OAKLAND UNIVERSITY - DOC by EQfY16z

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									                         ATTACHMENT A




  OAKLAND UNIVERSITY


      Fiscal Year 2009
Five-Year Capital Outlay Plan
                                             Table of Contents


I.          Mission Statement                                            p. 3

II.         Instructional Programming                                    p. 3

                  A Distinctive University                               p. 3
                  A Growing University                                   p. 4
                  Applied Research and Economic Development              p. 5
                  Partnerships                                           p. 7
                  Instructional Technology                               p. 9
                  Technological Enhancements                             p. 10
                  Cultural and Performing Arts                           p. 10
                  Community Engagement                                   p. 11
                  Academic and Student Life Enhancements                 p. 11
                  Degree Programs                                        p. 12

III.        Staffing and Enrollment                                      p. 21

                  Figure 1 - Faculty and Staff Full Time Equivalent      p. 21
                  Figure 2 - Student Credit Hours                        p. 22
                  Figure 3 - Degrees Awarded by Program                  p. 23
                  Figure 4 - Enrollment Trends                           p. 24
                  Figure 5 - Enrollment Projections                      p. 25
                  Figure 6 - Gross Square Feet per Student in Michigan   p. 26
                  Future Staffing Needs                                  p. 27
                  Average Class Size                                     p. 27

lV.         Facility Assessment                                          p. 27

                  Utilization Rates                                      p. 27
                  Mandated Standards                                     p. 27
                  Functionality                                          p. 27
                  Replacement Value of Facilities                        p. 29
                  Utility Systems Condition                              p. 29
                  Facility Infrastructure Condition                      p. 29
                  Land                                                   p. 29
                  Buildings Obligated to the State Building Authority    p. 29
                  Classroom Utilization Reports                          p. 30
                  Facility Condition Assessment                          p. 37

       V.      Implementation Plan                                       p. 46

                  State Funding Request                                  p. 46
                  Supplemental State Funding Requests                    p. 46
                  University Funded Priorities                           p. 47
                  Plant Renewal/Deferred Plant Renewal                   p. 47
                  Capital Outlay Project Request                         p. 48




                                                                                 2
I. Mission Statement

“Oakland University has a three-fold mission. It offers instructional programs of
high quality that lead to degrees at the baccalaureate, master’s, and doctoral
levels as well as programs in continuing education; it advances knowledge and
promotes the arts, through research, scholarship, and creative activity; and it
renders significant public service. In all its activities, the University strives to
exemplify educational leadership.”


II. Instructional Programming

Oakland University (Oakland, University or OU) is a doctoral/research university
located in Rochester, Michigan, suburban Oakland County. Through unique and
distinctive academic experiences, Oakland is preparing students to make meaningful
and substantial contributions to the workplace, academia and the community.

A Distinctive University

This year Oakland University marks its 50th anniversary, celebrating five decades of
innovation and opportunity, including achievement in preparing student leaders, advancing
research frontiers and engaging with business, educational and community partners for the
benefit of our region.

Through the dedication of inspired faculty, Oakland prepares students to make meaningful
and substantial contributions to society and the workplace by producing graduates who can
think critically and creatively, communicate effectively, navigate and use information
technology, and interact well with others.

In addition to equipping graduates with a broad base of knowledge and top-notch intellectual
and experiential opportunities, Oakland University is equally dedicated to the development of
students in all aspects of their lives. Through a carefully thought out collection of campus life
experiences, the University gives students opportunities to develop leadership, team-building,
decision-making and social skills that will serve them well in their professional careers and
personal lives.

In all that it does, OU is committed to offering a distinctive undergraduate education – one
that is complemented by opportunities to conduct research at the undergraduate level, and to
participate in internships, field experiences and study abroad opportunities.




                                                                                               3
A Growing University

Student enrollment projections through 2010 include the following:

                continued enrollment growth to 20,000 students
                increased FTIAC enrollment of minority students
                a significant increase in graduate students, responding to new
                  program development, greater outreach activities and advanced
                  technology-assisted education delivery

Oakland has continued to keep pace with growth by providing new and advanced academic,
research and support facilities, such as the:

              Science and Engineering Building
              renovated Hannah Hall
              Elliott Hall of Business and Information Technology
              Pawley Hall of Education and Human Services
              renovation and expansion of the Oakland Center
              renovation of O’Dowd Hall to provide additional classrooms
              Recreation and Athletics Center
              renovation of Meadow Brook Hall
              renovation and technology upgrades of South Foundation Hall first and
             second floors
              Student Apartments
              Parking structure
              Student Technology Center
              Joan Rosen Writing Laboratory

Oakland has added more than 35 new degree programs over the past seven years to
strengthen educational offerings.

A Campus Master Plan was finalized in 2001. It addresses expected growth and includes:

                recommendations for additional parking
                infrastructure improvements
                the identification of potential building sites
                a research and development park
                a new humanities facility
                expansion of the School of Engineering and Computer Science
                possible future phases of student housing




                                                                                         4
In Spring 2005, Oakland launched its first-ever comprehensive campaign seeking $110
million raised by 2010. Funds will be used to support student scholarships, faculty chairs and
professorships, research endowments, academic programming and capital enhancements.
Midway through the campaign, $78.2 million has been raised.


Applied Research and Economic Development

Oakland University offers knowledge, resources and programs that help companies grow.
With its research labs, facilities, faculty and students, Oakland assists companies in
transforming ideas into new business developments, turning dreams into reality and giving
vitality to vision. The University’s applied research and technology development capabilities
include the areas of:

• Advanced manufacturing
• Life sciences
• Information technology
• Alternative energy/power train
• Homeland defense

OU is also expanding its technology transfer and intellectual property management emphasis
to facilitate the discovery and commercialization of technologies that appear promising at the
proof-of-concept or prototype stage.

The University is committed to assisting start-ups and spin-outs to locate and secure
technology development, business planning and capital acquisition as well as providing
opportunities for the licensing of Oakland University’s intellectual assets. To foster emerging
discoveries, the University features several noted research centers, including:

      OU SmartZone Business Incubator: A collaboration with Automation Alley, the Great
       Lakes Interchange, the Michigan Economic Development Corporation, Oakland
       County and the City of Rochester Hills, OU INC provides the expertise and skills of
       faculty, students and corporate partners to area businesses in a variety of capacities,
       including entrepreneurial resources and strategic business solutions to develop
       intellectual property. The incubator supports existing and grows new technology-based
       and life science businesses with University resources, decision support technology,
       business counseling services and financial/capital acquisition assistance.

      Fastening and Joining Research Institute: A collaboration between OU, the U.S.
       Congress, the National Science Foundation and Chrysler Corporation, it is the only
       facility of its kind in the world. FAJRI has thrived since its beginning in 2003 with nearly
       20 people on staff and $6.8 million in approved grants. Researchers explore the
       fundamental and applied research to develop and disseminate new technology for the
       fastening and joining of metals, composites and polymers.




                                                                                                  5
      Center for Robotics and Advanced Automation: Funded by the National Science
       Foundation, the Big Three automotive companies and the Department of Defense, the
       center works on smart control technology with industrial and defense applications,
       intelligent robotics, homeland security technology, suspension systems, digital
       shearography, and global satellite communication technology and systems.

      Eye Research Institute (ERI): This unique center of ophthalmic research collaborates
       with the William Beaumont Hospital Ophthalmology Department on research and
       provides a joint Ophthalmology residency and fellowship program. Since 1968, ERI
       scientists have received more than $40 million from private and federal health
       agencies.

      Center for Biomedical Research: This center provides core facilities and pilot
       funding for the applied biomedical research efforts of OU’s life scientists. Key
       research includes eye diseases, chemical toxicology, medical physics and biological
       communication.

      Physics Lab at Henry Ford Hospital: At Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, members of
       Oakland’s Department of Physics are researching new ways to reverse the effects of
       stroke. Distinguished Professor of Physics Michael Chopp is the director of the
       Neuroscience Institute, where faculty members and students in the Medical Physics
       Ph.D. program have access to experimental labs, clinical research and state-of-the-art
       clinical equipment.

      Product Development and Manufacturing Center: Named a “Center of Excellence”
       by Chrysler in recognition of its system engineering training and consulting work, the
       center supports independent studies, continuing education of engineers and
       managers, and Ph.D. research.

The University estimates its regional economic impact to exceed $500 million annually.




                                                                                                6
Partnerships
Oakland has leveraged its unique location in the heart of Michigan’s technology and
automotive corridor by forging strategic partnerships with hospitals, Fortune 500 and
international companies, individuals, cities, government agencies, and educational
institutions – from Southeast Michigan to other countries. The benefits of these associations
are far reaching: students are rewarded with internship and co-op opportunities, University
researchers have access to the latest technology tools, and the region benefits through new
business opportunities and a stronger economy.

      Macomb 2 Oakland: In 2006 Oakland University and Macomb Community College
       implemented the state's first joint admission, concurrent enrollment program called
       “M2O”. One application, coordinated advising and financial aid, and expanded course
       selection make it easy for those who live or work in Macomb County to seamlessly
       complete their associate and bachelor’s degrees.

      Wayne State University: An alliance between OU’s School of Health Sciences and
       Wayne State University’s Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health
       Sciences provides Oakland’s undergraduates a unique opportunity to earn a doctorate
       in pharmacy. Students can earn their bachelor’s degree at OU while taking pharmacy
       classes at WSU and the opportunity to complete the doctorate program in seven
       years, instead of eight, saving time and money.

      Bachelor’s in social work: OU is partnering with Michigan State University to build
       an accredited bachelor’s in social work (BASW) program at Oakland University. In
       addition, MSU will establish an advanced standing master’s in social work (MSW-AS)
       program on Oakland’s campus.

      The Oakland University-Guizhou exchange program has been building bridges and
       furthering teacher education on both sides of the world for more than 20 years. Up to
       a dozen OU-trained volunteers annually travel to China to immerse themselves in the
       culture and share their skills with their Chinese counterparts. More than 100 teachers
       from Michigan have participated in the program and more than 3,000 Guizhou
       teachers have benefited from the institute’s classes, reaching 30,000 students
       combined when they return to their classrooms in the fall.

      Jack’s Place for Autism at Oakland University: Oakland’s School of Education and
       Human Services autism program expanded its services and offerings when it joined
       with the Jack’s Place for Autism Foundation, a non-profit organization, in 2004.
       Families affected by Autism Spectrum Disorders are connected with resource
       referrals, therapeutic programs, counseling services, recreational programs, seminars
       and workshops.




                                                                                                7
   The Lean Learning Institute, established in 2002 through a gift from Dennis Pawley,
    OU alumnus and chair of the OU Board of Trustees, provides instruction and research
    that employs the practice of organizational improvement to business, education and
    public service. The OU campus community is using lean training principles to
    eliminate waste and become even more efficient. Significant permanent savings has
    been realized, in part due to lean practices, of $7.3 million and one-time savings of
    $3.3 million over the past several years. Additional cost savings tactics have included
    outsourcing and partnerships, energy conservation and benefit and employment
    changes.

   Applied Technology in Business: The heart of this award-winning program is the
    relationship between Oakland University, corporate sponsors and OU students. The
    program combines a rigorous education with hands-on training in the application of
    information technology in business. Students earn a scholarship along with a minor
    degree in Applied Technology in Business while tackling five projects on-site at
    sponsoring organizations over the course of two years.

   St. John Health System at Conner Creek Village: Oakland continues to find new
    ways to fill Michigan’s severe nursing shortage. Through this partnership, students in
    the Accelerated Second Degree in Nursing program are taking classes and performing
    clinical laboratory courses at Conner Creek Village, the former Holy Cross Hospital in
    Detroit.




                                                                                          8
Instructional Technology
Instructional technology enhancements in the classrooms have become a standard
expectation of Oakland’s faculty and students. Ninety-nine out of one hundred and
four general purpose classrooms are equipped with enhanced instructional technology
features.

Enhanced technology classrooms are equipped with the following features:
         Multimedia workstation containing: a rack mounted computer hardwired to
          campus network; a digital document camera; an electronic whiteboard; a
          rack mounted VCR/DVD combination player; an interface to plug in a user
          provided laptop computer, an interface to plug in an accessory analog
          audio/video device; speaker system; and an electronic push button control
          system
         Ceiling mounted video/data projection system connected to the multimedia
          workstation
         Wireless network providing OU NET access to the desktop

Oakland continues to offer courses via distance education. The three modes of delivery
include live interactive video, synchronous and asynchronous web-based learning
opportunities.

The MiCTA/Sprint T1 network and the Internet continue to provide the transmission vehicle
for the University’s live two-way compressed video course activity. Beginning with the fall
2007 semester, a credit course is being delivered to the University of Windsor. Cooley Law
also offers ITV classes between OU and Lansing. There are seven interactive video
classrooms on Oakland’s campus that are available to provide this mode of instructional
delivery. The improvement in IP video over the Internet is becoming a lower cost option for
two-way interactive video applications.

Oakland University supports a web-based Course Management System (CMS) solution
utilizing Moodle. Moodle can be used as a full "web based" solution where no face-to-face
teaching is required or as a "web supplemented" course resource that enhances the
standard face-to-face classroom contact between faculty and student.

Elluminate is a new web-based synchronous learning, video-conferencing solution Oakland
is offering where students are able to participate in live class meetings from any computer
connected to the Internet.

During the Fall 2007 semester, Oakland is offering 93 course sections that are fully online
and approximately one third of all course sections that are providing some level of web
supplemented activity. Oakland also offers three online programs, RN/BSN degree, a
completion of a Bachelor of Science in Nursing for registered nurses, the Autism
Collaborative Endorsement (ACE), the Education Specialist Degree (Ed.S.), and a
concentration in School Administration with internship.



                                                                                              9
Technological Enhancements

Oakland University is dedicated to enhancing education through the use of contemporary
and emerging technologies and continues to commit significant resources to technological
enhancements, including:
      Implementation of a complete administrative software suite.

      On-line registration.

      Extensive campus network to all classroom buildings and residence halls.

      Wireless Internet connections in residence halls, student apartments, east
       campus, all academic buildings and the Oakland Center.

      Elliott Hall of Business and Information Technology, a $17.5-million, 74,000-
       square foot, technology-rich facility.

      The Pawley Hall of Education & Human Services Building with 24 enhanced
       technology classrooms and an all digital video recording, playback and archive
       system in the School's Counseling Center.

      Significant interactive television and video conferencing capability to supplement
       instruction and administrative program activity.

      On-line web-based course offerings to students utilizing Moodle.

      Other teaching and learning software, such as CourseWeb, Scantron, Turnitin,
       Second Life, Camtasia, I-clicker, and Visual Communicator.

      Major classroom renovation projects that included significant technology
       enhancement in older campus buildings continue to be a priority objective.


Cultural and Performing Arts

In the next decade, Oakland’s contribution to the arts will move beyond local boundaries to
secure a place of prominence in the region. The Department of Music, Theatre and Dance
received three separate five-year accreditations for all three of its disciplines in 2002. The
University is one of only a few in the country to receive all three in the same year. Historically,
OU has had a strong performing arts program with record-high enrollment numbers.

OU has earned a reputation for taking artistic risks, developing gifted artists, nurturing arts
partnerships and achieving new heights of quality and professionalism.

Meadow Brook Hall, the former home of University founders Matilda and Alfred Wilson and
the country’s fourth largest historic house-museum, attracts 100,000 visitors to campus each
year.



                                                                                                  10
The Oakland University Art Gallery, now housed in the Department of Art and Art History,
continues to garner critical acclaim for the quality and scope of its exhibitions.

Community Engagement

Oakland proudly partners with its hometown community, the City of Rochester, as well as
other neighboring communities including Pontiac, Auburn Hills and Rochester Hills. Students
are involved in downtown Rochester events including an annual holiday parade, attracting
more than 100,000 spectators. Students, alumni, faculty and staff enjoy discounts at
participating stores and restaurants through the OU GO card. The University also partners
with the Rochester Regional Chamber of Commerce for joint programming and assistance.

OU and the City of Pontiac have a long history together through programs such as GEAR
UP, which helps students at Jefferson/Whittier Middle School and Pontiac Central and
Northern High Schools; Project Upward Bound, which helps thousands of Pontiac students
finish high school and develop the social and cultural skills needed to realize their dreams
and succeed in college and society; student teacher placements at Longfellow Elementary
School; and providing the Wade H. McCree Jr. Incentive Scholarship program, which
assures that students who meet specific criteria will be awarded a full-tuition scholarship to
Oakland when they graduate from high school.


Academic and Student Life Enhancements

All students should have the benefit of academic support services, especially mentoring
and small learning communities, aimed at helping them make the necessary academic
and social adjustments to achieve collegiate success.

In 2005, Oakland University opened a Student Technology Center, which serves as a digital
hub for the promotion, instruction and support of technology literacy. Through the Center,
professional system specialists combined with undergraduate student technology mentors
provide the training and support in one-on-one or group sessions to students. This support
helps them become proficient in technology, complete coursework in various disciplines,
conduct University-related business transactions and work-related tasks, and improve
personal growth skills.

OU’s new Student Financial Services Center in North Foundation Hall offers a one-stop-shop
for student administrative needs.

In 2006, Oakland dedicated the Joan Rosen Writing Laboratory in Kresge Library established
through a leadership gift from OU professor emerita of English, Joan Rosen. The writing
center is designed to help students use effective writing and communications skills in all
subject areas. In the future, the Center will provide assistance to students and faculty, and
also community members and area businesses on the topics of writing and communication.




                                                                                                 11
                            Oakland University Degree Programs

       UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS (135)

College of Arts and Sciences (101)
             Bachelor of Arts - CASBA (55)
                 1045 Independent Major
                 1055 Art History
                 1070 Studio Art
                 1075 Studio Art - Spec in Drawing
                 1080 Studio Art - Spec in Painting
                 1085 Studio Art - Spec in Photography
                 1090 Studio Art – Spec in Media Mail
                 1105 Biology
                 1230 Chemistry
                 1405 English
                 1410 English w/Concentration in Linguistics
                 1505 History
                 1605 African African-Amer Studies
                 1610 East Asian Studies - China
                 1615 East Asian Studies - Japan
                 1620 South Asian Studies
                 1625 Latin American Studies
                 1630 Slavic Studies
                 1705 Linguistics
                 1710 Linguistics - Modified
                 1805 Mathematics
                 1980 French Language and Literature
                 1985 French - Modified
                 2010 German Language and Literature
                 2015 German w/Concentration in German Studies
                 2020 German - Modified
                 2060 Latin American Lang and Civ
                 2100 Spanish Language and Lit
                 2110 Spanish - Modified
                 2130 Two Modern Languages
                 2205 Music
                 2211 Music Theatre – Performing Arts
                 2212 Theatre Performance – Performing Arts
                 2214 Theatre Production – Performing Arts
                 2290 Dance
                 2294 Theatre
                 2375 Philosophy
                 2380 Philosophy - Modified
                 2385 Philosophy w/Concentration in Linguistics
                 2405 Physics
                 2515 Political Science
                 2605 Psychology
                 2615 Psychology w/Concentration in Linguistics



                                                                  12
   2705   Communication
   2715   Communication w/Concentration in Linguistics
   2735   Journalism
   2805   Sociology/Anthropology
   2810   Anthropology
   2815   Anthro w/Concentration in Linguistics
   2820   Sociology
   2825   Soc w/Concentration in Linguistics
   2830   Soc w/Spec in Criminal Justice (2 + 2)
   2862   Women's Studies
   3700   Economics

Bachelor of Fine Arts – BFA (4)
  2283 Acting
  2285 Music Theatre
  2290 Dance
  2296 Theatre Design & Technology

Bachelor of Music - BM (8)
  2240 Music - Vocal Performance
  2245 Music - Piano Performance
  2250 Music - Composition
  2265 Music - Instrumental Performance
  2270 Choral/General Music Education
  2272 Instrumental/General Music Education
  2278 Instrumental/General Music Education/Performance
  2279 Choral/General Music Education/Performance

Bachelor of Science - CASBS (16)
  1105 Biology
  1110 Modified Major in Biology with Concentration in Applied Statistics
  1120 Biology w/Spec in Cell-Molecular Biology
  1125 Biology w/Spec in Anatomy
  1130 Biology w/Spec in Microbiology
  1225 Biochemistry
  1230 Chemistry
  1805 Mathematics
  1835 Applied Statistics
  2405 Physics
  2420 Medical Physics
  2530 Public Admin and Public Policy

Bachelor of Science – ENVSCI (4)
  1246 Env Hlth Spec Public Health
  1251 Env Health Spec Env/Res Mgt
  1256 Env Hlth Spec Occ Hlth Safety
  1261 Env Hlth Spec Toxic Subs Cntrl

Bachelor of Social Work – BSW (1)
  2860 Social Work



                                                                            13
            K-12 Education Programs (8)
               1070 Studio Art
               1075 Studio Art – w/Specialization in Drawing
               1080 Studio Art – w/Specialization in Painting
               1085 Studio Art – w/Specialization in Photography
               1090 Studio Art – w/Specialization in New Media
               1992 French w/K-12 Certification
               2027 German w/K-12 Certification
               2122 Spanish w/K-12 Certification

            Secondary Education Programs (9)
               1140 Biology w/Secondary Cert
               1240 Chemistry w/Secondary Cert
               1430 English w/Secondary Cert
               1515 History w/Secondary Cert
               1825 Mathematics w/Secondary Cert
               1990 French w/Secondary Cert
               2025 German w/Secondary Cert
               2120 Spanish w/Secondary Cert
               2430 Physics w/Secondary Cert

School of Business Administration (9)
            Bachelor of Science - SBABS (9)
               3100 Accounting
               3200 Finance
               3300 General Management
               3400 Human Resource Management
               3500 Management Information Systems
               3600 Marketing
               3700 Economics
               3705 Business Economics
               3805 Production/Operations Management (pending Board approval)

School of Education and Human Services (2)
            Bachelor of Science (2)
               4120 Elementary Education
               4320 Human Resource Development

School of Engineering and Computer Science (8)
            Bachelor of Science (2)
               5020 Computer Science
               5070 Information Technology
            Bachelor of Science in Engineering (4)
               5120 Computer Engineering
               5140 Electrical Engineering
               5160 Mechanical Engineering
               5185 Industrial & Systems Engineering

School of Health Sciences (11)



                                                                                14
              Bachelor of Science (11)
                6020 Health Sciences
                6041 Occupational Safety and Health
                6050 Wellness, Health Promotion, and Injury Prevention
                6061 Medical Laboratory Science
                6062 MLS: Cytotechnology
                6063 MLS: Histotechnology
                6065 MLS: Nuclear Med Tech
                6066 MLS: Radiation Therapy
                6067 MLS: Clinical Lab Science
                6068 MLS: Radiologic Technology
                6070 Applied Health Sciences

School of Nursing (2)
            Bachelor of Science in Nursing (2)
               7020 Nursing
               7040 Nursing (Completion Sequence)


University Programs (1)
             Bachelor of General Studies (1)
                7510 General Studies

              Bachelor of Science – Joint between CAS & SECS (3)
                5040 Engineering Chemistry
                5050 Engineering Biology
                5060 Engineering Physics




                   UNDERGRADUATE CONCENTRATIONS AND MINORS

Undergraduate Concentrations (24)
   1435 American Studies
   1835 Applied Statistics
   2850 Archeology
   2858 Criminal Justice
   1270 Environmental Studies
   1437 Film Aesthetics and History
   1995 French Studies
   2016 German Studies
   6015 Pre-Physical Therapy
   6021 Pre-Health Professional Studies
   6022 Pre-Pharmacy
   6023 Integrative Holistic Medicine
   6240 Exercise Science
   6030 Health Behavioral Sciences
   6071 Medical Assistant Studies
   6072 Respiratory Therapy
   6073 Health Information Technology


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    6074 Surgical Technology
    6075 Occupational Therapy Assistant
    6076 Physical Therapist Assistant
    1150 Pre-Prof Studies Med/Dent/Opt/Vet
    2856 Religious Studies
    2860 Social Work
    2855 Urban Studies

Undergraduate Minors (65)
   3100 Accounting
   2740 Advertising
   1605 African African-Amer Studies
   2810 Anthropology
   1810 Applied Mathematics
   1835 Applied Statistics
   3810 Applied Technology in Business
   1055 Art History
   1105 Biology
   1230 Chemistry
   2841 Christianity Studies
   2705 Communication
   5020 Computer Science
   5021 Computing
   2290 Dance
   1611 East Asian Studies
   3700 Economics
   1405 English
   3850 Entrepreneurship
   1266 Environmental Science
   6240 Exercise Science
   3200 Finance
   1981 French Language
   1980 French Language and Literature
   3315 General Business
   2011 German Language
   2011 German Language and Literature
   2016 German Studies
   1505 History
   4320 Human Resource Development
   3400 Human Resource Management
   3302 International Management
   5070 Information Technology (code to be determined)
   5300 International Orientation for SECS
   2842 Islamic Studies
   2035 Japanese Lang and Civ
   2735 Journalism
   2843 Judaic Studies
   4350 Labor and Employment Studies


                                                         16
1625 Latin American Studies
1705 Linguistics
3500 Management Information Systems
3600 Marketing
1805 Mathematics
2205 Music
6055 Nutrition and Health
6041 Occupational Safety and Health
2375 Philosophy
2405 Physics
2515 Political Science
3805 Production/Operations Mgt
2605 Psychology
2742 Public Relations
3800 Quantitative Methods
1630 Slavic Studies
2820 Sociology
1620 South Asian Studies
2101 Spanish Language
2100 Spanish Language and Lit
1070 Studio Art
2294 Theatre
1147 Three Science
4900 Training & Development
1146 Two Science
6050 Wellness Health Promotion Injury Prevention
2862 Women's Studies



               OAKLAND UNIVERSITY
           GRADUATE PROGRAM REPORT (98)

Doctor of Philosophy (12)
PH1900 Applied Mathematical Sciences
PH1115 Biomedical Sciences: Biological Communication
          Biomedical Sciences: Health and Environmental
PH1350 Chemistry
PH2490 Biomedical Sciences: Medical Physics
PH5030 Computer Science and Informatics
PH4951 Education: Educational Leadership
PH4950 Education: Counseling
PH4952 Education: Early Childhood Education
PH5160 Mechanical Engineering
PH2305 Music Education
PH4940 Reading Education
PH5180 Systems Engineering

Doctor of Physical Therapy (1)
DP6220 Physical Therapy



                                                          17
Doctor of Science in Physical Therapy (1)
DS6220 Physical Therapy

Doctor of Nursing Practice (1)
DN7400 Nursing

Education Specialist (1)
ES4650 School Administration

Master of Arts (6)
MA1105 Biology
MA4400 Counseling
MA1405 English
MA1505 History
MA1705 Linguistics
MA1805 Mathematics

Master of Arts in Liberal Studies (1)
MA1700 Liberal Studies

Master of Accounting (1)
MA3100 Accounting

Master of Arts in Teaching (3)
MT4120 Elementary Education
MT4500 Reading and Language Arts
MT4220 Secondary Education

Master of Business Administration (1)
MB3900 Business Administration

Master of Education (5)
ME4700 Early Childhood Education
ME4610 Educational Leadership
ME4620 Educational Studies
ME4800 Special Education
ME4615 Teacher Leadership
ME4610 Educational Leadership

Master of Music (8)
MM2335 Conducting
MM2340 Instrumental Pedagogy
MM2345 Instrumental Performance
MM2305 Music Education
MM2320 Piano Pedagogy
MM2325 Piano Performance
MM2310 Vocal Pedagogy
MM2315 Vocal Performance




                                            18
Master of Public Administration (1)
MP2560 Public Administration

Master of Science (17)
MS1835 Applied Statistics
MS1105 Biology
MS1230 Chemistry
MS5520 Computer Science and Engineering
MS5540 Electrical and Computer Engineering
MS5620 Embedded Systems
MS5560 Engineering Management
MS6240 Exercise Science
MS1860 Industrial Applied Mathematics
MS5580 Information Systems Engineering
MS3550 Information Technology Management
MS5160 Mechanical Engineering
MS6220 Physical Therapy
MS2405 Physics
MS6045 Safety Management
MS5600 Software Engineering
MS5180 Systems Engineering


Master of Science in Nursing (5)
MS7270 Adult Gerontological Nurse Practitioner
MS7280 Family Nurse Practitioner
MS7220 Nurse Anesthesia
MS7285 Nursing Education
MS7290 RN to MSN

Master of Training and Development (1)
MD4900 Training and Development

Graduate Certificate (15)
GC4551 Advanced Microcomputer Applications
GC6245 Clinical Exercise Science
GC6248 Complementary Medicine and Wellness
GC6246 Corporate and Worksite Wellness
GC4750 Early Mathematics Education
GC6240 Exercise Science
GC4550 Microcomputer Applications
GC6233 Neurological Rehabilitation
GC7285 Nursing Education
GC6230 Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapy
GC6232 Orthopedics
GC6231 Pediatric Rehabilitation
GC1880 Statistical Methods
GC6234 Teaching and Learning for Rehabilitation Professionals
GC1720 Teaching English as Second Language



                                                                19
Post Masters Graduate Certificate (18)
PM3100 Accounting
PM7270 Adult Gerontological Nurse Practitioner
PM4561 Advanced Reading, Language Arts and Literature
PM3705 Business Economics
PM3850 Entrepreneurship
PM7280 Family Nurse Practitioner
PM3200 Finance
PM3300 General Management
PM4670 Higher Education
PM3400 Human Resources Management
PM3305 International Business
PM2568 Local Government Management
PM3500 Management Information Systems
PM3600 Marketing
PM2567 Nonprofit Organization & Management
PM7220 Nurse Anesthesia
PM3805 Production/Operations Management
PM4560 Reading, Language Arts and Literature




                                                        20
III. Staffing and Enrollment

The following tables and graphs are provided:
Figure 1 - Faculty and Staff Full Time Equivalent (FTE) by Program, FY 2005-06
       This chart shows the FTE for faculty, administration and clerical/service for both
       instructional disciplines and non-instructional program classes.



                                                                                    CLERICAL AND
                                            FACULTY          ADMINISTRATION           SERVICE


     5    AREA STUDIES                       13.90                0.22                  0.63
     9    COMMUNICATION                      34.33                0.53                  0.02
    11    COMPUTERS                          17.78                3.49                  3.84
    13    EDUCATION                          107.38               15.99                22.74
    14    ENGINEERING                        34.11                10.10                 6.18
    16    FOREIGN LANGUAGES                  38.33                0.33                  3.35
    23    ENGLISH & LETTERS                  68.36                1.02                  3.88
    24    LIBERAL ARTS                        4.44                0.41                  0.16
    26    BIOLOGY                            22.45                2.89                  3.65
    27    MATH                               33.17                0.80                  3.88
    31    PARKS RECREATION & FITNESS          5.52                0.00                  0.00
    38    PHILOSOPHY                          8.91                0.13                  0.75
    40    PHYSICAL SCIENCES                  23.95                7.81                  6.91
    42    PSYCHOLOGY                         15.62                0.12                  1.59
    44    PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION               3.08                0.00                  0.00
    45    SOCIAL SCIENCES                    38.58                0.75                  2.67
    50    VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS           47.13                7.57                  5.77
    51    HEALTH PROFESSIONS                  2.94                0.00                  0.00
  51.16   NURSING                            23.49                1.38                  0.58
  51.22   PUBLIC HEALTH                       3.83                0.00                  0.00
  51.99   OTHER HEALTH PROFESSIONALS         17.20                0.97                  2.44
    52    BUSINESS                           71.81                12.53                16.60
    54    HISTORY                            17.23                0.43                  1.76

          TOTAL INSTRUCTION                  653.54               67.47                87.40


          RESEARCH                                                10.19                 3.27
          PUBLIC SUPPORT                                          0.00                  0.82
          ACADEMIC SUPPORT                                       108.88                93.09
          STUDENT SERVICES                                        55.59                71.79
          INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT                                   94.68                84.83
          PLANT OPERATION & MAINT                                 12.59                94.34
          AUXILIARY ENTERPRISES                                   22.11                 3.00

          TOTAL FTEs                         653.54              371.51                438.54




                                                                                                21
Figure 2 - Student Credit Hours by Level and by Program, FY 2006-07
       This chart shows credit hours awarded by instructional discipline.

CIP                                              Lower              Upper     Masters   Doctoral    Total

05          Area Studies                                   12,512     1,243                         13,755
09          Communication                                   8,900    10,817                         19,717
11          Computer Science                                4,694     1,116     1,780        18      7,608
13          Education                                       3,786    18,495    29,082      3,550    54,913
14          Engineering                                     3,672     5,544     4,064       672     13,952
16          Modern Languages                               18,414     3,550      504                22,468
23          English                                        28,529     9,970      560                39,059
24          Liberal Arts                                     904        123      242                 1,269
26          Biology                                        12,682     6,055      574                19,311
27          Math                                           21,802     1,210     1,155        72     24,239
            Parks, Recreation &
31          Fitness                                         2,220       943      628                 3,791
38          Philosophy                                      7,236     1,022                          8,258
40          Physical Sciences                              19,032     1,115      568        216     20,931
42          Psychology                                     13,204     4,586                         17,790
44          Public Administration                                               1,136                1,136
45          Social Science                                 18,180    10,540      444                29,164
50          Fine Arts                                      16,608     5,330      812         62     22,812
51.16       Nursing                                         5,893    12,395     2,652       188     21,128
51.22       Public Health                                    257        917       56                 1,230
51.99       Other Health Professions                        5,502     3,879     3,268      1,303    13,952
52          Business                                       10,775    26,466     8,410               45,651
54          History                                         9,460     4,038      260                13,758
Total                                            224,262            129,354   56,195     6,081     415,892




                                                                                                             22
Figure 3 - Degrees Awarded by Program, FY 2005-06
       This chart shows the degrees awarded by program.

CIP                              Bachelor's     Post       Master's    Post      Doctoral   Total
                                              Bachelor's              Master's
05   Area Studies                    8            0           0          0          0        8
09   Communication                  193           0           0          0          0       193
11   Computer Science                31           0          50          0          0        81
13   Education                      273           1          434        60         20       788
14   Engineering                    155           0          88          0         10       253
15   Engineering Management          0            0          27          0          0        27
16   Modern Languages                27           0           3          0          0        30
23   English                         95           0           8          0          0       103
24   Liberal Arts                   102           0           2          0          0       104
26   Biology                         84           0           7          0          1        92
27   Math                            9            1          10          0          1        21
     Parks, Recreation &
31   Fitness                         0            2           4          0          0        6
38   Philosophy                      8            0           0          0          0        8
40   Physical Sciences               10           0           8          0          3        21
42   Psychology                     124           0           0          0          0       124
44   Public Administration           6            0          18          0          0        24
45   Social Science                 145           0           0          0          0       145
50   Fine Arts                       52           0           8          0          0        60
51.2 Nursing                        173           0          39          0          0       212
51.2 Public Health                   3            0           0          0          0        3
52   Other Health Professions        64           0           4          0         27        95
52   Business                       438           0          214         0          0       652
54   History                         55           0           6          0          0        61
     Total                          2,055         4          930        60         62       3,111




                                                                                                    23
Figure 4 - Enrollment Trends from Fall 1998 to Fall 2008
       This graphic shows the growth over the last six years in undergraduate and
       graduate resident students and undergraduate and graduate non-resident
       students. During this period Oakland University’s enrollment increased from 14,289 to 18,082, an increase of over
       26%.


  Fall Term                Undergraduate                            Graduate                               Total

                In-State      Out-State      Total     In-State    Out-State       Total       In-State   Out-State     Total
    1998        10,963          148         11,111      3,061        117           3,178       14,024       265        14,289
    1999        11,473          181         11,654      2,989         83           3,072       14,462       264        14,726
    2000        11,797          205         12,002      3,132        101           3,233       14,929       306        15,235
    2001        12,311          218         12,529      3,236        110           3,346       15,547       328        15,875
    2002        12,418          216         12,634      3,310        115           3,425       15,728       331        16,059
    2003        12,731          228         12,959      3,515        102           3,617       16,246       330        16,576
    2004        12,894          221         13,115      3,580        207           3,787       16,474       428        16,902
    2005        13,233          215         13,448      3,787        104           3,891       17,020       319        17,339
    2006        13,484          217         13,701      3,936        100           4,036       17,420       317        17,737
    2007        13,907          183         14,090      3,879        113           3,992       17,786       296        18,082




                                                                                                                      24
Figure 5 – Enrollment Projections by School/College and Level, Fall 2007 – Fall 2012
       Oakland University continues to experience increases in enrollments.
                                    Enrollment Projections by School/College and Level
                                                    Fall 2007 - Fall 2012
                      Actual                                           Projections                               % Change
Undergraduate          2007               2008            2009            2010         2011         2012          2007 - 2012

CAS                       4,647              4,762          4,835          4,906          4,953        4,985          7%

SBA                       2,238              2,352          2,388          2,423          2,446        2,462          10%

SEHS                      1,529              1,595          1,619          1,643          1,659        1,669          9%

SECS                          953            1,001          1,016          1,031          1,041        1,048          10%

SHS                       1,046              1,078          1,095          1,111          1,121        1,129          8%

SON                       1,826              1,872          1,901          1,929          1,947        1,960          7%

UP/None                   1,851              1,822          1,850          1,876          1,894        1,907          3%

Total                    14,090             14,483         14,705         14,919         15,062       15,160          8%

Graduate               2007               2008           2009          2010           2011          2012

CAS                           382                389            394           401             411          420        10%

SBA                           567                576            583           594             609          622        10%

SEHS                      2,052              2,056          2,081          2,119          2,173        2,218          8%

SECS                          523                528            535           545             558          570        9%

SHS                           254                259            262           267             274          279        10%

SON                           214                217            219           223             229          234        9%

Medical School                                                                100             200          300

Total                     3,992              4,025          4,073          4,148          4,254        4,433          11%

Total                  2007               2008           2009          2010           2011          2012

CAS                       5,029              5,151          5,229          5,307          5,364        5,405          7%

SBA                       2,805              2,928          2,971          3,017          3,055        3,084          10%

SEHS                      3,581              3,651          3,700          3,762          3,832        3,887          9%

SECS                      1,476              1,529          1,551          1,576          1,599        1,618          10%

SHS                       1,300              1,337          1,357          1,378          1,395        1,408          8%

SON                       2,040              2,089          2,120          2,152          2,176        2,194          8%

Medical School                                                                100             200          300

University Programs       1,851              1,822          1,850          1,876          1,894        1,907          3%

Total                    18,082             18,508         18,778         19,167         19,516       19,802          10%




                                                                                                                                25
Figure 6 - Gross Square Feet per Student in Michigan, FY 2006
       This chart shows that Oakland University is last in gross square footage per student of
the 15 Michigan institutions. Source: Heidi Data Base



                                     Univ. Ft2/Student
                                     UM-AA      362.6
                                     MTU        355.6
                                     MSU        324.0
                                     LSSU       312.5
                                     WSU        293.1
                                     UM-F       269.8
                                     WMU        257.9
                                     NMU        238.6
                                     UM-D       201.6
                                     SVSU       168.6
                                     FSU        156.9
                                     EMU        155.9
                                     CMU        143.7
                                     GVSU       115.7
                                     OU         110.4




                                                                                            26
Future Staffing Needs

Oakland University currently employs over 3,000 full and part-time faculty and staff and
over 5,100 student employees. In addition, there are over 100 employees of contract
service providers for food service, bookstore, and custodial services. Faculty and staff
will grow with increased enrollment.

Average Class Size

Average class size for undergraduate instruction in fall 2006 was 32.38 students.
Graduate class size in fall 2006 was 17.25, and PhD classes averaged 10.73 students.
It is important to the institutional character that the size of classes remains small.
However, larger classes have been a cost-effective way to absorb growth.

IV. Facility Assessment

Utilization Rates

Oakland University has the lowest building square footage per student (figure 6) of any
of the 15 public universities. However, a comparison of its programmatic mix with its
doctoral programs and the relatively large number of engineering and science programs
would lead to the conclusion that it should at least be near the overall average in total
space. Program by program comparisons to national norms for disciplines indicates
that all programs, even the School of Business with its new facility, fall short in space.

Classroom utilization is also very high, especially in the evenings. Oakland’s enrollment
includes a large number of non-traditional students. Demand for evening classes
exceeds available facilities. A large number of evening classes are offered at area high
schools.

Mandated Standards

Mandated standards for animal research are met to the best of our ability.

Functionality

The limited amount of specialized program space affects overall space functionality.
This is particularly evident in the most impacted areas of Engineering and the
Performing Arts. Recent facilities additions for the sciences, business and education
provide good space for programmatic needs. Most academic programs on the Oakland
University campus are offered in the following buildings:

   Dodge Hall of Engineering - Completed in 1969, houses engineering and biology
    laboratories, offices, and classrooms. It also provides space for the Eye Research
    Institute and the administrative/academic-computing center. The School of
    Engineering and Computer Science has a significant space deficit compared to
    national standards. This deficit would be significantly reduced by the construction of
    the proposed Engineering Center.

   Hannah Hall of Science - Completed in 1961, houses science, health science, and
                                                                                    27
    engineering laboratories as well as classrooms and offices. Air conditioning was
    added as part of a major energy project undertaken several years ago. Portions of
    the building were renovated to accommodate health sciences as part of the State
    funded Science and Engineering Building.

   Kresge Library – This building was completed in 1961 with additions in 1989. This is
    the central library for the institution.

   North Foundation Hall – This building was completed in 1959, and is primarily a
    student services building, but also includes three classrooms. The building is
    receiving a general facelift and significant improvements to the air distribution
    system.

   O’Dowd Hall - Completed in 1982, this building houses the School of Nursing, the
    Graduate Office, the Registrar, the Departments of History, Linguistics and
    Philosophy, Cooley Law School, and a number of general purpose classrooms. The
    building continues to suffer from leaks along the curtain wall that have been a
    problem for a number of years.

   South Foundation Hall - Completed in 1959, this building is primarily a classroom
    building. The University has been adding technology to the classrooms over the past
    several years. This building is used by nearly all academic disciplines.

   Varner Hall - Completed in 1970, houses the departments of Music, Theatre and
    Dance (MTD), Political Science, and Sociology/Anthropology. The facilities for MTD
    are inadequate to meet the needs of their growing programs.

   Wilson Hall - Completed in 1967, houses the departments of Art and Art History,
    English, Modern Languages and Literature, and Rhetoric, Communications and
    Journalism. It also houses Meadow Brook Theatre and several administrative
    offices.

   Elliott Hall - Completed in 2000, houses the School of Business Administration and
    Information Technology.

   Pawley Hall - Completed in 2002, houses the School of Education and Human
    Services, as well as the Lowry Child Development Center. This state of the art
    facility is adequate to meet the needs of the school’s planned growth program.


Although academic programs are offered in other facilities and there are a number of
other service buildings and auxiliary buildings, the above are the major academic
facilities. The average age of buildings on the main campus is 30 years old. In
general, buildings are in fair condition. Oakland University maintains a comprehensive
list of plant renewal and deferred plant renewal projects, which is updated annually.

Replacement Value of Facilities

The replacement value of Oakland University’s nearly 3 million square feet, including
Meadow Brook Hall is estimated at $670 million.
                                                                                     28
Utility Systems Condition

The utility systems in facilities (i.e., heating, ventilation, air conditioning (HVAC), water,
sewage, and electrical) are in varying degrees of condition, depending on facility age.
All are fully functional, with those in the 20 to 30 year age group needing upgrades to
increase efficiency and effectiveness of operation.

The existing water/sewage infrastructure is adequate to serve the projected
programming needs for at least 10 years, due to a recently installed water source. An
upgrade to the electrical substation was completed, which included cabling, switchgear,
and a new substation. This upgrade will meet projected electrical needs for at least 15
years. Additional upgrades to infrastructure throughout campus will be required as
campus facilities age and enrollment grows.

Facility Infrastructure Condition

The pavement/structural infrastructure is generally in fair condition. Funds are allocated
to pavement/sidewalk repair to restore the most deteriorated portions.

Land

Oakland University’s campus includes nearly 1,500 acres. The main campus is
approximately 350 acres. The remaining campus includes several major developments
(a faculty/staff subdivision, the National Register Meadow Brook Estate, two golf
courses), a large amount of wetland, and significant undeveloped acreage. The
Campus Master Plan, approved by the Board of Trustees in April 2001, has identified
future uses for all of the undeveloped property.

Buildings Obligated to the State Building Authority

The following buildings/portions of buildings are bonded through State bonds:
       Library wings – lease expiration in 2008
       Science and Engineering Building – lease expiration in 2034
       Elliott Hall – lease expiration in 2040
       Pawley Hall – lease expiration in 2042

The following facilities are bonded through the University:
       Golf course - final payment in 2026
       Recreation and Athletic Center - final payment in 2026
       Student Apartments – final payment in 2031
       Electrical Power Upgrade – final payment in 2031
       Parking Structure – final payment in 2031
       Oakland Center Expansion – final payment in 2031




                                                                                         29
   Oakland University Classroom Utilization Reports

Classroom Utilization Report
                                                  25 Available Weekly Room Hours
Peak - 10 AM to 3 PM                              - WRH
Fall 2006 Data                            Room Type 110 - Classrooms



              Room                                                Station
 Bldg Num     Num      ASF     Capacity    WRH       WRH%        Occupancy
   DHE         200     1126      108       15.10      60.5%         64.9%
   DHE         201     3004      314       15.30      61.2%         31.9%
   DHE         202      702       52       20.10      80.4%         65.9%
   DHE         203      990       77       19.90      79.7%         71.8%
   DHE         204      374       25        8.00      32.0%         60.0%
   DHE         236      394       25       16.00      64.0%         70.0%
   DHE         237      389       25        8.40      33.7%         81.5%
    EH         204      541       35       19.30      77.0%         65.3%
    EH         206      523       35       23.00      92.0%         79.6%
    EH         208      686       45       20.30      81.2%         73.3%
    EH         210      683       45       22.00      88.0%         71.7%
    EH         212      696       45       23.00      92.0%         44.9%
    EH         214      902       44       20.90      83.7%         63.6%
    EH         235     1021       40       18.90      75.4%         57.6%
    EH         237     1026       40       22.00      88.0%         52.3%
    EH         239     1018       40       23.00      92.0%         60.4%
   HHS         190     2131      187       25.30     101.0%         49.9%
   HHS         195     2068      187       21.80      77.0%         60.6%
   HHS         220      548       40       22.90      91.6%         79.2%
   HHS         225      422       30       10.40      41.7%         46.3%
   HHS         350      675       40       15.30      61.3%         46.8%
   NFH         156     1757      157       20.30      81.1%         93.0%
   NFH         159     1757       90       22.00      88.0%         82.7%
   ODH         108      424       60       21.10      84.6%         73.6%
   ODH         110     1548       60       18.00      72.0%         82.8%
   ODH        202B     2391      100        8.00      32.0%         58.5%
   ODH         203     2460      229       22.30      89.3%         40.2%
   ODH         204     2426      178       19.40      77.7%         43.8%
    PH         302     1660       72       21.10      84.6%         64.1%
    PH         306      910       48       24.30      97.1%         57.2%
    PH         307      938       48       22.30      89.4%         58.7%
    PH         308      910       48       21.30      85.4%         41.8%
    PH         309      930       48       18.00      72.0%         63.9%
    PH         310      732       36       13.70      54.7%         73.2%
    PH         312      738       36       18.00      72.0%         58.5%
    PH         314      916       48       16.00      64.0%         67.7%
    PH         316      918       48       18.50      74.2%         59.2%
    PH         318      910       48       12.10      48.6%         71.2%
    PH         320      735       36       16.70      66.7%         63.2%
   SEB         093      570       38        7.40      29.7%         34.8%
   SEB         130      630       42       17.40      69.6%        151.8%
   SEB         164     1200       64       22.00      88.0%         81.4%
   SEB         168     1200       64       23.00      92.0%         83.6%
   SEB         172     1200       64       22.50      89.8%         82.4%
                                                                             30
SEB   185    900   50   18.00    72.0%    60.4%
SEB   187    540   36   15.10    60.4%    78.1%
SEB   364    435   30    9.30    37.3%    27.9%
SEB   372    940   50    3.30    13.4%    17.9%
SEB   376    687   30   12.00    48.0%    61.1%
SEB   378    687   30   17.10    68.5%    23.2%
SEB   384    650   44   18.00    72.0%    69.7%
SEB   386    590   40   18.00    72.0%    67.5%
SEB   388    550   30   14.90    59.7%    53.6%
SFH   163    985   70   23.00    92.0%    69.9%
SFH   164    667   48   25.10   100.4%    57.6%
SFH   165    992   75   20.90    83.7%    69.7%
SFH   166    667   48   24.10    96.4%    52.9%
SFH   167    667   30   21.90    87.7%    91.8%
SFH   168    667   48   23.00    92.0%    62.4%
SFH   169    667   40   19.00    76.0%    72.8%
SFH   170    667   48   25.10   110.4%    52.6%
SFH   171    667   40   22.30    89.3%    62.5%
SFH   172    667   48   23.00    92.0%    51.9%
SFH   173    667   48   23.00    92.0%    55.3%
SFH   174    667   48   23.00    92.0%    52.7%
SFH   176    732   48   22.00    88.0%    64.2%
SFH   263    991   75   23.00    92.0%    69.6%
SFH   265    446   25   14.00    56.0%    57.7%
SFH   266    688   48   20.00    80.0%    55.8%
SFH   268    668   48   22.30    89.3%    44.9%
SFH   269    688   48   22.00    88.0%    89.2%
SFH   270    688   48   22.00    88.0%    60.2%
SFH   271    668   48   22.00    88.0%    50.6%
SFH   272    668   48   19.00    76.0%    61.2%
SFH   273    668   48   19.90    79.4%    60.0%
SFH   274    668   48   19.00    76.0%    44.5%
SFH   276    733   48   22.00    88.0%    48.7%
SFH   363    896   70   22.00    88.0%    85.1%
SFH   364    668   48   22.00    88.0%    43.9%
SFH   365    992   75   22.00    88.0%    74.1%
SFH   366    668   48   22.00    88.0%    73.1%
SFH   367    668   48   22.00    88.0%    48.5%
SFH   368    668   48   22.00    88.0%    43.0%
SFH   369    668   48   23.00    92.0%    42.0%
SFH   370    688   48   22.00    88.0%    43.0%
SFH   371    668   48   22.00    88.0%    69.1%
SFH   372    668   48   22.00    88.0%    53.4%
SFH   373    668   48   22.00    88.0%    45.8%
SFH   374    668   48   23.00    92.0%    52.5%
SFH   376    732   48   22.00    88.0%    45.3%
VAR   205   1151   90   23.00    92.0%    78.9%
VAR   206   1184   90   22.00    88.0%    88.9%
VAR   229    371   25   12.00    48.0%    50.7%
VAR   479    998   60   23.00    92.0%    66.9%
WH    102    870   60   16.30    65.1%   111.7%
WH    105    856   60   22.00    88.0%    83.6%
WH    124   1041   90   22.00    88.0%    81.9%
WH    301    305   20   14.00    56.0%    80.0%
WH    313    499   25    8.00    32.0%    82.0%
                                                  31
Totals              87,306   5,845      1,913.3    77.3%          62.5%



Classroom Utilization Report
                                                  20 Available Weekly
Off Peak - 8 AM to 10 am and 3pm to 5 pm         Room Hours - WRH
Fall 2006 Data                           Room Type 110 - Classrooms



Bldg      Room                                             Station
Num       Num       ASF      Capacity    WRH      WRH%     Occupancy
  EH        204       541        35       11.27   56.4%      60.7%
  EH        206       523        35       17.00   85.0%      69.1%
  EH        208       686        45       15.00   75.0%      78.1%
  EH        210       683        45       10.00   50.0%      52.9%
  EH        212       696        45        7.93   39.7%      49.0%
  EH        214       902        44        8.93   44.7%      62.6%
  EH        235      1021        40        5.00   25.0%      93.0%
  EH        237      1026        40       17.00   85.0%      51.8%
  EH        239      1018        40        9.93   49.7%      57.7%
 DHE        200      1126       108       11.00   55.0%      60.9%
 DHE        201      3004       314       18.15   90.8%      25.9%
 DHE        202       702        52       12.00   60.0%      64.3%
 DHE        203       990        77       13.00   65.0%      79.2%
 DHE        204       374        25        0.00    0.0%       0.0%
 DHE        236       394        25        7.00   35.0%      62.3%
 DHE        237       389        25        3.00   15.0%     120.0%
 HHS        190      2131       187       17.00   85.0%      69.6%
 HHS        195      2068       187       18.00   90.0%      67.0%
 HHS        220       548        40       19.72   98.6%      78.6%
 HHS        225       422        30        4.43   22.2%      40.6%
 HHS        350       675        40        3.00   15.0%      73.3%
 NFH        156      1757       157       13.00   65.0%      45.3%
 NFH        159      1757        90        8.93   44.7%      69.4%
 ODH        108       424        60       16.00   80.0%      69.0%
 ODH        110      1548        60       14.00   70.0%      94.0%
 ODH       202B      2391       100        3.00   15.0%      67.0%
 ODH        203      2460       229        8.80   44.0%      36.2%
 ODH        204      2426       178       11.55   57.8%      24.4%
  PH        302      1660        72        9.00   45.0%      55.7%
  PH        306       910        48       14.57   72.8%      74.8%
  PH        307       938        48       12.76   63.8%      49.2%
  PH        308       910        48       13.76   68.8%      53.0%
  PH        309       930        48        6.00   30.0%      70.8%
  PH        310       732        36        9.88   49.4%      65.4%
  PH        312       738        36        4.00   20.0%      54.2%
  PH        314       916        48        4.00   20.0%      91.7%
  PH        316       918        48        6.55   32.8%      76.8%
  PH        318       910        48        3.00   15.0%      62.5%
  PH        320       735        36        2.43   12.2%      56.8%
 SEB        093       570        38        0.00    0.0%       0.0%
 SEB        130       630        42       13.00   65.0%      73.1%
 SEB        164      1200        64       16.00   80.0%      67.5%
 SEB        168      1200        64       17.00   85.0%      49.0%

                                                                          32
SEB   172   1200   64   12.67    63.4%    77.2%
SEB   185    900   50   13.00    65.0%    74.0%
SEB   187    540   36    4.00    20.0%    36.1%
SEB   364    435   30    3.00    15.0%    13.3%
SEB   372    940   50    1.05     5.2%    44.2%
SEB   376    687   30    3.00    15.0%    40.0%
SEB   378    687   30    4.00    20.0%    66.7%
SEB   384    650   44   12.00    60.0%    48.5%
SEB   386    590   40   13.00    65.0%    69.8%
SEB   388    550   30    6.00    30.0%    71.7%
SFH   163    985   70   16.50    82.5%    81.0%
SFH   164    667   48   15.20    76.0%    50.0%
SFH   165    992   75    8.93    44.7%    73.9%
SFH   166    667   48   12.20    61.0%    58.7%
SFH   167    667   30   11.00    55.0%   111.2%
SFH   168    667   48   17.00    85.0%    60.2%
SFH   169    667   40   15.00    75.0%    75.8%
SFH   170    667   48   16.20    81.0%    56.2%
SFH   171    667   40    7.22    36.1%    56.4%
SFH   172    667   48   13.00    65.0%    57.5%
SFH   173    667   48   13.00    65.0%    52.2%
SFH   174    667   48    9.00    45.0%    44.9%
SFH   176    732   48    7.00    35.0%    54.2%
SFH   263    991   75   17.00    85.0%    68.0%
SFH   265    446   25    3.55    17.7%    74.2%
SFH   266    688   48    7.00    35.0%    42.9%
SFH   268    668   48    7.22    36.1%    39.2%
SFH   269    688   48   13.00    65.0%    62.0%
SFH   270    688   48    6.00    30.0%    50.0%
SFH   271    668   48    6.00    30.0%    45.1%
SFH   272    668   48    9.00    45.0%    44.9%
SFH   273    668   48    6.00    30.0%    54.2%
SFH   274    668   48   12.00    60.0%    53.3%
SFH   276    733   48   10.00    50.0%    44.6%
SFH   363    896   70   10.00    50.0%    80.9%
SFH   364    668   48   10.00    50.0%    48.3%
SFH   365    992   75    9.00    45.0%    76.6%
SFH   366    668   48   10.00    50.0%    80.0%
SFH   367    668   48   10.00    50.0%    51.7%
SFH   368    668   48    6.00    30.0%    32.6%
SFH   369    668   48    9.00    45.0%    45.4%
SFH   370    688   48    6.00    30.0%    45.1%
SFH   371    668   48   10.00    50.0%    57.9%
SFH   372    668   48    6.00    30.0%    56.9%
SFH   373    668   48    6.55    32.8%    52.2%
SFH   374    668   48   20.00   100.0%    53.3%
SFH   376    732   48    6.00    30.0%    41.0%
VAR   205   1151   90   15.00    75.0%    48.7%
VAR   206   1184   90   11.93    59.7%    73.8%
VAR   229    371   25    0.00     0.0%     0.0%
VAR   479    998   60   13.00    65.0%    53.5%
WH    102    870   60    6.00    30.0%    97.8%
WH    105    856   60   10.00    50.0%    53.3%
WH    124   1041   90   10.00    50.0%    88.2%
WH    301    305   20    7.22    36.1%   108.3%
                                                  33
 WH         313         499        25        8.00    40.0%     100.0%
Totals                 87,306     5,845     965.0    48.7%      58.1%


Classroom Utilization Report
                                                   25 Available Weekly
Evening 5 PM - 10 PM                               Room Hours - WRH
Fall 2006 Data                             Room Type 110 - Classrooms



 Bldg     Room                                                Station
 Num      Num          ASF      Capacity    WRH     WRH%     Occupancy
 DHE       200         1126       108       13.48   53.9%      46.1%
 DHE       201         3004       314       13.75   55.0%      28.3%
 DHE       202          702        52       14.00   56.0%      22.1%
 DHE       203          990        77       14.27   57.1%      45.0%
 DHE       204          374        25       16.00   64.0%      82.0%
 DHE       236          394        25       13.00   52.0%      39.7%
 DHE       237          389        25       13.00   52.0%      69.5%
  EH       204          541        35       12.70   50.8%      75.7%
  EH       206          523        35       14.20   56.8%      58.4%
  EH       208          686        45       13.70   54.8%      61.9%
  EH       210          683        45       13.70   54.8%      59.5%
  EH       212          696        45       12.37   49.5%      60.7%
  EH       214          902        44       13.20   52.8%      53.4%
  EH       235         1021        40       13.63   54.5%      87.3%
  EH       237         1026        40       13.70   54.8%      80.5%
  EH       239         1018        40       15.42   61.7%      66.5%
 HHS       190         2131       187       13.13   52.5%      40.0%
 HHS       195         2068       187       18.00   72.0%      27.7%
 HHS       220          548        40        7.70   30.8%      52.3%
 HHS       225          422        30       11.82   47.3%      50.7%
 HHS       350          675        40       12.32   49.3%      55.2%
 NFH       156         1757       157       15.20   60.8%      37.6%
 NFH       159         1757        90       10.65   42.6%      47.3%
 ODH       108          424        60       12.75   51.0%      66.0%
 ODH       110         1548        60       10.65   42.6%      75.6%
 ODH      202B         2391       100       11.65   46.6%      60.0%
 ODH       203         2460       229        7.82   31.3%      48.9%
 ODH       204         2426       178        8.00   32.0%      26.4%
  PH       302         1660        72       14.20   56.8%      54.2%
  PH       306          910        48       13.20   52.8%      56.3%
  PH       307          938        48       10.15   40.6%      67.5%
  PH       308          910        48       14.20   56.8%      61.3%
  PH       309          930        48       14.20   56.8%      39.9%
  PH       310          732        36       14.20   56.8%      44.7%
  PH       312          738        36       15.25   61.0%      50.5%
  PH       314          916        48       14.20   56.8%      89.9%
  PH       316          918        48        6.10   24.4%      84.6%
  PH       318          910        48       13.20   52.8%      52.8%
  PH       320          735        36       13.70   54.8%      56.1%
 SEB       093          570        38       12.87   51.5%      32.5%
 SEB       130          630        42       19.43   77.7%      57.6%
 SEB       164         1200        64       18.00   72.0%      41.9%
 SEB       168         1200        64       16.00   64.0%      77.7%

                                                                         34
SEB   172   1200   64   18.00   72.0%   51.4%
SEB   185    900   50   12.43   49.7%   52.6%
SEB   187    540   36   11.22   44.9%   48.3%
SEB   364    435   30   12.21   48.8%   82.0%
SEB   372    940   50   16.00   64.0%   38.5%
SEB   376    687   30   17.00   68.0%   61.2%
SEB   378    687   30   14.77   59.1%   39.1%
SEB   384    650   44   14.00   56.0%   33.5%
SEB   386    590   40   16.22   64.9%   48.9%
SEB   388    550   30   15.50   62.0%   32.6%
SFH   163    985   70    7.10   28.4%   62.3%
SFH   164    667   48   15.80   63.2%   48.0%
SFH   165    992   75   11.10   44.4%   56.6%
SFH   166    667   48   15.30   61.2%   59.9%
SFH   167    667   30   14.47   57.9%   98.6%
SFH   168    667   48    7.55   30.2%   63.5%
SFH   169    667   40    9.55   38.2%   56.0%
SFH   170    667   48   15.20   60.8%   51.5%
SFH   171    667   40    8.00   32.0%   25.0%
SFH   172    667   48   16.20   64.8%   37.1%
SFH   173    667   48   14.60   58.4%   36.0%
SFH   174    667   48   13.20   52.8%   62.7%
SFH   176    732   48   16.75   67.0%   71.6%
SFH   263    991   75   11.55   46.2%   66.2%
SFH   265    446   25   14.20   56.8%   58.7%
SFH   266    688   48   11.15   44.6%   60.5%
SFH   268    668   48   12.65   50.6%   41.9%
SFH   269    688   48   16.10   64.4%   61.7%
SFH   270    688   48    7.10   28.4%   55.3%
SFH   271    668   48   11.10   44.4%   56.4%
SFH   272    668   48   10.65   42.6%   41.0%
SFH   273    668   48   10.65   42.6%   59.2%
SFH   274    668   48   15.20   60.8%   60.9%
SFH   276    733   48   11.10   44.4%   29.9%
SFH   363    896   70   13.70   54.8%   78.5%
SFH   364    668   48   10.15   40.6%   42.4%
SFH   365    992   75    3.00   12.0%   40.4%
SFH   366    668   48   11.55   46.2%   40.4%
SFH   367    668   48    7.10   28.4%   58.5%
SFH   368    668   48    3.55   14.2%   91.8%
SFH   369    668   48   10.65   42.6%   43.3%
SFH   370    688   48    3.55   14.2%   62.4%
SFH   371    668   48   10.65   42.6%   60.4%
SFH   372    668   48   11.10   44.4%   45.1%
SFH   373    668   48   10.10   40.4%   37.6%
SFH   374    668   48   10.65   42.6%   70.4%
SFH   376    732   48   10.65   42.6%   59.2%
VAR   205   1151   90   14.70   58.8%   51.6%
VAR   206   1184   90    7.60   30.4%   74.1%
VAR   229    371   25    3.55   14.2%   15.7%
VAR   479    998   60    3.05   12.2%   38.3%
WH    102    870   60   10.65   42.6%   75.4%
WH    105    856   60    7.10   28.4%   86.9%
WH    124   1041   90    7.10   28.4%   68.1%
WH    301    305   20   13.10   52.4%   93.9%
                                                35
  WH        313       499       25         10.65     42.6%    106.7%
 Totals              87306     5845       1206.23    48.7%     51.5%



Oakland University
Classroom Utilization Report
                                           9 Available Weekly Room Hours -
Saturday - 8 AM to 5 pm                    WRH
Fall 2006 Data                             Room Type 110 - Classrooms


             Room                                              Station
Bldg Num     Num      ASF      Capacity    WRH       WRH%     Occupancy
DHE          236        394          25       3.72    41.3%    20.0%
EH           206        523          35       3.55    39.4%    68.6%
EH           237       1026          40       2.97    33.0%    80.0%
HHS          350        675          40       8.22    91.3%    62.5%
PH           309        930          48       6.97    77.4%    23.3%
PH           310        732          36       4.22    46.9%    55.6%
PH           312        738          36       3.22    35.8%    41.7%
SEB          384        650          44       3.55    39.4%    25.0%
SEB          386        590          40       3.72    41.3%    32.5%
SEB          388        550          30       3.72    41.3%    13.3%
SFH          172        667          48       3.55    39.4%    62.5%
WH           105        856          60       3.22    35.8%    81.7%
WH           301        305          20       3.22    35.8%    85.0%
Totals                 8636         502      53.85    46.0%    46.1%




                                                                             36
                             OAKLAND UNIVERSITY
                             FACILITY CONDITION ASSESSMENT
   PLANT RENEWAL, DEFERRED PLANT RENEWAL and PLANT ADAPTATION
                            BACKLOG

The Facilities management computerized Capital Asset Management (CAM) program is
a relational database management system, containing approximately 1450 line items –
totaling over $157.01 million. The present list has been developed with the outside
consulting firm of Integrated Design Solutions and updated by Oakland University
Facilities Management. In addition to this summary report, the database is capable of
producing ad-hoc reports by priority rank, building system, and backlog category.

The objective with this document, in addition to identifying our needs, is to raise
awareness of the deferred maintenance liability, and to serve as a point of departure for
broader facilities planning.

The Facilities Condition Assessment was completed in 2006 and was updated in 2007.
 This assessment identified needs, established scope, determined preliminary costs,
and prioritized facility projects for the University. This assessment will assure Oakland
University has a thorough and accurate plan for years to come.

MAJOR CHANGES FROM LAST YEAR’S REPORT INCLUDE:

$29.41M net added for items addressed in the 2007 updated Facility Condition
Assessment:

                                                            Million Dollar
 System                                       2006            Closed             New           2007
  Code    System Description               Reported          Projects        Projects         Totals
   AC     Accessibility                        $1.29            $0.00          $0.34           $1.63
   EL     Electrical                          $10.37            $0.16          $0.18          $10.39
   EN     Energy                               $0.69            $0.08          $0.38           $0.99
   ES     Exterior System                     $10.76            $0.13          $1.82          $12.45
   FS     Fire/Life Safety                     $9.26            $0.07          $0.92          $10.11
   HE     Health                               $0.43            $0.00          $0.03           $0.46
   HT     High Temp / Hot Water               $14.16            $0.05          $0.47          $14.59
   HV     HVAC                                $21.26            $4.16          $3.48          $20.59
   IS     Interior System                     $24.34            $0.28          $2.85          $26.91
   IT     Information Technology               $0.00            $0.00         $21.00          $21.00
   PL     Plumbing                             $4.49            $0.14          $0.02           $4.37
  RW      Roads / Walks / Parking Lots        $13.95            $0.49          $1.26          $14.73
   SI     Site                                $14.56            $0.12          $1.12          $15.56
   VT     Elevator                             $2.04            $0.16          $1.37           $3.24
                                             $127.60                                         $157.01
        NET CHANGE FROM PREVIOUS                                $5.83         $35.25          $29.41

                                                                                        37
                                        DEFINITIONS

Capital Asset Management is a systematic approach to renewing University’s capital assets
through planned:
       Plant Renewal
       Deferred Plant Renewal
       Plant Adaptation
These terms have been formally defined by the National Association of College, University
Business Officers (NACUBO) as follows:

Plant Renewal
“…a systematic approach to planning and budgeting for known future cyclical renewal and
replacement requirements that extend the (present) life and retain the usable condition of campus
facilities and (building) systems … not normally contained in the annual operating budget. …”
(NACUBO)
          Cyclical renewals typically exceed five year cycle and include such items as roof
replacement, electrical switchgear, HVAC system replacement. These expenditures keep the
physical plant and related infrastructure in reliable operating condition for its present use.

Deferred Plant Renewal
“… encompasses measures that are not carried out because of under funding in the budgeting
process or perceived low priority…” (NACUBO) This includes actual projects, from the prior or
current years, not included in the routine maintenance work. These projects represent
“Postponed Work” that was deferred because total costs exceed current budget, or projects that
are of a “Low priority” that present a minimal return on investment. Also included in the
Deferred Plant Renewal project list are those projects that were shifted because funds were re-
allocated to address emergencies that have no other funding source.

Plant Adaptation
“…improvements are driven by institutional program changes …” (NACUBO) This involves a
programmatic process to plan and fund for projects that will be required due to an evolving use
of the institution (e.g., changes in academic disciplines, shifting expectations, supporting
institutional mission, etc.), or changing standards (e.g., campus master plans, architectural
standards, etc.).
These expenditures are over and above normal maintenance, and are not typically contained in the
annual operating budget.




                                                                                            38
                  FACILITY CONDITION ASSESMENT RANKING

PRIORITY 1             Current Critical (immediate or current year)
                       Projects in this category require immediate action to:
                          Return a facility to normal operation
                          Stop accelerated deterioration
                          Correct a cited safety hazard

PRIORITY 2             Potentially Critical (within one year)
                       Projects in this category, if not corrected expeditiously, will become
                       critical within a year. Situations in this category include:
                            Intermittent interruptions
                            Rapid deterioration
                            Potential safety hazard

PRIORITY 3             Necessary – Not Yet Critical (within years two – five)
                       Projects in this category include conditions requiring prompt
                       attention to preclude predictable deterioration or potential down
                       time and associated higher costs if deferred further.

PRIORITY 4             Recommended (within years six – nine)
                       Projects in this category include items that represent a sensible
                       improvement to existing conditions. These are not required for the
                       most basic function of a facility; however, Priority 4 projects will
                       either improve overall usability and/or reduce long-term
                       maintenance.

PRIORITY 5             Recommended (beyond year ten)
                       Projects in this category may not improve overall usability and/or
                       reduce long-term maintenance; however, they provide an economic
                       payback that would not otherwise be present.




SOURCE: Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers (APPA)




                                                                                      39
                             ABBREVATIONS

CAMPUS SYSTEM - Accessibility (AC)
                Electrical (EL)
                Energy Management (EN)
                Exterior Structure (ES)
                Fire/Life Safety (FS)
                Health (HE)
                High Temperature / Hot Water (HT)
                HVAC (HV)
                Information Technology (IT)
                Interior / Finish System (IS)
                Plumbing (PL)
                Roads, Walks, Parking Lots (RW)
                Site (SI)
                Vertical Transportation (VT)

CATEGORY -         Plant Renewal (PR)
                   Deferred Plant Renewal (DPR)
                   Plant Adaptation (PA)




                                                    40
FACILITIES CONDITION NEEDS INDEX (FCNI) Facility Condition Needs Index provides a
relative measure for comparing one building (or group of buildings) to another. The index
is a simple calculation, derived by dividing the total project costs (for the ten-year window)
by the total facility replacement cost (FRC). When applying the index as an evaluation tool,
the lower the number, the better the facility condition. It should also de noted that this is an
index, not a percentage. It can (and often does in the case of historic facilities) exceed
1.00. (This will always be higher than a related facility condition index (FCI) which only
recognizes deferred plant renewal needs, rather than the total needs to meet current
standards).

                              Facility Condition Needs Index

 Individual Building                            Condition Description
    FCNI Range
     0.01 – 0.05        Excellent condition, typically new construction
     0.06 – 0.15        Good condition, renovations occur on schedule
     0.16 – 0.30        Fair condition, in need of normal renovation
     0.31 – 0.40        Below average condition, major renovation required
     0.41 – 0.59        Poor condition, gut / renovation indicated
   0.60 and above       Complete facility replacement indicated



FACILITIES REPLACEMENT COST (FRC) Facilities Replacement Cost is reported as the
total replacement cost for the building or structure and its contents or fixed assets. As an
example, the FRC for student housing includes the replacement cost for the building and
all the fixtures within each room. Likewise, the FRC for a central heating plant would
include the cost of the structure and the boilers, generators and other equipment contained
within.




                                                                                         41
                                                        Executive Summary
                                                     Facility Condition Analysis
                                                         Totals By Building
Asset                                                          Square                      Project          FCNI       Benchmark
Code                         Name                       Use     Feet         FRC           Costs            Total       per APPA
ANI       Anibal House                                 HS       20,487     $3,315,159      $1,171,696       0.34    Below Average
ASD       Athletic Sports Dome                         UNIV     30,557     $4,583,550       $186,592        0.04    Excellent Condition
BB        Belgian Barn                                 AUX       9,324      $602,330        $288,365        0.48    Poor Condition
BGM       Building Grounds & Maintenance Bldg          UNIV     14,400     $1,160,367       $535,425        0.45    Poor Condition
BRS       Biomedical Research Support Facility         UNIV     14,300     $4,290,000       $256,794        0.05    Excellent Condition
CCC       Chicken Coop Center                          AUX       4,388      $611,982        $177,201        0.29    Fair Condition
CHP       Central Heating Plant                        UNIV     16,833    $20,199,600      $4,883,302       0.24    Fair Condition
DHE       Dodge Hall of Engineering                    AD      151,204    $37,489,762      $9,038,105       0.20    Fair Condition
EC        East Campus                                  AUX                $30,000,000      $2,502,445       0.08    Good Condition
EH        Elliott Hall                                 AD       74,582    $13,329,278      $1,059,691       0.02    Excellent Condition
FM        Facilities Management Building               AD        3,300      $247,278          $95,374       0.15    Good Condition
FTZ       Fitzgerald House                             HS       20,610     $3,335,062      $1,259,895       0.36    Below Average
GAT       Gatehouse at MBH                             UNIV      2,032      $304,800        $413,172        1.36    Historical
GHC       Graham Health Center                         UNIV     13,161     $1,835,527       $444,870        0.15    Good Condition
GLF       Golf Courses                                 AUX                $20,000,000      $4,641,457       0.23    Fair Condition
GRN       Greenhouse                                   UNIV      3,630      $544,500        $691,306        1.27    Historical
HAM       Hamlin Hall                                  HS      143,872    $29,038,123     $11,014,521       0.37    Below Average
HHS       Hannah Hall of Science                       AD       89,418    $22,170,442      $4,919,037       0.20    Fair Condition
HIL       Hill House                                   HS       42,522     $8,582,345      $3,140,746       0.35    Below Average
JDH       John Dodge House                             AD       10,696     $1,613,290       $418,210        0.16    Fair Condition
KCC       Katke-Cousins Club House                     AUX       6,038      $905,700        $205,990        0.23    Fair Condition
KL        Kresge Library                               AD      164,522    $24,305,143      $4,473,337       0.14    Good Condition
MBH       Meadow Brook Hall                            AUX      78,002    $40,000,000      $8,534,690       0.21    Fair Condition
MC        Main Campus                                  UNIV              $100,000,000     $43,632,266       0.38    Below Average
Misc      Miscellaneous small structures (9-25-06)     AUX     278,083             $1      $3,719,649               N/A
MSH       Married Student Housing                      HS       47,464     $6,325,462       $212,443        0.03    Excellent Condition
NFH       North Foundation Hall                        AD       67,691    $11,538,598      $3,102,772       0.17    Fair Condition
OC        Oakland Center                               AD      146,693    $21,300,901      $3,744,849       0.14    Good Condition
ODH       O Dowd Hall                                  AD      105,000    $17,861,424      $5,077,352       0.22    Fair Condition
OUInc.1   O.U. INCubator (Health Enhancement Bldg)     UNIV     11,385     $1,611,357       $505,953        0.31    Below Average
OUInc.2   O.U. INCubator (Shotwell Gustafson)          AUX      25,850     $3,877,500       $473,152        0.11    Good Condition
PH        Pawley Hall                                  AD      132,406    $25,930,590      $2,611,140       0.01    Excellent Condition
PRY       Pryale Hall                                  AD       20,829     $3,442,917      $1,219,873       0.31    Below Average
PSS       Police & Support Services                    UNIV     26,444     $3,773,608      $1,329,530       0.30    Fair Condition
SEB       Science & Engineering Building               AD      165,494    $46,695,171      $3,140,532       0.04    Excellent Condition
SFH       South Foundation Hall                        AD       55,041     $9,097,969      $1,035,352       0.09    Good Condition
SRAC      Student Recreation & Athletic Center         AD      253,494    $37,711,024      $2,036,864       0.04    Excellent Condition
SST       Sunset Terrace                               HS       12,587     $2,275,613       $412,063        0.17    Fair Condition
USA       University Student Apartment                 HS      181,291    $18,565,069       $914,170        0.01    Excellent Condition
VAR       Varner Hall                                  AD      119,939    $30,976,945      $5,274,975       0.14    Good Condition
VBH       Vandenberg Hall                              HS      178,321    $35,991,070     $12,679,473       0.34    Below Average
VWH       Van Wagner House                             HS       43,305     $8,740,380      $3,130,192       0.35    Below Average
WH        Wilson Hall/Meadow Brook Theatre             AD       98,153    $15,898,274      $2,406,056       0.11    Good Condition
          Grand Totals:                                         2,883,348 $670,078,111   $157,010,877   *   0.23    Fair Condition
Notes:    Some assets have not been fully audited; use these values as "best case"
          * Excludes Routine Maintenance                                                                                 September 2007




                                                                                                                    42
                                Detailed Project Totals
                              Facility Condition Analysis
                            Project Class by Priority Class
                          Priority
 Project Classification      1         Priority 2    Priority 3    Priority 4    Priority 5     Subtotal

Plant Renewal              3,527,076     4,489,841    40,382,718    19,970,020     4,952,698     73,322,354


Deferred Plant Renewal     1,644,614     4,788,097    15,498,486    13,018,112    10,580,329     45,529,639


Plant Adaptation            617,030      2,317,318     9,842,233    15,123,583    10,258,722     38,158,884


Totals                    $5,788,720   $11,595,256   $65,723,437   $48,111,715   $25,791,749   $157,010,877



Facility Replacement Cost                                                               $670,078,111


Facility Condition Index                                                                               0.23


Total Cost per Square Foot                                                                       $54.45


Gross Square Foot                                                                              2,883,348




                                                                                                  43
                                             Detailed Project Totals
                                           Facility Condition Analysis
                                         System Class by Priority Class
                                                                    Priority Classes
                                            1             2               3                4                5            Sub Total

System
 Code    System Description               FY'07         FY'08         FY'09-12          FY'13-16          FY'17 +
 AC      Accessibility                     16,234         10,897         637,093          796,861          165,105            1,626,190
  EL     Electrical                             360     1,540,314      3,524,578         2,318,112        3,006,576          10,389,940
 EN      Energy                           232,677         25,190         440,354          289,429               2,880          990,530
 ES      Exterior System                  650,107       2,553,322      4,944,107         3,980,389         318,722           12,446,647
  FS     Fire/Life Safety                 931,877        508,487       3,299,750         2,899,713        2,473,318          10,113,145
 HE      Health                            44,310        403,790                 0                 0        15,000             463,100
 HT      High Temp / Hot Water            401,500        379,053       7,006,645         4,923,323        1,877,497          14,588,018
 HV      HVAC                            1,223,463      1,765,057      9,507,982         6,973,736        1,117,154          20,587,392
  IS     Interior System                  541,160       1,568,436      8,811,022        11,984,835        4,002,666          26,908,119
  IT     Information Technology                   0             0     21,000,000                   0                0        21,000,000
  PL     Plumbing                          56,197        378,379       1,528,839         2,160,281         243,817            4,367,513
 RW      Roads / Walks / Parking Lots     658,000       1,345,759      1,559,530         5,779,210        5,384,144          14,726,643
  SI     Site                             734,735        631,615       2,001,896         5,580,538        6,612,149          15,560,933
  VT     Elevator                         298,100        484,957       1,461,641          425,288          572,721            3,242,707

TOTALS                                  $5,788,720    $11,595,256   $65,723,437        $48,111,715      $25,791,749     $157,010,877



         Plant Renewal                                                                         $73,322,354
         Deferred Plant Renewal                                                                $45,529,639
         Plant Adaptation                                                                      $38,158,884



         Facility Condition Index                                                                            0.23


         Total Cost per Square Foot                                                                      $54.45


         Gross Square Foot                                                                             2,883,348




                                                                                                                        44
                                          Detailed Project Totals
                                        Facility Condition analysis
                                        System Class by Category

                                                        Deferred
System                                      Plant        Plant           Plant
 Code           System Description         Renewal      Renewal        Adaptation      Subtotal         %
 AC      Accessibility                       15,000        88,721        1,522,469      1,626,190           1.0%
 EL      Electrical                         903,190      4,464,512       5,022,238     10,389,940           6.6%
 EN      Energy                             552,571       226,240         211,719        990,530            0.6%
 ES      Exterior System                   7,061,945     4,712,483        672,219      12,446,647           7.9%
 FS      Fire/Life Safety                   639,180      2,828,138       6,645,827     10,113,145           6.4%
 HE      Health                              17,850       377,000          68,250        463,100            0.3%
 HT      High Temp / Hot Water             8,641,385     4,002,346       1,944,287     14,588,018           9.3%
 HV      HVAC                              6,944,853    10,603,828       3,038,711     20,587,392        13.1%
  IS     Interior System                  21,345,850     2,180,530       3,381,739     26,908,119        17.1%
  IT     Information Technology           21,000,000               0            0      21,000,000        13.4%
 PL      Plumbing                           819,662      3,209,235        338,616       4,367,513           2.8%
 RW      Roads / Walks / Parking Lots      2,602,857      325,149       11,798,637     14,726,643           9.4%
  SI     Site                              2,054,562     9,992,199       3,514,172     15,560,933           9.9%
 VT      Elevator                           723,449      2,519,258              0       3,242,707           2.1%

         TOTALS                          $73,322,354   $45,529,639     $38,158,884   $157,010,877       100.0%




         Plant Renewal                                                                            $73,322,354
         Deferred Plant Renewal                                                                   $45,529,639
         Plant Adaptation                                                                         $38,158,884


         Facility Condition Index                                                                        0.23


         Total Cost per Square Foot                                                                   $54.45


         Gross Square Foot                                                                          2,883,348




                                                                                                               45
V. Implementation Plan

State Funding Request

Per the guidance in State Budget Office letter of September 6, 2007, Subject: Fiscal
Year 2009 Capital Outlay Budget Information, only Oakland University's top priority
capital outlay request is to be submitted. In accordance with that guidance, Oakland
University provides the following as the top priority:

Oakland University Engineering Center ($68.3 million)
The proposed Oakland University Engineering Center (OUEC) is designed to provide
appropriate instructional and research facilities for programs that support automotive,
defense and other industries critical to the economy of southeastern Michigan and the
State of Michigan as a whole. The OUEC will add approximately 42,225 square feet of
assignable space to the School of Engineering and Computer Science (SECS), sufficient
to house approximately one-third of the School, as well as 34,201 square feet of
assignable general purpose classroom space to support the growth of the overall student
population. The repair/renovation of 5,000 square feet of space (being vacated by
functions moving into the new OUEC) for the School of Health Services, will support the
Wellness, Health Promotion, and Injury Prevention Program and the Exercise Science
Program.

Supplemental State Funding Requests

In the future, as additional state projects are considered, Oakland University has need for
the following based on program growth, opportunity and State needs:

Human Health Building
The proposed Human Health Building is the University’s second highest priority capital
outlay request and will house the School of Health Sciences and School of Nursing.
Collectively, this new enterprise is part of Oakland University’s vision of better preparing
today’s health care students by creating an innovative partnership housed in one
structure. With this new building, growth in undergraduate and graduate enrollment can
be doubled in response to vital shortages in nursing and heavy demand for health
science professionals.

NFH Student Services Addition
The proposed 19,400 square foot addition will enable advising services to be in one
location and allow for a major upgrade of two heavily used classrooms, bathrooms and
the conversion of existing office space adjacent to these services into classrooms.

Varner Hall Addition and Renovation
The proposed addition would house the Music, Theatre and Dance Department with the
space vacated in Varner renovated into general purpose classrooms.




                                                                                      46
University Funded Priorities

Energy Project
This project funds a portion of the energy and deferred plant renewal backlog identified in a
campus wide energy audit conducted by Chevron Energy Services. This project was funded
in the amount of $17.7 million and is complete.

Parking Garage
The proposed parking deck would provide 637 parking spaces to accommodate the
increased demand as Oakland University grows and house the Police Department.


Plant Renewal / Deferred Plant Renewal

As previously noted, Plant Renewal and Deferred Plant Renewal projects total $115 million of
the $157 million Facility Condition Analysis. There is a current allotment of approximately
$1.3 million annually to address these projects, funded from General Fund budgets and
maintenance endowments.




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