, available
at http://www.saltinstitute.org/saltandenvironment-english.pdf

In addition, go to www.carbohydrateeconomy.org, word search for "deicer" to find information
companies that make/sell these alternative products for both ice control. Site is part of the Institute for
Local Self-Reliance.

Remind the facility if they have 5 tons or more of salt, they would be subject to the Part 5 rules

13) Here is a great reference from the University of Minnesota....
http://www.extension.umn.edu/projects/yardandgarden/ygbriefs/h456de-icer.html
                                                                                                            335
Our program has been looking at the environmental impacts and possible specifications for deicers.
Based on our analysis of the products available on the market, we found that while many of the products
may offer a significant reduction in the amount of chlorides released into the environment (through using
chlorides other than sodium chloride, "activating" sodium chloride with other chemicals or completely
replacing chlorides as active ingredients), many of the chemicals come with environmental concerns of
their own.

While sodium chloride is a fairly pure chemical, a lot of the alternative deicing products may include a
broad range of impurities, including heavy metals and significant concentrations of phosphorus and
nitrogen. In addition, many of the smaller product manufacturers and marketers may have difficulty
supplying products with consistent chemical composition, because the organics they get as byproducts of
the food industry, for example, will vary in concentrations of copper, zinc and other metals batch to batch.

This is not to say that there are no good alternative deicing products out there. Those products definitely
exist. At the same time, the fact that a product has a lower chloride concentration or has "all natural"
components in it does not make it green.

I would suggest using the chemical specifications established by the Pacific Northwest Snowfighters
(PNS) Association as the minimum standard for the deicing chemicals that you are buying. The
Association includes state departments of transportation from Washington, Montana, Idaho and others.
Here is the link to their website: http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/partners/pns/

There are a couple of issues with the standard, most notably, the limit for phosphorus (in some states it
may be considered high) and the lack of a limit for nitrogen. At the same time, the standard definitely
takes into account many other variables and has been successfully used by several states for many years.

The PNS standard is well known in the industry today. If you are concerned about the issues I noted
above, consider setting additional, more stringent, specifications above and beyond that standard. One of
the ideas we had here in MA was to set the PNS standard as a minimum specification and then mark
products that comply with the set of more stringent specifications (which I will be happy to send you)
with the "green" rating.

In summary, we should continue looking at deicing products and technologies and possibly agree on
some common standards to use. I think the PNS standard is an excellent starting point for anyone who is
interested in buying alternative deicers.

Dmitriy Nikolayev, Procurement Manager
Facilities and Environmental Services
Operational Services Division
Commonwealth of Massachusetts
One Ashburton Place, Room 1017
Boston, MA 02108
Phone: 617-720-3351 Fax: 617-727-4527
dmitriy.nikolayev@osd.state.ma.us

2. Jonathan and EPP listserv participants, Below please find the text from New York's environmentally-
preferable specification for road salt. Feel free to check out any of the state's approved EPP specs at
http://www.ogs.state.ny.us/EO/4/ApprovedSpecs.asp

                                                                                                          336
Have a great weekend, Brenda Grober

TREATED ROAD SALT
Covered products: Treated Road Salt
Definitions: Granular sodium chloride (rock salt) treated with corrosion inhibited liquid magnesium
chloride – categorized as Type 1 or Type 2 treated salt. Type 1 is defined as rock salt treated with at least
25% Magnesium Chloride concentration (w/v). Type 2 is defined as rock salt treated with 13 - 24%
Magnesium Chloride Concentration (w/v) plus a minimum of 12% Organic Based Performance Enhancer
mixed in.

BOD5: Abbreviates “Biological Oxygen Demand” and refers to the amount of dissolved oxygen consumed
in five days by bacteria that perform biological degradation of organic matter.

Standards: Where applicable and appropriate, available at a competitive cost and where it meets
operational objectives, affected entities shall, to the maximum extent practicable, use treated salt as an
alternative to untreated salt or sand. Affected entities are encouraged to use treated salt in
environmentally sensitive areas. Sand is the least desirable alternative due to the potential for increased
human health and ecological impacts.

Treated salt shall not exceed the concentrations of constituents listed below:
Constituents Concentration
Phosphorus      250.00 ppm
Cyanide          0.20 ppm
Arsenic          5.00 ppm
Copper          0.50 ppm
Lead            1.00 ppm
Mercury         0.05 ppm
Chromium         0.50 ppm
Cadmium          0.20 ppm
Barium           75.00 ppm
Selenium        5.00 ppm
Zinc             10.00 ppm

Sampling results shall be provided to the New York State Department of Transportation to demonstrate
that a product meets the parameters above and for Type 2 treated salt, to indicate the product’s BOD5.
Sampling shall be performed in accordance with ASTM D-345. BOD5 shall be expressed as mg/L. Product
shall be tested using generally accepted industry standard analytical procedures as appropriate.

When Type 2 product choices are considered, affected entities are encouraged to utilize products with a
phosphorus content lower than listed above as well as comparatively lower BOD5. In the event of equal
prices for treated salt and with all other criteria being met, the lowest concentration of phosphorous shall
be used in determining award

Brenda Grober | Strategic Business Development
Empire State Development
(518) 292-5342: Office
(518) 852-8219: Mobile
www.esd.ny.gov

                                                                                                          337
3.  http://www.magicsalt.info/Magic%20Salt.htm Have you ever looked into Magic Salt?
Best regards,
Deborah
Deborah Robbins
cell:716-474-1303

4. Jonathan, The State of Washington is a member state in the Pacific Northwest Snowfighters
Association (PNS) which establishes standards and specifications for winter snow and ice control
products and was referenced in one of your replies.

King County, WA uses the GeoMelt C product (calcium chloride) that is available on the State of
Washington contract using the PNS standards. You can view contract details at:
https://fortress.wa.gov/ga/apps/ContractSearch/ContractSummary.aspx?c=02708

You can also view the King County Snow and Ice Removal brochure at:
http://www.kingcounty.gov/transportation/kcdot/Roads/AboutUs/~/media/transportation/kcdot/roa
ds/aboutus/docs/snowandicebrochure.ashx


Karen Hamilton
Environmental Purchasing Program Manager
King County Procurement and Contract Services
401 5th Avenue, 3rd Floor
Seattle, WA 98104
(206)263-9294
www.kingcounty.gov/procurement/green

5. Jonathan, I have zero personal experience with this but some municipalities around
here (Wisconsin) swear by a salt/de-sugared beet juice mix... word on the street is that it works better at
colder temps, you can save a ton of money overall, and that much less salt gets into our fresh waterways,
there's more salt to go around during shortages, it's safer, it's less corrosive, etc. Here are a few random
articles that came up in a search:
http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2007/11/30/WinterRoad.ART_ART_11-30-
07_B1_0N8KKP5.html
http://www.secorgroupinc.com/blog/2011/06/17/the-daily-iowan-review-on-promelt/

Debbie
Deborah Lema
Research and Education
Racine Industries, Inc.




                                                                                                         338
                      Language to specify water efficient fixtures, August 2011
3 Posts

Original Posting:
Hi all; I'm working on an RFP template and looking for some general language to require contractors to
use water efficient fixtures in residential renovations. Does anyone have any
clauses/language/specs that they can share?

Also is anyone specifying the new WaterSense Certification? Is there another standard that I can
reference?

Thanks in advance for any help,
Lynda
Lynda Rankin,
Manager, Sustainable Procurement Integration
Economic and Rural Development and Tourism
PO Box 787
Halifax Nova Scotia
B3J 2V2
email: rankinlx@gov.ns.ca

Responses:
1. WaterSense is a label for standards specifically geared for residences and the one we would suggest
but are interested to learn if there are other more robust water efficiency standards---Sandra

Sandra Cannon, Technical Support
U.S. Department of Energy Sustainable Acquisition Program
Tel. 509-529-1535

2. Also check the DOE FEMP Specifications for Energy-Efficient Products - it includes plumbing fixtures.
http://www1.eere.energy.gov/femp/technologies/eep_purchasingspecs.html
-Stacey
Stacey Foreman
City of Portland, Oregon, Procurement Services




                                                                                                      339
    Tools or sample contracts on how to weight environmental considerations, September 2011
3 Posts

Original Posting:
I am looking for some tools or examples that show how to weight (or evaluate) environmental
considerations into a contract. Alternatively examples of contracts to illustrate how this has been done
would help. Would welcome any assistance.

Thanks
Hugh
Hugh Wareham
Chief Executive Officer
ECO-Buy Limited
p (03) 9349 0401
mobile 0417 139 809
E-mail hwareham@ecobuy.org.au
web www.ecobuy.org.au

Responses:
1. Hi Hugh, There are many different ways to weight/evaluate environmental considerations in
contracts. We might have some examples. If you want to give me a call, we can talk through what you are
looking for, and I can try to provide some relevant information. My number is (510) 547-5475.

If the timing is too difficult (given that it looks like you are in Australia), maybe send me an email with
more details -- are you looking for environmental specifications for particular product categories? Or
more general bid solicitation strategies?

Thanks,
Ellen Love
Responsible Purchasing Network
(510) 547-5475
1201 Martin Luther King Jr. Way
Oakland, CA 94612
ellen@greenpurchasing.org

2. We have posted samples from several RFBs and RFPs for Minnesota state contracts - you can view
them on our website:
http://www.pca.state.mn.us/index.php/topics/preventing-waste-and-pollution/environmentally-
preferable-purchasing/state-contracts.html




                                                                                                              340
                                Sustainable IT policies, September 2011
3 Posts

Original Post:
Hi all-I was wondering if anyone knows of any organizations or institutions that have a Sustainable IT
policy? I’ve come across general Sustainability Policies or general Environmentally Preferable
Purchasing Policies but we’re looking specifically for IT/Electronics (preferably dealing with purchasing,
management and disposal).

Regards,
    -Sue
Sue Chiang
Pollution Prevention/Sustainable Electronics Director
Center for Environmental Health
Office #: 510.655.3900 x311

Responses:
1. Hi Sue, Most institutional purchasers that have a policy have specific requirements for buying EPEAT.
On the EPEAT website they have a section on sample purchaser contracts:
http://www.epeat.net/resources/sample-purchase-contracts/.

Near you, I believe San Francisco was one of the first cities in the country to implement an IT policy a few
years ago. You may want to talk to the folks at SF Environment on their specific policy. Their website for
the Committee on Information Technology has a little bit of info here:
http://www.sfcoit.org/index.aspx?page=619.
Hope this helps!

Josh Saunders
Greencurement
312-623-5529
josh@greencurement.com
http://www.Greencurement.com

2. Hi Sue – A few years ago I worked with the Washington State Departments of General Administration
and Information Services (now combined into Enterprise Services) to develop a green IT policy for state
purchasing. Policy development was mandated by the passage of WA’s e-waste legislation RCW
70.95N.250 in 2006. The policy doesn’t have a reporting requirement, but I am hoping in the next year to
get some state wide data.

The policy is located within the Washington State Purchasing Manual, section 6.20, Purchasing of
Electronic Products - see http://www.ga.wa.gov/PCA/manual.htm.

Regards,
Tina Simcich
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Coordinator
(360) 407-7517
Washington State Department of Ecology
http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/swfa/epp

                                                                                                         341
                             Laundry service specifications, October 2011
3 Posts

Original Posting:
Hi all, Does anyone know of some good examples of RFPs for laundry services and/or uniform rental
services that incorporate environmental criteria?

Specifically, I’m looking for best practices in the following areas:
    Least toxic options for commercial laundry detergents and related chemicals
    Third party certifications (either for chemicals or the operation as a whole)
    Water and energy conservation practices
    Packaging reduction
    Other opportunities to reduce the environmental impacts

Thanks in advance for any help you can provide!

Kelly Panciera
Green Spectrum Consulting
PO Box 29135
Portland, OR 97296-9135
503-208-3786
kelly@green-spectrum.net

Responses:
1. Some jurisdictions are looking into requirements that uniforms NOT require dry cleaning.
Elizabeth E. Meer
Special Assistant
Commissioner's Policy Office
NYS Department of Environmental Conservation
625 Broadway, 14th Floor
Albany, NY 12233
518-402-2796 Telephone
518-402-8541 Fax

2. Hi Kelly – there’s a nice case study on a Kaiser Permanente laundry effort (and an email contact for
more info) at http://practicegreenhealth.org/sites/default/files/upload-
files/ncal_external_laundry_success_story_6.11.pdf

I did some work with H2E on ozone use in place of bleach– no longer have the info readily available but it
was a substantial improvement in terms of toxicity, enabling lower temps, actually reducing wear on
textiles – though of course like every alternative it had some issues of its own…

Sarah O'Brien
EPEAT/Green Electronics Council
sarah.obrien@greenelectronicscouncil.org
+1 (802) 479 0317



                                                                                                          342
                         Strategies to Reduce Paper Towel Waste, October 2011
4 Posts, 3 Attachments

Original Post:
Hi all, I’m an AmeriCorps member working on climate change issues in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am
currently working with Alameda County on waste reduction and sustainable purchasing.

Does anyone have experience implementing an office-based paper towel waste reduction program? I am
considering a sticker campaign for dispensers, reminding people to use fewer paper towels. Could you
send me information on outreach techniques (e.g. messaging, sticker, survey, fact sheet, etc.) that worked
for your office? Other resource, data or information is appreciated, as well. Thanks,

Will Quinn
Sustainability Associate
AmeriCorps Member
william.quinn@acgov.org
(This request is posted to EPPnet by Karen Cook on Will's behalf)

Responses:
1. Hello Will - It's always best to REDUCE before composting and recycling. So I like your idea of
reminding people to minimize use in the first place.

Secondly, I just heard about a program where a commercial property management company in Seattle,
who is LEED certified, worked with a regional composter and the local public health department, to
approve and pilot a composting collection program for paper towels in their property bathrooms.
(Although, I don't know all the details, there may be some issues with public health requirements if a
specific composting process is not guaranteed to provide the composting conditions to ensure pathogen
destruction. I believe this was part of the assessment and approval process of this program).

Also, I would imagine that property tenant education and signage would be a very important part of such
a program. The pilot was apparently successful and is moving beyond the pilot phase. E-mail me directly
if you want referral contact information.

Michelle Gaither
1402 Third Ave, Suite 1420 | Seattle, WA 98101
T 206.352.2050 | F 206.352.2049 |
mgaither@pprc.org | www.pprc.org
Twitter: twitter.com/PacNW_PPRC
LinkedIn Group: linkd.in/hjKoi3
Facebook Page: facebook.com/PacNW.PPRC

2. Will, Do they have to stay with paper? Excel hand dryers are terrific, I just hate paper towels. Cost
benefit analysis?
Best regards,
Deborah
Deborah Robbins
cell:716-474-1303

3. Here's something I had. Additional files at the end of this first article.
                                                                                                       343
Can You Recycle Paper Towels? By Laura Dattaro, eHow Contributor
updated: August 26, 2009
Most paper products can and should be recycled, but paper towels present problems due to the fibers
from which they're made. Learning how to dispose of them properly will divert much waste from landfills
and encourage the use of healthy practices like composting, reusing and recycling.
How it Works
    Paper towels cannot be recycled the way other paper products can. They are generally already
       made of recycled paper products, and as the products get reused, the fibers get continuously
       shorter. Recycling paper towels would also raise concerns of bacteria and food waste, as they are
       used to clean up messes.
Composting
    Although paper towels cannot be recycled at most recycling plants, they can be used for
       composting and creating mulch. Creating and maintaining a compost heap can be a time-
       consuming process, but will produce cheap, high-quality mulch to use in gardens. Paper towels
       can be added to compost heaps since they break down easily and are made of recycled fibers.
Reusing
    Most people throw away paper towels after one use, but they are designed to be sturdy enough for
       multiple uses. If a towel is not completely saturated or dirty, save it for reuse. Rinse it with water,
       squeeze the excess water out and hang on a line with a clothespin to dry. Towels that are only
       used for wiping up dry messes can be saved and reused without rinsing.
Waste Disposal
    Some waste-disposal companies will accept paper towels as part of yard waste, as it will break
       down in this environment. Waste Management, Inc., the country's leading waste-disposal
       company, practices this method of disposal. Check with your local waste-disposal provider; if they
       offer this option, save paper towels and dispose of them with grass clippings and other yard waste.
Benefits
    Composting or reusing paper towels cuts down on landfill waste, where paper towels may not
       break down. Reusing them saves money and encourages environmental practices, while
       composting provides a cheap and healthy way to add life to a yard or garden. Because paper
       towels are already made of recycled fibers, finding ways to recycle and reuse them completes the
       cycle of an environmentally friendly product and helps cut down on the amount of household
       waste produced.

Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist, Office of Materials Management,
EPA, Region III
1650 Arch Street (3LC40) Phila, PA 19103-2029
ph: 215-814-3298 fax:215-814-3114 giuranna.mike@epa.gov




                                                                                                          344
                            Attachment A – Paper Towel Rolls vs. Folded
We are a small programme offering sustainable procurement and practice advice to government
agencies in New Zealand (see Govt3 website at www.mfe.govt.nz/issues/sustainable-
industry/govt3/index.html).... And really have enjoyed reading your helpful advice on EPPnet, thank you!

One question which we have been asked by a number of agencies is about which hand-drying option to
use and why: air towels, paper towels, or roller cloth towels. The few reports we have seen address
resource use (particularly electricity, landfill & and paper industry impacts), but omit the cloth towel
option completely. We have also had questions raised about health which we cannot answer (for example
do we need to care about all those germ-laden water droplets whizzing off one’s hands in the air towel
breeze? Obviously in a roller towel, you want them replaced as soon as they run out).

Our current advice is to go with air towels (our energy here is 70% hydroelectric) and/or cloth towels
(discharge from commercial laundries is covered by regional water quality laws)…. And paper towels if
they are going to re-pulping or composting after use instead of landfill (incineration for energy recovery
is not an option here). But we’d really like fewer gaps in our information if possible.

We are looking for leads to other studies, data, comparisons, advice – can any of you out there help?
Many thanks!
Dana Peterson
Acting Govt3 team leader dana.peterson@mfe.govt.nz
Ministry for the Environment
Wellington, New Zealand

Dana – I’ll send you a copy of an August 2001 life cycle assessment that claims hand dryers are better. It
was prepared for Airdri Ltd. and Bobrick Washroom Equipment Inc. so the results might not surprise
anyone. I’d also refer you to the EPPnet archives. There is a thread from March 2004 that covers the
topic. If you can’t find it, I have a Word version of the thread I cut-and-pasted that I can send you. Scot

At the County of Alameda in California, we have been examining similar questions. Here is some info to
get you started:
Life cycle or similar studies that highlight which hand-drying options (not including carry-your-own hand
towel) are favorable in terms of certain impacts:
§     Environmental Resources Management: http://www.getf.org/file/toolmanager/O16F20922.pdf
        o     Note that this uses a less energy-efficient and slower dryer than those available today (e.g.,
        1.5 kW draw & 15-second dry for one new model).
§     Sylvatica: http://www.buildinggreen.com/auth/article.cfm?fileName=110106a.xml (sidebar)
        o     The folks behind this pointed out in personal communications that the importance of the
        electricity factor makes how the electricity is generated particularly important in weighing the
        analysis -- average generation mix for US or Europe still favors the drier (and it does seem that the
        mix is constantly improving!). This analysis does not include the manufacturer of the dryer;
        however, apparently this is less significant than the use impacts as the product is used thousands
        of times in its life.
§     NYC Department of Sanitation:
http://www.nyc.gov/html/dsny/downloads/pdf/guides/recycling/wprr/wprr07.pdf (used for analysis
in “Alternatives to Multi-Fold Paper Towels” at http://www.stopwaste.org/home/index.asp?page=225)
 Other useful sources:
 §     Paper towel impacts and recommendations:
http://www.greenseal.org/recommendations/CGR_tissuetowel.pdf
                                                                                                         345
§     Calculator for climate benefits of paper diversion:
http://yosemite.epa.gov/oar/globalwarming.nsf/content/ActionsWasteWARM.html
§     Assumptions that may be used in converting tons of paper saved to “trees saved” for
communications materials: http://www.conservatree.org/learn/EnviroIssues/TreeStats.shtml

As far as the bacteria question, we have been collecting scientific journal articles on the subject, as well
as calling the Centers for Disease Control, and the consensus I’ve understood is that this is a myth -- or at
best, unproven because the published studies have not focused on this issue of bacteria inside the dryer
directly. I’m going to prepare a summary of the research for our own use and would be happy to share it
with you. (We don’t have permission to share some unpublished studies which are most helpful in
discrediting the original research -- funded by paper tissue manufacturers -- that gave rise to this concern
but can put you in touch with the study sponsors off-list if you’re interested.)
Best, Emily Sadigh
Resource Conservation Specialist
County of Alameda, California

JamesR@dred.state.nh.us 02/07/02 12:37PM >>>
FYI - from Resource Conservation Alliance's (RCA), Washington, DC monthly e-newsletter on wood
consumption issues at: http://lists.essential.org/mailman/listinfo/rca-news
WEB: http://www.rca-info.org

"Drying Off Without Destroying Forests:
A new electric hand dryer was recently introduced into the marketplace which may have an impact on
the consumption of paper towels. Excel Dryer, Inc. is manufacturing the "XLerator" which greatly
reduces the energy consumption of standard electric hand dryers, as well as the time it takes to dry
hands, according to "XLerator -- The Electric Hand Dryer Reinvented" in Environmental Building News,
January 2002. The dryer also consumes much less energy per use than virgin or even recycled paper
towels and of course eliminates the need for this additional paper product. So architects and designers
looking for the most environmentally preferable option for public rest rooms have a new, forest-friendly
option."

James Robb, Recycling Market Development Program
NH Division of Economic Development
172 Pembroke Road - PO Box 1856
Concord, NH 03302 603-271-2591; fax 271-6784
jamesr@dred.state.nh.us

Sandra Cannon, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Technical Assistance for the U.S.
Department of Energy Tel. 509-529-1535

From Susan Kinsella, Susan Kinsella & Associates, Novato, CA:
When Nancy VandenBerg and I did a buy-recycled and source reduction procurement project in Alameda
County in 1995-1996, Nancy researched the waste reduction opportunities involved in switching from
single- or multi-fold towels to roll towels. Using calculation figures supplied by Scott and Wisconsin
Tissue, she used packaging and sizes from the then-current Alameda County and Oakland paper towel
specifications and developed a table that calculated the paper saved, plus packaging waste and labor cost
savings.

                                                                                                         346
In her intro, she explains, "People use more folded towels than roll varieties because: They pull folded
towels out of dispensers by the handful, they rarely unfold towels before using them and they take towels
to their desks to mop up spills. Dispensers control the amount of paper for roll towels and they are not as
wide as folded towels, so less paper is used per 'handwipe.' By changing from folded towels to roll towels,
you can reduce waste 25% to 35% in toweling alone. There are packaging, cost and labor savings as well.
. . . Dispensers that hold 800-feet rolls as well as stub rolls (partially used rolls) are the most
cost-effective in maintenance terms."

I can fax the table to people if they want it. The summary is: "In busy public restrooms, maintenance staff
put 500 folded towels (single fold or multi-fold) into each dispenser every day. That is 2,500 towels per
5-day week or 130,000 towels (32.5 cases) per dispenser per year. In our example, 1,800 cases will serve
55.3 folded towel dispensers each year or 3,600,000 people who dry their hands once. If maintenance
staff used 800-foot roll towels to serve the same number of people at the same rate, they would fill
dispensers 2.4 times per week and use just under 1,256 rolls (20.8 cases) per year. With the factors in our
example, one folded towel dispenser serves 65,000 pairs of hands per year while one roll towel dispenser
serves 156,000 pairs of hands during the same time."

Nancy found that roll towels saved 27-34% of the paper used for folded towels, saved 80% of the
packaging, and saved 58% on labor costs. Roll towels were also less expensive (comparisons ran 24-39%
less expensive, depending on roll size and vendor), required less maintenance, and were more compact,
saving storage space. She noted that nearly all paper towel vendors have calculation models through
which you can run stats based on your organization's own usage patterns. E-mail: SEEK251@aol.com

>From Beth Eckl, Alameda County General Services Agency, Oakland, CA:
(Note from Tom: I believe the study Beth describes here is the same one that Susan describes above.)
There are several sources for documented savings by switching from folded towels to roll paper towels.
The first resource is the paper towel vendors themselves. They know these savings well. Our county also
studied the savings in an in-house test at eleven locations over 8 months. Our numbers are higher than
other reports so I'll give a summary of the ranges one might expect. Also, an Alameda County publication
called "Resourceful Purchasing" has a chapter outlining the savings. If you would like more information,
let me know.

Weight of paper reduced: 25-78%. Cost of Paper reduced: 49-78%. Labor time reduced to replace
towels: 80-90%.

Our janitorial staff cannot wait for this switch! Our bid goes out next week. Our baseline data says we
use about 200,000 pounds of towels annually so we will be able to measure results. E-mail:
eeckl@co.alameda.ca.us

Dear Mike:
Four years ago we did a limited analysis of the cost and waste stream impacts of towels and dryers for
one government building in New York City. The analysis considered towel dispenser and dryer
procurement costs, maintenance, towel procurement, electricity use and waste management and
disposal. For a facility with 27 restrooms using c-fold paper towels, savings were $239/year by
converting to roll toweling and $235/year from converting to hot air drying. Roll towels also reduced
disposal by 1,162 pounds of towel waste and hot air dryers avoided disposal of 2,182 pounds of towel
waste per year.


                                                                                                          347
The study also showed that for high-use restrooms, dryers are most cost effective because their
operational costs (electricity and even potential maintenance) are low compared to the purchasing and
labor associated with refilling towel dispensers.

Carole O. Bell, Senior Project Manager
Science Applications International Corporation
221 Third Street
Newport, Rhode Island 02840
phone: (401) 848-4756
fax: (401) 8474654
e-mail: cbell@mtg.saic.com

Hand-drying and bacteria
Cloth, paper or electric hand dryer? When it comes to washing your hands and bacteria, the way you dry
them has little impact on cleanliness, a new study indicates.

Daniel R. Gustafson, a medical technologist, and colleagues at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn., compared
drying methods used by 100 volunteers whose hands were contaminated with bacteria. The researchers
found that washing eliminated the same number of germs whether hands were dried with cloth toweling
on a roller, paper towels stacked on the sink, an electric hand dryer, or evaporation.

Although experts agree that hand washing reduces the risk of getting and passing along infection, earlier
studies of drying methods have drawn conflicting conclusions. Some research supported electric hand
dryers, while others favored paper or cloth towels.

Co-author Franklin R. Cockerill, III, M.D., a microbiologist and infectious disease specialist at Mayo Clinic,
noted that these earlier studies used different methods, sometimes exposing only fingertips to bacteria.
In the Mayo study, the entire hand was contaminated with bacteria.

The study is published in the July issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Link to an August, 2001, life cycle
assessment study of air dryers vs. paper towels, commissioned by a British air dryer manufacturer and an
air dryer supplier (forwarded by Kinley Deller from the GreenBiz.com website):
http://www.getf.org/file/toolmanager/O16F20922.pdf

>From David Cera, Minnesota Office of Environmental Assistance, St. Paul, MN:
What about good old fashioned rolls of cloth towels that are washed and reused? A few years back our
building management tried to replace our cloth towels with paper. We complained, and within a short
period of time, had our cloth towel rolls back.

E-mail: david.cera@moea.state.mn.us

From Jeffrey Smedberg, County of Santa Cruz Public Works, Santa Cruz, CA, responding to the 3/22/99
posting asking about signs for dispensers of paper hand towels, to encourage people to minimize the
number of towels they use:

Ecology Action of Santa Cruz came up with a nice sticker: Graphic of a roll of towels with a picture of a
tree on each sheet of paper. Text: "Yes... paper towels DO grow on trees. Thanks for using only what you
need." Simple production: Black-and-white laser-printed on crack-n-peel paper, 4"x5". (We don't want to

                                                                                                           348
use up too many resources trying to save some, do we?) Contact: Victor Aguiar at vaguiar@ecoact.org I'm
sure they would be happy to share.

Since I once lived near forests that were being clear-cut for tissue paper, I have a personal solution: I
carry a handkerchief which I use for a variety of purposes, including drying my hands. (When the towel
dispensers are out of paper, I'm the only one not complaining.) Not sure when this will become
fashionable again.

E-mail: dpw179@scruza.cahwnet.gov

From Jesse White, Resource Management Group, Tallevast FL, clarifying his 3/24/99 posting about a U.S.
Postal Service project (that he worked on) to switch to a high post-consumer content paper hand towel
made in part from recycled mail.

I would like to clarify to the list that it was NOT the MAIL that made the towel product of lower quality, it
was the particular grade of towels, which includes its basis weight and the towel finish. Actually, mail is a
decent fiber source for many paper-making applications. I think it's important to understand that the
mill always has and continues to use mail in its recipe. Each towel product attempts to fill a market niche,
and it turned out that the USPS could not satisfy several goals with this towel product. Which was really
my point that we need to be mindful of why we are buying recycled, closing the loop, or seeking waste
reduction alternatives, achieving a bottom line gain for the environment. Overall, I think this was an
innovative and progressive move on the part of the USPS to close the loop, conserve resources, reduce
waste, and be cost-effective. All of which help the organization move toward sustainability. E-mail:
Jessewhite@aol.com

Dear Mike:
I can't resist a challenging topic. Did some searching and found the following references that may be
helpful to you: http://www.hi-tm.com/Documents/handwash.html - Listing of articles on hand
washing that is located on the Hospitality Institute of Technology and Management website. Use the
"find on this page" function found on the Edit menu of either Navigator or Internet Explorer to look for
the text string "paper towels." This will help you find all articles that discuss in some way the differences
between paper towels and other hand drying methods such as electric dryers.

http://suntzu.larc.calpoly.edu/ecs/courses/407/hygiene/had2.htm
http://www.wmin.ac.uk/~redwayk/Research/had2.htm
http://www.wmin.ac.uk/~redwayk/Research/WADsummary98.htm

These links reference two University of Westminster studies comparing different hand drying methods.
The findings of these studies are more favorable toward paper towels. It should be noted, however, that
the 1998 study was supported by paper tissue manufacturers. (Some of the article abstracts listed on the
HITM site, by contrast, are not as critical of paper towels). I don't know how well regarded these U. of W.
studies are – it may be worthwhile to get an opinion from some public health professionals who are
familiar with this literature.

Sincerely,
Roger M. Guttentag
610-584-8836
rgutten@concentric.net

                                                                                                          349
Mike, If you're looking for comparisons in regard to health aspects see: "Comparison of cloth, paper, and
warm air drying in eliminating viruses and bacteria from washed hands" from the Department of
Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, and the Division of Biometrics,
Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Health and Welfare Canada.
Reprint requests: Syed A. Sattar, PhD at(the above) 451 Smyth, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1h 8M5

You can also get this article from Volume 19, Number 5 of the American Journal of Infection Control,
October 1991. The summary of the six page article with references is: "Irrespective of the hand-washing
agent used, electric air drying produced the highest, and cloth drying the lowest, reduction in numbers of
both test organisms." (human rotavirus and E. coli)

There is a website that is not un-biased; but it addresses health and other issues:
http://www.nova-intl.com/health.html

We installed 153 dryers in 80 restrooms. We offer a limited paper alternative. Given the opportunity I
will make my personal choice for air drying (with no buttons to push) over paper every time. Doug

At the School of Natural Resources and Environment at the University of Michigan, a group of students
this spring did a semester project in the Industrial Ecology class on this topic. Contact Greg Keoleian,
Associate Research Scientist, at gregak@umich.edu to see if he can give you their results. The study was a
life cycle assessment so it covers all aspects of the products.

Good luck,
Megan DeYoung
Student
Masters of Science, UM School of Natural Resources and Environment
Masters of Business Administration, UM Business School

NEW ELECTRIC HAND DRYER SAVES ENERGY, OUTPERFORMS PAPER TOWELS
Excel Dryer, Inc.'s new XLerator hand dryer for public lavatories gets hands dry in one-third the time,
and uses about one-third the energy of conventional dryers. By providing air at a higher temperature
than that of standard dryers, the XLerator dries hands in 12 to 15 seconds. Conventional dryers take 30
to 45 seconds. In addition, the XLerator draws only 1,500 watts instead of the usual 2,200. And a life-
cycle analysis performed by Sylvatica, Inc. and Franklin Associates, Ltd. shows that on the basis of energy
use, electric hand dryers perform far better than paper towels. Drying one's hands with virgin paper
towels consumes 743 kilojoules (kJ) per use, with recycled towels 460 kJ/use, with a standard electric
dryer 222 kJ/use, and with the XLerator dryer 76 kJ/use.

Environmental Building News, Jan 2002, p 6, by Nadav Malin. [Full text:
http://www.buildinggreen.com/products/xlerator.html]

Mike,
I would like get some of the information you gather on the paper towel versus air dryer debate.
I was going to email Greg at U.Mich., but figured you could forward any response you get from him. It
almost seems like the jury has already delivered their verdict convicting air dryers. I know Cam Metcalf
from the Kentucky Pollution Prevention Center has made comments in the past about preferring paper
towels to air dryers. I assume that's based on life-cycle environmental impact, I don't know. thanks a lot,
nato.
Nate Sturm
                                                                                                        350
Northern Kentucky Solid Waste Management Coordinator
trashnate@yahoo.com
859-283-1885
E-mail: RickHlavka@aol.com

From Blair Pollock, Orange County Solid Waste Management Department, Chapel Hill, NC, responding to
the recent postings about hand dryers vs. paper towels:
Is there any discussion of the industrial cloth drying towel as an alternative here? We have them in our
restroom at the office and they are well-accepted by all.

Further, our local botanical garden at the University of North Carolina has incorporated the paper towels
from their restrooms into their on-site composting with no apparent problems (that's almost always the
only thing in their restroom waste cans).




                                                                                                      351
                                   Attachment B – Hand Dryers Article, 2000
As bathrooms go, the facilities at the Environmental Protection Agency, Region III in Philadelphia are
more than adequate. The janitorial technicians do a great job of keeping them clean, and you would be
hard-pressed to find a mess left in the sinks or on the floor by employees. Even the color scheme of these
fine facilities is just right. Only one thing could turn each bathroom into a mini environmental paradise -
warm-air hand dryers!

The hand dryer has a bad reputation, backed mostly by most paper towel die-hards. Their reasoning is
that it wastes energy, promotes germs, and it takes too long to get a good, solid dry. While the first two
reasons of the aforementioned statement are relevant, the third will not float in an intelligent discussion.

An extra minute of inconvenience here or there is worth the amount of trash that we save from going into
our already crowded landfills. According to the Coastal Rainforest Coalition, post-consumer paper
products make up 40% of a landfill. And since modern landfills allow for less decomposition to protect
groundwater from leachate, it takes quite a while for even paper products to decompose.

Those who are afraid of having their hands decompose from bacteria should also look into the facts on
hand dryers. One argument against hand dryers is the idea that paper towels are the only hygienically
way to dry the hands. The notion that hand dryers increase germs or make them airborne is not an
undisputed claim. A hygiene study in 1991 came to the conclusion that hand dryers are perfectly safe in
drying the hands with germ free results.*

The paper towel waste that goes into our landfills is full of germs. Just because they go from our hands to
the towels does not mean they disappear. The out-of-sight out-of-mind mentality makes us ignorant to
the fact of where our trash goes. Trucks, which use up plenty of energy, shuttle our refuse to a landfill (or
New Jersey). The cost of operating a hand dryer also wastes energy, but does it use as much as the
process of dealing with trash? It usually depends on the size of the company or agency, so it’s hard to
generalize.

The pros generally outweigh the cons concerning hand dryers. Source reduction is the most logical
solution to our municipal waste problems. Unfortunately, most of our decisions have to consider the
economic benefits and losses. Reduction in waste will only occur if the money to operate hand dryers is
less than the funds needed to bring in the paper towels and ship them to a landfill when finished. The
idea of a company with zero waste can be a reality, but the man-made rules that govern our lives throw a
lot of factors into every decision that is made. One simple rule is constant though; if it doesn’t exist, you
can’t throw it away.

*Ansari, Shamin A., et al. “Comparison of cloth, paper, and warm air drying in eliminating viruses and
bacteria from washed hands.” American Journal of Infection Control 19 (1991): 243-249.




                                                                                                          352
                               Attachment C – Paper Towel Composting
Mike, The fancy hand dryers are shown in the link below. Scroll down a page and you will see them. I
noticed the cost, which explains why they are not around much yet. http://www.handdryer.com/

tom

Steve, You're welcome, the normal problem with paper towels is that they are already made with
recycled paper and the fibers are very short so can't usually be recycled again but are good for
composting because they break down so quickly. See http://www.ehow.com/about_5344123_can-
recycle-paper-towels.html. I guess you could ask Blue Mountain, but I don't know if they'd want our
paper towels and if they could recycle them. The cloth towel machines are the best option but don't
know if the building would change.

Mike Giuranna, Solid Waste Specialist
-----Steven Donohue/R3/USEPA/US wrote: -----

To: Mike Giuranna/R3/USEPA/US@EPA
From: Steven Donohue/R3/USEPA/US
Date: 01/28/2011 07:46AM
Cc: David Iacono/R3/USEPA/US@EPA, Nicholas Dinardo/R3/USEPA/US@EPA
Subject: Re: Fw: Recycling Paper Towels from our Restrooms

Thanks Mike for providing the history and background of this issue here as well as the research.

I believe that the article indicates that Penn is recycling (not composting) their paper towels. I think the
separation issue for either recycling or composting would not be that hard to overcome if we focused
only on diverting waste paper towels from the rest rooms. Not much if anything else is disposed of in the
rest rooms but these paper towels. I believe Penn switched to a different colored plastic bag in the rest
rooms to differentiate this waste from other waste once it was picked up.

I think we were looking at options of what can we do that will not involve infrastructure. The new hand
air dryers are amazing but would be costly to install. I have been trying to get the building to get rid of
the old incandescent above the sinks for years but we haven't been able to make that happen let alone
running electric and buying and installing 28 air dryers in the rest rooms.

Steven J. Donohue (3EA40)
Environmental Scientist
US Environmental Protection Agency

Considering that we recycle most of the paper, cans, bottles, etc. and that we use the tri fold (as opposed
to the roll) paper towels, they are probably more than 30% of our waste stream. Composting would be a
good solution, but would be a major effort, separating them from the other trash and paying someone to
haul them to a composting facility (Peninsula in Wilmington, DE or wherever Penn is taking theirs). If we
can send them for composting we should meet with the proper people at Penn and see what they're doing
and maybe we can work together or do the same thing. The thing we talked about years ago was
replacing the trifold paper towels with the roll cloth towel dispenser.



                                                                                                         353
which was rated as the best environmentally or the hot air dryers, another good solution, although you
need and use electricity, but have no waste.




The roll dispensers are next best as people only use as much towel as they need.




We couldn't get the building to agree to change the paper towels at that time so we stayed with the tri
folds. Here's what we put together at that time:

Dave: THANKS for sending this - it is very interesting and timely! On Friday I sent a concept paper to
Nick, our EMS Coordinator, on options for increasing composting in our building. One of the options we
looked at was to compost our paper towels from the restrooms (an idea Mike had mentioned to me
awhile back).

Our new EPA EMS Agencywide Objectives and Targets are out in draft and HQ would like us to increase
composting and recycling (strive for 55 % recycling). Penn's experience is very interesting especially the
fact that they think 30% of their building waste stream was paper towels. I copied Nick on this and we
can certainly look into it with the building manager. Steve Donohue

 Mike/Steve:
 I have wondered if we could recycle our used bathroom paper towels. Apparently, Penn is now doing so.
 Can we do it here?
School of Medicine Expands Paper Towel Recycling
In December 2010, the School of Medicine launched paper towel recycling in all of its public restrooms, an
effort that the school anticipates will significantly increase the overall percentage of materials recycled on
campus. The expansion is a result of several successful pilots across the campus. Huntsman Hall served as
the first test location after data from a 2010 Earth Day waste audit revealed that paper products such as
towels and napkins accounted for approximately 30 percent of the building’s waste stream. Clear trash
bags in restrooms throughout the School of Medicine were simply switched out for blue recycling liners,
making the transition to recycling seamless. Read more about Penn’s paper towel recycling initiative here.

David Iacono
                                                                                                           354
EPA Mid-Atlantic Region
iacono.david@epa.gov
215 814-3231




                          355
                  Cities that have Eliminated Plastic Foam Packaging, October 2011
6 Posts

Original Post:
Hi all, I'm researching policies and programs that require vendors to eliminate plastic foam packaging
(e.g. polystyrene) from deliveries (computers and IT equipment, office supplies, etc.).

Can anyone point me to some good examples? I'm primarily interested in U.S. cities, but other examples
would work as well. Thanks in advance for your help!

Kelly Panciera
Green Spectrum Consulting
PO Box 29135
Portland, OR 97296-9135
503-208-3786
kelly@green-spectrum.net

Responses:
1. You may want to check out Burlington, VT. Last time I was there, nothing at the restaurants were
packaged in foam.

-Kathy
Kathleen Kosciolek
Business Manager
New York State Pollution Prevention Institute
Rochester Institute of Technology
111 Lomb Memorial Drive
Rochester, NY 14623
Phone (585) 475-4325
Fax (585) 475-6610

2. My understanding here in Juneau, AK, some restaurants don't use foam. However, there are still some
that do.

3. To clarify, I'm looking for examples of deliveries to office buildings rather than examples from the food
service industry. But I appreciate the info and quick replies!

Kelly Panciera
Green Spectrum Consulting
PO Box 29135
Portland, OR 97296-9135
503-208-3786
kelly@green-spectrum.net

4. Food Service Packaging Requirements - City of Seattle
www.seattle.gov/util/Services/.../PlasticFoamFoodwareBan/index.htm
The City of Seattle is requiring all food service businesses to find packaging alternatives to throw-away
food service ... The foam ban took effect January 1, 2009. ...

                                                                                                         356
5. Here is a great example of Styrofoam elimination done with partnership of the City of Seattle and
Gateway computers. (sorry for sending the non-applicable response earlier on food packaging).

"To help Seattle with its conservation efforts, Gateway recently worked with officials to develop a
reusable cart for equipment deliveries and storage. A unique storage unit that can hold up to 24 PCs, the
cart eliminates the need for excessive packing materials and reduces the amount of cardboard, Styrofoam
and plastic wrap in the city's waste system. The cart is easy to use and helps the City of Seattle's IT
organization save valuable storage space. In addition, the cart will enable the city to deliver PCs back to
Gateway as part of its asset recovery efforts when the city refreshes its systems every four years"

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/making-paper-passe-city-of-seattle-selects-gateway-
tablet-pcs-58918797.html

Michelle Gaither
1402 Third Ave, Suite 1420 | Seattle, WA 98101
T 206.352.2050 | F 206.352.2049 |
mgaither@pprc.org | www.pprc.org
Twitter: twitter.com/PacNW_PPRC
LinkedIn Group: linkd.in/hjKoi3
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            Standardized Environmental Questions for Medical Products, October 2011

This might be of interest to county hospitals and others who are involved in health care.




NEWS RELEASE
October 13, 2011
Practice Greenhealth Announces Release of 'Standardized Environmental Questions for Medical
Products,' Version 1.0
Tool Presents Industry Standard for Medical Product
Procurement
October 13, 2011 (Reston, Virginia) Practice Greenhealth has
announced the release of the Standardized Environmental
Questions for Medical Products (Version 1.0), which can
be used to guide the identification, selection and
procurement of environmentally preferable medical products. This tool is a significant part of
Practice Greenhealth’s Greening the Supply Chain™ Initiative, which was launched earlier this
year in order to provide a common set of tools for purchasers, suppliers and manufacturers to
ensure that environmentally preferable products (EPP) are indeed available, cost competitive, of
comparable quality and generate a sector-wide market shift in the direction of sound EPP
practices.

The tool is intended to serve as a template with a common set of standardized questions on key
environmentally preferable attributes of medical products that can be used by all stakeholders,
including Group Purchasing Organizations (GPOs) and healthcare purchasers in their supply chain
procurement process and manufacturers and suppliers in their entire product life cycle process.
The questions were selected with input from dozens of organizations representing various sectors
of the health care industry, including: hospitals, health systems and suppliers – participating as
advisory members – and GPOs – as stakeholders. Practice Greenhealth also worked with nonprofit
organizations and government agencies in developing questions for consideration.

The initial endorsing GPOs, members of Practice Greenhealth, are committed to providing
environmentally preferable products and services to their members. These include: Amerinet, Inc.,
HealthTrust Purchasing Group, MedAssets, Inc., Novation LLC, and Premier, Inc., each of whom
already ask suppliers about the environmental attributes of their products. These organizations
collectively represent over $135 billion in annual purchasing volume.

The questions represent product attributes currently being asked by all five of these GPOs and
gathered by Practice Greenhealth; and were informed by Kaiser Permanente’s Sustainability
Scorecard, issued in 2011; and by input from suppliers, manufacturers, scientists, clinicians, and
available research.

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The tool includes a number of environmental attributes for future consideration. These other
attributes may be considered in updated versions. Over time, the questions will be continuously
reviewed with stakeholders and advisory members, and published on an annual basis, to reflect
the priorities of health care.

“What we buy matters. By selectively choosing the medical products that enter hospital facilities,
we can generate demand for inherently safer products and services for patients, workers and the
environment. Products should have a reduced impact on our natural resources, contain safer
chemicals, and drive reductions in energy use. We strive for a healthy environment and to do no
harm. Environmentally preferable purchasing is an effective way for improving the environmental
performance of health care products,” said Anna Gilmore Hall, Executive Director of Practice
Greenhealth. “Greening the supply chain is an essential element for any health care facility
embarking on a journey toward sustainable health care. Purchasing products and services with a
reduced impact on human health and the environment takes into account one or more
environmental attributes in products and services and applies them in the supply chain process.”

HSCA (formerly HIGPA) endorses Standardized Environmental Questions for Medical
Products
In a related announcement, the Board of Directors of the Healthcare Supply Chain Association
(HSCA—formerly the Health Industry Group Purchasing Association), has voted to endorse
Practice Greenhealth’s Standardized Environmental Questions for Medical Products.
HSCA President Curtis Rooney noted, “Product safety is a key issue within the healthcare supply
chain and we are proud to work with Practice Greenhealth to address this issue. Our endorsement
ensures that our members will commit to asking these important questions in the procurement
process. We believe this will significantly contribute to the efforts of health care providers aimed at
reducing their environmental footprint. It will also serve to educate the nation’s health care
providers and create a more informed decision-making process when sourcing and purchasing
products.”

The Importance of Standardized Questions
These standardized questions are key considerations in purchasing practices in order to meet
several goals including, but not limited to, providing a supply chain tool identifying key
environmental attributes of concern to the health care sector, utilizing a collaborative approach
among the largest purchasers of medical products to accelerate demand for products with reduced
environmental and human health impacts, inform and educate the health care community, and
create a consistent platform to reduce the RFI/RFP burden on suppliers.
    Download: “Standardized Environmental Questions for Medical Products,” Version
       1.0
    Organizations in the health care sector are invited to formally endorse the
       Standardized Questions

Beth Eckl
Director, Environmental Purchasing Program
Tel 866.598.2240
beckl@practicegreenhealth.org
www.practicegreenhealth.org



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