Citizen Schools SES Application

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					SECTION I-GENERAL INFORMATION


Name of provider: Citizen Schools-New Mexico

Website: www.citizenschools.org

Telephone number: 505-265-4332

CONTACT INFORMATION - CONTACT INFORMATION MAY BE GIVEN TO FAMILIES AND
SCHOOL DISTRICT PERSONNEL – BE SURE THE CONTACT INFORMATION IS ACCURATE.
FAMILIES AND SCHOOL DISTRICT PERSONNEL MAY USE THE CONTACT INFORMATION FOR
IMMEDIATE RESPONSES.

Contact (include title): Sue Goodwin, Executive Director

Address (include street, city, state, zip): 1420 Carlisle Blvd. NE, Suite 101, Albuquerque

Telephone (include area code): 505-920-8241

Fax: 505-265-4355

E-mail: suegoodwin@citizenschools.org



Provider Classification. (Check (X) all that apply.)
    School district
    Charter school
    Community-based organization
    Faith-based organization
    For-profit commercial/ private educational services provider
 Not-for-profit
    Institution of higher education
    Other (explain and be specific.)




                                                       1
                           SECTION II-OVERALL ASSURANCES


To be eligible for approval, your organization must assure the New Mexico Public Education Department
(NMPED), by issuing a statement of concurrence for each assurance, that all of the following are and shall
remain true and correct. Failure to provide a statement of concurrence will result in a non-responsive
submission. Failure to adhere to the assurances may result in the removal from the state approved list
of Supplemental Educational Services providers.

Provision of Service and Student Progress
The provider must provide parents of children receiving supplemental educational services and the appropriate
LEA with written information on the progress of the children in increasing achievement, in a format and, to the
extent practicable, a language that the parents can understand. The provider will ensure that written progress
reports are delivered to parents/guardians and appropriate school and district personnel on a regular basis, as
stated in this application and in the contract with the LEA. Written student progress reports will provide
information to parents/guardians showing how their student is progressing towards the standards and
benchmarks indicated on the individualized Student Improvement Plan. The provider will keep copies of these
progress reports on file for review, if needed by the NMPED, its contractor or the United States Department of
Education.
A statement of concurrence is required.
Citizen Schools will comply and provide parents and appropriate school and district personnel with written
progress reports.

Consistency of Instruction
The provider must ensure the instruction provided and the content used by the provider are consistent with the
instruction provided and content used by the LEA and state, and are aligned with state student academic
achievement standards (New Mexico Standards for Excellence 6.30.2 NMAC).
A statement of concurrence is required.
Citizen Schools’ will ensure its instruction and content are consistent with the instruction and content used by
its school district partners and the state’s academic achievement standards.

Compliance with Applicable Laws
The provider must comply with all applicable federal, state, and local health, safety, and civil rights laws.
A statement of concurrence is required.
Citizen Schools will comply with all applicable federal, state and local health, safety and civil rights laws.

Non-Biased Instruction
The provider must ensure all instruction and content offered are secular, neutral, and non-ideological.
A statement of concurrence is required.
Citizen Schools will ensure all instruction and content are secular, neutral, and non-ideological.

Compliance with Family Educational Rights & Privacy Act (FERPA)
The provider must ensure compliance with the FERPA of 1975, as amended (ensures access to educational
records for students and parents while protecting the privacy of such records), and any regulations issued
thereunder, including Privacy Rights of Parents and Students (34 CFR Part 99), if the contractor is an
educational institution.
A statement of concurrence is required.
Citizen Schools will ensure compliance with FERPA.




                                                         2
                 SECTION II-OVERALL ASSURANCES (Continued)


Agreement to Contract
Once parents select a provider for their child, the LEA must enter into an agreement with the provider that
includes the following minimum components:
1. a requirement that the local educational agency will develop, in consultation with parents (and the provider
    chosen by the parents), a statement of specific achievement goals for the student, how the student's
    progress will be measured, and a timetable for improving achievement that, in the case of a student with
    disabilities, is consistent with the student's individualized education program under section 614(d) of the
    Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

2. a description of how the student's parents and the student's teacher or teachers will be regularly informed
   of the student's progress;

3. a provision for the termination of such agreement if the provider is unable to meet such goals and
   timetables;

4. provisions with respect to the making of payments to the provider by the local educational agency;

5. a provision that prohibits the provider from disclosing to the public the identity of any student eligible for,
   or receiving, supplemental educational services under this subsection without the written permission of the
   parents of such student; and

6. specific achievement goals for the student, developed in consultation with the student’s parents [Section
    1116(e)(a)].
A statement of concurrence is required.
Citizen Schools will ensure that it enters into a contract agreement with the LEA once parents have selected a
provider.

On-line/ distance learning
The provider must ensure supervision will be provided while children are participating in the program.
Families are not responsible for any fees (accessing computers, an internet connection and/or software -
whether they are reimbursed or not) associated with enrolling in the program. Any fees incurred for operating
the program are the sole responsibility of the provider. Failure to adhere to this provision may result in
termination of contracts with LEAs and the NMPED reserves the right to remove provider from the state
approved list.
A statement of concurrence and description of how you will ensure appropriate adult supervision will be
provided is required.
Citizen Schools provides in-person instruction and does not use online/distance-learning technology. As an in-
person, school-based SES program, there is adult supervision for all students at all times.

Contracts
The NMPED will not intervene if contractual issues arise. Contractual issues need to be resolved by the LEA
and the SES provider with whom the contract is being negotiated. SES providers will not under any
circumstance begin to provide a service if a contract is not in place. All contracts need to be honored, or they
may be terminated by either party.
A statement of concurrence is required.
Citizen Schools will ensure a contract is in place prior to providing services, and should any contractual issues
arise, Citizen Schools will work directly with the LEA to resolve said issues.




                                                        3
                 SECTION II-OVERALL ASSURANCES (Continued)

Taxation and Revenue
The provider will ensure that needed taxation and revenue documentation is secured to work and conduct
business in New Mexico before providing any services. The provider will supply the NMPED and/or local
school district taxation and revenue documentation when needed. Failure to obtain proper taxation and
revenue documentation may result in termination of contracts with LEAs and may result in removal from state
approved list of Supplemental Educational Service providers.
A statement of concurrence is required.
Citizen Schools will ensure that it secures necessary taxation and revenue documentation prior to providing
services.

6.19.6 NMAC
The provider and all employees and or subcontractors must review and adhere to the requirements set forth in
6.19.6 NMAC; provided as Attachment A.
A statement of concurrence is required.
Citizen Schools will adhere to the requirements set forth in Attachment A – 6.19.6 NMAC of the SES
application.

Supplemental Educational Services Non-Regulatory Guidance
The provider and all employees and or subcontractors must review the Supplemental Educational Services
Non-Regulatory Guidance; provided as Attachment C.
A statement of concurrence is required.
Citizen Schools has reviewed the Supplemental Educational Services Non-Regulatory Guidance.

Reporting and Monitoring Requirements
The provider must comply with all reporting and monitoring requests from the NMPED, its contractor or an
LEA including, but not limited to student progress, attendance, fiscal issues, other federal reporting issues, and
documentation of tutor qualifications.
A statement of concurrence is required.
Citizen Schools will comply with all reporting and monitoring requests from the NMPED, its contractor,
and/or the LEA.

Background check
The provider must ensure that all employees, contractors or subcontractors who will work with children at a
public school facility, will successfully obtain a background check from an agency that the school district
approves (based on the local school board policy). Failure to obtain background checks will result in
employees or subcontractors not being able to provide services to students enrolled. Under no circumstance
will an employee, contractor or subcontractor work with a student if they do not have valid background check.
The NMPED strongly encourages the provider to ensure that all tutors obtain a background check, regardless
of physical location of tutoring session.
A statement of concurrence is required.
Citizen Schools will obtain background checks for all employees, contractors, and subcontractors who will
work with students.

Student Safety
The provider will ensure that students who receive services will be supervised until student has secured safe
and reliable transportation to their next destination. Time supervising students during this time cannot be
billed to the LEA where services are taking place.
A statement of concurrence is required.
Citizen Schools will ensure students are fully supervised, including during transitional periods (e.g., when the
Citizen Schools’ program ends each day and students are transported home). Further, Citizen Schools will not
bill the LEA during this transitional time.

                                                        4
                 SECTION II-OVERALL ASSURANCES (Continued)


Providing Services
If selected to provide services by parents/guardians, your organization must ensure that services begin in a
timely manner. If services do not follow the timelines in the agreed upon contract, the contract may be
terminated by the LEA, and students may be reassigned.
A statement of concurrence is required.
Citizen Schools will ensure its program begins in a timely manner.

On-line Data Management System
The provider will ensure that all required data and information will be uploaded, when requested, through an
on-line data management system operated by the districts where services are being provided.
A statement of concurrence is required.
Citizen Schools will ensure full and timely compliance with the on-line data management system.

Tutor Selection/Hiring Process
You must describe your selection/hiring process of tutors and the process you use to match tutors with
students. Failure to respond will result in a non-responsive submission and your application will not be
reviewed. Be sure to indicate your criteria for pairing tutors with students. Tutor qualifications/background,
content area and grade(s) of expertise must match the needs of the student.

A description of your selection/hiring process is required. Failure to respond to this description will
result in a non-responsive submission and your application will not be reviewed.

Citizen Schools has a track record of recruiting, selecting, and retaining outstanding educators to advance the
learning and improve the academic performance of its students. The recruitment, selection, and matching
processes described below have contributed to the strong results Citizen Schools has delivered. In addition to
a rigorous selection process, Citizen Schools provides extensive training and support to help its instructors
accomplish their foremost objective – moving students onto a success track.

Citizen Schools recruits its Campus Directors and instructors (Team Leaders) from outstanding candidates
who apply from the local area and across the country. Many of its front-line instructors are recent college
graduates and for these instructors, Citizen Schools focuses on four recruitment channels:

   1) web presence, including the Citizen Schools web site, which offers a comprehensive description of
   positions available and the application process (approximately 60% of applicants learn about the
   opportunities at Citizen Schools on the Internet);
   2) colleges and universities, including those in communities where our programs operate;
   3) national "feeder" programs for outstanding candidates, including minority candidates; and
   4) personal referrals, usually from current and former staff members or from community partners.

Citizen Schools’ recruiters strive to build a network of “pipeline” relationships with selected colleges and
universities, attending fairs and events, conducting information sessions and on-campus interviews, and
maintaining consistent contact with faculty and career services associates.

For recent college graduates. the formal application process for instructor positions includes an online
application, detailed cover letter and resume, college transcripts, and three letters of recommendation. The
selection process is conducted by Citizen Schools’ Campus Recruitment Manager and includes a phone
interview with a recruiter, an on-site interview with a Campus Director, a curriculum development assignment,
and reference checks. Background checks are also conducted during the interview process.

For supervisory positions, including the Campus Director, recruitment includes a variety of local and national
channels, including promotion from within the organization.


                                                        5
Citizen Schools requires its Campus Directors to have substantial experience and expertise in teaching in
classrooms and informal environments, especially in urban settings. Citizen Schools’ instructors (Team
Leaders) are dynamic aspiring educators, 74% of whom have bachelor’s degrees and all have prior teaching or
leadership experience.

In selecting its instructional staff, Citizen Schools emphasizes:
      relevant experience teaching and working with children in other developmental environments,
      strong academic skills, especially in writing and mathematics;
      commitment to expanding opportunity for low-income students;
      the background and ability to serve as a positive role model; and
      the ability to build partnerships with schools and parents.

Citizen Schools regularly reviews the performance of its instructors in order to ensure high quality and
stimulate continuous improvement. In addition to a formal annual performance review and mid-year check-in,
instructors meet with their direct supervisor every 1-2 weeks to review the effectiveness of teaching practices
and the design of educational activities.

Matching Students with Instructors
Citizen Schools matches students with instructors by considering both the assessment of the student’s learning
goals and its instructors’ prior experiences, academic backgrounds, and instructional styles. Citizen Schools
then forms teams of students, typically organized by grade level, and matches each team with an instructor
(Team Leader), who leads the students as they participate in each of the program elements. Soon after
instructors are matched with students, each instructor contacts each student’s parents to discuss the student’s
learning style, prior experiences, and learning objectives. The instructor also communicates with the student’s
teachers in order to understand the student’s academic situation, experiences of success and struggle, as well as
non-academic factors that may affect the student’s learning.

Parents’ Right to Know
If selected to provide services by parents/guardians, your organization must ensure, before the start of tutoring,
that the educational qualifications of tutors providing services will be fully disclosed to parents/guardians who
have enrolled their student in your program.
A statement of concurrence is required.
Prior to the beginning of the program, Citizen Schools will fully disclose to parents/guardians the educational
qualifications of tutors providing services.

Engaging Students
If selected to provide services by parents/guardians, your organization must ensure that students enrolled in
your program are actively engaged in the learning process and the standards and benchmarks that will be
addressed are aligned to the individualized Student Improvement Plans. The tutor must have an
individualized Student Improvement Plan, for each student enrolled, on file at all times so that it may be
regularly accessed to ensure alignment with the tutoring program. Models based on homework help may not be
the sole method of delivery. Homework help may be utilized as one component of a comprehensive model if it
addresses the standards and benchmarks identified in the individualized Student Improvement Plan. Providers
must have their own curriculum.
A statement of concurrence is required.
Citizen Schools will ensure that students enrolled in the program are actively engaged in the learning process
and that the standards and benchmarks are aligned to the individualized Student Improvement Plans. Citizen
Schools uses an integrated program design that combines academic and study skills with project-based
learning activities.

Scheduling Services
A master list of tutor schedules, which includes at minimum: days, times, and location (building/room number
or address where services will take place) of services must be given to the District Administrator to help



                                                        6
ensure student safety and fiduciary responsibilities are being met, by the date specified in the contract with the
LEA.
A statement of concurrence is required.
Citizen Schools will provide a master list of program schedules to the District Administrator by the date
specified in the contract with the LEA.




                                                        7
                 SECTION II-OVERALL ASSURANCES (Continued)


Notifying Parents and District Personnel
If services can not be provided to children enrolled with your program, your organization must contact the
families affected and the appropriate District Personnel and notify them that you will not be able to provide
services. Notifying families is the sole responsibility of your organization, and not the responsibility LEA in
which the student is enrolled. Failure to inform parents/guardians and the District Personnel could result in an
unfavorable end-of-year evaluation and may result in the termination of your contract with the LEA in which
the students are enrolled.
A statement of concurrence is required.
Should Citizen Schools be unable to provide service to children enrolled in its program, it will contact the
families and appropriate district personnel.

Endorsement
If selected as a provider through this application process, your organization will not consider selection as an
NMPED endorsement or as a guarantee of work. You understand that the NMPED does not guarantee
payment by a district (LEA).
A statement of concurrence is required.
Yes – Citizen Schools understands that if selected, the NMPED will not endorse or guarantee work.


Tutor Training
The provider will ensure that all employees/tutors will undergo appropriate training related to the researched
based delivery of Supplemental Educational Services, including but not limited to delivery of the approved
model/program, correctly filling out student progress reports and other required documents by the LEA,
NMPED and/ or its contractor. All trainings must be documented.
A statement of concurrence is required.
Citizen Schools will provide appropriate training for all employees and fully document such trainings.


21st Century Community Learning Centers (CCLC) collaboration
If selected as a provider through this application process, your organization will engage in meaningful
consultation with 21st CCLC sites where both SES providers and 21st CCLC programs could operate.
A statement of concurrence is required.
If selected, Citizen Schools will consult with sites where both SES and 21st CCLC program could operate.

Providing services and removal from other states
The provider will notify the NMPED in writing if they are an approved Supplemental Educational Services
provider in other states and if they have been removed and state reason for removal from another state’s list of
approved Supplemental Educational Services providers. Failure to disclose removal and/or reason for removal
from another state’s list of approved Supplemental Educational Services providers will result in removal from
approved provider list.
A list of state(s) where you are currently approved and, if applicable, the state(s) you have been removed
from and reason for removal is required.
Citizen Schools currently operates SES programs in Massachusetts and has been an approved provider since
2002. Citizen Schools is not, and has not previously been, an SES provider in any other state.




                                                       8
SECTION II-OVERALL ASSURANCES (Continued)


Indemnification
The provider shall defend, indemnify and hold harmless the NMPED and the State of New Mexico from all
actions, proceeding, claims, demands, costs, damages, attorneys’ fees and all other liabilities and expenses of
any kind from any source which may arise out of the performance of this Agreement, caused by the negligent
act or failure to act of the provider, its officers, employees, servants, providers or agents, or if caused by the
actions of any client of the provider resulting in injury or damage to persons or property during the time when
the provider or any officer, agent, employee, servant or provider thereof has or is performing services pursuant
to this Agreement. In the event that any action, suit or proceeding related to the services performed by the
provider or any officer, agent, employee, servant or provider under this Agreement is brought against the
provider, the provider shall, as soon as practicable but no later than two (2) days after it receives notice thereof,
notify the legal counsel of the NMPED and the Risk Management Division of the New Mexico General
Services Department by certified mail.
A statement of concurrence is required.
Citizen Schools agrees to defend, indemnify, and hold harmless the NMPED and the State of New Mexico
from all actions, proceeding, claims, demands, costs, damages, attorneys’ fees and all other liabilities and
expenses of any kind from any source which may arise out of the performance of this Agreement.


SIGNATURE


I, THE UNDERSIGNED, CERTIFY that all information requested by this application has been provided and
that all facts, figures, and representations are true and correct. I further certify that I have full legal authority
to submit this application on behalf of the organization identified herein.




 Type or Print Name of Designated Agent                                Title of Designated Agent for Provider




 Date Signed                                                           Signature of Designated Agent




                                                         9
                             SECTION III-SERVICE SUMMARY


1. Provide a brief description of your program that families may use in their initial search for providers. Use
   an “active” voice when writing this description and understand the audience to whom you are writing –
   families. Be sure to mention: (50 points)

The Citizen Schools program helps middle school students 1) build important math and writing skills, 2)
develop positive values and leadership abilities, 3) prepare for high school and college success, and 4) gain
exposure to careers and mentors from a variety of professions. Under the guidance of dynamic instructors,
students “apprentice” with talented volunteers from diverse fields, including, architecture, business,
journalism, law, and technology. Students develop and practice academic skills and make the connection
between what they learn in school and career success as they complete real-world apprenticeship projects, such
as preparing and arguing a mock trial, writing and publishing a newspaper, redesigning public parks, creating
web pages, and more. Citizen Schools’ instructors also support homework completion and connect regularly
with classroom teachers.

a) where and when services will take place,
Citizen Schools programs operate during the after-school hours in public middle school buildings. Typically
Citizen Schools programs begin at 3:30 and end at 6:00, Monday through Thursday. The program operates
throughout the school year.


b) the typical tutor- to-student ratio and tutor qualifications,
Learning activities are organized in teams of 10-13 students each, usually organized by grade level. Each team
is led by an instructor, called the Team Leader. The large majority of instructors have four-year college
degrees.


c) in what grade(s) and content area(s) the student will be receiving tutoring,
Learning activities will be offered to students in grades 6, 7, and 8 in the content areas of mathematics and
reading/language arts. Students will also develop study skills and habits of success that are applicable to all
subject areas.


d) estimated number of hours of services are included,
Students are expected to participate in all program activities, approximately 10 hours per week, throughout the
school year. The program is intensive. Consistent attendance is mandatory.


e) if you can and how you will serve limited English proficiency (LEP)/English language learners (ELL)
students and students with disabilities and
The Citizen Schools program will strongly value inclusiveness in all its dimensions. It will welcome any
student who is interested in participating, including students with disabilities and students with Limited
English Proficiency. For students with disabilities and LEP, the Citizen Schools Campus Director will first
meet with the student’s parents and appropriate school staff to understand the student’s learning and
developmental needs, to establish clear expectations, and develop strategies for overcoming any logistical
obstacles. The program will also consult the student’s IEP and strive to link its efforts with services provided
during the school day, based on frequent communication with the student’s parents and relevant staff and
specialists.

Students with disabilities and with Limited English Proficiency will be assigned to a team and an instructor
and will participate along with all other students in Citizen Schools’ diverse program elements. Citizen
Schools will make clear to the parents and school staff that its instructors do not have special qualifications or


                                                        10
expertise in working with students who have severe disabilities or Limited English Proficiency. Many students
with disabilities and LEP have participated in Citizen Schools successfully in the past, and the key to their
success has been open and clear communication between the family, the school-day staff, and the program.


f) a description of what your program looks like, be sure to include the type of curriculum used and how the
instruction is delivered.
Citizen Schools is a team-based program that operates in school buildings during the after-school hours,
Monday through Thursday. Citizen Schools offers a variety of learning activities that help students develop
both academic skills and study skills so that they can improve their performance in school and advance toward
college and career opportunities. Activities include academic coaching, study skills lessons, and
apprenticeship projects, in which students work with volunteers from diverse professions to connect their
learning in school with potential career paths.



2. Indicate which key words best match your program’s offerings: (Check (X) all that apply.) (0 points)
    On-line/ distance learning
    One-to-one instruction
    Small group instruction (Ratio of one tutor to no more than three students)
 Medium group instruction (Ratio of one tutor to four, five or six students)
 Large group instruction (Ratio of one tutor to seven students or more)
 Reading/Language Arts
 Mathematics
    Science
    Instruction for limited English proficient students
    Instruction for students with disabilities




                                                          11
                    SECTION III-SERVICE SUMMARY (Continued)


3. Provide a complete and detailed narrative description of your program that can be used to inform and
   provide information to districts and schools about your services (50 points). Program summaries must
   include, but are not limited to:

    the model of instruction, including specific strategies to evaluate the program’s effectiveness;
    the total program hours per student (based on estimated per pupil allocation in each district – appendix
       B);
    the ratio of instructors to children;
    the typical weekly schedule of services;
    the proposed location of services;
    the qualifications of instructional staff in content areas of English, math and science (If your program
     is computer or web based you must provide specific information regarding tutor locations and tutor
     qualifications) and

    instructional materials and equipment provided (and those the student is required to provide, if any).

   NOTE: This section needs detailed descriptions of what individual sessions will look like. Broad and
   general descriptions are not acceptable. Models based on homework help may not be the sole method of
   delivery. Homework help may be utilized as one component of a comprehensive model if it addresses the
   standards and benchmarks identified in the individualized Student Improvement Plan.


   The Citizen Schools program design is deeply grounded in research on effective pedagogy and
   engagement in learning. Citizen Schools provides students with an intensive, comprehensive program that
   advances their academic performance and develops the study skills and habits of success that students
   need in order to sustain their improvement after they complete the program. The program design also
   reflects Citizen Schools’ 14 years of direct experience in implementing the program with urban school
   partners and evaluating its effectiveness.

   Students in 6th, 7th, and 8th grades will attend the program Monday through Thursday afternoon, from 3:30
   until 6:00, throughout the school year. Thus, most students will participate in the program for 300+ hours
   per year and it will serve as their primary out-of-school activity. The program will be delivered in school
   buildings where Citizen Schools’ instructors will maintain a strong and consistent presence, and build
   partnerships with classroom teachers and other school staff members.

   Citizen Schools’ current plan for 2009-10 is to offer services
   in Albuquerque at the
        Grant Middle School
        Van Buren Middle School
        Wilson Middle School

   in Santa Fe at the
        De Vargas Middle School

   The major academic elements of the Citizen Schools program are:
        School Navigation/Study Skills
        AIM Time (Aspire, Invest, Make the Grade)

                                                     12
       Apprenticeships
       Learning Labs

Additional elements include opening circles at which students share and celebrate their learning with their
peers and receive recognition for progress they have made, and explorations in which students learn about
resources in their community and college opportunities.

Instruction is organized in teams (typically by grade level) and occurs in small groups, with a typical ratio
of about 10-13 students per instructor. Citizen Schools has a higher student to staff ratio than many
traditional tutoring programs, but it also provides many more hours of service to each student – offering
300+ hours over the course of the year. During AIM Time (4 hours per week), instructors work
individually with students on specific skills. They also engage in Grades and Goals conferences twice
during each marking period to establish benchmarks for success and to identify and overcome obstacles to
progress.

AIM Time (Aspire, Invest, Make the Grade)
Each day, the Citizen Schools program begins with a full hour devoted to academic skill development and
reinforcement of school-day curricula (often with a strategy of “looping back”). This segment is also used
for frequent individual conferencing and goal-setting. As a school-based program, Citizen Schools uses
AIM Time to strengthen the connection between in-school and after-school learning and to leverage strong
relationships with the school faculty and staff who are students’ primary educational leaders. (Citizen
Schools’ staff members devote significant time to meeting with classroom teachers to understand students’
individual needs and to discuss progress and challenges throughout the year.) The daily academic support
segment will provide students with time, space, resources, and tools to review and practice skills, and to
develop increased competency in self-directed learning.

School Navigation/Study Skills
Citizen Schools’ School Navigation lessons help students to develop the competencies that support success
in school, such as organization, note-taking, self-advocacy, goal-setting, active learning, and test
preparation. The School Navigation segment also facilitates the development of the values, attitudes and
behaviors that contribute to academic achievement, such as focus, resourcefulness and perseverance. In
conjunction with a pervasive culture of achievement that Citizen Schools strives to create, the School
Navigation lessons motivate and inspire students to exhibit academic excellence.

Apprenticeships
Citizen Schools recruits adult volunteers who are experts in their professions to become Citizen Teachers
and lead weekly after-school apprenticeship courses. Each apprenticeship is an 11-week, hands-on course
that reinforces and applies academic skills and introduces students to a new field in which they create a
high-quality product, service, or presentation. The apprenticeship culminates in a public celebration of
learning at which students teach back what they have learned to parents, teachers, peers, and community
members.

Learning Labs
Learning labs are structured opportunities for students to practice math and language arts content through
organized games and activities. Learning labs reflect recent research that points to the benefits of using
games to strengthen students’ mathematical skills. The research concludes that when students spend even
a small amount of time on math games their positive experience can spark greater interest in the subject
and result in academic advancement. For example, one lab entitled “Piece of Cake” uses a cake to visually
demonstrate fractions and then help students convert fractions to decimals and percentages.




                                                   13
The typical weekly schedule of services is shown below

Citizen Schools SES Program: Time on Task
                 Monday               Tuesday                     Wednesday               Thursday
      3:30                              Academic                                            Academic
                   Academic         Coaching: Aspire,              Academic              Coaching: Aspire,
      3:50     Coaching: Aspire,     Invest, Make the           Coaching: Aspire,        Invest, Make the
                Invest, Make the          Grade                 Invest, Make the              Grade
      4:00           Grade                                           Grade
      4:15
                                     Study Skills and
      4:30                            Learning Lab
      5:00     Apprenticeship 1                                  Apprenticeship 2           Exploration

     5:10                                  Choice Time
     6:00

Each program site is lead by an experienced educator, the Campus Director. All Campus Directors have
Bachelor’s Degrees and at least two years experience working in educational environments with low-
income students (many have Master’s Degrees and five or more years of experience). Instructors (also
called Team Leaders) are typically college graduates (74% have four-year degrees) who are pursuing
careers in education, in both classroom settings and alternative learning environments.

The Citizen Schools program has a strong, independently-validated track record of building students’
skills and improving academic achievement. Since 2001, Policy Studies Associates, a national leader in
educational evaluation, has conducted a rigorous, longitudinal study of Citizen Schools’ Boston program.
The evaluation uses a quasi-experimental design, comparing the performance of cohorts of Citizen
Schools students to matched comparison groups of their peers. Students are matched on the basis of
academic achievement prior to entry into the program and demographic characteristics. The evaluation
has reported that 6th and 7th grade students who consistently attended Citizen Schools significantly
outperformed a comparison group in six out of seven indicators of school success (including grades,
attendance, and standardized test scores). Policy Studies Associates has concluded:

    Overall, Citizen Schools is succeeding in moving a group of low-income, educationally at-
    risk participants towards its desired outcomes of successful high school completion,
    advancement to college, and full participation in the civic and economic life of their
    communities.

In 2007-08, its first year of operation in Albuquerque and Santa Fe, the average daily attendance rate for
Citizen Schools’ programs was 89%. Also in 2007-08, 75% of Citizen Schools students maintained an A
or B grade or improved a grade of C+ or lower in English from the first to the third quarter of the
academic year. In math, 73% of students maintained an A or B or improved a lower grade. According to a
pre-post assessment, 88% of students improved their oral presentation skills and 82% improved their
leadership skills.

Citizen Schools will use learning activities and related materials that are aligned with specified learning
goals for the subject area and grade level. Citizen Schools does not use a “canned” curriculum or “off the
shelf” materials. Rather, it works in close partnership with the faculty and administration at each of its
school sites to develop and implement learning activities that will help students improve and advance.




                                                  14
                       SECTION III-SERVICE SUMMARY (Continued)


Supplemental Educational Services Summary:
      Reading/ language arts        Grade Level(s) Able to Serve: (Check (X) all that apply.)
            (0 points)
                                      K     1st    2nd    3rd     4th    5th 6th
                                            7th 8th            9th   10th   11th   12th
                 Math                       Grade Level(s) Able to Serve: (Check (X) all that apply.)
               (0 points)
                                               K      1st        2nd   3rd    4th    5th 6th
                                            7th 8th            9th   10th   11th   12th
                Science                     Grade Level(s) Able to Serve: (Check (X) all that apply.)
               (0 points)
                                               K      1st        2nd   3rd    4th    5th    6th
                                               7th    8th        9th   10th   11th   12th


Check (X) the time(s) that best describe when you will deliver services to students. (0 points)
    Before School
 After School
    Weekends

Place of Service. (Check (X) all that apply.) (0 points)
    Student’s home (parent/guardian must be present)
 Student’s school
    Community center
    Place of worship
    On-line/ distance learning - include information on how and where children will access online
services. If the program will be accessed outside of the student’s home discuss the supervision that will
be provided while children are participating in the program.


    Business establishment. List address (es); include street, city, state, zip.



    Other (be specific.)


LEAs may charge providers for equipment, facilities, personnel, or other resources that they
make available to those providers. LEAs are not required to provide a location on campus for
providers.




                                                            15
                   SECTION III-SERVICE SUMMARY (Continued)


The information provided below may be used by families to select the most appropriate SES provider for their
student.

The NMPED reserves the right to edit any entry or description that may lead families to select services based
on a complimentary resource to participate in the program instead of academic content.

The program description below must be provided in both English and Spanish. The template for English and
Spanish are provided on the following pages.

Your target audience is families who have students who are eligible for SES. Be sure to use an “active voice”
when creating your program descriptions. The information submitted on your program descriptions needs to
accurately reflect your program and needs to align with your submitted application. Families, schools and
districts will expect you to follow through with your program descriptions.




                                                      16
Name of Provider      Description of Services and Effectiveness and Expected          Subjects and Grades           Tutor Qualifications
and contact           Number of Service hours                                         Student will be tutored        Tutors are licensed teachers or have a bachelor’s
information           Citizen Schools programs operate during the after-school         Reading/ language arts      degree or higher.
Citizen Schools       hours in public middle school buildings. Typically Citizen      Grades able to serve:
1420 Carlisle Blvd.   Schools programs begin at 3:30 and end at 6:00, Monday          6, 7, 8                        Tutors have less than a four year degree, but more
NE, Suite 101         through Thursday.                                                                             than an associate of arts degree or its equivalent of
Albuquerque, NM                                                                        Math                        forty-eight (48) credit hours.
87110                 The program is intensive and consistent attendance is           Grades able to serve:
tel 505.265.4332      mandatory. Students who participate in Citizen Schools          6, 7, 8                           Tutors have less than an associate of arts degree,
fax 505.265.4355      are enrolled for all program hours, throughout the                                            but more than a high school diploma or its
                                                                                         Science                    equivalent.
                      academic year. Billing for services is estimated based on
                                                                                      Grades able to serve:
                      80 hours of service, but most students receive far more, up
                                                                                                                    Background Checks
                      to approximately 300-350 hours over the course of the                                         Will all of your tutors undergo background checks?
                      school year. (There is no charge for the additional hours of
                      service.)
                                                                                      Size of Tutoring Group         YES
                                                                                          1:1; 1:2; 1:3 tutor-to-      NO, if not please explain why not:
                                                                                      student ratio
                      Citizen Schools offers an integrated combination of hands-
                      on learning and skill development activities. Learning              1:4; 1:5; 1:6 tutor-to-   Can you serve ELL and/ or Special Needs
                      activities are organized in teams of 10-13 students each,       student ratio                 Students
                      usually by grade level. Each team is led by an instructor,                                    Yes
                      called the Team Leader. Activities include academic              1:7 or greater tutor-to-
                      coaching, study skills lessons, learning labs,                  student ratio
                      apprenticeships, and explorations.
                                                                                      Location of Service
                      Citizen Schools partners closely with its host schools to       Albuquerque: Grant
                      align in-school content and methods with the approach           Middle School; Van
                      adopted by Citizen Schools during the after-school hours.       Buren Middle School;
                      Through consistent communication with students, families,       Wilson Middle School
                      and school partners, Citizen Schools strives to advance
                      achievement and expand opportunity.                             Santa Fe: De Vargas
                                                                                      Middle School
                      Citizen Schools has an independently-validated track
                      record of improving students’ achievement and helping
                      middle school students make a successful transition to high
                      school. A long-term evaluation has reported that students
                      who completed Citizen Schools out-performed a matched
                      comparison group on six out of seven indicators of school
                      success, including grades, test scores, and attendance.



                                                                                     17
El nombre de          La descripción de Servicios y Eficacia y del Número Esperado de Atiende a        Los sujetos y Gradúa a       Calificación del tutor
Proveedor y           horas                                                                            Estudiante será dado          Los tutores son licenciados a
contacta                                                                                               clases privadas              maestros o tienen una
información           El programa de Citizen Schools toma lugar en escuelas secundarias o               La lectura/las artes del   licenciatura o más alto.
Citizen Schools       “middle” después de la escuela en los edificios de las escuelas de las mismas    idioma
1420 Carlisle Blvd.                                                                                    Los grados capaces de         Los tutores tienen menos que
                      escuelas públicas. El típico programa de Citizen Schools inicia a las 3:30p.m.
NE, Suite 101                                                                                          servir:                      un cuatro grado de año, pero
                      y termina a las 6:00p.m. de la tarde de Lunes a Jueves.
Albuquerque, NM                                                                                        6, 7, 8                      más que un socio de licenciatura
87110                                                                                                                               en letras o su equivalente de
tel 505.265.4332      El programa es intenso, consistente y la asistencia del estúdiate es              Matemáticas                cuarenta y ocho (48) horas de
fax 505.265.4355      mandataria. Los estudiantes que participan en el programa de Citizen             Los grados capaces de        crédito.
                      Schools atienden y participan en el todas las sesiones del programa durante el   servir:
                      año escolar incluyendo todas las horas de operación del programa. (No hay        6, 7, 8                          Los tutores tienen menos que
                      costo por las horas extras de servicio.)                                                                      un socio de licenciatura en
                                                                                                           Ciencia                  letras, pero más que un
                       Citizen Schools ofrece una combinación integral de desarrollo de                Los grados capaces de        bachillerato o su equivalente.
                      habilidades y oportunidades de aprendizaje director a través de experiencias     servir:
                      directas en actividades variadas. El aprendizaje y actividades se organizan en                                El fondo Verifica
                      grupos pequeños de 10-13 alumnos, generalmente divididos por grado                                            Hace a todos sus tutores
                      escolar. Cada uno de estos grupos es dirigido por uno instructor denominado      Tamaño de Dar clases         experimentan cheques de
                      como “Team leader” o “Líder de grupo”. Las actividades incluyen tutoría          privadas el Grupo            fondo?
                      académica, desarrollo de habilidades para mejorar los estudios, laboratorios         1:1; 1:2; 1:3            Sí
                      de enseñanza, visitas de exploración y aprendizajes                              proporción de tutor a            No, si no explica por favor
                                                                                                       estudiante                   por qué no:
                      Citizen Schools se asocia con las escuelas con las que trabaja para alinear el
                      contenido y los métodos utilizados por la escuela durante las horas de clase         1:4; 1:5; 1:6
                                                                                                       proporción de tutor a        Pueden dar clases a
                      con las tácticas utilizadas por Citizen Schools durante las horas después del
                                                                                                       estudiante                   estudiantes de ELL y/o de
                      la escuela cuando este programa se lleva a cabo.
                      A través de comunicación constante con los estudiantes, familias y                                            necesidades especiales
                                                                                                        1:7 o proporción más       Si
                      representantes de las escuelas, Citizen Schools se comete a avanzar el éxito y   grande de tutor a
                      expender las oportunidades para los estudiantes que participan en el             estudiante
                      programa.
                                                                                                       Lugar de servicio
                      Citizen Schools tiene una record de éxito validado por autoridades externas      Albuquerque: Grant
                      que han medido el avance académico de los estudiantes, así como la               Middle School; Van
                      transición exitosa de los estudiantes de la escuela secundaria o “middle” a      Buren Middle School;
                      preparatorias o “high school”. Evaluaciones extensivas de impacto a largo        Wilson Middle School
                      tiempo han reportado que los estudiantes que participan y completan los
                      programas de Citizen Schools sobrepasan en éxito cuando son comparados           Santa Fe: De Vargas
                      con aquellos que no participan en el programa en 6 a 7 indicadores de éxito      Middle School


                                                                                18
escolar, incluyendo grados, resultados de exámenes, y asistencia a clases.




                                                          19
         SECTION III-SERVICE SUMMARY (Continued)

Tutor-to-student ratio for your program. (0 points)
    1:1; 1:2; 1:3 tutor-to-student ratio (A supplemental educational services provider that maintains a tutor: student
ratio of one tutor to three students or fewer may charge the eligible school district the full hourly amount based on
tutor qualifications.)

    1:4; 1:5; 1:6 tutor-to-student ratio (A supplemental educational services provider that maintains a tutor-to-student
ratio of one tutor to four students, one tutor to five students, or one tutor to six students may charge the eligible
school district eighty-five percent of its hourly amount based on tutor qualifications.)
If ratio exceeds one to three you must explain how your program will meet individual student needs.


 1:7 or greater tutor-to-student ratio (A supplemental educational services provider that maintains a tutor- to-
student ratio of one tutor to seven students or greater may charge the eligible school district fifty percent of its
hourly amount based on tutor qualifications.)
If ratio exceeds one to three you must explain how your program will meet individual student needs.
In the Citizen Schools program, instruction is organized in teams (typically by grade level) and occurs in small groups,
with a ratio of about 10-13 students per instructor. Citizen Schools uses a higher student-to-staff ratio than many
traditional tutoring programs, but it also provides many more hours of service to each student – offering 300+ hours over
the course of the year. During AIM Time (4 hours per week), instructors work individually with students on specific skills.
They also engage in individual Grades and Goals conferences twice each marking period to establish benchmarks for
success and to identify and overcome obstacles to progress.

As an intensive, school-based program, Citizen Schools’ close partnership with in-school educators will be the key to its
ability to:

       diagnose each student’s needs;
       prescribe an educational program and define goals that meet each student’s needs;
       evaluate and monitor the student’s progress toward those goals; and
       communicate with the school regarding the student’s goals and progress.

Citizen Schools uses its consistent presence in the school in order to expand its knowledge of individual students’ actual
school performance, and to guide the instruction it offers to each student. The instructional staff seeks and incorporates
input from teachers and other school personnel who see students’ work daily. Working in close partnership with its host
schools, Citizen Schools attempts to analyze -- at a high level of detail -- students’ performance to identify more clearly the
skill areas in which students need the most attention.

By communicating directly and frequently with teachers and school staff, Citizen Schools will identify the specific skill
gaps of students who receive Supplemental Educational Services. Because of the collegial relationship between in-school
classroom teachers and Citizen Schools’ instructors, the identification of learning needs goes deeper than the general
categories of “writing” or “math;” it extends to the specific skills that require intensive focus in order for improvement in
student performance to occur. For example, in writing composition this might mean an emphasis on organization,
appropriate format, or voice. In mathematics it might mean the manipulation of fractions, estimation, or graphing.


NOTE: While providing services, providers may not exceed the ratios checked above.




                                                                 20
Tutor Qualifications. (0 points)
If you are currently approved as a SES provider in another state, provide information regarding tutor
qualifications for the prior school year. List the percent (%) and number (#) of tutors who are:
     %                #
                                Licensed Teachers
     100              48           Bachelor’s Degree or higher but not a licensed teacher
                                   Non degreed tutors




                                                          21
                              SECTION III-SERVICE SUMMARY (Continued)

To successfully provide services in New Mexico, it is essential to understand its vast geographic and demographic nature.
Please visit the following websites to get a geographic and demographic understanding of New Mexico:
http://www.ped.state.nm.us/IT/schoolFactSheets.html
http://www.newmexico.org/index.php
http://www.newmexico.gov/

Visit the following website to view the schools that have a NCLB designation of School Improvement-Year 2 or beyond:
http://www.ped.state.nm.us/ayp2007/ayp07dist.html - 2007 District Schools AYP Reports
http://www.ped.state.nm.us/ayp2007/ayp_charters_2007.html - 2007 Charter Schools AYP Reports

The school ratings for 2008-2009 may not be released until August 2008 at the earliest, so the information provided to you
at the above mentioned websites is meant to show you which districts and schools might have to offer SES.

You will only be able to serve the districts or schools that are listed. Failure to provide services in a district or school that
you listed may lead to removal from the state approved list and may adversely affect your provider evaluation.

The term “statewide” will not be an acceptable answer. Using the term “statewide” will result in a non-responsive
submission and your application will not be considered for approval. Each district or school that you will serve must be
listed individually.

List all district(s) or state charted charter school(s) individually that you are able to serve. (0 points)

De Vargas Middle School, Santa Fe Public Schools
Grant Middle School, Albuquerque Public Schools
Van Buren Middle School, Albuquerque Public Schools
Wilson Middle School, Albuquerque Public Schools




                                                                  22
                            SECTION IV-SERVICE SUMMARY


A. Provision of appropriate services to students with Limited English Proficiency (LEP). (0 points)
    Will you provide services to limited English proficient (LEP) students?
        NO
    If “NO”, why not?


     YES
    If “YES”, describe how you will properly match students with qualified tutors and provide appropriate
    services to Limited English Proficient (LEP) students. If your model of instruction is computer or
    web based, how will that model support LEP students?

    The Citizen Schools program will value inclusiveness in all its dimensions. It will welcome any
    student who is interested in participating consistently, including students with Limited English
    Proficiency. For LEP students, the Campus Director will meet the student’s parents and appropriate
    school staff to understand the student’s learning needs, to establish clear expectations, and to develop
    strategies for overcoming obstacles. While many instructors will be fluent in Spanish, most program
    activities will be conducted in English. Citizen Schools does not commit to matching all LEP students
    with an instructor who is competent in each student’s primary language. Many LEP students have
    thrived in the Citizen Schools program. They have found hands-on learning projects to be a learning
    environment in which they can succeed and gain an increased sense of efficacy. Citizen Schools has
    worked effectively with the staff members of its host schools in Albuquerque and Santa Fe (where
    many students are Spanish speakers) who have advised its instructors about students’ learning needs
    and who have collaborated in supporting students’ advancement.



B. Provision of appropriate services to students with disabilities. (0 points)
    Supplemental educational services must be provided consistent with a student’s individualized
    education program under Section 614 of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act or a student’s
    individualized services under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Moreover, these and
    others laws which may be applicable to SES providers require that accommodations be made to
    individuals with disabilities pursuant to their IEP or 504 plan. For these reasons, please review and
    complete all information required by this Section.

    Will your organization provide SES to students with disabilities in accordance with such student’s
    Individual Education Program under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act
    and services consistent with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973?

        NO
    If “NO”, why not?



     YES
    If “YES”, describe how you will properly match students with qualified tutors and provide appropriate
    services to students with disabilities. If your model of instruction is computer or web based, how will
    that model support students with disabilities?


                                                    23
The Citizen Schools program will value inclusiveness in all its dimensions. It will welcome any
student who is interested in participating consistently, including students with disabilities. For
students with disabilities, the Campus Director will meet the student’s parents and appropriate school
staff to understand the student’s learning and developmental needs, to establish clear expectations, and
develop strategies for overcoming any logistical obstacles. The program will also consult the
student’s IEP and strive to link its efforts with services provided during the school day, based on
frequent communication with the student’s parents. Students with disabilities will be assigned to a
team and a Team Leader and will participate along with all other students in Citizen Schools’ diverse
program elements. Citizen Schools will make clear to the parents and school staff that its staff does
not have special qualifications or expertise for working with students who have severe disabilities.
Many students with disabilities have participated in Citizen Schools successfully, and the key to their
success has been open and clear communication between the family, the school staff, and the program.




                                                24
                      SECTION V-TUTOR QUALIFICATIONS


Tutor Qualifications. (Check (X) all that apply.) (0 points)
NMAC 6.19.6 states that invoicing is to be based on the qualifications of tutor providing services and
the tutor to student ratio.

Parents have the right to know the education level of their child’s tutor.

 Tutors are licensed teachers or have a bachelor’s degree or higher.
A supplemental educational services provider may charge the eligible school district its full hourly
amount if the tutor has a valid teaching license or a four-year degree or greater from an accredited
university or college. The per pupil cap will not be ratably reduced based on the education level of
the tutor providing supplemental educational services.

 Tutors have less than a four year degree, but more then an associate of arts degree or its equivalent of
forty-eight (48) credit hours.
A supplemental educational services provider may charge the eligible school district eighty-five
percent of its hourly amount if the tutor has less than a four year degree, but more then an
associates of arts degree, or its equivalent of forty-eight (48) credit hours, from an accredited post
secondary institution. The per pupil cap will be ratably reduced by fifteen percent based on the
education level of the tutor providing supplemental educational services.

     Tutors have less than an associate of arts degree, but more than a high school diploma or its
equivalent.
A supplemental educational services provider may charge the eligible school district seventy-five
percent of it hourly amount if the tutor has less than an associates of arts degree, or its equivalent of
forty-eight (48) credit hours, from an accredited post secondary institution but more than a high
school diploma The per pupil cap will be ratably reduced by twenty-five percent based on the
education level of the tutor providing supplemental educational services.




                                                   25
                              SECTION VI-COST SUMMARY
                             (Non computer based services only)


See Attachment B for the 2008-2009 New Mexico Preliminary SES Per Student Cap by District. (0
points)

Fixed hourly rate per student if tutors are licensed teachers or have a bachelor’s degree or higher (all applicable
taxes are included in the hourly amount).
$ 29.00
A supplemental educational services provider may charge the eligible school district its full hourly
amount if the tutor has a valid teaching license or a four-year degree or greater from an accredited
university or college. The per pupil cap will not be ratably reduced based on the education level of the
tutor providing supplemental educational services.

Fixed hourly rate per student if tutors have less then a bachelor’s degree, but more than an associates of arts
degree (all applicable taxes are included in the hourly amount).
$ 24.65
A supplemental educational services provider may charge the eligible school district eighty-five percent
of its hourly amount if the tutor has less than a four-year degree, but more than an associates of arts
degree, or its equivalent of forty-eight (48) credit hours, from an accredited post secondary institution
The per pupil cap will be ratably reduced by fifteen percent based on the education level of the tutor
providing supplemental educational services.

Fixed hourly rate per student if tutors have less than an associates of arts degree, but more than a high school
diploma (all applicable taxes are included in the hourly amount).
$
A supplemental educational services provider may charge the eligible school district seventy-five percent
of its hourly amount if the tutor has less than an associates of arts degree, or its equivalent of forty-eight
(48) credit hours, from an accredited post secondary institution but more than a high school diploma The
per pupil cap will be ratably reduced by twenty-five percent based on the education level of the tutor
providing supplemental educational services.

NOTE: Separate registration and testing fees are not permissible. These fees, if applicable, must be built
into the regular fixed hourly rate. If a registration or testing fee is included in your fixed hourly rate,
describe the rationale for this cost.




                                                      26
                              SECTION VI-COST SUMMARY
                               (Computer based services only)


See Attachment B for the 2008-2009 New Mexico Preliminary SES Per Student Cap by District. (0
points)

Staffing is the sole responsibility of the SES provider and must be built into the pricing structure of the
provider. LEAs are not responsible for funding staff to supervise/ oversee the tutoring session.

NOTE: Computer-based or on-line providers must provide a description of any staffing requirements at
school sites or at other service locations.
N/A

If your computer-based or on-line program is software only and the ratio is one student to one computer then
the tutor to student ratio will be considered one to one. For invoicing purposes the educational qualifications
of the tutor will not be taken into consideration because the program is based on software not a tutor. Please
note that you may not have more than one student per computer.

Your fixed hourly rate per student is: $ N/A (all applicable taxes are included in the hourly amount)



If your computer-based or on-line program has an on-line instructor only and the ratio is one student to one
computer then the tutor to student ratio will be considered one to one. For invoicing purposes the educational
qualifications of the tutor will be taken into consideration because the program is based on student and tutor
interactions. Please note that you may not have more than one student per computer.

Your fixed hourly rate per student is:$ N/A (all applicable taxes are included in the hourly amount)




                                                     27
                     SECTION VII-INDICATORS OF QUALITY


A. Supplemental assessments (0 points)
   NOTE: The NMPED encourages LEAs to share their short cycle assessment data, which will identify
   student needs and is the basis of each Student Improvement Plan, with SES providers who will be
   providing services to their students.


    In case the LEA does not have a short cycle assessment in place or is unable to provide diagnostic
    information to providers, you must provide the NMPED with the name and description of any
    diagnostic assessment(s) you will be using to identify students needs and how it will be administered.
    The assessment(s) used must be of high quality.

    In addition to conferring directly with the educators who know students best, Citizen Schools will
    analyze students’ grades in their core subjects. Rather than using an intermediary assessment to
    diagnose student needs, Citizen Schools will use grades as its primary source – and then investigate
    further with students, teachers, and parents, to understand why a student is not making adequate
    progress. Often Citizen Schools has found that the reasons for under-performance encompass both
    “content” skills and the “navigational” skills required to succeed in school. As described below, the
    Citizen Schools program design addresses both the content skills and the navigation skills that
    students need to improve – and sustain - their improvement

    Citizen Schools expects that in the districts where Citizen Schools operates, the LEA will provide
    diagnostic information (including short cycle assessment and SBA data) to Citizen Schools as an
    educational partner. If that diagnostic information is not available, Citizen Schools will consult with
    the host LEA to select and implement an appropriate, high-quality diagnostic assessment and will
    inform NMPED of the instrument to be used and the plan for implementation.



B. Connection to Student Improvement Plan and school and district programs (150 points)
   The individualized Student Improvement Plan is the driving force behind student instruction. NMAC
   6.19.6 states, “Each student who is enrolled in supplemental educational services must have a student
   improvement plan, with goals relating to academic improvement based on state standards in place.”


    Describe how you will utilize standard diagnostic assessment(s), district short cycle, and summative
    assessments to create a SIP specifically to identify goals and teach to student’s current needs.

    Citizen Schools will consult with the school staff in order to develop an appropriate individualized
    Student Improvement Plan (also referred to as the Agreement on Learning Goals). This consultation
    will include a review of the student’s performance in school (attendance, grades, disciplinary issues)
    as well as other assessments that provide data and insights into the student’s learning style and
    proficiency levels, including diagnostic assessments and short cycle assessments conducted by the
    LEA. This information will complement –and will not substitute for -- the direct knowledge and
    observation of the professional educators at the school who know the student and the family well.


    Describe how you will collaborate with the LEA in the development of the individualized Student
    Improvement Plan.

    As a school-based SES provider, Citizen Schools operates as a full partner to the school and district as
    it works with students, and their families, to lift academic performance. The program operates four
                                                    28
    afternoons per week, and its instructors become a familiar, trusted presence in its host schools. This
    means that Citizen Schools will communicate frequently with teachers and other school staff members
    about students’ needs and their progress, from the initial development of the Student Improvement
    Plan through the reporting to the parents, school, and district about the progress students have made.

    In developing the Student Improvement Plan, Citizen Schools recognizes that in order for students to
    make progress, instructors must be attentive not only to their academic issues, but also to the context
    of their learning and their family environment. Citizen Schools will strive to develop a Student
    Improvement Plan that draws on the strengths of the student’s home and school environment and that
    fosters a team approach among teachers, parents, and SES instructors. Citizen Schools will
    collaborate with the LEA and with school-based staff to make effective use of assessment information
    that is available and to build upon that with recent, relevant information about student’s learning and
    the challenges they face.



    Describe how you plan to collaborate with classroom teachers to support the instruction the student is
    receiving during the regular school day.


    Citizen Schools will consult regularly with the teachers in the schools where it operates to implement
    complementary learning activities that build on, but do not duplicate, the content delivered during the
    school day. In many cases, Citizen Schools’ activities will be structured and scheduled to “loop back”
    with students to reinforce material covered in their regular classes 1-2 weeks earlier.
    Since Citizen Schools will be present in the school during the after-school hours, it will take
    advantage of this proximity to exchange lesson plans and informal progress reports with classroom
    teachers. The goal of this frequent communication is to ensure a steady, two-way flow of information
    so that in-school educators and SES instructors are working in concert, using methods, lessons, and
    strategies that reinforce each other. Citizen Schools will encourage classroom teachers to share timely
    information with its instructors about successes and struggles they observe, as well as about
    assignments and projects on which Citizen Schools can help support students’ learning, directly and
    indirectly. Typically, Citizen Schools staff members will communicate with teachers in person, or if
    that is not feasible, they will speak by phone or communicate by email. At the four middle school
    sites in Albuquerque and Santa Fe where it currently operates, Citizen Schools instructors also
    exchange progress reports and other communications with teachers in their school mailboxes, and this
    practice is highly valued by teachers.


C. Instructional practices and evidence of effectiveness (300 points)
   Describe the nature of your instructional model specific to the proposed grade level(s) and content
   area(s). You must include: 1) your proposed curriculum , 2) time on task, 3) materials that will be
   used, 4) training that tutors will receive (relevant to academic services), and 5) how locations and
   tutors will be monitored and how adjustments will be made, if needed.

    Instructional Model - Overview

    Citizen Schools is a highly esteemed leader in leveraging out-of-school learning to advance
    achievement and expand opportunity for low-income students.

    Citizen Schools currently operates out-of-school learning programs at 44 school-based sites, serving
    approximately 4,400 students in 20 urban districts across seven states.

    Citizen Schools has been an approved provider of Supplemental Educational Services in
    Massachusetts since 2001 and has served approximately 2,500 students approved to receive SES in
    five urban districts.
                                                    29
A rigorous independent evaluation has reported that:

    Overall, Citizen Schools is succeeding in moving a group of low-income, educationally
    at-risk participants towards its desired outcomes of successful high school completion,
    advancement to college, and full participation in the civic and economic life of their
    communities.

Citizen Schools is a valued educational partner in the districts where it operates.

For example, Dr. Peter Gorman, Superintendent of the Charlotte Mecklenburg (North Carolina)
Schools, commented, “I have seen the quality and impact of Citizen Schools’ programming firsthand.
Citizen Schools programs employ sound teaching methods that advance students’ learning.”

In Albuquerque, Chief Academic Officer Linda Sink has stated,

    [Citizen Schools’] programs set a standard for high-quality in our district. Their staff is highly
    qualified, immensely talented, and deeply committed to expanding opportunity for low-income
    students.

In Santa Fe, Superintendent Bobbie Gutierrez stated, “Citizen Schools has become an authentic and
essential partner of the De Vargas Middle School in Santa Fe.”

1. Proposed Curriculum

The Citizen Schools curriculum and its program design are deeply grounded in research on effective
pedagogy and engagement in learning. Citizen Schools provides students with an intensive,
comprehensive program that advances their academic performance and develops the study skills and
habits of success that students need in order to sustain their improvement after they complete the
program. The program design also reflects Citizen Schools 14 years’ of direct experience in
implementing the program with urban school partners and evaluating its effectiveness.


Program basics
Students in 6th, 7th, and 8th grades will attend the program Monday through Thursday afternoon, from
3:30 until 6:00, throughout the school year. Thus, most students will participate in the program for
300+ hours per year and it will serve as their primary out-of-school activity. The program will be
delivered in school buildings where Citizen Schools’ instructors will maintain a strong and consistent
presence, and build partnerships with in-school educators.

For 2009-10, Citizen Schools plans to operate its program in Albuquerque and Santa Fe at the
Following sites:

in Albuquerque at the:
    Grant Middle School
    Van Buren Middle School
    Wilson Middle School

in Santa Fe at the:
    De Vargas Middle School

The major academic elements of the program are:

     School Navigation/Study Skills
     AIM Time (Aspire, Invest, Make the Grade)
                                                 30
     Apprenticeships
     Learning Labs

Additional elements include opening circles at which students share and celebrate their learning with
their peers and receive recognition for progress made, and explorations in which students learn about
resources in their community and college opportunities.

Instruction is organized in teams (typically by grade level) and occurs in small groups, with a typical
ratio of about 10-13 students per instructor. Citizen Schools has a higher student to staff ratio than
traditional tutoring programs, but also provides many more hours of service to each student – offering
300+ hours over the course of the year. During AIM Time (4 hours per week), instructors work
individually with students on specific skills. They also engage in Grades and Goals conferences twice
during each marking period to establish benchmarks for success and to identify and overcome
obstacles to progress.

Study Skills and “School Navigation”
Citizen Schools believes that all children can achieve at high levels and that academic achievement is
not determined by innate ability, but by the amount and quality of effort invested in developing
ability. Jeffrey Howard of the Efficacy Institute contends that academic performance is a direct
outcome of effort expended effectively—not innate intellectual endowment (Howard, 1992, 1995;
Howard & Hammond, 1985). Consequently, Citizen Schools focuses on student effort invested in
academic tasks, as well as on the effectiveness with which such effort contributes to student learning
and achievement. Citizen Schools instructors function as academic coaches whose practices are
guided by their potential to maximize students’ effective effort as learners. In the role of academic
coach, the Citizen Schools instructor provides close guidance and comprehensive support.

Citizen Schools’ School Navigation lessons help students to develop the competencies that support
success in school, such as organization, note-taking, self-advocacy, goal-setting, active learning, and
test preparation. These lessons reflect the findings of Carole S. Dweck in Improving Academic
Achievement, and Learning and Motivation in the Classroom. The School Navigation segment also
facilitates the development of the values, attitudes and behaviors that contribute to academic
achievement, such as focus, resourcefulness and perseverance. In conjunction with a pervasive
culture of achievement that Citizen Schools strives to create, the School Navigation lessons motivate
and inspire students to exhibit academic excellence.

AIM Time, (Aspire, Invest, Make the Grade)
Each day of the Citizen Schools program begins with a full hour devoted to academic skill
development and reinforcement of school-day curricula (often with a strategy of “looping back”).
This segment also includes frequent individual conferencing and goal-setting. As a school-based
program, Citizen Schools uses AIM Time to strengthen the connection between in-school and after-
school learning and to leverage strong relationships with the school faculty and staff who are students’
primary educational leaders. The daily academic support segment will provide students with time,
space, resources, and tools to review and practice skills, and to develop increased competency in self-
directed learning.

One of the elements of AIM time, which also demonstrates effective effort put in practice, is
successful homework completion. Homework is intended to deepen learning through practice.
Homework done haphazardly or incompletely will not serve its purpose. To make homework efforts
effective, students need to spend sufficient time working on their homework, focus on the tasks at
hand without unnecessary distractions, use the resources available to them, and employ those
strategies that work best for them as individuals. This is the environment that the Citizen Schools
instructor creates.

The consistency of AIM Time helps surface the obstacles that block students’ progress. Often, their
struggles are not limited to mastery of content, but rather extend to issues of motivation, focus, and
                                                31
goal-setting. Citizen Schools’ experience has shown that many middle school students are unable to
connect the demands and requirements of their classes to the future educational and career
opportunities they hope to access. Equally important, many students are unaware of how they can
improve their performance. They see their grades as something that happens to them, a force of nature
over which they have no control. Therefore, during AIM Time Citizen Schools works intensively
with students to replace this passivity with a proactive commitment – and specific skills – to improve
their academic performance. Citizen Schools’ instructors communicate directly and consistently with
each student’s classroom teachers and use the teachers’ input when the hold regular student
conferences to review grades and set goals (Grades and Goals conferences). By communicating
directly with teachers, Citizen Schools’ instructors gain a clear understanding of how each student is
doing, the areas of strengths and weakness, and the priorities for improvement.

The Grades and Goals conferences will be held twice in each marking period, with an intensive focus
on communication with teachers in the two weeks before grades close. Citizen Schools has found that
conferencing, if done regularly and rigorously, can have a significant positive effect on students’
grades and their perceptions of efficacy.

Apprenticeships
Citizen Schools recruits adult volunteers who are experts in their professions to become Citizen
Teachers and lead weekly after-school apprenticeship courses. Each apprenticeship is an 11-week,
hands-on course that reinforces and applies academic skills and introduces students to a new field in
which they create a high-quality product, service, or presentation. The apprenticeship culminates in a
public celebration of learning at which students teach back what they have learned to parents,
teachers, and community members.

For example:

     in a Law apprenticeship, students will draft, revise, and deliver oral and written arguments in a
      mock trial;
     in an Engineering apprenticeship students will practice calculating ratios and understanding
      percentages as they design a bridge or a rollercoaster;
     in a Journalism apprenticeship, students will write and edit news and feature stories as they
      produce a community newspaper;
     in an Environmental apprenticeship, students will practice laboratory procedures and
      manipulate fractions as they conduct water quality tests.

Apprenticeships build on sound pedagogy, drawing from principles originally espoused by John
Dewey in the 1920s and 30s and extending to more recent research by Howard Gardner and Lauren
Resnick. The apprenticeship approach can be especially effective for students who are not thriving in
the traditional classroom setting. Apprenticeships promote significant retention of knowledge by
engaging students in doing and teaching as opposed to merely hearing and seeing. They provide the
authenticity and credibility that adolescents crave, and as a result, promote a high level of investment,
participation, and learning.

Learning Labs
Learning labs are structured opportunities for students to practice math and language arts content
through organized games and activities. Learning labs reflect recent research that points to the
benefits of using games to strengthen students’ mathematical skills (Cavanaugh, 2008). The research
concludes that when students spend even a small amount of time on math games their positive
experience can spark greater interest in the subject and result in academic advancement. For example,
one lab entitled “Piece of Cake” uses a cake to visually demonstrate fractions and then help students
convert fractions to decimals and percentages.


                                                 32
Additional Program Elements
Explorations and College Visits
Explorations, which occur 1-2 times per month, teach students about resources in their community and
how to access them. Some explorations involve students leaving the school site to visit civic and
cultural institutions such as libraries and museums, to develop research and leadership skills, learn
about local history, and become familiar with enrichment opportunities. Other explorations include
visits to nearby college campuses that help students connect their current learning with future careers
to which they aspire. During explorations, students will typically have challenges to solve,
individually and in teams, that require them to connect with adults and gather information.

A Positive Culture for Learning
The learning environment in which Citizen Schools teaches its lessons is as important as their
academic content. In studies cited in Beth Miller’s Critical Hours, an alternative environment such as
an active group-setting, where students are important contributors rather than passive recipients,
builds motivation and initiative leading to increased engagement. Citizen Schools uses a combination
of formal and informal techniques to build a culture of high-motivation and high-achievement.
Without the “skills” of self-confidence, perseverance, and goal-setting, students are unlikely to rise to
the challenge of their schoolwork or to sustain the progress they make while enrolled in Citizen
Schools.

Citizen Schools recognizes that children’s cognitive and academic development during their
adolescent years cannot be seen apart from the social and emotional factors that shape this
developmental period. Our program works to overcome the perception that it is not cool to be smart.
We create an environment in which learning and achievement are celebrated. We strive to “catch
kids doing something right,” and when we see positive values put into practice, we offer immediate
recognition to the student and call the parents to let them know, too.


2. Time on Task

Citizen Schools provides an intensive program that sets a high expectation for consistent attendance.
Students attend Citizen Schools’ programs for 10 hours per week throughout the school year, Monday
through Thursday, from 3:30 to 6:00. (If a student completes his/her allotment of hours funded by the
SES contract, Citizen Schools will provide all additional hours of service throughout the school year,
at no cost to the family.)

The Citizen Schools program combines formal and informal learning environments and engages
students in a blend of traditional academic activities and hands-on projects. The program model
reflects the principle that students, especially those who are not thriving in conventionally-structured
classrooms, need the opportunity to thrive in alternative environments that address a diversity of
learning styles.

A block schedule of learning activities in the Citizen Schools program is shown below




                                                 33
Citizen Schools SES Program: Time on Task
           Monday                 Tuesday                   Wednesday              Thursday
3:30                                Academic                                        Academic
            Academic             Coaching: Aspire,           Academic             Coaching: Aspire,
3:50        Coaching:            Invest, Make the         Coaching: Aspire,       Invest, Make the
          Aspire, Invest,             Grade               Invest, Make the             Grade
4:00      Make the Grade                                       Grade
4:15
                                  Study Skills and
4:30                               Learning Lab
5:00      Apprenticeship 1                                Apprenticeship 2           Exploration

5:10                                Choice Time

6:00


3. Materials that will be used
Citizen Schools will use learning activities and related materials that are aligned with specified
learning goals for the subject area and grade level. Citizen Schools does not use a “canned”
curriculum or “off the shelf” materials. Rather, it works in close partnership with the faculty and staff
of each of its school sites to develop and implement learning activities that will help students improve
and advance.

In many instances, faculty will share their lesson plans and classroom materials with the SES
instructors. During the AIM (Aspire, Invest, Make the Grade) segment, SES instructors will loop
back to this material with students in order to reinforce the material they have learned and to fill in
gaps that become apparent.

In the Learning Labs segment, materials include challenges and puzzles created by educational
publishers; in some cases these materials are available on line. Materials created by Citizen Schools
practitioners and curriculum developers include activities on Baking Fractions, Stock Picking,
Geometry Hunt, and Accentuating the Negative.

In the School Navigation (study skills) segment materials include lesson plans created by Citizen
Schools practitioners and developers on Organization, Active Class Participation, Learning Strategies,
and Test Preparation.

In apprenticeships, the volunteer Citizen Teachers develop a series of lesson plans in concert with the
Citizen Schools instructor who serves as their co-teacher. Citizen Teachers supply necessary
materials, which vary based on the content of the apprenticeship. For example, in a creative writing
apprenticeship students may review writing samples that illustrate a variety of genres whereas in an
environmental science apprenticeship students may use basic lab equipment to test water quality.

4. Training for instructional staff
Citizen Schools has a track record of hiring, training and retaining outstanding educators to advance
students’ learning and improve their academic performance.

A full-time Campus Director will manage daily operations and instruction at each Citizen Schools
program site. Campus Directors are highly-qualified, talented, and experienced educators. In addition
to the Campus Director, the instructional staff at each site will include several Team Leaders
(instructors) who will lead small groups of students in their learning activities.

Citizen Schools will provide extensive pre-service and in-service training to its instructional staff, as
well as ongoing coaching and skilled supervision. Training topics will include skill development in
                                                  34
mathematics and language arts, adolescent development, effective coaching and tutoring techniques,
analysis of assessment results, working with English Language Learners, project-based learning, and
family engagement. Since the Citizen Schools program operates Monday through Thursday, each
Friday will be devoted to in-service training, professional development, and program planning.

All Citizen Schools instructors will attend an intensive weeklong training Academy each summer,
with training sessions tailored to staff members’ prior experiences and job functions. Campus
Directors and instructors will receive training on the effective delivery of each program element as
well as general topics of adolescent development, positive youth development, family and community
engagement, and partnership building.

As part of its general training activities for instructional staff, Citizen Schools highlights the need for
effective partnerships with parents. Ongoing feedback, training and professional development
regarding parental involvement is provided through coaching, supervision, and peer groups of
instructional staff.

5. Monitoring of Sites and Plan to Ensure Quality
Citizen Schools will monitor its program sites frequently and thoroughly in order to ensure that
students receive high-quality learning experiences. Citizen Schools will implement a variety of
assessment instruments and clear metrics, along with regular observations by senior staff and school
partners, in order to ensure accountability and promote quality. The primary monitoring tool is the
Program Quality Rubric, which addresses quality across the domains of

        attendance and retention;
        students’ grades in their core subjects;
        stakeholder engagement and feedback; and
        apprenticeship quality.

Citizen Schools’ collection of data on program quality facilitates self-assessment and fosters
continuous improvement. Each program site will record and compile daily attendance and retention
information. It will collect and analyze grades and other indicators of in-school performance, and also
conduct pre- and post assessments of oral presentation and leadership skills. The pre-post leadership
rubric assesses students’ skills on 15 attributes across the categories of self-confidence, teamwork,
responsibility, courage, and future orientation. These assessment rubrics have been developed in
consultation with youth development experts and have been implemented at more than 40 program
sites. In addition, all sites will conduct detailed surveys of students, parents, volunteers, and
classroom teachers in order to assess program quality and impact, and to stimulate continuous
improvement.

Campus Directors and their supervisor (the Program Director) will meet twice each year (and more
often informally) with the principal of each of the program’s host schools to receive feedback and
collaborate on joint strategies for improvement.



Describe what the family, student and school district/teacher should expect during a typical
Supplemental Educational Services session. You must include: 1) how student needs are identified,
2) how identified student needs are met, 3) how identified student needs are communicated to the
family, student and school district/teacher, 4) how you know progress has been achieved/not achieved
and, 5) the next steps for tutor and student.

1. Identification of Students’ Needs
As an intensive, school-based program, Citizen Schools’ close partnership with in-school educators
will be the key to its ability to:

                                                  35
      diagnose each student’s needs;
      prescribe an educational program and define goals that meet each student’s needs;
      evaluate and monitor the student’s progress toward those goals; and
      communicate with the school regarding the student’s goals and progress.

Citizen Schools uses its consistent presence in the school in order to expand its knowledge of
students’ actual school performance and to guide the instruction it offers to each student. The
instructional staff seeks and incorporates input from teachers and other school personnel who see
students’ work daily. Working in close partnership with its host schools, Citizen Schools attempts to
analyze -- at a high level of detail -- students’ performance (including performance on standardized
tests) to identify more clearly the skill areas in which students are in most need of attention.

By communicating directly and frequently with teachers and school staff, Citizen Schools will identify
the specific skill gaps of students who receive Supplemental Educational Services. Because of the
close, collegial relationship between in-school classroom teachers and Citizen Schools instructors, the
identification of learning needs goes deeper than the general categories of “writing” or “math;” it
extends to the specific skills that require intensive focus in order for improvement in student
performance to occur. For example, in writing composition this might mean an emphasis on
organization, appropriate format, or voice. In mathematics it might mean the manipulation of
fractions, estimation, or graphing.

2. Meeting Identified Needs
The Citizen Schools program individualizes activities and academic support to meet individual student
needs, while maintaining the small-group, team-based structure that makes the program engaging and
promotes high levels of attendance and motivation. Instructors will give individual students attention
on those areas that have been identified as skill or knowledge gaps through the process described
above.

Citizen Schools instructors will set formal goals for overall improvement with each student as well as
informal intermediate goals for each learning activity. For example, working in consultation with a
student’s family and teachers, a Campus Director may set a formal goal of raising a student’s grade in
mathematics by one letter grade in the next marking period and an informal goal of completing all
homework assignments in a given month. Citizen Schools also involves and empowers the student to
help create and take ownership for learning goals.

3. Communicating about needs to family, student, and teacher
Citizen Schools communicates to students and their families the identified student needs through a
combination of oral and written methods that are mutually reinforcing.

For each student, Citizen Schools will draft a written Agreement on Learning Goals that is prepared
after consultation with classroom teachers and other school staff. Citizen Schools will then discuss
the draft Agreement with both the student and the parents/guardians. The Agreement will include a
concise statement -- in accessible, relevant language -- of both the student’s learning needs, his/her
goals for improvement, the activities planned, and the timeline for achieving them. The Citizen
Schools instructor will ensure that the student and family understand the language of the Agreement
fully, and have the opportunity to revise it in order to encourage authentic “ownership” of the goals
and the learning plan. The Agreement of Learning Goals will be signed by the student, the parents,
and the program staff – each of whom will make a commitment to contribute to the accomplishment
of the goals.

Citizen Schools will share the signed Agreement on Learning Goals with appropriate school and
district staff, and with the student’s classroom teachers.

4. Assessing Progress and Communicating About It

                                                36
Citizen Schools’ primary mechanism for the assessment of student progress will be the regular
observation of the academic work and hands-on projects that students complete at Citizen Schools.
Citizen Schools is an intensive program, with students attending 10 hours per week. During their
extensive participation in Citizen Schools, students produce academic work in a variety of settings and
this variety – and frequency – strengthens the program’s ability to measure students’ progress. Each
day, instructors have the opportunity to see students work on their assignments and school projects.
They also observe project-based work in their apprenticeships.

Citizen Schools instructors will formally note students’ progress on their school assignments. Each
day during the AIM segment, students set priorities for their assignments as they complete a
Homework Log which is checked and retained by their instructor. The completed logs often serve as
a starting point for communication with teachers and parents. Each student also maintains a portfolio
that includes homework logs, reports of conversations about grades, and copies of exemplary
homework assignments completed.

In addition to the ongoing monitoring of student progress, Citizen Schools formally monitors students’
grades each marking period, and discusses grades with students and parents, making reference to the
Agreement on Learning Goals. As noted above, the program uses grades as a primary source for
monitoring school achievement, rather than an intermediary diagnostic method. Citizen Schools will
also communicate consistently with students’ classroom teachers to understand better which
instructional strategies are generating improvement, where more improvement is needed, and what
other factors may be influencing progress. This consultation encompasses both a formal exchange of
information about student performance (facilitated by the Campus Director) and informal exchanges
made possible by Citizen Schools’ regular presence in the school.

As noted in Section VII D and E, Citizen Schools will report regularly to the student, family, school,
and district on the progress students are making and will use grades in core subjects, assessment
rubrics, frequent observations, and reference to the Agreement on Learning Goals to determine
whether progress is made.

5. Determining and Implementing Next Steps
Citizen Schools builds a strong relationship between the instructor, the student, and the family. This
relationship is intended to help students progress academically and in other domains of healthy
development. The instructor sees the student daily and comes to understand the student’s academic,
extracurricular, and career aspirations. The instructor also speaks with the parents, at least every two
weeks. Throughout the academic year, the instructor and student will assess the student’s progress,
both informally in daily interaction and formally in Grades and Goals conferences each marking
period. In these interactions, the instructor and the student will determine next steps and a plan for
taking them. For example, an instructor and an 8th grade student may work closely to select the
student’s courses in 9th grade, to ensure that the courses are challenging and well-suited to the
student’s past experiences and future goals. For students moving from 6th grade to 7th grade, the
instructor and the student may visit the student’s teachers for the next year, to talk openly about
progress made and areas of improvement. Citizen Schools is especially attentive to major transitions
that can be perilous for students who are struggling academically. Each of these approaches take
advantage of Citizen Schools’ consistent presence in the school building and its close partnership with
the faculty and staff of the school, as well as with students and families.



Present evidence that your instructional practices have a positive impact on academic achievement for
low income, under achieving student, if applicable, in the areas of math, reading and science. This may
include results from parent surveys or parent recommendations and evaluation results obtained using
objective methodologies and scientifically valid methods. You must be thorough and specific, broad
statements are not permissible.

                                                37
Evidence of Positive Impact
The Citizen Schools program has a strong, well-documented, independently-validated track record of
building students’ skills and improving academic achievement.

Since 2001, Policy Studies Associates, a national leader in educational evaluation, has conducted a
rigorous, longitudinal study of Citizen Schools’ Boston program. The evaluation uses a quasi-
experimental design, comparing the performance of cohorts of Citizen Schools students to matched
comparison groups of their peers. Students are matched on the basis of academic achievement prior to
entry into the program and demographic characteristics. The evaluation has reported that:

       6th and 7th grade students who consistently attended Citizen Schools significantly
        outperformed a comparison group in six out of seven indicators of school success (including
        grades, discipline issues, and standardized test scores).

       Among students who attended Citizen Schools regularly, differences in school attendance
        rates were particularly positive, amounting to an additional nine school days per year in
        middle school and 9-16 additional days per year during high school, after they completed the
        Citizen Schools program.

       Two years after completing Citizen Schools, a significantly higher percentage of participants
        than matched non-participants earned A’s or B’s in their 10th grade English courses (46% to
        26%). In math, the difference also favored participants, although the sample size was too
        small to make it statistically significant. Most students also made gains on an internal pre-
        post assessment of leadership skills and oral presentation skills.

       Prior to entering the program, students who later graduated from Citizen Schools were less
        likely to score at the proficient or advanced levels on the statewide exam, but were more
        likely to score at these levels on the 10th grade exam, after completing the Citizen Schools
        program.

Policy Studies Associates has concluded:

    Overall, Citizen Schools is succeeding in moving a group of low-income, educationally
    at-risk participants towards its desired outcomes of successful high school completion,
    advancement to college, and full participation in the civic and economic life of their
    communities.

In addition to the external evaluation conducted by Policy Studies Associates, Citizen Schools has
conducted an internal analysis of 8th graders who completed its Boston program in 2002 and 2003.
This review found that 87% of Citizen Schools’ students graduated from high school in four years, as
compared to a citywide on-time graduation rate of 59%. Among Citizen Schools’ alumni, 95% of
those high school graduates reported enrolling in a two- or four-year college.

Citizen Schools has been recognized as a model program by the U.S. Department of Education and
featured in its publication, The Innovator as well as in a front-page story in Education Week. In May
2006, the U.S. Department of Education invited Citizen Schools’ co-founder Ned Rimer to appear on
its television program, Education News Parents Can Use to describe Citizen Schools as an effective
SES option for parents.

Citizen Schools has earned the respect of parents, teachers, and educational leaders in districts that
serve low-income, under-achieving students.

Dr. Peter Gorman, Superintendent of the Charlotte Mecklenburg (North Carolina) Schools,
commented, “I have seen the quality and impact of Citizen Schools’ programming firsthand. Citizen
Schools programs employ sound teaching methods that advance students’ learning.”
                                                 38
The principal of the Gavin Middle School, which partners with Citizen Schools in Boston,
commented:

    Citizen Schools stands out amongst nonprofits dedicated to ensuring a bright future for Boston’s
    middle schoolers. It has 14 years of experience building partnerships with schools, families, and
    adult volunteers to provide a web of support that wont’ let our students fail. Citizen Schools
    understands the hard work and collaboration that is necessary to make such partnerships work.

Another principal reported:

    Citizen Schools develops the combination of academic and leadership skills that students
    need, both to improve their current performance in school and to put themselves on a trajectory
    for sustained success. I have seen Citizen Schools deliver high-impact results.

The mother of a Citizen Schools’ student said:
    Since attending, my daughter's grades and outlook on school have improved, and she wants to be
    more successful as well. Citizen Schools has given her a place to shine and she is truly
    blossoming and coming into her own. Kiah very much looks up to her Team Leader and holds
    him in the highest regard.

Another parent commented:
   Ms Emily and Mr. Rafael [Citizen Schools’ instructors) do a very good job at keeping me
   informed with my daughter's academic progress and what they can do to help. If it wasn't for Mr.
   Rafael this semester I don't know if my daughter would have passed the 3 classes she was failing.

A student reported, “Citizen Schools has really pushed me to do well. I've been working harder every
day and I improved a lot.”

As noted above, Citizen Schools has been an approved provider of Supplemental Educational Services
in Massachusetts since 2002. After making a site visit to assess the effectiveness of the Citizen
Schools SES program, the Director of the Supplemental Education Services program for the
Massachusetts Department of Education wrote in her summary of the site visit:

       The Citizen Schools supplemental educational services program appears to be well designed
        and organized. The program is made up of several components including skill building,
        explorations, and apprenticeships.
       The program is well attended.
       The program has a process in place for regular communication with the parents of the
        students participating in the program.
       The program has clear links to the school-day program.
       The program appears to have an excellent training and evaluation process for instructional
        staff.

Also impressive is the program’s apprenticeship component. Volunteers from the community work
with the students on specific issues. The Department staff viewed a class participating in a finance
apprenticeship. The volunteer worked extremely well with the students, and all of the students
participated in the activities and were engaged.




                                               39
              SECTION VII-INDICATORS OF QUALITY (Continued)


D. Communication of student progress to the school and district (100 points)
    Describe the specific procedures used to report student progress to students, teachers and appropriate
    school or district staff and how often you report student progress.
    6.19.6 NMAC states parents or guardians, and appropriate school personnel must be notified of
    student progress in a format that is easily understandable.
    Citizen Schools will report on students’ goals and progress to teachers and school staff through both
    formal reports and informal channels.

    Citizen Schools will work with the instructional leaders at each of its host schools to develop on-site
    reporting and communication practices that will most effectively advance student achievement. The
    emphasis of this collaboration is to ensure a steady, two-way flow of information so that in-school
    educators and SES instructors are working in concert, using methods, lessons, and strategies that
    reinforce each other. We will work to discourage the generation of reports that are not read, and
    instead encourage communication in real-time to advance learning and support effective instruction
    and partnership.

    Students’ progress towards the goals indentified in their Agreement on Learning Goals will be
    reported formally to the school leadership, typically in conjunction with the reporting of course grades
    each marking period. This report typically occurs at a meeting convened expressly for the purpose of
    examining students’ performance and developing effective, collaborative strategies to generate
    improvement. At these meetings, the Citizen Schools Campus Director and school leaders work as a
    team, looking both at larger patterns of achievement and at individual students’ issues. Formal
    reporting to the district will follow established procedures, and will include making available copies of
    the progress reports provided to parents, and presenting that data in aggregate form.

    Citizen Schools will also convene a year-end meeting with the district leadership to discuss the
    effectiveness of the program and opportunities to deepen its collaboration. This meeting will be used
    to review data from the completed academic year and to discuss issues of alignment for the coming
    year. In conjunction with the meeting, Citizen Schools will prepare reports and analyses that
    effectively communicate the progress made towards goals for individual students and the overall
    program.

     State the frequency of communication of student progress to the school and district:

         One time a week – Written progress reports will be given to appropriate school district personnel
         One time every two weeks – Written progress reports will be given to appropriate school district
     personnel
         One time every three weeks – Written progress reports will be given to appropriate school district
     personnel
         One time every four weeks – Written progress reports will be given to appropriate school district
     personnel
      Other, please explain Citizen Schools, as a school-based SES program that will operate in only a few
     school, will determine the communication based on discussion with each school and district partner. If
     desired by schools and districts, Citizen Schools can provide frequent written progress reports.

E. Communication of student progress with parents/families (100 points)
   Describe the specific procedures used to report student progress to the student’s parents/families and
   how often student progress is reported.
   6.19.6 NMAC states parents or guardians and appropriate school personnel must be notified of
   student progress in a format that is easily understandable.
   You must be thorough and specific, broad statements are not permissible.
                                                     40
Gains made during the after-school hours will be short-lived if they are not fortified by a trusting
partnership with each student’s family. Citizen Schools will communicate consistently with parents,
verbally and in writing, to keep them informed about their child’s progress and to build a sense of
teamwork among the caring adults in each child’s life.

Citizen Schools will send parents at least two written progress reports that communicate in
straightforward language the student’s progress in relation to the goals stated in the Agreement on
Learning Goals. These reports will be mailed to the student’s home address and also emailed to
parents (if parents provide their email address). The formal progress reports will be supplemented by
additional emails or information, depending on individual students’ needs and parents’ requests.

While the written reports will document progress, Citizen Schools has found that the most effective
method for communicating with parents about student progress is direct bi-weekly telephone calls
from Citizen Schools instructors to parents of all students enrolled in the program. Instructors use
these weekly phone calls to:

       share information on the students’ participation and progress in learning activities;
       discuss non-academic issues that affect the students growth and school success;
       highlight upcoming activities, especially those that involve parents; and
       to receive feedback from parents about general program issues and specific learning
        activities.

The first goal of the weekly calls is to establish a trusting partnership with parents in advancing
students’ academic performance and school success. Building on a platform of trust and mutual
commitment, the instructor can then serve as a bridge between parents and schools, increasing
parents’ comfort levels in contacting teachers.

In order to promote consistency and to ensure quality in the instructors’ calls to parents, Citizen
Schools uses a call tracking system that is maintained by the instructor and reviewed by the Campus
Director. If parental outreach is unsuccessful through regular means, the Campus Director will tailor
appropriate alternative means to encourage full participation of parents and to share information on
student progress.

The design of Citizen Schools is intended to meet the needs of working parents. Citizen Schools
operates during the out-of-school hours in order to provide constructive learning activities as an
alternative to unsupervised or unsafe activities for middle school students. In communicating with
working parents, Citizen Schools accommodates their schedules by making phone calls in the evening,
or at other preferable times that they designate. Outreach events and community potlucks typically
occur in the early evening, as do the events that culminate apprenticeships. Parents are always
encouraged to bring students’ siblings and other relatives to program activities – eliminating the need
for parents to secure additional child care. Most program sites also use newsletters to keep parents
apprised of general program activities.


 State the frequency of communication of student progress with the parents/families:

     One time a week – Written progress reports will be given to appropriate family member
     One time every two weeks – Written progress reports will be given to appropriate family
 member
     One time every three weeks – Written progress reports will be given to appropriate family
 member
     One time every four weeks – Written progress reports will be given to appropriate family
 member
  Other, please explain Citizen Schools will provide written progress reports 2-3 times during the
 school year to complement weekly phone conversations between instructors and parents.
                                                 41
                     SECTION VIII-FINANCIAL SOUNDNESS AND
                          ORGANIZATIONAL CAPACITY


Attach proper documentation to demonstrate that your organization has adequate financial,
organizational and technical resources to provide the proposed Title I supplemental educational
services and that you have satisfactorily delivered similar services in the past. (50 points)

For purposes of this application: (a) “organization” means any entity eligible to provide SES; and (b) the
term “related organization” means an entity that: (i) directly or indirectly controls, or is controlled by, your
organization; (ii) influences, or is influenced by, your organization in terms of operational policies; or (iii)
is controlled or influenced by another organization that also controls or influences your organization.

The No Child Left Behind Act requires that one criterion for selecting an offeror must include evidence
that it is “financially sound.” These indicators help the Evaluation Committee evaluate a program
provider’s capacity to deliver quality services over time and at scale.

There are a number of ways an offeror might prove that it is financially and organizationally sound, and
the acceptable evidence will vary depending on the initial size and capacity of the offeror. Potential
offerors will possess different financial and management structures. The Evaluation Committee will take
these differences into account when reviewing applications.

Evidence of acceptable financial and management capacity must include at least one of the following
items:

     Copies of business license or formal documentation of legal status with respect to conducting
      business in the state (and district(s), if applicable);

     Proof of liability insurance (company name and policy number, or a copy of the policy cover
      page);

     Audited financial statements; SEE ATTACHED – Citizen Schools audited financial
      statements are included as an attachment.

     Credit ratings from an independent rating agency; or

     Business plans or profiles that might include: goals, timelines and expected outcomes; detailed
      action steps; descriptions of financial and staff resources; organizational budgets that account for
      revenues and expenses and cash flow activity; and outlines of roles and responsibilities of staff
      within the organization.




                                                      42
                SECTION IX-PROPOSAL EVALUATION PROCESS


The evaluation process will follow the steps listed below:

1. All offeror proposals will be reviewed for compliance with the overall assurances stated within the
   application. Applications deemed non-responsive will be eliminated from further consideration.

2. Art Martinez may contact the offeror for clarification of any response.

3. The evaluation committee may use other sources of information to perform the evaluation.

4. Responsive applications will be evaluated on the factors that have been assigned a point value. The
   responsible offerors with the highest scores will be selected as finalist offerors based upon the
   applications submitted. The responsible offerors, whose application is most advantageous to the
   NMPED, will be recommended for approval. Please note, however, that a serious deficiency in the
   response to any one factor may be grounds for rejection regardless of overall score.




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