FAMILY INVOLVEMENT

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					FAMILY INVOLVEMENT
What is family involvement in education?
 Why Care about Family Involvement
• Best predictor of student success is
  family’s involvement with child’s
  education
• Family involvement at HOME seems more
  effective than at school
• Effectiveness of appropriate expectations
  and consistent, appropriate support -
  may need support in developing these
  skills
• Active rather than passive more effective
           Student Outcomes
• Better achievement/scores
• More positive attitudes toward learning
• Higher graduation and college
  matriculation rate
• Fewer special education placements
• Less truancy
            Parent Outcomes
• Happier/more satisfied with school
• Parents feel better about their own
  parenting
Parent Institute’s 2006 Education Leader Survey
     • What key factors do you feel put a
       student “at risk”?
     • Most frequent answers:
        • Poor home environment
        • Lack of parent
          involvement/support for the
          student
        • Low family socioeconomic status
• Which of the following do you feel are so
  important to student’s school success
  that schools should provide information
  about them to parents?
• Top 5 answers:
  • Regular school attendance.
  • Building responsibility in their children.
  • Instilling in students respect for rules,
    authority and other people.
  • Motivating their children to do well in
    school.
  • The importance of home and school
   teamwork.
                  NCLB & Family Involvement
…The participation of parents in regular,
  two-way, and meaningful
  communication involving student
  academic learning and other school
  activities including:
• Assisting their child’s learning
• Being actively involved in their child’s
  education at school;
 www.ncpie.org/nclbaction/parent_involvement.html
       NCLB & Family Involvement
• Serving as full partners in their child’s
  education
• Being included in decision-making and
  on advisory committees to assist in the
  education of their child
       NCLB & Family Involvement
• Title 1 schools should have meetings to
  discuss parent involvement policies,
  programs and activities with flexible
  hours designed to accommodate
  working parents.

• Parents must be involved in deciding
  how funds are allotted for parent
  involvement programs and activities.
• Monies from Title 1 schools can be used
  to provide support to parents for
  transportation, childcare, or home visits,
  in cases where these things prevents a
  parent from becoming involved in their
  child’s school
JOYCE EPSTEIN

6 types of parent invovlement

Content used to create
National PTA Standards for Family
 Involvement
• TYPE 1--PARENTING:
• Assist families with parenting and child-
  rearing skills, understanding child and
  adolescent development, and setting
  home conditions that support children
  as students at each age and grade level.
  Assist schools in understanding
  families.
• Workshops, videotapes, computerized phone
  messages on parenting and child development at
  each age and grade level
• Parent education and other courses or training for
  parents (e.g., GED, family literacy, college or
  training programs)
• Family support programs to assist families with
  health, nutrition, and parenting, including clothing
  swap shops, food co-ops, parent-to-parent groups
• Home visiting programs or neighborhood
  meetings to help families understand schools and
  to help schools understand families
• Annual survey for families to share information
  about their children's goals, strengths, and special
  talents
• TYPE 2--COMMUNICATING:
• Communicate with families about
  school programs and student progress
  through effective school-to-home and
  home-to-school communications.
• Conferences with every parent at least once a
  year with follow-ups as needed
• Language translators to assist families as
  needed
• Parent and student pickup of report cards
• Regular schedule of useful notices, memos,
  phone calls, and other communications
• Effective newsletters including information
  about questions, reactions, and suggestions
• Clear information on all school policies,
  programs, reforms, assessments, and
  transitions
• Annual survey of families on students' needs
  and families' suggestions and reactions to
  school programs
• TYPE 3 - VOLUNTEERING:
• Improve recruitment, training, work, and
  schedules to involve families as
  volunteers and audiences at the school
  or in other locations to support
  students and school programs.
• Annual survey to identify interests, talents, and
  availability of volunteers
• Parent room or family center for volunteer work,
  meetings, and resources for families
• Class parent, telephone tree, or other structures
  to provide all families with needed information
• Parent patrols to increase school safety
• Annual review of schedules for students'
  performances, games, and assemblies to
  encourage all families to attend as daytime and
  evening audiences
• TYPE 4--LEARNING AT HOME:
• Involve families with their children in
  learning activities at home, including
  homework and other curriculum-linked
  activities and decisions.
• Information for families on required skills in
  all subjects at each grade
• Information on homework policies and how
  to monitor and discuss schoolwork at home
• Information on how to assist students with
  skills that they need to improve
• Regular schedule of interactive homework
  that requires students to demonstrate and
  discuss what they are learning in class
• Calendars with daily or weekly activities for
  parents and students to do at home or in the
  community
• Summer learning packets or activities
• TYPE 5--DECISION MAKING:
• Include families as participants in school
  decisions, governance, and advocacy
  through PTA/PTO, school councils,
  committees, and other parent
  organizations
• Active PTA/PTO or other parent organizations,
  advisory councils, or committees (e.g., curriculum,
  safety, personnel) for parent leadership and
  participation
• Action Team for School, Family, and Community
  Partnerships to oversee the development of the
  school's program with practices for all six types of
  involvement
• District-level advisory councils and committees
• Information on school or local elections for school
  representatives
• Networks to link all families with parent
  representatives
• Independent advocacy groups to lobby for school
  reform and improvements
• TYPE 6: COLLABORATING WITH THE
  COMMUNITY:
• Coordinate resources and services for
  families, students, and the school with
  businesses, agencies, and other
  groups, and provide services to the
  community.
• Information for students and families on
  community health, cultural, recreational, social
  support, and other programs or services
• Information on community activities that link to
  learning skills and talents, including summer
  programs for students
• "One-stop" shopping for family services through
  partnerships of school, counseling, health,
  recreation, job training, and other agencies
• Service to the community by students, families,
  and schools (e.g., recycling projects; art, music,
  drama, and activities for senior citizens; tutoring
  or coaching programs
• Participation of alumni in school programs for
  students
Family Support
www.familysupportamerica.org


 • Focus is to strengthen & empower
   families/communities in order to foster
   optimal development of children, youth &
   adult family members
 • Community-based, grass roots approach to
   preventing family problems by
   strengthening parent-child relationships &
   supporting parents
Family Support continued
 • Shift in human services delivery – preventative,
   responsive, flexible, family-focused, strengths-
   based, holistic
 • Movement for social change – changing
   communities and society to put children and
   families first to ensure all children and families
   get what they need to succeed
      Community Schools Movement

• Coalition for Community Schools
  • www.communityschools.org/index.php

 Alliance of organizations in education K-16,
 youth development, community planning and
 development, family support, health and human
 services, government and philanthropy …
 advocating for community schools as the vehicle
 for strengthening schools, families and
 communities so that together they can improve
 student learning
Community Schools cont’d
 • National Community Education
   Association
   • www.ncea.com
   • Advocates the creation of opportunities for
     community members — individuals, schools,
     businesses, and public and private
     organizations — to become partners in
     addressing community needs. … the
     community school … open beyond the
     traditional school day for the purpose of
     providing academic, recreation, health, social
     service, and work-preparation programs for
     people of all ages.
       EFFECTIVE BELIEF SYSTEMS
• all families have strengths
• parents can learn new techniques
• parents have important perspectives
  about their children
• most parents really care about their
  children
• cultural differences are both valid and
  valuable
• many family forms exist and are
  legitimate
           Barriers?
• Barriers for Families



• Barriers for Schools/Teachers
        Parent Invovlement By Event and Type of
                        School

80
                                         ALL
70
                                         < 25% RL
60
                                         >50% RL
50
40
30
20
10
 0
     P T Conf   Open House   Art event   Sport Event   Academic
                                                         Event
http://nces.ed.gov/surveys/frss/publications/98032/10.asp
Effective Family involvement programs
• Henderson and Berla (1994)
• Comprehensive: Reaching out to all
  families, not just those most easily
  contacted, and involving them in all
  major roles, from tutoring to governance.
• Well-Planned: Specific goals, clear
  communication about what is expected of
  all participants, training for both
  educators and parents.
• Long-Lasting: A clear commitment to the
  long-term, not just to an immediate
  project.
• Planning and preparation
  • Community and school assessment
  • Stakeholder input
  • Identify purposes and policies
• Parents
  • School climate
  • Reaching out to all
  • Fitting programs into interest, needs,
    resources
• Staff
  • Learn about cultures represented,
    appreciate and respect diversity
  • Assume best about parents
  • Build trust and engagement
J.H. Wherry, Parent Involvement Institute
5 WAYS TO FAIL AT PARENT
  INVOLVEMENT

1.Think of yourself as the main parent
  involvement person at your school.
  School Survey Results: "Can you give me
  the names of any people you know who
  work up at school?" 1) School Secretary,
  2) Custodian, 3) Food Service/Bus Driver,
  4) A Veteran Teacher, 5) A Music Teacher,
  6) Nurse/Coach 7) The Principal.
2. Think of parent involvement as
  something that only happens when
  parents are in your school building

3. Try to build positive attitudes among
  parents by just using newsletters,
  memos, newspaper articles, TV, other
  mass media
4. Keep on thinking that children from
  'broken' or 'disadvantaged' homes do
  not have the benefit of parent
  involvement.

5. Write parents off as apathetic &
  uninterested after you repeatedly
  provide programs for them and invite
  them to come to school, but they don't
  show up!

http://www.parent-institute.com/educator/resources/10things/10things.php
What does it mean for you to
      show respect?
What does it mean for you to
   be shown respect?
Education Equity and Social Justice
           Awareness
  Standardized Awareness Quiz
• Familial Folklore & Pregnant Women
  When you were growing up, what did you
  hear that a pregnant woman should never
  do? Why not?


• ����   The Common Cold
• When you were growing up and you caught
  a cold, what were you told about why you
  caught cold, and how you should treat it?
         Culture and Disability
• Traditional, religious and spiritual
  beliefs about disability
• Beliefs about health and healing
• Traditional and folk methods for healing
  and health
• Child’s role in the family

				
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