PRESENTATION COLLEGE by KLNS4Q

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									                                 SYLLABUS
 INTRO TO ORGANIC & BIOCHEMISTY LECTURE & LABORATORY
                       CH133/CL131
                        Spring 2009

NAME OF SCHOOL: Presentation College

NAME OF DEPARTMENT: College of Arts & Sciences – Department of Chemistry

SEMESTER/YEAR: Spring 2009

CLASS DAY: Lecture (AB) – Monday, Wednesday, & Friday
           Laboratory (AB) – Tuesday, Wednesday, & Thursday

CLASS HOURS: Lecture – 1:00 am until 1:50 pm (MWF)
             Laboratory – Tuesday (CL131A) 10:00 am until 12:00 pm
                           Wednesday (CL131B) 3:00 am until 5:00 pm
                           Thursday (CL131C) 8:00 am until 10:00 pm

MEETING ROOM: Lecture – Nursing Building NU27
              Laboratory – Main Building E106 & E111

CAMPUS SITE: Aberdeen

INSTRUCTOR NAME: Dr. James Johnson (Lecture)

INSTRUCTOR OFFICE: E-360

INSTRUCTOR CONTACT INFORMATION:
Office phone: 229-8360 or email: jimmy.johnson@presentation.edu
You may also contact me anytime at home (cell: 216-0117).

INSTRUCTOR OFFICE HOURS:
Monday: 10:00 am to 11:00 am and from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Tuesday: 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Wednesday: 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Thursday: 10:30 am to 11:30 am
Friday: 9:00 am to 10:00 am
Please note: I have an open door office policy
If the above mentioned times will not work please schedule a time with me
that will 216-0117
COURSE NUMBER: CH133 and CL131

COURSE TITLE: Intro to Organic & Biochemistry – Lecture and Laboratory
COURSE DESCRIPTION: CH133 & CL131 (Intro to Organic & Biochemistry with Lab – 3,1
credits). This is a one-semester course that offers and introduction to the chemical principles
important to biological systems. It is designed mainly for students of nursing, health sciences,
and those not planning to take additional chemistry courses. Topics covered are those especially
important for health-related majors with special emphasis placed on examples illustrating the
relevance of organic and biochemical principles to medical applications. It will involve
approximately five weeks of organic chemistry and ten weeks of biochemistry. This course
includes 3 hours of lecture plus 2 hours of laboratory and/or recitation weekly.
        Prerequisite: “C” or above in CH123/CL121 or its equivalent, or a satisfactory score on
        the departmental-approved placement exam. The lab may only be taken if previously or
        concurrently enrolled in CH133. (Foundational Science course).

CHANGES: Any and/or all parts of this syllabus are subject to change at any time.
Students will be notified in class of any changes made to the syllabus prior to taking effect.
Updated versions of the syllabus will be posted on WebCT

CLASS CANCELLATION POLICY: When class is canceled, an email message will be
sent to all students via your Presentation College email address (PLEASE CHECK YOU
EMAIL DAILY)

CLASS NOTIFICATIONS: Check email and website daily for class relocations, assignments
and relevant course information.

TEXTBOOK: “Organic & Biochemistry for Today, 6th Edition,” Seager and Slabaugh;
Thomson Learning, Inc. (Lachina Publishing Services) – 2008 (REQUIRED)

SOFTWARE: GOB Chemskills 3000 for General, Organic, and Biochemistry (Version 3.4), by
    Spain, Garmon, and Peters; Electronic Homework Systems, Inc. – 2007 (REQUIRED)

       Laboratory Supplies:
             1. Safety goggles or glasses will be required for admission to the laboratory and
             may be purchased at the bookstore. It is departmental policy that no one will
             be permitted to work in a chemistry laboratory without eye protection. If
             you wear prescription glasses, you still have to have safety glasses that have side-
             shield protection.
             2. Scientific calculator – scientific notation and log functions.
             3. Composition notebook for homework and laboratory assignments.
             4. A lab coat or apron to protect your clothing (optional).

COURSE OBJECTIVES/OUTCOMES:

                                     COURSE OBJECTIVES
       Course objectives for lecture and laboratory:
              Develop a working vocabulary and knowledge of the two major fields
                discussed in this course (Organic Chemistry & Biochemistry)




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           Understand the basic scientific theories and principles of chemistry (General
            Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, and Biochemistry).
           Develop a systematic approach to problem-solving.
           Prepare for advanced learning in physiology, nutrition, and/or human
            chemistry.
           To fulfill PC’s general education goal (#6) in that students will be able to:
                Demonstrate knowledge of a natural science’s focus
                Demonstrate the ability to apply the scientific method
                Demonstrate skills in scientific problem solving, critical thinking and
                    reading
                PLEASE NOTE: in order to fulfill goal #6, students may be required
               to take and successfully pass an additional science exit exam in order to
               pass CH133.

After attending lecture and studying the assigned materials, the student will:

   Recognize the molecular formulas of organic and inorganic compounds.
   Be able to explain some general differences between inorganic and organic compounds.
   Be able to use structural formulas to identify compounds that are isomers of each other.
   Assign IUPAC names and draw structural formulas for alkanes and cycloalkanes.
   Be able to name and draw structural formulas for geometric isomers.
   Be able to classify unsaturated hydrocarbons as alkenes, alkynes, or aromatics.
   Be able to write IUPAC names of alkenes from their molecular structures.
   Be able to write equations for addition reactions of alkenes, and use Markovnikov’s rule to
    predict the major products of certain reactions.
   Be able to write IUPAC names of alkynes from their molecular structures.
   Classify organic compounds as aliphatic or aromatic.
   Recognize uses for specific aromatic compounds.
   Be able to name and draw structural formulas for alcohols and phenols.
   Be able to classify alcohols as primary, secondary, or tertiary on the basis of their structures.
   Be able to write equations for alcohol dehydration and oxidation reactions.
   Recognizes uses for specific alcohols and phenols.
   Be able to name and draw structural formulas for ethers.
   Be able to assign IUPAC names to aldehydes and ketones.
   Be able to write key reactions for aldehydes and ketones.
   Be able to give specific uses for aldehydes and ketones.
   Be able to assign IUPAC names and draw structural formulas for carboxylic acids.
   Recognize and write key reactions of carboxylic acids.
   Recognize and write key reactions for ester formation.
   Be able to assign common and IUPAC names to esters.
   Recognize and write key reactions of esters.
   Be able to classify amines as primary, secondary, or tertiary.
   Be able to assign common and IUPAC names to amines.
   Recognize and write key reactions for amines.
   Be able to name amines used as neurotransmitters.
   Be able to give uses for specific biological amines.
   Be able to assign IUPAC names for amides.


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   Be able to show the formation of hydrogen bonds with amides.
   Be able to describe the four major functions of carbohydrates in living organisms.
   Be able to classify carbohydrates as mono-, di-, or polysaccharides.
   Be able to identify molecules possessing chiral carbon atoms.
   Be able to use Fischer projections to represent D and L compounds.
   Be able to classify monosaccharides as aldoses or ketoses and classify them according to the
    number of carbon atoms they contain.
   Be able to describe the uses for important monosaccharides.
   Be able to list sources and uses for important disaccharides.
   Be able to describe the structures and list sources and uses for important polysaccharides.
   Be able to classify lipids as saponifiable or nonsaponifiable and list major functions of lipids.
   Be able to describe four general characteristics of fatty acids.
   Be able to describe the structural similarities and differences of fats and oils.
   Be able to describe uses for phosphoglycerides.
   Be able to describe uses for sphingolipids.
   Be able to describe the major features of cell membrane structure.
   Be able to identify the structural characteristics typical of steroids and list important groups
    of steroids in the body.
   Be able to name the major categories of steroid hormones.
   Be able to describe the biological importance and therapeutic uses of the prostaglandins.
   Be able to identify the characteristic parts of alpha-amino acids.
   Be able to write reactions to represent the formation of peptides and proteins.
   Be able to describe the uses for important peptides.
   Be able to describe proteins in terms of the following characteristics: size, function,
    classification as fibrous or globular, and classification as simple or conjugated.
   Be able to explain what is meant by the terms primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary
    regarding the structure of proteins.
   Be able to describe the conditions that can cause proteins to hydrolyze or become denatured.
   Be able to describe the general characteristics of enzymes and explain why enzymes are vital
    in body chemistry.
   Be able to identify the general function of cofactors.
   Be able to list two ways of describing enzyme activity and identify the factors that affect
    enzyme activity.
   Be able to describe the three methods of cellular control over enzyme activity.
   Be able to describe the importance of measuring enzyme levels in the diagnosis of disease.
   Be able to identify the components of nucleotides and correctly classify the sugar and bases.
   Be able outline the process of DNA replication.
   Be able to describe the structures of DNA and RNA and list the function of the three types of
    cellular RNA.
   Be able to describe what is meant by the terms transcription and translation.
   Be able to describe the process by which RNA is synthesized in cells.
   Be able to explain how the genetic code functions in the flow of genetic information.
   Be able to explain the process by which proteins are synthesized in cells.
   Be able to describe how genetic mutations occur and how they influence organisms.
   Be able to describe the difference between macronutrients and micronutrients in terms of
    amounts required and their function in the body.
   Be able to describe the primary functions in the body of each macronutrient and for each
    major mineral.



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   Be able to distinguish between and classify vitamins as water-soluble or fat-soluble on the
    basis of name and behavior in the body.
   Be able to differentiate among metabolism, anabolism, and catabolism.
   Be able to describe the three stages in the extraction of energy from food.
   Be able to explain the role of coenzymes in the common catabolic pathway.
   Be able to identify the products of carbohydrate digestion.
   Be able to explain the importance of maintaining proper blood sugar levels in the body.
   Be able to list the starting material and products of the glycolysis pathway.
   Be able to describe how the glycolysis pathway is regulated in response to cellular needs.
   Be able to describe the three fates of pyruvate.
   Be able to identify the two major functions of the citric acid cycle and describe how the citric
    acid cycle is regulated in response to cellular energy needs.
   Be able to explain the function of the electron transport chain and describe how electrons
    move down the chain.
   Be able to list the major features of the chemiosmotic hypothesis.
   Be able to calculate the amount of ATP produced by the complete oxidation of a mole of
    glucose.
   Be able to explain the importance of the processes of glycogenesis and glycogenolysis.
   Be able to describe gluconeogenesis and the operation of the Cori cycle.
   Be able to describe how hormones regulate carbohydrate metabolism.
   Be able to describe the digestion, absorption, and distribution of lipids in the body.
   Be able to explain what happens during fat mobilization.
   Be able to outline the steps of -oxidation for fatty acids.
   Be able to calculate the amount of ATP produced by the complete catabolism of a fatty acid.
   Be able to name the ketone bodies and list the conditions that cause their overproduction.
   Be able to describe the pathway for fatty acid synthesis.
   Be able to describe the source and function of the body’s amino acid pool.
   Be able to write equations for transamination and deamination reaction and explain the
    overall results of the urea cycle.
   Be able to describe how amino acids can be used for energy production, the synthesis of
    triglycerides, and gluconeogensis.
   Be able to outline the relationship between intermediates of carbohydrate metabolism and the
    synthesis of nonessential amino acids.
   Be able to describe the chemical compositions of plasma, interstitial fluid, and intracellular
    fluid.
   Be able to explain how oxygen and carbon dioxide are transported within the bloodstream.
   Be able to explain how materials move from the blood into the body cells and from the body
    cells into the blood.
   Be able to list the normal and abnormal constituents of urine.
   Be able to explain how proper fluid and electrolyte balance is maintained in the body.
   Be able to explain how acid-base balance is maintained in the body and how buffers work to
    control blood pH.
   Be able to describe respiratory and urinary control of blood pH.
   Be able to list the causes of acidosis and alkalosis.




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       Laboratory Practices
       1. Students will work in the laboratory in accordance with good laboratory practices.
       A) No eating or drinking in the laboratory.
       B) Dress appropriately on lab days (wear long pants and shoes with enclosed
       toes). Hair must be tied back.
       C) Safety goggles or glasses are required for admission to the laboratory. Wear safety
       goggles when anyone in the laboratory is using chemicals. (If caught not wearing your
       safety goggles, you will lose 5 points for the respective lab). If you wear prescription
       glasses, you still have to have safety glasses that have side-shield protection. Contact
       lenses are not acceptable eye protection and you are strongly encouraged not to wear
       contact lenses to the laboratory. It is departmental policy that no one will be
       permitted to work in a chemistry laboratory without eye protection.
       D) Follow written/verbal directions accurately.
       E) Work safely, effectively, and correctly when using equipment and chemicals.
       F) Demonstrate use of required techniques.
       G) Obtain samples from stock reagents that are the correct substance, concentration, &
       sample size
       H) Dispose of waste products appropriately.

       2. Students Will Gather and Record Qualitative and Quantitative Data Accurately.
       A) Keep notebooks and worksheets that are neat, clean, understandable and
       accurately represent work done.
       B) Display computer data in a spreadsheet or graphically, as is relevant.

       Course objectives for lab in addition to the above mentioned objectives for lecture
       1. Learn how to reason and solve scientific problems.
       2. Learn to communicate effectively.
       3. Learn about chemicals and their properties.
       4. Learn various laboratory techniques involved in collecting and analyzing data.
       5. Learn to draw conclusions from experiments and evaluate the validity of the data.

INSTRUCTIONAL METODS: A variety of instructional techniques will be used in this
course. These may include, but are not limited to, class lectures, small group work, out-of-class
assignments, in-class assignments, and quizzes.

METHODS OF COURSE ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION: PLEASE NOTE: in order to
fulfill Presentation College’s General Education Program goal #6 (located on page 42 of the
2008-2009 College Catalog), students will be required to take and successfully pass an additional
science exit exam in order to be eligible to pass CH133.

GRADING SCALE:
    Lecture: You are expected to attend all lecture sessions. The letter grade, which you will
    earn for the lecture portion of this course, will be determined as follows: (1) The
    “Lecture assignments” total points you earned (i.e. in-class assignments, handouts,
    unannounced quizzes, etc…) will be divided by the total possible “Lecture assignments”
    points and then multiplied by 20 (these “Lecture assignments” points are worth 20% of


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your Overall Lecture %), (2) The total points you earned from four exams will be divided
by the total possible exam points and then multiplied by 70 (exams points are worth 70%
of your Overall Lecture %), and (3) The total points you earned from the American
Chemical Society Standardized Exam (ACS Exam) and Assessment Exams will be
divided by the total possible points for the ACS and Assessment exams and then
multiplied by 10 (the ACS and Assessment exams are worth 10% of your Overall Lecture
%). The three calculated percentages (Lecture assignments %, Exam %, and
ACS/Assess %) will be added together to obtain your Overall Lecture Percentage
for CH133. Final Lecture Grades will be distributed as outlined below (please see
Final Grades).

Laboratory: The laboratory portion of the course is designed to supplement various
lecture topics and provide you with some experience in conducting experiments. Each
laboratory activity (handout and/or experiment) is worth 25 points. These points will be
incorporated into your Laboratory grade. The laboratory activities (a combination of dry
and wet labs) are due at the end of the lab period unless otherwise indicated. Please note:
CL131 labs will consist of approximately 4 dry labs and 7 wet labs. However, the
number of dry or wet labs may vary if students elect (vote) to have a review session(s) as
opposed to a scheduled lab or additional lecture material needs to be covered. The dry
labs will consist of computer based projects that are designed to enhance various
concepts covered in lecture. The wet labs are designed to enhance various lecture
concepts and/or provide insight into concepts not covered in lecture. You will not be
tested on specific material or concepts that were introduced in a wet lab but were not
covered during lecture. I solicit and appreciate your comments, suggestions and feedback
for helping me refine labs for yourselves and future students. The letter grade, which you
will earn for the laboratory portion of this course, will be determined as follows: (1) The
“Lab Assignments” total points you earned from laboratory experiments will be divided
by the total possible “Lab Assignments” points and then multiplied by 100% (these “Lab
Assignments” points are worth 100% of your Overall Laboratory %). Final Laboratory
Grades will be distributed as outlined below (please see Final Grades).

Attendance: You are expected to attend all lecture and laboratory sessions. I do not
give make-up exams, and/or lecture/lab assignments. If you are unable to attend
lecture/lab you should contact me as soon as you possibly can in order to discuss your
situation. Those who may miss class because of illness, family emergency, or weather
must hand in a signed paper (or e-mail) stating the date and reason for the absence.
However, an excused absence does not automatically entitle you to make-up a
missed exam and/or lecture/lab assignments; only that you have asked me to provide
you an opportunity to make-up the points for the work you missed. The validity of
the excuse(s) is totally up to the instructor’s discretion. Exams and/or lecture/lab
assignments missed for compelling reasons may be rescheduled; however, the student
must take the initiative in rescheduling the missed activity. Rescheduling a missed exam
is done at the instructor's convenience. The make-up exam is similar to the classroom
exam but it is never the same exam. These exams are written such that the level of
difficulty is on par with the classroom exam, though some students may perceive them as




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more difficult. Unexcused absences for any activity (i.e. exam, quiz, in-class activity,
etc…) will result in a grade of zero.

       Lecture: When a student has accumulated five (5) unexcused absences in the
       lecture portion of this course, he/she will receive a letter of warning (via email)
       which will indicate that any additional absences will result in a reduced grade for
       the lecture portion of the course. In other words, when you have six (6)
       unexcused absences your grade for lecture will be lowered one letter grade, and
       will be lowered an additional letter grade for each subsequent unexcused absence.
       When the total number of absences (both excused and unexcused) exceeds eight
       (8) lectures during the semester, the instructor will arrange a meeting with the
       student, his/her advisor, and the Vice President of Academics to discuss if the
       student should be allowed to remain in the course or should be dropped with a
       grade of "F".

       Laboratory: If you miss a lab(s), you will be proved only one opportunity to
       make-up the missed points for a lab by washing glassware and/or cleaning
       laboratory equipment or writing a 10-page paper (this will be a referenced paper
       with the topic to be decided by the instructor). Please note: missed labs must be
       completed by no later than May 4th, 2009. If labs are missed due to unexcused
       absences, your final letter grade for lecture will be lowered one letter grade for
       each lab missed. In other words, if you miss two labs (unexcused), your grade for
       the lecture will be lowered two letter grades. If three or more labs (unexcused)
       are missed your letter grade for the Lecture of the course will be an “F”. There
       will be NO opportunity to make-up missed labs points unless exceedingly
       unavoidable circumstances have occurred (please see above).

Any students knowing of unavoidable, documented conflicts (i.e. doctor appointments) or
traveling on university-sponsored activities that will make it impossible for you to attend
lecture must notify me either with a written note or by e-mail BEFORE (As Soon As
Possible) the appointment or planned trip. (If you think you might be traveling with the
team but aren’t sure, it is recommended that you still notify me A.S.A.P. before the
planned trip). Make-ups (i.e. exams and/or lecture assignments) will not be allowed if
I’m not notified, in advance, of the appointment or planned trip.

Any lecture assignment turned-in by a student, who was absent when the assignment was
given, will receive a score no greater than 68% of the original point value of the
assignment. I will accept one “absentee or late” assignment per student. Any additional
“absentee” assignments turned-in will receive a zero. There will be no make-up exams
and/or lecture assignments unless exceedingly unavoidable circumstances have occurred
(please see above). Students without excused absences will not be given the opportunity
to make-up any missed exams and/or assignments

Late Policy: Any assignment turned-in late (1 day) will receive a score no greater than
68% of its original point value, and any assignment submitted 2 days late (or after
answers have be posted) will not be graded (unless other arrangements have been made).



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     Final Grades, as determined above, will be based upon the follow %’s.

                            Lecture Grade                  Lecture Grade
                    A       90% or above         C+          78% - 75%
                    A-           89%             C           74% - 70%
                    B+        88% - 85%          D+          69% - 64%
                    B        84% - 80%           D           63% - 60%
                    B-           79%             F         59% and below


     THE INSTRUCTOR MAY LOWER BUT WILL NOT RAISE THE
     PERCENTAGE REQUIRED FOR A LETTER GRADE.

     I DO NOT CURVE TESTS, LECTURE ASSIGNMENTS, OR GRADES, SO
     PLEASE DO NOT ASK ME TO DO SO.

     Exams and lecture assignments are not normalized; therefore, it is in your best interest to
     be thoroughly prepared (by studying every night) to ensure success on every quiz and
     exam. There is no additional extra credit that can be attempted or awarded for the course,
     outside of occasional extra credit problems on exams and/or lecture assignments. I do
     not distribute grades according to a fixed formula; there are no set number of A’s, B’s,
     etc. So you will be able to determine how your study of chemistry is progressing relative
     to the grade you are working to obtain. Definitive letter grade assignments are not
     possible until total raw point scores can be examined and compared at the end of the
     semester.

SCHEDULE OF ACTIVITIES/DATES:

     EXAMS: Exams will be taken during your scheduled laboratory time.
     There are six exams for this course (one ACS, one assessment, and four lecture exams).
     These exams will consist of multiple-choice and short answer questions. The exams are
     TENTATIVELY SCHEDULED for the following dates: Exam 1 (the week of
     February 2nd), Exam 2 (the week of February 23rd), Exam 3 (the week of March. 23rd),
     Exam 4 (the week of April 20th), and the Final Exam – Exam 5 (the week of May 5th).
     The ACS and Assessment exams are tentatively scheduled for the week of April 27th and
     May 4th, respectively. Exams will be available for students to look over during office
     hours or a time scheduled with Dr. Johnson. Exams must be turned back before the
     students leave the room. If an exam is not turned back, it will automatically turn to a
     zero.

     RETAKING EXAMS: Students will be provided the opportunity to retake (only once)
     any of the first four exams scheduled in this course (i.e. take exam one and then retake
     exam one, take exam two and then retake exam two, etc….). There is no opportunity to
     retake the Final Exam. PLEASE NOTE: if a student chooses to retake an exam, the
     score they receive on the retake will be the “final” score entered for their grade on that



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       particular exam. The student must take the initiative in rescheduling the retake-exam.
       Rescheduling of an exam is done at the instructor's convenience and the student must
       retake the exam no later than two (2) weeks from the original exam date.

       LECTURE SCHEDULE: The tentative lecture and laboratory schedules are posted on
       WebCT (Any and/or all parts of these schedules are subject to change at any time).

EXAM ETIQUETTE: You may not leave the room during an exam without the instructor’s
permission.

CELL PHONES: Cell phones must be turned off and put away during lecture, lab, exams and
quizzes. Taking out a cell phone during an exam or quiz is considered cheating, your exam or
quiz will be confiscated, and you will receive an automatic F in the class. If your cell phone
rings during an exam or quiz, five points will be deducted from your score per ring (i.e. two rings
= 10 points). Also, YOU MUST REFRAIN FROM USING CELL PHONES, TEXT
MESSAGING, SENDING OR READING EMAIL, WATCHING VIDEOS, PLAYING
COMPUTER GAMES, OR SURFING THE INTERNET DURNING LECTURE OR LAB.
IF YOU ARE CAUGHT PARTICIPATING IN ANY OF THE ABOVE MENTIONED
ACTIVITIES, YOU WILL BE ASKED TO LEAVE AND WILL NOT BE ALLOWED TO
RETURN TO CLASS THAT DAY. If you have circumstances that could possible require
outside commutation during lecture or lab, please see me before class.

STUDENT CONDUCT: Students are expected to act in an appropriate and respectable manner.
If any student chooses to act in an inappropriate manner, the instructor has the right to dismiss
the student from the class (lecture or lab) for that particular session. Should the problem
continue, further, more stringent actions will be taken.

SEXUAL HARASSMENT: Sexual Harassment will not be tolerated at Presentation College.
Please contact the instructor at any time during the semester with any comments or concerns.

RELATION OF CLASS TO PRESENTATION COLLEGE’S ASSESSMENT
PROGRAM: This is a Foundational Science course.
           To fulfill PC’s General Education Program goal (#6) in that students will be
             able to:
                 Demonstrate knowledge of a natural science’s focus
                 Demonstrate the ability to apply the scientific method
                 Demonstrate skills in scientific problem solving, critical thinking and
                    reading
                 PLEASE NOTE: in order to fulfill goal #6, students may be required
                to take and successfully pass an additional science exit exam in order to be
                eligible to pass CH123.

       PLEASE NOTE: Goals, Outcomes, and Means of Assessment may be found on
       page 42 of the 2008-2009 College Catalog.




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TUTORS: If you would like additional help with the course material, please contact myself or
Kristie Morrison (Director of Career Learning Institute Services) at 229-8581.
PLAGIARISM STATEMENT: Students, please read page 37 (section entitled “Plagiarism”)
of the 2008-2009 College Catalog.

ADA ACCOMMONDATION STATEMENT—DISABILITY STATEMENT:
Presentation College is committed to ensuring equal learning opportunities for all students, and
providing students with disabilities reasonable accommodations in accordance with the College’s
procedures. If you have, or believe you may have, any type of disability (physical,
psychiatric/emotional, medical or learning disability) that requires special accommodations or
services to promote maximum learning in this class, I urge you to please contact the Office of
Student Disability Services at 1-800-437-6060, Ext. #581.

POLICY ON ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT: Students, please read page 37 (section entitled
“Actions Related to Academic Integrity”) of the 2008-2009 College Catalog.

PLEASE SIGN THE SYLLABUS CONTRACT FOUND BELOW
AND RETURN TO DR. JOHNSON AS SOON AS POSSIBLE.




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                                 SYLLABUS CONTRACT

                           Department of Arts & Sciences (Chemistry)

                                       Presentation College


Course Number:________________________________________________________


Course Name:__________________________________________________________


Instructor:_____________________________________________________________


I affirm that I have read the complete copy of the syllabus for this course (CH133/CL131
that Dr. Johnson has posted on WebCT), made a copy for my files, and agree to abide by its
terms, conditions, procedures, deadlines, and penalties. In addition, I affirm that I have read
the applicable sections (noted in the syllabus) from the 2008-2009 College Catalog.



Print name:____________________________________________________________



Sign name:____________________________________________________________



Date:__________________________________________________________________




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