CONNECTICUT COMMUNITY-TECHNICAL COLLEGES by xY1337NG

VIEWS: 15 PAGES: 54

									PROGRAM:
DATE: 9/10/2008

                  BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE
                               PROGRAM REVIEW
                           COLLEGE SELF-STUDY REPORT




Program Review Instrument (October 2006)              Page 1
Based on Houston Community College System’s Model
PROGRAM:
DATE: 9/10/2008



              BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE
                           PROGRAM REVIEW

                  I. CRITICAL SUCCESS INDICATOR: PROGRAM MISSION

I.1 MEASURE:           MISSION STATEMENT
I.1a STANDARD:         The institution’s mission clearly defines its purpose within the context of
                       higher education and explains whom the institution serves and what it
                       intends to accomplish. The mission, goals, and objectives are developed and
                       recognized by the institution with its members and its governing body and
                       are utilized to develop and shape its programs and practices and to evaluate
                       its effectiveness. (MSCHE 1)

1.   Does your program/department have a mission statement?

     x    Yes, please explain:
          No, please explain:

2.   State the mission of the program/department.

The mission of the Mathematics Department for the Developmental Mathematics Program at Borough
of Manhattan Community College is to cultivate outstanding teaching throughout our department, to
accommodate full educational access for all those who strive to advance in their academic goals; to
prepare students for college-level mathematics courses and other courses requiring a mathematical
foundation, to allow students the opportunity to explore and investigate the logic, structure and beauty
of mathematical principles, and to instill the foundations of quantitative literacy in all of our students.


3.   Where is the mission statement published?

It will be published on the Math Department website.

4.   Does the program/department satisfy a unique goal(s) for the college? Please explain:

1) To prepare students for 'college level mathematics' (mathematics courses listed as requirements for
postsecondary programs).
 2) To prepare students for other courses which require a mathematical foundation (such as science,
business and technology courses).
 3) To prepare students for general academic success by building quantitative literacy, academic skills
and positive quantitative attitudes, and by providing challenging, engaging, and nurturing learning
experiences.




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5.   What are the educational goals and objectives of the program/department? Please list:

NUMERACY: Students will develop and apply the concepts of numeracy to investigate and describe
quantitative relationships and solve problems in a variety of contexts.
PROPORTIONAL REASONING: Students will represent proportional relationships and solve
problems that require an understanding of ratios, rates, proportions, and scaling.
ALGEBRAIC REASONING: Students will reason using the language and structure of algebra to
investigate, represent, and solve problems.
CRITICAL THINKING: Students will use logic, estimation, and comparison with prior knowledge
and experience to strategize problem solving techniques and to accept or reject a proposed solution.
COMMUNICATION SKILLS: Students will be able to write, read, listen and speak critically and
effectively.
INFORMATION & TECHNOLOGY LITERACY: Students will be able to collect, evaluate and
interpret information and effectively use information technologies.

6.   Describe how the program/department’s mission, goals, and objectives support the college’s
     mission.

Consistent with the mission of BMCC to provide general and liberal arts education relevant to the
needs, interests and aspirations of our students, the Math Department’s objectives are to provide
students with proficiency in the mathematical skills which will ensure their readiness for college and
will continue to prove valuable in the workplace and beyond.

7.   Have there been any changes in program/department’s mission, goals or objectives since your
     previous APP self-study? Please explain:

     Yes, the Math Department’s objectives have been expanded to encompass the objectives of the
     college for General Education Learning Outcomes.

Department’s Recommendations: None

Evaluator’s Recommendations:




II. CRITICAL SUCCESS INDICATOR: PROGRAM DESIGN
II.1 MEASURE:         CURRICULUM
II.1a STANDARD: The institution’s educational offerings display academic content, rigor, and
coherence that are appropriate to its higher education mission. (MSCHE 11) The institution’s
curricula are designed so that students acquire and demonstrate college-level proficiency in
general education and essential skills, including oral and written communication, scientific and
quantitative reasoning, critical analysis and reasoning, technological competency, and
information literacy. (MSCHE 12)


Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                             Page 3
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DATE: 9/10/2008



1.   Describe how the curriculum is structured to achieve the program/department’s educational goals.

        Our curriculum is broadly structured around two levels of remediation, those being pre-algebra
        and introductory algebra, with a third tier of intermediate algebra offered to those students
        pursuing degrees requiring additional algebraic study. The courses offered are as follows:

        010 Basic Mathematics (6 hours):

        Math 010 covers whole numbers, fractions, decimals, basic algebra, ratios and proportion,
        percents, signed numbers, and scientific notation.

        011 Basic Mathematics (3 hours):

        Math 011 covers the same topics as listed above but in an abbreviated time format.

        012 Basic Mathematics and Introductory Algebra (6 hours):

        Math 012 covers the topics listed above, combined with introductory algebra.

        051 Introductory Algebra (4 hours):

        Math 012 covers introductory algebra (signed numbers, algebraic expressions, linear equations
        in one and two variables, polynomials, factoring, quadratic equations, rational expressions and
        radical expressions, systems of linear equations).

        056 Intermediate Algebra (6 hours):

        Math 056 covers linear and quadratic equations, rational and radical expressions, linear
        equations in two variables, logarithms, and trigonometry.

        The objectives of our remedial program are broadly two-fold: one, to enable students to satisfy
        university requirements for mathematical competency, and two, to provide students with a solid
        foundation in basic mathematical concepts, for application in the students’ future engagement
        with the world and in further mathematical study.

        Our program achieves the first goal of preparing students so that they may satisfy university
        requirements by closely coordinating the pre-algebra and introductory algebra levels of
        remediation with the computer-adaptive test that students must take to satisfy the university
        requirements. Instructors are advised to administer problems to students throughout the
        semester that are similar in format and theme to problems offered on the computer-adaptive test
        (COMPASS) through which students satisfy the university requirements.

        Students take a departmental math midterm and final in their respective remedial course to (1)
        ensure competency in the course material and (2) ensure academic rigor. The departmental final
        is taken prior to taking the the computer-adaptive test (COMPASS).
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        Our program achieves the second goal of providing students with a solid education in
        mathematical fundamentals by offering an array of courses which most efficiently address the
        required area and level of remediation. For those students whose placement scores indicate that
        only minor remediation is needed in pre-algebra, a 3-hour course (MAT 011) is offered, while
        for those students who need extensive remediation in pre-algebra, a 6-hour course (MAT 010)
        is available. For those students who need minor remediation in both pre-algebra and
        introductory algebra, a 6-hour course combining this material (MAT 012) is offered, while for
        those students who have already satisfied their pre-algebra requirement, a course based
        exclusively on basic algebra (MAT 051) is offered. Finally, a second level of algebra
        remediation (MAT 056) is offered so that students who lack the necessary skills to succeed in
        subsequent mathematics courses, such as Pre-Calculus, can get the skills they need.

2.   Did your previous self-study report, or your external reviewer’s report, recommend any curricula
     changes? Have these recommended changes been implemented?

        No curricular changes were recommended.

3.   How reasonable are course prerequisites? That is, are you confident that course prerequisites –
     basic skills and content courses – provide the necessary foundation for subsequent courses?

        We believe that the pre-algebra level of remediation provides the necessary arithmetic skill set
        which is necessary for success in our introductory algebra level remediation, as the pre-algebra
        course includes intensive work in fractions, proportions, signed numbers, and the order of
        operations, as well as offering an introduction to solving equations and working with algebraic
        expressions. We believe that our introductory algebra course provides a solid foundation in
        algebra upon which the next course in the calculus-trajectory sequence, intermediate algebra,
        only adds two major topics: logarithms and trigonometry.
4.   Do any of the courses serve both majors and non-majors? What evidence is there as to how well
     each constituency is served?

        Most remediation courses serve non-majors, as most students who go on to major in
        mathematics do not need mathematics remediation. We believe that our student evaluations
        testify to our success in serving all groups of our students.

5.   What procedures are in place to ensure that course content is up-to-date and appropriate for the
     level and goals of each course in the program/department?

     Courses are designed to address measurable deficiencies of current, entering student population.
     The remediation committee in our department meets regularly, during which all issues pertaining to
     the remediation courses we offer are discussed. Furthermore, at departmental meetings any
     concerns over the substance of the courses and any pedagogical issues pertaining to the courses are
     regularly aired.



Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                             Page 5
Based on Houston Community College System’s Model
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DATE: 9/10/2008

6.    To what extent is the curriculum designed and revised to consider the institutions to which students
      in the program/department transfer?

      This review addresses remedial math courses. Remedial math courses are not transferable.

7.    To what extent have articulation agreements for upper-division study been developed? How often
      are these agreements revised or updated?

      There are no articulation agreements involving remedial math courses.

8.    How does the faculty work with the Cooperative Education faculty to provide cooperative
      educational opportunities to the program/department’s students? (NOTE for Coop Ed’s APP.
      Please answer this question: How does Cooperative Education faculty work with faculty from other
      departments to provide cooperative educational opportunities for their students?)

      n/a

9.    How does the faculty work with the Career Center to assist students without a Coop Internship in
      obtaining jobs?

      n/a

10.   Using the chart below, list the courses in your program or department that cover the college’s
      General Education learning goals. (If you have a program, answer for the complete curriculum. If
      you do not have a program, answer for your courses in general.)




            General Education Learning Goals                    Courses that cover the goal:

       Students will …                       Extensively            Somewhat
       1.Write, read, listen and speak                              All math courses
       critically and effectively
       2.Use quantitative skills and the     All math courses
       concepts of mathematics to solve
       problems
       3.Develop an understanding of and                            Calculus Courses
       be able to apply the concepts and                            and Above
       methods of the natural sciences
       4.Develop an understanding of and     N/A                    N/A
       be able to apply the concepts and
       methods of the social sciences
       5. Develop knowledge and              N/A                    N/A
       understanding of languages, arts
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       and cultures
       6. Collect, evaluate, and interpret   Probability and
       information and effectively use       Statistics
       information technologies
       7. Make informed choices based        N/A                   N/A
       on an understanding of personal
       values, human diversity,
       multicultural awareness and social
       responsibility


11.   Does the program/department adequately cover each of the college’s General Education learning
      goals? Please explain:

         The developmental mathematics program does adequately cover some General Education
         Learning Goals. The Quantitative Reasoning objective, as per the College Faculty Council's
         May 8th, 2006 General Education Assessment Plan is: "Students will use quantitative skills
         and the concepts and methods of mathematics to solve problems. Student behaviors include
         being able to:
                • use quantitative skills to solve problems
                • interpret quantitative information
                • translate problem situations into their symbolic representations"

         These goals were intended for credit level courses, but even in the developmental courses,
         students must use quantitative skills to solve problems and translate problems into symbolic
         representations. Departmental final exams insure that students across all sections must have a
         certain level of problem solving skills.


12.   How often are Catalog descriptions of courses in the program/department reviewed for currency?
      Is the process adequate?

         Catalog descriptions of courses are updated every three years if needed. This process is
         adequate for our developmental courses; even when course textbooks have changed, the topics
         covered in these classes remain generally the same. Major changes in developmental course
         structure or topics require a long departmental process, so that a three year time period between
         description revisions suffices.


13.   How are textbooks reviewed and selected? Please explain.

         Textbooks are reviewed by a committee. The committee then votes on a recommendation,
         which is then brought to the whole department for a vote, at a department meeting. This process
         ensures that all members of the department have input.


Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                              Page 7
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DATE: 9/10/2008

14.   Are program/department courses scheduled to meet the needs of day, evening, and weekend
      students?

           Yes, please explain:
           No, please explain:

         The BMCC mathematics department offers courses at many different times, including a large
         selection of evening and weekend courses. For example, in the Fall, 2010 semester, sections of
         pre-algebra (Math 010 and Math 011) were offered in the early morning, during the day, in the
         evening, and on Saturday and Sunday.

      Provide the program/department’s schedule as evidence.


Department’s Recommendations: To be more inclusive of Gen-Ed goals at the remedial math level:
(1) include elements of Logic, Statistics, and basic Probability, similar to those of the Quantitative
Reasoning (MAT 160) course;
(2) include content that requires use of basic formulas involving the natural sciences; Also include
content of a qualitative nature, requiring oral and written discussion of mathematical definitions, rules,
and methods.


Evaluator’s Recommendations:


II.1b STANDARD: Assessment of student learning demonstrates that the institution’s students
                have knowledge, skills and competencies consistent with institutional goals
                and that graduates have achieved appropriate higher education goals.
                (MSCHE 14)

1. Are the program/department’s objectives measurable? In other words, how do you determine
   whether the program/department is achieving its stated educational goals and objectives? Please
   explain:

      Yes, the program’s objectives are measurable. At the end of each semester, the department collects
      data about passing rates of all of our students enrolled in the developmental mathematics courses.
      This data includes their final exam grades as well as their results of the COMPASS test. This is the
      best indicator that will determine the success of the department in achieving its educational goals.

2. Describe how the program/department ensures that its educational goals, objectives, curriculum,
   and intended learning outcomes are well aligned? (For example, in a well-aligned program, the
   goals, objectives, and curriculum have been designed to maximize the achievement of the intended
   learning outcomes.)



Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                               Page 8
Based on Houston Community College System’s Model
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DATE: 9/10/2008

   Various departmental committees meet on a regular basis to ensure the success of the program. For
   instance, the Remediation Committee, with more than twenty faculty members, work in
   collaboration every week on constant reevaluation and revision of educational goals, objectives and
   curriculum. The committee makes recommendations to the department about any curriculum or
   other necessary changes to ensure and maximize the department’s achievements and
   accomplishments in this area.

3. How does the program/department assess student learning (e.g., comprehensive exams, portfolios,
   special projects, special assignments)?

The Remediation Committee works on a weekly basis to design and revise comprehensive exams,
intervention assignments, and other coursework in order to assess students learning and ensure
students’ success in all remedial mathematics courses.


4. List the competencies that the program’s graduates are expected to have. If your program does not
   have a major, answer with respect to your courses in general.

By the time of successful completion of our program, our students are expected to be well prepared for
college coursework in mathematics. In particular:
         Students should be able to correctly compute a variety of operations involving real
           numbers in a number of different formats, including the correct usage of the order of
           operations.
         Students should be able to correctly convert between a variety of real number types and
           formats.
         Students should be able to make estimates and to check whether solutions to
           calculations and problems involving real numbers are reasonable.
         Students should be able to solve applied word problems, including correctly setting up
           problems and translating between words and algebraic expressions and equations.
         Students should be able to perform operations and solve equations involving algebraic
           expressions in the real numbers, including polynomial, rational, and radical expressions
           and equations, linear inequalities and systems of equations.
         Students should be able to represent equations in the real numbers graphically, and
           translate between graphical and algebraic forms, and use both graphical and algebraic
           forms to solve problems.


5. How are these competencies verified (e.g., tests, portfolios, capstone course, course-by-course,
   other forms of assessment)?

   A common midterm and final exam are used for respective remedial math classes to assess
   competencies in addition to the compass exam.

6. To what extent are students achieving the intended learning outcomes?


Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                            Page 9
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   During the academic years 2004 – 2009, 59.4 % of BMCC students in remedial classes completed
   their remedial courses with a grade of C or better (Trends in Success/Failure rates in Math,
   CUNY). This indicates the extent to which students are achieving the intended learning outcomes
   for remedial math- students demostrated their ability to use basic mathematics and passed the
   Compass exam.


7. Do program/department faculty members use the results from BMCC’s Assessment of Student
   Learning survey to help assess their teaching? Please explain:

   Results of the BMCC Assessment of Student Learning survey are analyzed by the department and
   Remedial Math Committee and appropriate recommendations are made for faculty teaching
   remedial math courses.

8. How has the department used results of assessment? What changes/improvements have been made
   to your program/department as a result of assessment?

   The Remedial Math Committee uses the assessment results to target critical areas that need
   improvement. A recent change in instruction is the requirement that all remedial math students use
   Math homework software to supplement learning. Also, all remedial math students that fail the
   midterm are required to complete an “intervention” assignment through the use of mathematical
   software.

Department’s Recommendations: At the remedial level, include qualitative questions as part of the
quiz, midterm and final exam content. Test for understanding- provide some test questions that require
the student to offer explanations.


Evaluator’s Recommendations:



II.2 MEASURE:   LINKAGES, EXTERNAL AGREEMENTS AND AFFILIATIONS
II.2a STANDARD: Programs have external agreements with schools, universities, and other
                partners.

Which of the following linkages and agreements are in place for your program/department?


             Advanced placement
             Course articulation (w/secondary schools)
             Course transfer (w/colleges and universities)
             Program articulation (w/colleges and universities)
             Credit by exam
             Credit for work experience
Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                          Page 10
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             Dual credit/college option
             CLEP (College Level Examination Program)
             BMCC EOP (Educational Opportunity Program)
             CLIP (CUNY Language Immersion Program)
             University Admissions/Placement Agreements
             Other, please list:




Department’s Recommendations: None


Evaluator’s Recommendations:


II.3 MEASURE:   INSTRUCTION
II.3a STANDARD: Students are provided written information about the goals and
                requirements of each course and the methods of evaluation to be employed.

Are written course syllabi available for all program/department courses? Provide copies as evidence.

         Yes, please explain:
         No, please explain:

Syllabi are given to the students by their instructors. Also, syllabi are available for students
online.

Are these syllabi informative, thorough, accurate and reflective of current standards?

         Yes, please explain:
         No, please explain:

       Yes. The syllabi for remedial math courses state the student objectives, textbook, and the
       course topics with a suggested time line. The syllabi also state the grading criteria.

Are student learning objectives explicitly stated for each course?

         Yes, please explain:
         No, please explain:

         See “Student Learning Outcomes and Assessments” page 1 of each syllabus.

Indicate date(s) and nature of most recent revision of the course outlines and objectives:
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      Course                           Date Revised     Nature of Revisions
     010                               Fall 2009        Supplemental Instruction
     012                               Fall 2009        Supplemental Instruction
     051                               Fall 2009        Supplemental Instruction
     056                               Fall 2009        Supplemental Instruction




II.3b STANDARD: Methods of instruction must be appropriate to the goals of each course and
                the capabilities of the students.

1. Describe the methods of instruction that are used in your program/department. (e.g.,
   lecture/discussion, research projects, collaborative learning, lab assignments, etc.)

In the remedial classes, there are numerous methods of instruction that are used. While the type of
instruction used varies by instructor, most instructors use the following methods:
a. Lecture/Discussion- instructor speaks, and students take notes, asking questions where applicable.
b. Online H.W. System- Students involved in remedial classes use a dynamic online homework
system where they may "ask" the computer for help, or tutelage about their homework sets.
c. Mathematics Lab- A laboratory dedicated to extra tutoring for students at all levels of mathematics.
 The tutoring is drop-in, and accessible during the day, evening, and weekend.
d. Office Hours- All instructors are required to hold office hours so that students can ask questions, or
receive extra tutoring.
e. Collaborative Learning- Some instructors prefer to place students in groups and have them discuss
problem sets during class.
f. In class mentoring/tutoring- A grant awarded to the BMCC mathematics department places peer
mentors and tutors into some remedial classes to help students that are at risk of failing or struggling in
class.

2. The widely known Bloom Taxonomy for Learning and Teaching ranks the cognitive difficulty of
assignments from simple recall to higher-order thinking skills. Specifically, the taxonomy is: 1) recall,
2) comprehension, 3) application, 4) analysis, 5) synthesis, and 6) evaluation. To what extent do
course syllabi have assignments that demand higher-order thinking? In other words, what is the
program/department doing to insure that student learning is well beyond simple recall and
comprehension? Along with your explanation, please provide course assignments as examples.

The structure of the coursework, along with the textbook, clearly follows the Bloom Taxonomy for
Learning and Teaching. Each chapter begins with a review of knowledge necessary to understand the
new material, followed by new definitions, theorems and/or lemmas that students must understand.
Next, students are taught how to operate on the system (add, subtract, multiply, divide and
exponentiate) using the definitions, and theorems. Students are then given a mixed review
(incorporating all of the definitions), and taught how to solve examples using the system. Finally, the
book ends a typical chapter with applications of the operations modeling real-world situations. At the
Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                              Page 12
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end of each chapter most instructors give a quiz to test student understanding, which is the final
evaluation. Most instructors then review the quizzes with the class to help students understand their
mistakes, and to ensure they don't make the same mistakes again.

For example, consider the topic of rational expressions. Typically, an instructor will take a week to
teach students about rational expressions. The instructor would begin with a review on how to operate
(add, subtract, multiply and divide) with rational numbers, as well as how to factor polynomial
expressions. Next, each one of the operations would be defined- using definitions and theorems. For
example, when multiplying and dividing rational numbers, the definition of FACTOR would be
reviewed. Each one of operations would be pulled apart, and defined, reviewing the similarities
between rational numbers and rational expressions. Students would then be taught how to solve
rational equations, using the least common denominator method. Lastly, students would solve real
world situations involving rational equations. They are usually asked to check their work as well to
make sure that it makes sense within the context of the problem. The instructor will then sum up the
weekly lesson with a quiz- and will review the quiz with their class.


3. Describe how students’ learning styles are addressed by the instructional methods that are used
in your program/department.

Most instructors use a blended teaching style to appeal to all students. Instructors will present material
verbally. Many also give students numerous written notes with multiple examples. Some instructors
will give the students group-work, as well as individual desk work. Some instructors ask students to
present their answers on the board. For students that require extra tutoring- there is a mathematics lab,
as well as required office hours from their professors.

4. Do instructional methodologies utilize technology? And how widespread is the use of
technology, i.e. what percent of course sections are taught with technology?

         Yes, please explain:
         No, please explain:

All of the remedial courses (010/011/012/051) are supposed to be taught with dynamic, adaptive
computer systems. As this is a new initiative, only about 85% of all sections actually use the computer
system. Students must take a computer-based ACT-COMPASS examination in order to pass their
remedial classes.


5. Indicate recently implemented innovations in instructional methodology or use of technology:

     Course                        Innovation                                      Date
     Arithmetic & Algebra          Online resources were added for all sections.   8/2009
     (MAT 010, 011, 012,           These resources include a textbook,
     051)                          homework assignments, instructional videos.
                                   There are homework assignments on
                                   individual topics as well as summative
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                                   assignments on each unit.




6. Does the program/department curriculum require a dedicated lab?

         Yes,
         No, please skip question 7.

Do lab schedules allow time for demonstration and practice?

         Yes, please explain:
         No, please explain:

The department has recently incorporated lab activities into Arithmetic & Algebra courses (MAT 010,
011, 012, 051). In online environments, students work on assignments, explore topics, and watch
tutorials. The math department has added a new computer room that serves students specifically in
these assignments. In that room, students can work on their assignments as well as receive tutoring in
both mathematics and the technical aspect of the online homework system.


Department’s Recommendations: None

Evaluator’s Recommendations:


II.3c STANDARD: Instruction must be evaluated regularly and results used to ensure quality
                instruction.

1. What means do you use to evaluate instruction in the program/department?

         Assessment of performance of students in subsequent courses
         Assessment of performance of graduates in transfer institutions
         Departmental tests
         Peer review
         Sampling of opinions of former students
         Standardized tests and comprehensive exams
         Student evaluation of instruction
         Supervisor review
         Other, please describe:




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2. Describe how evaluation results are used to improve instruction in your program/department.

-Instructors with poor evaluations are individually coached and advised.
-Advisors are available throughout the semester to support and advise via email, individual or group
appointments.
-Professional development workshops for adjuncts are held to address academic, behavioral, security,
and classroom management issues.
-Instructors are not reappointed if department standards are not met.


Department’s Recommendations: None


Evaluator’s Recommendations:


II.3d STANDARD: Instructional methodologies support nontraditional delivery.

1.   Indicate and describe program/department offerings through nontraditional formats.

      Nontraditional Format                    Description Of Offerings
         Distance Education                    The following types of E-learning courses are
                                               offered by the mathematics department:
                                                    1. Online Courses- A course delivered via the
                                                        internet which is 80%-100% online. Some
                                                        online courses may require campus meetings
                                                        for orientations or exams.
                                                    2. Hybrid Courses- A course in which the
                                                        delivery content is distributed between online
                                                        and face-to-face instruction. At least 33%-
                                                        67% of the content is provided in an
                                                        asynchronous online instructional
                                                        environment.
                                                    3. Web-Enhanced Courses- A face-to-face
                                                        course which meets on campus for all
                                                        scheduled classes. The course utilizes
                                                        internet resources on a regular basis to
                                                        enhance and extend the classroom for
                                                        instructional and learning enrichment.
          Independent Study                    It is currently offered when a faculty member
                                               submits a request in writing to the chairperson. The
                                               request, if approved by the Chair is then forward to
                                               the Dean of Academic Affairs for final approval.
                                               Usually Independent Study courses are reserved for
                                               upper level courses.
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          Others, please explain:




2.   How do the faculty in the program/department participate in the College Honors Program? Is there
     sufficient participation? Please explain:

     A student can approach a faculty member at the start of the semester, propose a project, and ask the
     faculty member to mentor him/her (the student has to be enrolled the faculty member’s class, and
     satisfy certain academic requirements). A contract is then drafted by the BMCC’s Honor Program.
     If the faculty and the student are in agreement the contract is then signed. Once approved by the
     Honor’s Committee, the student can then work on the project, which can usually be completed in
     one semester outside of the classroom. The student then submits and defends the project before
     Honor’s Committee for final approval.

     About 20 students college-wide are granted participation in the Honor’s program each semester.
     Currently we have about seven faculty members participating in the Honors program.

3. Describe the program/department’s participation in continuing education and contract training at
   the college.

     At BMCC, The Center for Continuing Education is a separate entity from the mathematics
     department with its own Director and budget. Ae have about five math faculty who are employed
     by the Center for Continuing Education to conduct ACT Math Workshops.

4. Does your department use outside resources (e.g., government agencies, businesses, educational
   institutions, etc.) to expand nontraditional format learning opportunities in the
   program/department?

          Yes, please explain
          No, please explain:

           Currently the Math Department offers courses every semester at four off-campus sites. The
     four sites are at Inwood/Washington Heights, Harlem at Adam Clayton Powell Jr. State office
     Building, Lehman College and at Brooklyn College.


Department’s Recommendations: None


Evaluator’s Recommendations:


Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                            Page 16
Based on Houston Community College System’s Model
PROGRAM:
DATE: 9/10/2008

                  III. CRITICAL SUCCESS INDICATOR: PROGRAM OUTCOMES

III.1 MEASURE:   IDENTIFICATION OF STUDENTS IN THE PROGRAM
III.1a STANDARD: The number of majors and students enrolled in program courses are
adequate.

1. What were the program enrollments in the last three fall terms?

          Fall Term
                          Number of
                           Students
                          Enrolled in
                           Remedial
                           Courses
          Fall 2009        5645
          Fall 2008        6003
          Fall 2007        4533

2. Are the number of majors adequate? Please explain:

    n/a

3. If not, what efforts are in place to address this issue?

    n/a

4. How many program majors took courses in the department during the last three fall terms?
   (Institutional Research will provide these data)

    n/a

5. How many students took courses in the department during the last three fall terms?

See question 1

6. What were the department course enrollments during the last fall and spring terms?


                                        Course Enrollment Trends

     Course                                  Fall             Spring
     MAT 010                                 1029             1032
     MAT 011                                 994              979
     MAT 012                                 869              795
     MAT 051                                 2007             2344
Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                          Page 17
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PROGRAM:
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     MAT 056                                 746              800

7. Are the number of students taking courses in the department adequate?

    n/a

8. If not, what efforts are in place to address this issue?

    n/a

9. How does the program/department complement/support enrollment in other college
programs/departments?

All students enrolled in credit-bearing courses within the mathematics department are required to
either successfully complete the remedial curriculum or be exempt from remedial mathematics by
taking a placement exam. This exam is currently the ACT-COMPASS.

10. Are there an adequate number of sections for the number of students taking department courses?

    Yes.

11. If not, what efforts are in place to address this issue?

    n/a


Department’s Recommendations: The department always offers remedial courses dependent on student
demand, so enough sections are always offered to cover the number of students who register for
remedial course sections.

Evaluator’s Recommendations:


III.2 MEASURE:   STUDENT COMPLETION
III.2a STANDARD: Course completion rates demonstrate program needs and effectiveness.

    1.    Is the rate of course completion among program majors satisfactory? Specifically, are program
          majors completing required departmental courses at a satisfactory rate? Departments without
          programs should answer for their courses in general. (Institutional Research will provide
          pertinent data).


                         Course Completion Rate
           Fall           including      excluding
           Term               WN*             WN*
Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                           Page 18
Based on Houston Community College System’s Model
PROGRAM:
DATE: 9/10/2008

         fall
         2009                79.8%            81.7%
         fall
         2008                82.3%            81.0%
         *the first column includes students who
         earned any grade other than W, WU, and
         WN; the second column includes those
         students who earned any grade other than
         W or WU



         Yes, please explain:
         No, please explain:

        The completion rate is quite high, around 80%, which is in line with national standards for
        remedial mathematics courses.


   2.   What efforts are in place to improve student retention in courses?

         In fall 2009 and spring 2010 a number of changes were made to the remedial program with
   the aim of improving passing rates in the MAT 010-051 level courses: departmental midterms,
   online homework systems, and an intervention for students who fail the midterm. A significant
   improvement in student passing rates was seen after the implementation of these program changes,
   and it is hoped that in the long run these changes to the program can also improve retention.

   3.   What percentage of students successfully progress through key course sequences?
        (Institutional Research can provide pertinent data.) Please explain:

      Of fall 2007 students who passed MAT010 or MAT011 (N=456), 167 (37%) passed
MAT051 at some point between spring 2008 and fall 2009.

   4.   Has there been any notable change in the distribution of the department’s grades over the past
        three fall terms? Does the department give a high percentage of A and B grades? If so, is this
        an area of concern? Please explain:

        There has been a statistically significant increase in passing rates overall in MAT 010-051 in
        2009-2010 compared to previous semesters.

        Improvements in Fall 2009:

 Fall 2008                               Spring 2009                          Fall 2009
 Passing Rates                           Passing Rates                        Passing Rates
             S           R       WU                  S        R       WU                  S           R   WU
Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                            Page 19
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DATE: 9/10/2008

  010      29.8% 60.2% 9.3%              010       25.9% 62.4% 10.4%    010       42.0% 46.9%     9.0%
  011      32.2% 59.7% 7.2%              011       29.5% 60.3% 8.8%     011       49.1% 33.4% 14.5%
  012      28.6% 59.9% 10.3%             012       23.8% 65.4% 9.7%     012       42.3% 42.5% 11.9%
 051       34.0% 59.9% 5.4%              051       29.8% 61.3% 7.9%     051       42.4% 43.2% 11.8%
 TOTAL 31.9% 59.9% 7.4%                  TOTAL 28.1% 62.0% 8.7%         TOTAL 43.7% 41.8% 11.8%
 Passing Rates Excluding WU              Passing Rates Excluding WU     Passing Rates Excluding WU
             S       R                               S       R                      S       R
 010       33.1% 66.9%                   010       29.3% 70.7%          010       47.2% 52.8%
 011       35.0% 65.0%                   011       32.9% 67.1%          011       59.5% 40.5%
 012       32.3% 67.7%                   012       26.7% 73.3%          012       49.9% 50.1%
 051       36.2% 63.8%                   051       32.7% 67.3%          051       49.5% 50.5%
 TOTAL 34.7% 65.3%                       TOTAL 31.2% 68.8%              TOTAL 51.1% 48.9%

                      % Change from Spring          % Change from Fall 08
                      Passing Rates                 Passing Rates
                                   S   WU/W                      S    WU/W
                      MAT                           MAT
                      010       +62.1% -16.4%       010       +40.9%     -.6%
                      MAT                           MAT
                      011       +66.1% +8.6%        011       +52.4% +38.8%
                      MAT                           MAT
                      012       +77.7%   +.6%       012       +48.2%    -5.5%
                      MAT                           MAT
                      051       +42.2% +24.6%       051       +24.7% +51.6%
                      TOTAL +55.5% +8.2%            TOTAL +37.1% +24.8%

                      Excluding WU                  Excluding WU
                                  S                             S
                      MAT                           MAT
                      010       +61.1%              010       +42.6%
                      MAT                           MAT
                      011       +80.9%              011       +69.8%
                      MAT                           MAT
                      012       +86.9%              012       +54.6%
                      MAT                           MAT
                      051       +51.4%              051       +36.9%
                      TOTAL +63.8%                  TOTAL +47.1%




Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                        Page 20
Based on Houston Community College System’s Model
PROGRAM:
DATE: 9/10/2008

       Improvements in Spring 2010:

 Spring 2009                                   Spring 2010                            % Change
 Passing Rates                                 Passing Rates                          Passing Rates
             S            R          WU                  S      R       WU                          S
 010       25.9%         62.4%       10.4%     010        39.4%   40.1%  16.9%        010         +52.3%
 011       29.5%         60.3%        8.8%     011        46.9%   31.1%  18.0%        011         +58.6%
 012       23.8%         65.4%        9.7%     012        39.5%   43.4%  14.3%        012         +65.9%
 051       29.8%         61.3%        7.9%     051        30.3%   49.9%  16.4%        051          +1.6%
 TOTAL 28.1%             62.0%        8.7%     TOTAL 36.7%        43.4%  16.5%        TOTAL       +30.5%

 Passing Rates Excluding                       Passing Rates Excluding
 WU                                            WU                                     Excluding WU
             S         R                                S         R                               S
 010       29.3%      70.7%                    010        49.6%     50.4%             010       +69.1%
 011       32.9%      67.1%                    011        60.1%     39.9%             011       +82.8%
 012       26.7%      73.3%                    012        47.7%     52.3%             012       +78.4%
 051       32.7%      67.3%                    051        37.8%     62.2%             051       +15.4%
 TOTAL 31.2%         68.8%                     TOTAL 45.8%          54.2%             TOTAL +46.8%



Department’s Recommendations: Student retention (and passing rates) could be improved by
providing more one-on-one resources for students. More tutors are needed in the math lab, as students
often have to wait a long time for help from a tutor, and more opportunities for one-on-one
counseling/advisement for remedial students are recommended – with approximately 6000 remedial
mathematics students each semester, three deputy chairs and a single remedial coordinator cannot
provide enough one-on-one advisement to serve even a quarter of the students.

Evaluator’s Recommendations:



III.2b STANDARD: Students progress satisfactorily to upper-level courses.

1. Are students placed correctly in classes in the program/department?

         Yes, please explain:
         No, please explain:

         Yes. Students are placed in a particular remedial course depending on their results in the
   ACT-COMPASS. Prior to enrollment at the college, students who cannot otherwise show that they
   are proficient in pre-college mathematics are required to take both the arithmetic and the algebra
   portions of the COMPASS exam.
Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                         Page 21
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2. What barriers do students in the program/department experience in progressing to upper-level
   courses in the same discipline?

   a) at the college

   Once students finish remediation, they may choose from a number of credit-bearing courses.

   b) at transfer institutions

   If students take a credit-bearing mathematics course at BMCC after finishing the remedial course
   sequence, they need not repeat the remedial course sequence at another CUNY college. However,
   some CUNY institutions have a COMPASS cutoff score of 45 instead of 30; in these cases, even if
   a student passed a remedial course at BMCC, if they did not follow it by taking a credit-bearing
   mathematics course at BMCC, they may be required to repeat remediation at the CUNY college to
   which they transfer, if their COMPASS score was between 30 and 45.

Department’s Recommendations: The current placement procedure is clear and seems to be relatively
effective, although it may be worth considering alternatives for students who pass remediaiton but who
wish to transfer to CUNY colleges with higher COMPASS score requirements before taking credit-
bearing courses at BMCC – for example, perhaps there should be an opportunity for them to work on
online assignments and/or receive tutoring and then to take the COMPASS again in order to achieve
the necessary score of 45.

Evaluator’s Recommendations:


III.2c STANDARD: Student degree completion and retention rates demonstrate program need
and effectiveness.

   1. How many students completed the program in each of the last three years?

   n/a

   2. Are these statistics satisfactory?

                  Yes, please explain:
                   No, please explain:

         n/a

   3. What percentage of your first-time freshmen earned 12 or more real credits? Report this from
      the last three Perkins III Reports (Institutional Research will provide).

                     n/a

Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                          Page 22
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PROGRAM:
DATE: 9/10/2008



   4. Are these statistics satisfactory?

         Yes, please explain:
         No, please explain:

         n/a


   5. What percentage of first-time freshmen who earned 12 or more credits graduated from your
      program, and graduated from another program? Report this from the last three Perkins III
      Reports (Institutional Research will provide).

                   n/a

   6. Are these statistics satisfactory?

         Yes, please explain:
         No, please explain:

         n/a

   7. What percentage of majors who completed the program’s first course graduated within the
      following three years? (Institutional Research will provide pertinent data).

           n/a


   8. Are these statistics satisfactory?

         Yes, please explain:
         No, please explain:

         n/a


Department’s Recommendations: n/a

Evaluator’s Recommendations:



III.3 MEASURE: STUDENT SATISFACTION
III.3a STANDARD: The program measures and documents student satisfaction.


Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                      Page 23
Based on Houston Community College System’s Model
PROGRAM:
DATE: 9/10/2008

1. Student Survey: Measurement of student satisfaction is based on the following:

         Graduate Survey (Institutional Research will provide graduate survey data)
         Focus Groups
         Other Surveys
         Other, please list:


         n/a

   Summarize student ratings based on measurements used by your program/department (may include
   interviews with students).

   n/a

   Provide documentation as evidence.


Department’s Recommendations: We recommend that the department begin surveying a random
sample of students in each remedial course each semester. Currently there is no program in place to
survey students.

Evaluator’s Recommendations:


IV.1a STANDARD: The institution’s instructional, research, and service programs are devised,
developed, monitored, and supported by qualified professionals. (MSCHE 10)

  1. Supply the following information for your program/department for the current and prior semester
(multiple positions should be counted as FT):

Spring 2010        Number of          Sections        Sections     Number of            Mean
Semester            Sections         Taught by      Taught by       Students         Number of
                                      Part-time      Full-time      Enrolled        students per
                                       Faculty        Faculty                          section
MAT 010                 43           38 (88.4%)      5 (11.6%)        1032              24.0
MAT 011                 47           32 (68.1%)     15 (31.9%)        1000              21.3
MAT 012                 41           32 (78.0%)      9 (22.0%)         785              19.1
MAT 051                 96           67 (69.8%)     29 (30.2%)        2343              24.4
MAT 056                 31           16 (51.6%)     15 (48.4%)         800              25.8
 Total                 258          185 (71.7%)     73 (28.3%)        5960              23.1




Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                          Page 24
Based on Houston Community College System’s Model
PROGRAM:
DATE: 9/10/2008

Spring            Number of   Day            Evening        Weekend
2010               Sections   Sections       Sections       Sections
Semester
MAT 010              43       30 (69.8%)     10 (23.3%)     3 (7.0%)
MAT 011              47       34 (72.3%)     9 (19.1%)      4 (8.5%)
MAT 012              41       29 (70.7%)     10 (24.4%)     2 (4.9%)
MAT 051              95       63 (66.3%)     18 (18.9%)     14 (14.7%)
MAT 056              31       21 (67.7%)     8 (25.8%)      2 (6.5%)
 Total              257       177            56 (21.7%)     25 (9.7%)
                              (68.6%)


 Fall      Number            Day Sections                Evening Sections                  Weekend
 2009         of          FT      PT      Total         FT       PT     Total       FT        PT     Total
           sections
 MAT          46          3         29      32         1       12        13      0         1         1
  010                  (9.4%) (90.6%)               (7.7%) (92.3%)
 MAT         51           9         31      40         1        7         8      2         1         3
  011                 (22.5%) (77.5%)              (12.5%) (87.5%)            (66.7%) (33.3%)
 MAT         40           4         23      27         2        8        10      0         3         3
  012                 (14.8%) (85.2%)               (20%)    (80%)
 MAT         70          23         34      57         0       15        15      2         6         8
  051                 (40.4%) (59.6%)                       (100%)             (25%)    (75%)
 MAT         34          12          7      19         4        5         9      3         0         3
  056                 (63.2%) (36.8%)              (44.4%) (55.6%)
 Total:     241          51        124     175         8       47        55      7        11        18
Percent:               29.1%     70.9%              14.5%    85.5%             38.9%    61.1%
For Fall 2009, full-time faculty taught 66 out of 241 remedial sections (27.4%). Adjunct faculty taught
72.6% of remedial sections.


Spring     Number Day Sections                    Evening Sections             Weekend
2010       of       FT      PT              Total FT       PT            Total FT      PT            Total
           sections
MAT         43       3      27              30      2         8       10        0            3       3
010                 (10%)   (90%)                   (20%)     (80%)
MAT         46       11     23              34      1         6       7         2            3        5
011                 (32.4%) (67.6%)                 (14.3%)   (85.7%)           (40%)        (60%)
MAT         41      8       21              29      0         10       10       1            1       2
012                 (27.6%) (72.4%)                                             (50%)        (50%)
MAT         95      24      39               63     3         15       18       2            12       14
051                 (38.1%) (91.9%)                 (16.7%)   (83.3%)           (14.3%)      (85.7%)
MAT         31       14     7                21     1         7        8        0            2       2
056                 (66.7%) (33.3%)                 (12.5%)   (87.5%)
 Total:    256      60      117             177     7         96      53        5            21      26
Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                                 Page 25
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PROGRAM:
DATE: 9/10/2008

Percent:             33.9%     66.1%              13.2%    86.8%              19.2%    80.8%
For Spring 2010, full-time faculty taught 72 out of 256 remedial sections (28.1%). Adjunct faculty
taught 71.9% of remedial sections.


   2. Is the number of full-time faculty adequate to support the program/department?

☐ Yes, please explain:

X No, please explain:

As cited in the above table, only 28.1% of our sections in this program are taught by full-time faculty.
While our part-time faculty are, for the most part, highly qualified and dedicated, students do benefit
from having an instructor who is obligated to be on campus for a greater number of office hours and
has a higher level of qualifications to be in his or her position. Full-time faculty in the department are
required to participate in departmental meetings and committee work, and thus contribute to the
successful implementation of these courses. Full-time faculty are on campus longer than part-time
faculty giving students greater access to assistance when needed outside of class. Full-time faculty
also conduct observation of peers that improves instruction in these courses.

   3. Is there at least one full-time faculty member with primary teaching assignment in the program
area?

 X Yes, please explain: Of the 46 full-time faculty in the department, 73.9%, taught at least one
remedial and one college-level course in the Spring 2010 semester. There are 5 full-time faculty who
teach only remedial courses and 7 full-time faculty who teach only college-level courses.

☐ No, please explain:


Is reassigned time for the administration of the program/department adequate?

☐ Yes, please explain:

X No, please explain:

There are 258 remedial sections this semester. To administer a program with such a large number of
sections requires many hours of labor. The labor is not only administrative work, such as arranging for
substitutes in the case of absences and personnel paperwork, but also many hours of work crafting
policies and creating instruments to assess students in the program (departmental examinations for
example). Faculty members who undertake this job typically receive released time from teaching one
course. The amount of released time from instruction is not equivalent to the time spent in
administering the program.



Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                              Page 26
Based on Houston Community College System’s Model
PROGRAM:
DATE: 9/10/2008

   4. Is administrative support adequate for assisting the department chair/academic coordinator? (e.g.
clerical support and college-level support)

 ☐ Yes, please explain:

 X No, please explain:

No. We currently have one administrative assistant who assists 46 full-time faculty and over 180
adjunct faculty.

   5. What role do faculty play in academic advisement?

Mathematics department faculty members participate in academic advisement in one of two ways.
Some advise liberal arts students who are assigned to come to our department for advisement based on
the first letter of their last name. These faculty members meet with students during their assigned
office hours and assist students with course selection. This selection is typically based on the students’
academic abilities as measured by placement tests and academic interests as well as transfer and career
goals.

Other faculty members (15 out of our 46 faculty members) have been trained in developmental
advisement practices and are assigned a cohort of students. The training for this program consists of a
week-long series of workshops (and ongoing follow-up sessions) that focus on implementing student
development theory into the practice of academic advisement. These advisors see the same students
throughout the student’s tenure at BMCC, which allows the advisor to establish a relationship with the
student. Advisement sessions build on previous sessions so that students just need to report progress
and any changes in goals so that the advisor can continue to recommend subsequent academic steps.
The student’s progress is recorded in the DegreeWorks database so that both advisor and advisee can
see the progress towards the student’s ultimate goal. This type of advisement has led to increased
retention for students in the program at BMCC.

   6. How are faculty made familiar with degree requirements, core curriculum, etc., so that they can
better advise students?

The College’s Academic Advisement and Transfer Center has ongoing training to help faculty
members who will be advising students.

   7. How are faculty in the program/department involved with student organizations and college
extracurricular activities?

Several mathematics faculty members advise the Math Club, which has been highly successful in
problem solving competitions. Few remedial students participate in these extra-curricular activities
however.

Department’s Recommendations: None.

Evaluator’s Recommendations:
Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                             Page 27
Based on Houston Community College System’s Model
PROGRAM:
DATE: 9/10/2008

IV.1b STANDARD: Faculty meet competency requirements for teaching in the program area.

   1. Supply the information requested below for all full-time and part-time faculty teaching in your
program/department in the current semester. Use Form 1 and attach (see page 33).

The information below was generated by the college’s Human Resources department.

Instructor Name Status Highest Degree/                    Other           Courses Taught
                FT/PT    Certificate                  Qualifications/
                                                     Work Experience

Instructors whose names are in capital letters are full-time. Highest degree, when known, is in
parentheses. “For cred” indicates foreign credentials.

Name:                            # of     Name:                     # of     Name:                  # of
                                 sections                           sections                        sections

Abdelazim, Sameh (BEE)           1          Greenhalgh, Alan        2          Okobi, Patrick       1
                                            (MA)                               (PhD)

Abousalham, Faouzi (MA)          2          Guareno, Marcos ( )     1          Olszewski, Peter     1
                                                                               (BS)

Adamson, Ifesanya                3          Gutman, Buruch Boris    1          O'Mara-Nordy,        2
                                            (For Cred)                         Patricia ( )

Agbotoudo, Thiery (MA)           1          HAN, ANNIE (EdD)        2          Osman,Habib ( )      1

AGWU, NKECHI (PhD)               2          Harriot, Nigel ( )      2          Paki, Emmanual       1
                                                                               (MA)

Ahmed, Mostaque (MS)             1          Hearns, Eddie (MA)      1          Parker, Kenneth ( 1
                                                                               )

Akhtaruzzaman, Akhtar            1          HIRSCH, JENNA           1          PASSANTINO,          3
(MS)                                        (PhD)                              NANCY (MSEd)

Alexander, Nathan (MA)           1          Huang, Laura (For       2          Pavlyuk, Iryna       1
                                            Cred)                              (MA)

Annamunthodo, John               2          Ibrahim, Saad ( )       1          PESKOFF,             2
(BBA)                                                                          FRED (EdD)

Anyanwu, Josephine (MS)          2          INKELLIS, ELLEN         3          PIERRE,              3

Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                           Page 28
Based on Houston Community College System’s Model
PROGRAM:
DATE: 9/10/2008

                                            (MA)                        DWIGHT (MA)

APFALTRER, FELIX                 2          Ishii, Minoru (MS)      1   PORTAFOGLIO, 1
(PhD)                                                                   ANTHONY
                                                                        (EdD)

Artamoshin, Sergei (MPh)         2          Javaid, Tanweer (MS)    1   PRADO, LUCIO       2
                                                                        (PhD)

Asherov, Boris (For cred)        1          Jawarska, Violetta      1   Pratt, John (MA)   1
                                            (For Cred)

ASHTON, BARBARA                  2          Johnson, Owen (MS)      1   Raleigh, Andrew    1
(PhD)                                                                   (PhD)

Auh, Karen ( )                   1          Joseph, Wainright ( )   1   Rao-Shantha,       1
                                                                        Arkalgud (PhD)

Ayoub, Toufik (MS)               1          Kamis, Jack (MA)        1   Reynarowch,        1
                                                                        Zenon (PhD)

Badalamenti, Anthony             1          Kennedy, Ann Marie      2   Rosen, Peter       2
(BS)                                        (BS)                        (MBA)

Bardac-Vlada, Daniela            1          KHAZANOV,               1   Rwykin, Richard    1
(For Cred)                                  LEONID (EdD)                (PhD)

Baruch, Sam (BA)                 1          KIRUPAHARAN,            2   Saha, Babul (BS)   1
                                            NADARAJAH (PhD)

Beck, Michael (BA)               1          Krishnamachari,         1   Saha, Partha ( )   1
                                            Namby (MA)

BEECHER, BERNARD                 1          KRISHNAMACHARI, 1           Saha, Subas        2
(MS)                                        SHANTHA (EdD)               Kumar (BS)

Bekralas, Rachid (MS)            1          Lagrance, Klara (For    1   Saifuddin, Asm     2
                                            Cred)                       (BS)

Benjamin, Joseph (BBA)           1          Lam, Wai-Lun (MA)       1   Saint Vil, Eddy    2
                                                                        (MS)

Bialas, Piotr (EdD)              1          Landesman, Peter        1   SAMUELS,           1
                                            (PhD)                       JASON (MA)

Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                   Page 29
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PROGRAM:
DATE: 9/10/2008

Bilsky-Bieniek, Carol            1          LAWRENCE,              3   Sanabria, Camilo    2
(MSE)                                       BARBARA (BA)               (For Cred)

Blair, Dakota (MA)               1          Lazarus, David ( )     2   SANFORD,            4
                                                                       BRUCE (MA)

Boakeye, Andy ( )                1          LEE, JAEWOO (PhD)      1   Sanga, Bakery       1
                                                                       (BA)

BOER, SANDRA (MA)                1          Leong, Kwan Eu ( )     1   Saravanamuthu,      1
                                                                       Victor ( )

Brof, Jane (MA)                  1          Levy, Karl ( )         1   Schon, Micky        1
                                                                       (MA)

Bromberg, Joshua ( )             1          Li, Lawrence (For      1   Scott, Barrington   2
                                            Cred)                      ()

Brown, Nellie (MSEd)             1          Li, Zuming (BBA)       1   Seaton, Marlon      1
                                                                       (MS)

Calligiros, Miguel ( )           1          Liao, Xiaojun (MA)     1   Seide, Pierre       1
                                                                       (ME)

Camilien, Jean (MS)              1          Lin, Jianye (MSEE)     1   Selig, Ralph        1
                                                                       (EdD)

Carroll, William ( )             2          Lin, Zhao (AA)         2   Selig, Vera (MA)    2

Carty, Frantz (BS)               1          Lovell, Jonathan ( )   1   SERME,              1
                                                                       ABDRAMANE
                                                                       (PhD)

Causapin, Mark (MA)              2          Lum, Audrey (MA)       1   Sher, Lawrence      1
                                                                       (EdD)

Chakhtoun, Omar ( )              2          MACIEL, JORGE          1   Shiv, Sikri ( )     1
                                            (PhD)

Chen, Anbo (MPh)                 1          Makdisi, Michael       1   Shkrab,             1
                                            (MSE)                      Alexsandr (For
                                                                       Cred)

Clarke, Belia (MA)               1          Mancu, Petruc (BE)     2   Siegel, Micheal     1

Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                   Page 30
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                                                                        (MA)

Constant, Daniel (BS)            1          Mandelkorn, Steven      1   SIMS, BRETT         1
                                            (MBA)                       (PhD)

Cornley, Fritz (MS)              1          McArdle, Harry (MS)     1   Sing, Anil ( )      1

Coulibaly, Guedimon (BA)         1          McCARTHY,               1   Solodukhin,         1
                                            CHRISTOPHER                 Yakov ( )
                                            (MA)

Daley, Trevor (BS)               1          Medina, Carlos (MA)     1   Spector,            1
                                                                        Lawrence (MS)

Daryani, Said (MS)               2          Melhem, Ahmad (MS)      1   Tam, Kai Chung      1
                                                                        ()

DAWES, DALE (MS)                 5          Menzie, Leonard (MS)    1   TEIXEIRA,           1
                                                                        KLEMENT
                                                                        (PhD)

DIARRASSOUBA,                    1          MILLER, GLENN           1   Tetteh, Isaac       2
MAHMOUD (MSE)                               (EdD)                       (ME)

Doku, Philip (EdD)               1          MILMAN, Yevgeniy        3   Thelusma, Frantz    2
                                            (MA)                        ()

Duvvuri, Varalakshmi             1          Morales, Marlon (MA)    1   Thomas, LaNisha     1
(For Cred)                                                              (MS)

Elite, Shamsum ( )               1          MORGULIS, ALLA          2   Toplan, Shirley     1
                                            (For Cred)                  (BS)

Elve, Francki (BA)               2          Morris, Ronald (MA)     1   Traore, Ibrahima    1
                                                                        ()

FEATHERSTONHAUGH, 4                         Mortimer, Clarel (MS)   1   Trinkunaite, Rita   2
STEPHEN (PhD)                                                           (For Cred)

FELIX, ALLAN (MA)                3          Moser, George (BS)      1   Wallace, William    1
                                                                        (MBA)

Fink, Elliot (BBA)               1          Mshelia, Ayuba (PhD)    1   Weierman,           1
                                                                        Stephen (MS)

Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                    Page 31
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     Fomba, Vakaba (For               2          Myrthil, Raymond         1         Welz, Gary (MS)        1
     Cred)                                       (PhD)

     Fullerton, Peter (BSO)           2          Nagarsheth-              2         White, Naseef          2
                                                 Balakrishnan, Shilpi (             (MSEd)
                                                 )

     GEORGE, MICHAEL                  2          NAYER, SOFYA             2         WHITENER,              3
     (EdD)                                       (EdD)                              MILDRED
                                                                                    (MEd)

     Ghani, Nasim (MS)                1          Nicholas, Amy (BA)       2         Wolf, Jesse            1
                                                                                    (MBA)

     Ghartey, Christian (MS)          2          Nicolas, Paul ( )        2         XIN, KE (BS)           3

     Gjoci, Bukurie (MS)              1          NOGINA, ELENA            1         XU, YIBAO              1
                                                 (For Cred)                         (PhD)

     GOLDSTEIN,                       1          Obanar, Peter ( )        1         Yu, Dongmei            2
     AVRAHAM (PhD)                                                                  (MA)

     Grant, Wilbert (MBA)             2          OFFENHOLLEY,             1         Zigelbaum,             1
                                                 KATHLEEN (PhD)                     Misha (MA)

                                                 Okafor, Anne (PhD)       1




2.          2. Do all program/department faculty meet the requirements for teaching in the program area?

      ☐ Yes, please explain:

      X No, please explain: The American Mathematical Association of Two-Year Colleges recommends
     that all instructors have at least a Master’s Degree. Here is a quote from AMATYC’s position paper
     on the qualification of instructors in two-year college mathematics departments:



                                                  Minimal Preparation
        All full- and part-time mathematics instructors at two-year colleges should possess at least a
        master's degree in mathematics or in a related field with at least 18 semester hours (27 quarter

     Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                            Page 32
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        hours) in graduate-level mathematics. A master's degree in applied mathematics is an especially
        appropriate background for teaching technical mathematics. Coursework in pedagogy is desirable.
     Source: http://www.amatyc.org/documents/Guidelines-Position/GuidelinesforAcademic.htm
        BMCC’s mathematics department has both full-time and part-time faculty members who have not
        yet obtained this credential.

     Department’s Recommendations:

     Each faculty who does not have the minimal credential as recommended by AMATYC (above) should
     have that fact recorded in his or her evaluation and progress or lack of progress towards attaining these
     credential should be a factor in determining re-hiring and promotion.



     Evaluator’s Recommendations:



     IV.1c STANDARD: Program provides professional development opportunities for faculty and
     demonstrates that such development occurs. Full-time program faculty participate in professional
     development activities each year.



1.           1. Did each full-time faculty member in your program/department participate in a professional
     development activity during the past year? (e.g., attend conference or scholarly meeting, attend TLC,
     training in instructional technologies, etc.)

      X Yes, please explain: Participating in professional development is a requirement for tenure and
     promotion. There are many opportunities and most of our faculty avail themselves of these
     opportunities.

     ☐ No, please explain:

         2. Did each full-time faculty member in your program/department engage in scholarly activity
     during the last three years? (e.g., publications, conference presentation, artistic performance/ exhibit,
     research, etc.)




     X Yes, please explain: Yes, many of our faculty members are active scholars.

     ☐ No, please explain:
     Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                              Page 33
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   3. Do part-time faculty in your program/department have access to ongoing professional
development activities?

 X Yes please explain The department, through its Adjunct and Faculty Development committees,
conducts adjunct training workshops – usually twice per semester. These cover departmental policies
and also discussions of effective practices for teaching courses in our remedial sequence.

☐ No, please explain:

    4. How many of the program/department’s part-time faculty this semester are paid for a
professional hour?

For the Fall 2010 semester, 134 of the adjunct faculty are paid for a professional hour.

   5. How do part-time faculty in the program/department spend their professional hour?

During their professional hour part-time faculty are available to assist their students.

    6. Are adequate opportunities and resources made available for faculty’s professional development
needs?

 X Yes, please explain: there are professional development opportunities at the university, college and
departmental level. Additional regional and national associations of mathematics and mathematics
education provide ample opportunities for conference participation.

☐ No, please explain:

   7. List needs not satisfied during the last three years.

 n/a

   8. How has your department enhanced learning and scholarship in the department via grants?

Yes (see below)



   9. How many external and/or internal grants did the faculty and/or department apply for in the last
      three years?

Two.




Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                              Page 34
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   10. How many grants did the faculty and/or department receive?

Recently, the department has been awarded two grants focused on the remedial program.

Profs. Alla Margulis and Claire Wladis received a CUNY Improving Undergraduate Mathematics
Learning Grant for this semester through next year to support the running of pilot sections of MAT
056, with the aim of assessing whether or not trying a cooperative learning class format during class
time would improve student passing rates in the course. They will be running about 6 experimental
and 6 control sections during both semesters next year, and the experimental sections will use
specifically designed collaborative projects during class time on a regular basis. Some of the changes
will also involve integrating technology, such as online homework systems and recorded video lectures
(hopefully with some interactivity).


Prof. Leonid Khazanov has received a grant that he describes as follows:

Remedial mathematics at the college level has evidenced strikingly low retention and passing rates.
Many efforts to improve student success have involved refinements to pedagogical strategies.
However, it has been shown that at least 25% of the variation in student performance is explained by
students’ affective variables such as attitudes, study habits and skills, dispositions, and math and test
anxiety. This study endeavors to address these affective variables by (1) incorporating the teaching of
study skills, time management strategies, test-taking skills, and anxiety reduction strategies into an
Elementary Algebra course, and (2) identifying at-risk students and assigning these students “coaches,”
who will function both as tutors and counselors, providing regular personalized support and
assistance. It is hypothesized that course sections in the experimental group (i.e., those sections in
which study strategies are incorporated into the teaching of the course and in which at-risk students are
provided with coaches) will evidence significantly higher course passing rates and student retention
rates than equivalent sections to which these interventions are not applied.


   11. How does the number of grants and applications compare with three years ago?

       Three years ago we had no grant funded work related to remedial courses.



   12. What number and percent of faculty are currently engaged in grant-supported activity and/or
       research?



 The three faculty named above are currently undertaking the studies in this area, but many more will
be involved by being a part of the studies’ treatment or control groups.

Department’s Recommendations: None.

Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                            Page 35
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     Evaluator’s Recommendations:



     IV.2 MEASURE: Budget Adequacy

     IV.2a STANDARD: The human, financial, technical, physical facilities, and other resources necessary
     to achieve an institution’s mission and goals are available and accessible. (MSCHE 3)



1.             Indicate program/department expenditures for the last fiscal year:

     Mathematics Department Budget (2010- 2011
     estimate)



     Personnel:

      College Assistants (Tax levy funded)           $127,997

         (tutors and office asst)

      College Assistants (grant funded)              $147,162

         (tutors and office asst)

     Tutors for Intervention program                 $26,352

     Assts for MAPLE labs                            $4,464

     Adjunct Faculty Development Funds               $4,800




      Total:                                         $310,775

        2. Indicate program/department budget for the prior and current year:



     Mathematics Department Budget (2010- 2011
     Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                       Page 36
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     estimate)



     Personnel:

      College Assistants (Tax levy funded)           $127,997

         (tutors and office asst)

      College Assistants (grant funded)              $147,162

         (tutors and office asst)

     Tutors for Intervention program                 $26,352

     Assts for MAPLE labs                            $4,464

     Adjunct Faculty Development Funds               $4,800




      Total:                                         $310,775




3.             Is the program/department budget adequate to meet the program/department’s needs?



        ☐ Yes, please explain:

        X No, please explain:

      Our student population utilizes our tutoring facility beyond its capacity to assist the students as
     needed. Additional funds allocated to tutors, perhaps through a work-study program where students
     serve as tutors and problem-solving role models for their peers would be highly beneficial and
     effective.

     Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                          Page 37
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Department’s Recommendations: See above paragraph.



Evaluator’s Recommendations:



V. CRITICAL SUCCESS INDICATOR: PROGRAM SUPPORT SERVICES

V.1 MEASURE: Library and Other Learning Resources

V.1a STANDARD: Students and faculty are provided convenient, effective access to library and other
learning resources needed in their program.

1. Indicate library resources that are needed to support students in your program/department and the
current level of access to those resources:

                                         Student Level of Access        Faculty Level of Access
                                          Adequate Inadequate           Adequate Inadequate

   ☐ Electronic catalog                        X         ☐                   X           ☐

   ☐Serials listing                            ☐         ☐                   X              ☐

   ☐Reserve listing                            X         ☐                   X              ☐

   ☐ Internet access                           X         ☐                   X              ☐

   ☐ Remote access                             X         ☐                   X              ☐

   ☐ Interlibrary loan                        NA        NA                   X              ☐

   ☐ Other, please list:                       ☐        ☐                    ☐          ☐




   Department’s Recommendations: Student response to second item was mixed (120 students were
   surveyed). There is a need to monitor what students are doing on computers.



Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                          Page 38
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   Evaluator’s Recommendations:




Program Review Instrument (October 2006)            Page 39
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V.1b STANDARD: Library collections are sufficient in quality, level, diversity, quantity and currency
to support and enrich the college’s academic offerings.

                                         Student Level of Access    Faculty Level of Access

                                         Adequate   Inadequate     Adequate   Inadequate

 1.    Print Materials

      ☐ Quantity                           ☐              ☐            ☐              X

      ☐ Quality                            ☐              ☐            ☐              X

      ☐ Level                              ☐              ☐            ☐            X

      ☐Diversity                           ☐              ☐            ☐           X



 2.    Non-Print Materials

      ☐ Quantity                           ☐          ☐            ☐              X

      ☐ Quality                            ☐          ☐            ☐              X

      ☐ Level                              ☐          ☐            ☐              X

      ☐Diversity                           ☐          ☐            ☐              X



 3.    Electronic Resources

      ☐ Quantity                           ☐              ☐         ☐              X

      ☐ Quality                            ☐              ☐         ☐              X

      ☐ Level                              ☐            ☐              ☐          X

      ☐ Diversity                          ☐           ☐               ☐          X



Department’s Recommendations: Student response all items was mixed. (120 students surveyed)
Increase holdings in all areas.

Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                         Page 40
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Evaluator’s Recommendations:

V.1c STANDARD: The college provides appropriate orientation and training for use of these
resources.

1. Does the program/department routinely require that students attend Library orientation and training
session(s)?

   Yes ☐ No X

                                               Adequate     Inadequate

2. How adequate is the Library orientation?               ☐            ☐

3. How many students were served last term? N/A



V.2a STANDARD: Facilities, equipment, and instructional support services are adequate and easily
accessible for program faculty and students.

1. Do students and faculty in the program/department have the facilities and instructional support
services they need for effective learning?

                     Adequate Inadequate Comment on Inadequacies

Audiovisual          X          ☐
equipment
Bookstore            X          ☐
Classrooms           ☐          X             Many classrooms are too small or oriented
                                             incorrectly.
Classroom supplies ☐            X             Chalk and erasers are missing. Whiteboard
                                             markers are dry.
Duplicating          ☐          X             Not enough copies per day. Accounts should
services                                     give a max per week instead of per day.
Group study areas    ☐          X             None available.
Individual study     ☐          X             Need more of these.
areas
Instructional        ☐          X            Increasingly sophisticated technology, training
Technology                                   and support should be provided.
Tutoring labs        ☐          X            More personnel and space needed in MathLab.
Library resources    ☐          X             See V.1.
Meeting space        ☐          X             We need more meeting spaces for committees
Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                             Page 41
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                                             and other groups.
General            X            ☐
departmental space




Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                         Page 42
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                  Adequate Inadequate Comment on Inadequacies

Multimedia        X         ☐
equipment

Office space      ☐         X           Not nearly enough for our large faculty. Too many
                                        people are crowded two to three to an office. (See
                                        attached survey)
Open access       ☐         X           We need more for our large student body.
computers
Work space        ☐         X           Space in offices is insufficient and there is now
                                        work space otherwise.
Other, please
list:


2. Are adequate tutorial services available to support learning for students taking courses in your
program/department?

   ☐ Yes, please explain:

   X No, please explain:

The MathLab is crowded and needs more space and tutors. Also, we need more help for students using
Blackboard.



3. Do faculty receive adequate support from the college ADA counselor in providing reasonable
accommodations for self-declared ADA students taking courses in the program/department?

   X Yes, please explain:

   ☐ No, please explain:

The ADA office provides admirable support. They come to department meetings to explain how the
office works and respond immediately to any questions about particular students.



   4. What specialized equipment is used in the classroom to support instruction in the
program/department?

Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                              Page 43
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      Computers, overhead projection systems, VCR's, Smartboards

 4.   Is available specialized classroom equipment adequate to meet your program/department needs?

      X Yes, please explain:

      ☐ No, please explain:

      It is adequate for now. But we need to be forward-looking to continue to keep up with more
      sophisticated technologies. More computer access is needed to support the changes in the
      remedial course structure.
 5.   Is a lab required to support instruction in the program/department?

      ☐ No

      X Yes, please describe.

      The Math Lab provides tutoring and many classes have computer or technology labs.

 6.   Does the program/department require a dedicated lab? (e.g. science lab, language lab, computer
      lab, or studio)

      ☐ No

       X Yes, please identify:

      Many of our courses need to meet in computer labs.

 7.   Are dedicated labs adequate to contribute to effective learning in the program/department?

      ☐ Yes, please explain:

      X No, please explain:

      We need more labs to support our growing student population. The Remediation Committee has
      recommended that all Mat 0XX courses meet one day a week in a computer lab so that students
      can use the online computer software required for their course. Currently, there are insufficient
      computer labs to make this possible.

 8.   For labs using hazardous materials, is there a safety process in place in your program/department
      with appropriate regulations regarding disposal, handling, and storage?

      ☐ Yes, please explain:

      ☐ No, please explain:
Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                            Page 44
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       We have no labs with hazardous materials.

 9.    Do students and faculty in the program/department have access to a Teaching and Learning
       Center or Learning Assistance Center at the college?

       ☐ No

        X Yes, (1) please identify type of Center and location and indicate whether support services,
       hardware, software, multimedia or other instructional materials are adequate to support effective
       learning.
       Use form 2, if needed, and attach (see page 34).

Type of Center Location                 Adequate Inadequate      Identify Inadequacies
MathLab        S511                        ☐         X       Needs more space and
                                                            personnel.
                                           ☐         ☐
                                           ☐         ☐


        Are any additional services needed to support effective learning? If so, please explain.

        Many students would like to hire personal tutors.



 10.   Describe the secretarial support provided for the program/department.

         X Full-time

         X Part-time, please explain: Student workers.

         ☐None

 12. Is the level of secretarial support adequate for effective departmental operations?

        ☐ Yes

        X No, please explain: We need more secretarial support.

        The faculty should not have to do their own copying. Also, faculty who are working on
        university committees and/or grants need support from department staff. Our deputy-chairs also
        need more secretarial support.

Department’s Recommendations: Much more support services and space needs to be provided for the
program to run efficiently. In regards to faculty offices we have the following recommendations:
Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                              Page 45
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   1. Find more office space for full-time faculty members. With two or more faculty members in a
      single office, it is impossible to store files and books and to meet with students. If one of the
      occupants is working with a student, the other faculty member may have to leave the office to
      get some work done.

   2. Space should be found for faculty members to meet with more than one student at a time.
      Currently no such space is available in the department and such interactions are strongly
      discouraged in M1016b.

   3. It is essential that more space be found for our adjunct faculty members to meet with students,
      store books and papers and use computers.

   4. Some fair and organized method for assigning office space needs to be determined and
      explained to full time faculty members to avoid confusion. It may be based on rank, time
      served, or other criteria.

 (Data collected on office space is attached at the end of this document.)



Evaluator’s Recommendations:




Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                           Page 46
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V.3 MEASURE: Information/EDUCATIONAL Technology Resources and Systems

V.3a STANDARD: Information technology resources support programs at the appropriate levels.

1. Identify the information technology resources needed by faculty and staff in the academic
program/department, and rate the availability and adequacy of those resources at the college.

 Resource Needed                                    Available   Not Available    Adequate
Inadequate

   ☐ PCs in dept/office                              X          ☐                 ☐             ☐

   ☐ Printers in dept/office                         X          ☐                 ☐             X

   ☐ e-mail for faculty and staff                    X          ☐                ☐              ☐

   ☐ e-mail for students                             X          ☐                 ☐             ☐

   ☐ Web access/connectivity                        X           ☐                ☐              ☐

   ☐ BlackBoard accounts                            X           ☐                 ☐             ☐

   ☐ BlackBoard support                             X           ☐                 ☐             X

   ☐ Loaner laptops                                  X          ☐                 ☐             ☐

   ☐ Up-to-date software                             X           ☐                 ☐            ☐

   ☐ Overhead projectors                            X           ☐                 ☐             ☐

   ☐ Computer projectors                             X          ☐                 ☐             ☐

   ☐ Audio/video shooting & editing                  X          ☐                 ☐             X
   resources
   ☐ Helpdesk support                                X          ☐                  ☐            X

   ☐ Other, please list:



   Please comment on any resource that is checked as needed but is not available or is inadequate.

   We need more computers due to the large number of faculty members. We also need more support
   for students, particularly since so many of our courses make use of Blackboard and online course
   software.

Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                           Page 47
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2. Do program/department faculty have adequate access to information/education technology
training?

   X Yes, please explain:

   ☐ No, please explain:

   Workshops are offered on a regular basis for faculty.

3. Do faculty in the program/department have adequate access to the computer hardware, software,
and communication network necessary for instructional preparation and to access available
information technology resources?

   X Yes, please explain:

   ☐ No, please explain:

   All faculty members have computers in their offices.

4. Is the level of technical support adequate for the information technology resources used by your
faculty and staff?

   ☐ Yes, please explain:

   X No, please explain:

   When problems are reported, it takes weeks for the issue to be resolved. This is particularly
   difficult when an office computer is involved. No other free computers are available so the faculty
   member cannot get their work done.



Department’s Recommendations: Resources are generally good but need to be improved in the areas
indicated above.



Evaluator’s Recommendations:




Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                           Page 48
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DATE: 9/10/2008

V.4 MEASURE: Student Development and ACADEMIC Support Services

V.4a STANDARD: Student development services support student success.

For each of the following services, indicate the level of satisfaction provided to students in your
program/department. (These data are compiled by Institutional Research)

                                     Student Development Services

 Services                                           1. Excellent 2. Good 3. Fair       4. Poor
Academic Advisement                                      ☐          X       ☐             ☐
Career Counseling                                        ☐          X       ☐             ☐
Personal Counseling                                      ☐          X       ☐             ☐
Financial Aid services                                   ☐          X       ☐             ☐
Job Placement                                            ☐          X       ☐             ☐
Registration process                                     ☐          X       ☐             ☐
Testing Office services                                  ☐          X       ☐             ☐
Tutoring services                                        ☐          X       ☐             ☐


1. Are these ratings adequate? Yes.

Department’s Recommendations: Academic Advisers are provided and trained. However, students
need to be encouraged to actually schedule and attend their advising appointments. An effort needs to
be made to make students aware of the other services available. They seem unaware that many of their
questions can be answered by simply looking at the BMCC or department webpages.



Evaluator’s Recommendations:



V.5 MEASURE: Advisory Committee

V.5a STANDARD: Program Advisory Committee membership reflects diversity of the community.

V.5b STANDARD: Program Advisory Committee meets a minimum of once a year; maintains written
minutes; advises on curriculum matters and encourages opportunities for increasing underrepresented
populations in the program.

1. Does the program/department have an advisory committee?

    ☐ Yes, please explain:
Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                             Page 49
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    X No, please explain:

   The Mathematics Department has the advantage of maintaining constant scrutiny and contact
   among its many active committees. These meet regularly and report to the full-time faculty of the
   department during the monthly department meetings on the second Wednesday of each month at 2
   PM. The various committees are as follows:

   Faculty Development (7 members)

   Technology/Internet (4 members)

   Math Team/Math Club (5 members)

   Remediation (12 members)

   Adjunct (8 members)

   Curriculum (7 members)

   Publication/Grant (12 members)

   Global Education (5 members)

   Math 100 (11 members)

   Math 200 (5 members)

   Math 300 (15 members)

   Biotech (5 members)

   General Education (5 members)

   Teacher Education (8 members)

   These commitees meet at various times during each semester and set their respective focus and
   agenda. Many faculty members belong to two or three different committees and there is often
   interaction between committees. For instance, The Adjunct and Remediation committees work
   closely on materials, classroom management, testing, and workshops for the benefit of our
   numerous (138) adjunct faculty members teaching our five different developmental non-credit
   courses. The Faculty Development committee works in conjunction with the Curriculum
   committee as well as the Adjunct committee. The Mathematics Department is self-contained, self-
   directed, and self-advised.

 2. Is the advisory committee membership reflective of the diversity of the community?

Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                         Page 50
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   ☐ Yes, please explain:

   ☐ No, please explain:

   N/A

 3. List the dates of the Advisory Committee meetings held in the last year. Attach the minutes.

   N/A

 4. Explain how the advisory committee participates in curriculum review.

   See above description of committee structure.

 5. Explain how the advisory committee provides valuable input and performs helpful services, to
include participation in each of the following: establishing technology needed for instruction;
marketing of program/department in community; the professional development of faculty.

6. Cite some of the ways in which the committee has made an impact on the program/department
and/or decisions
related to it.



Department’s Recommendations: Keep the current committee structure which functions in an advisory
capacity.



Evaluator’s Recommendations:

N561 NkechiAgwu, Professor                          N518 Felix Apfaltrer, Associate Professor

N539     Barbara Ashton, Associate Professor        N518 Bernard Beecher, Instructor

N528     Sandra Boer, Lecturer                      N532 ChokriCherif, Associate Professor

N524     Margaret Dean, Assistant Professor         N525 Mahmoud Diarrassouba, Lecturer

N525 Stephen Featherstonhaugh, Adjunct Program Coordinator/Assistant Professor

N537 Allan Felix, Full-time Faculty Coordinator N536 June Gaston, Professors

N524 Michael George, Math Team Coordinator / Assistant Professor


Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                          Page 51
Based on Houston Community College System’s Model
PROGRAM:
DATE: 9/10/2008

N770 Avraham Goldstein, Assistant Professor          N527 Marcos Guareno, College Laboratory
Technician

N520 Annie Han , Chairperson                         N518 Jenna Hirsch, Assistant Professor

N527 Mark Jagai, Math Lab Coordinator                N531 Margaret Karrass, Deputy Chair

N520 Michael Kent, Sr. College Laboratory Technician

N526 Leonid Khazanov, Associate Professor            N521 Nadarajah Kirupaharan, Associate
Professor

N535 Shantha Krishnamachari, Professor N538 Barbara Lawrence, Immersion Program
Coordinator

N770 Jaewoo Lee, Assistant Professor                 N522 David Lorde, Sr. College Laboratory
Technician

N560 Jorge Maciel, Associate Professor               N522 Christopher McCarthy, Instructor

N533 Glenn Miller, Assistant Professor               N526 AllaMorgulis, Mathematics Major
Coordinator

N531 SofyaNayer, Professor                           N524 Dr. Elena Y. Nogina, Professor

N522 Kathleen Offenholley, Adjunct Coordinator/Assistant Professor

N526 Fred Peskoff, Professor                         N532 Anthony Portafoglio, Deputy Chair

N518 Lucio Prado, Assistant Professor                N560 Frederick Reese, Lecturer

N524 Jean Richard, Deputy Chair                N518 Jason Samuels, Assistant Professor

N763 Bruce Sanford , Adjunct Coordinator/Lecturer

N770 AbdramaneSerme, C-STEP, S-STEM, and LS-AMP Coordinator

N521 KlementTeixiera, Associate Professor N538 Mildred Whitener , Lecturers

N529 Claire Wladis, Remedial Coordinator/Associate Professor

N527 KeXin, Lecturer                                 N558 YibaoXu, Associate Professor

N528 Marcos Zyman, Assistant Professor / Honors Coordinator

N534 Dwight Pierre, Lecturer
Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                         Page 52
Based on Houston Community College System’s Model
PROGRAM:
DATE: 9/10/2008



This list was taken from the department homepage.
There are a total of 47 people in 23 offices. A summary by office appears below.
We also have approximately 110 adjunct faculty who use space in two rooms, M1016b and N523.




             Office Number        # occupants       Ranks
             N518                 5                 1 instructor, 3 assistant, 1 associate
             N520                 2                 1 CLT, 1 full
             N521                 2                 2 associate
             N522                 3                 1 CLT, 1 instructor, 1 assistant
             N524                 4                 2 assistant, 1 full, 1 deputy chair
             N525                 2                 1 lecturer, 1 assistant
             N526                 3                 1 assistant, 1 associate, 1 full
             N527                 3                 1 lecturer, 1 CLT, 1 math lab coordinator
             N528                 2                 1 lecturer, 1 assistant
             N531                 2                 1 deputy chair, 1 full
             N532                 2                 1 deputy chair, 1 associate
             N533                 1                 1 assistant
             N534                 1                 1 lecturer
             N535                 1                 1 full
             N536                 1                 1 full
             N537                 1                 1 faculty coordinator
             N538                 2                 1 lecturer, 1 program coordinator
             N539                 2                 2 associate
             N558                 1                 1 associate
             N560                 2                 1 lecturer, 1 associate
             N561                 1                 1 full
             N763                 1                 1 lecturer
             N770                 3                 2 assistant, 1 coordinator




                        Rank                          # office mates (per person)
Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                              Page 53
Based on Houston Community College System’s Model
PROGRAM:
DATE: 9/10/2008

                        Full Professor (7)          0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 2, 2
                        Associate Professor (8)     0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 4
                        Assistant Professor (12)    0, 0, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4
                        Instructor (2)              2, 4
                        Lecturer (7)                0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2
                        CLT (3)                     1, 2, 2
                        Deputy chair (3)            1, 1, 3
                        Math lab coordinator (1)    2
                        Program coordinator (1)     1
                        Faculty coordinator (1)     0
                        Coordinator (1)             2




Program Review Instrument (October 2006)                                                 Page 54
Based on Houston Community College System’s Model

								
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