PSYCHOSOCIAL ASSESSMENT AND MONITORING TOOLS by CzD5MYr

VIEWS: 93 PAGES: 6

									PSYCHOSOCIAL ASSESSMENT AND MONITORING TOOLS
Use together with the MHPSS toolkit and references.



REVIEWS & EVALUATION REPORTS (some with tools):

Children and the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami: An Evaluation of UNICEF’s
Response in Thailand (2004-2008). New York: UNICEF Evaluation Office


UNICEF IRAN BAM EMERGENCY PROGRAMME 2003 – 2006
INDEPENDENT EVALUATION: FINAL REPORT (February 2007)


ASSESSING AFGHAN CHILDREN’S PSYCHOSOCIAL WELL-BEING: A MULTI-
MODAL STUDY OF INTERVENTION OUTCOMES (February 2005)


UNICEF Uganda Review of UNICEF supported ‘Right to Play’ interventions in
responding to the psychosocial needs of children affected by conflict in northern
and eastern Uganda.
Abridged version: Methodology and results (September 2007)



TOOLS:


UNICEF (2005). Field Action Guide for Psychosocial Assessment of Children and
Families in Emergencies. Bangkok: UNICEF EAPRO
http://www.unicef.org/eapro/Field_Action_Guide.pdf
This is a field action guide for any agency, organization or academic offering rehabilitation
services for children.


UNICEF RAPID CHILD PROTECTION ASSESSMENT FORM
This form should be used in an immediate relief situation. The aim is to try and assess what
needs to be done to stabilize the situation and to act on this information to make the
environment safer for children.
UNICEF BAM CFS: Monthly Report / Monitoring Sheet

UNICEF Recreational/Cultural Centres of Bam and Surrounding Villages: Monthly
Report / Monitoring Sheet


Jareg, Elizabeth. Assessment of children’s psychosocial needs during an
emergency.


UNICEF (2009) Guide to the Evaluation of Psychosocial Programming In
Emergencies
UNICEF has developed this Guide to the Evaluation of Psychosocial Programming in
Emergencies to assist UNICEF, our partners and other organizations working in the field of
psychosocial support in thinking through key issues in planning and implementing an
evaluation.


Have we made a difference? Participatory evaluation tools for monitoring and
measuring impact of psychosocial support programmes for children aged 6 to 18
Kurt Madoerin and Glynis Clacherty (2006) REPSSI
NOT EMERGENCY ORIENTED, CAN BE ADAPTED
Detailed explanations of qualitative enquiry methods and tools.


Mainstreaming Psychosocial Care and Support within Food and Nutrition
Programmes
REPSSI (2009)
NOT EMERGENCY ORIENTED, CAN BE ADAPTED
For practitioners working with children and families affected by HIV and AIDS, conflict and
poverty


Mainstreaming Psychosocial Care and Support within Early Childhood
Development
REPSSI (2009)
NOT EMERGENCY ORIENTED, CAN BE ADAPTED
For practitioners working with children and families affected by HIV and AIDS, poverty and
conflict.
Programmes and centres focusing on early childhood development are extremely valuable in
addressing the holistic needs of children and their families. Such programmes and centres are
especially important in times of adversity, such as HIV and AIDS, poverty, conflict and
displacement. Early childhood development centres may become centres of care and support
which not only provide educational enrichment, nutrition, healthcare and safety, but also help
children and their caregivers to grow a sense of self-worth, participation, social connectedness
and full enjoyment of life. Mainstreaming psychosocial support (PSS) into early childhood
development programmes tries to build on this notion of holistic care to support the full
development of the child.


CHILD STATUS INDEX
NOT EMERGENCY ORIENTED, CAN BE ADAPTED
Author(s): O'Donnell K | Nyangara F | Murphy R | Nyberg B
Organization: MEASURE Evaluation
Partners: Duke University
Year: 2009
(www.cpc.unc.edu → MEASURE Evaluation → Tools → Child Health → Child Status Index)

Description:
The Child Status Index (with its accompanying Child Status Record) is a tool that can be helpful
in assessing and tracking priority services a vulnerable child needs. Equally useful for initial
assessment and follow-up monitoring, the tool focuses on essential actions and is flexible
enough that users can adapt criteria to the local context. Data from the Child Status Index and
community mapping of services can be used together to inform coordination of care.

The CSI is based on six domains with 12 measurable goals related to the six core services that,
taken together, approximate a standard for overall child health and well-being. The CSI
measures attainment of goals in six domains of care: food and nutrition; shelter and care;
protection; health; psychosocial; and education and skills. The index includes a four-point scale
for each goal so that the child’s well-being can be assessed as good, fair, bad, or very bad. A
pictorial version of the index facilitates use with illiterate care providers.

The goals themselves, as well as the rating guidance, are phrased in ways that allow for some
local variation, yet the measures are still meaningful and specific. The accompanying Child
Status Record, which records status over time, indicates services received and identifies critical
events that have occurred in the life of the child.
Link:

Child_Status_Index_Measure_Eval_2009.pdf
Link:

Child_Status_Record_Form_Measure_Eval_2009.pdf
Link:

CSI_pictorial_version_2009.pdf
Link:

CSI_made_easy_Measure_Eval_2008.pdf
REPSSI INFORMATION AND ACTION TOOL FOR SUPPORTING CHILDREN,
FAMILIES AND COMMUNITIES
NOT EMERGENCY ORIENTED, CAN BE ADAPTED
The IAT has been designed for a number of purposes:
1. It is intended to assist community workers record information (what they see and
hear) and use it to guide them to act in helpful ways towards the children and families
identified to be in need.
2. It is also intended to help community workers communicate with supervisors, group
leaders and mentors about the needs of the children and families they are trying to
help, and for the team to jointly think about ways of giving assistance.
3. The tool can be used to generate data – combined information from several
community workers – to give the organisation or programme information about the
children and families they are seeing, the kinds of problems they have, the
resources there are in the community, and how best the programme should respond
to this information.
4. The tool can be used to review the work of the programme over time, by combining
all the information from groups of community workers, or from an area, over a period
like a month, or a year, so that the programme can demonstrate that its work is
effective to the community, stakeholder, funders and other people working in the
field.



REPSSI Psychosocial Capacity Assessment Tool (PSAT)
NOT EMERGENCY ORIENTED, CAN BE ADAPTED
About the PSAT
The REPSSI PSAT is a tool designed to help intermediary organizations assess their psychosocial
capacity.
The tool is divided into 2 sections: Capacity building and psychosocial competency.
The grid asks the reader to score the organization on each element of psychosocial capacity in
the two sections, by selecting the text that best describes the organization's current status or
performance. The framework and the descriptions in the grid were developed based on our
team’s collective experience as well as the input of other experts and practitioners.
The grid may be used by managers, staff, board members and external capacity builders with
the following objectives:
• To identify those particular areas of capacity that are strongest and those that
require improvement; and
• To measure changes in an organization's capacity over time
Strengthening the Social Analysis Component in Rapid Impact and Vulnerability
Assessment (IFRC, ProVention)
As experience with recent disasters has shown, comprehensive assessment of damage, losses,
needs, vulnerabilities and capacities plays a key part in providing effective frameworks for
recovery. Often however there is insufficient attention paid – particularly in early assessments –
to addressing social vulnerability and livelihoods needs and a general failure to include affected
communities in recovery planning and programming, especially in its earliest phases.
There is still need for a better understanding of how social groups are affected differently by
disasters, what are the broader impacts and secondary impacts on social infrastructure and
livelihoods systems, and what means might be most effective for reducing both immediate and
future risks.
Strengthening assessment in these areas requires more attention to social vulnerability and
livelihoods analysis, greater emphasis on the participation of affected communities, closer
collaboration with civil society organisations to reach communities and strengthen social
protection and safety nets, and increased analysis of risks and mitigation opportunities.
Many of these points have also been highlighted in the recent Tsunami Evaluation Coalition
review of “The role of needs assessment in the tsunami response” (available at www.tsunami-
evaluation.org).


Analysis and methods: DFID Social Vulnerability, Sustainable Livelihoods and
Disasters (DFID)
The need to analyse and prepare for peoples’ vulnerability to natural hazards could be rooted
in the sustainable livelihoods (SL) approach, and in development work which aims to reduce
the elements of vulnerability that are a result of poverty. As such, vulnerability analysis
(VA) may help to bring humanitarian work in line with DFID’s other main objectives and tie
it in with the sustainable livelihoods approach.
Case Study: Capacities and Vulnerabilities Analysis (CVA)
Case Study: Vulnerability and Capacity Assessment (VCA)
International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies
Case Study: Oxfam - Risk-Mapping and Local Capacities:
Lessons from Mexico and Central America
Case Study: CARE: Household Livelihood Security Assessment: a Toolkit for Practitioners
Vulnerability analysis: a preliminary inventory of methods and documents



READING:


Mental and Social Health During and After Acute Emergencies: Emerging
Consensus?
View document Author: Mark van Ommeren, Shekhar Saxena, and Benedetto Saraceno
Date: 2005
Mental health care programmes during and after acute emergencies in resource-poor countries
have been considered controversial. There is no agreement on the public health value of the
post-traumatic stress disorder concept and no agreement on the appropriateness of vertical
(separate) trauma-focused services.
This paper argues that distinct intervention strategies should be considered for the acute
emergency and post-emergency phases. It aims to achieve a conceptual distinction between
social and mental health interventions.

								
To top