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					                       Script for IDIS Online Training Modules

Module 1: Overview – Training Slides
Slide 1
Hello and welcome to IDIS Online Training for CDBG Grantees, an online course developed by Lockheed Martin and
sponsored by HUD’s Office of Block Grant Assistance. My name is Bill Kubal with Usona Development, and I will be
one of your trainers. The primary audience of this course will be staff at the grantee level who are tasked with
entering CDBG data into HUD’s IDIS system. Both new users of IDIS and those of you with experience should find
the course beneficial. Let’s get started.

Slide 2
One of the main objectives of the course is to learn how to use the system to help tell the story of how CDBG
benefits your community. As a grantee, IDIS will help you showcase your accomplishments and demonstrate
accountability to HUD and the folks in your neighborhood.

By inputting data correctly in IDIS, you will also help HUD tell the CDBG story at a national level.

IDIS is the only tool HUD has to collect, aggregate, and report CDBG accomplishments.

If the data is not entered correctly or in a timely fashion, HUD is not able to fully demonstrate the effectiveness of
the CDBG Program.

Through this course, you will learn how to correctly input CDBG data throughout the program year. You will learn
how to add activities at the beginning of the program year and how to provide accurate and timely
accomplishment data for those activities at the end of the year.

You will also learn what has changed from the legacy version to the new version of IDIS Online. We will spend a lot
of time discussing the new reports functionality, including Microstrategy.

Slide 3
The course is divided into a series of stand-alone modules. If you have some experience with IDIS, feel free to skip
around and just watch the parts of interest to you. If you are a new user, it is recommended that you watch each
module in order and only skip those that you are sure you do not need.

Each module has a set of slides and a data entry tutorial. The slides will preview the key points and provide some
background on related CDBG regulations. After the slides, the video will walk through the data entry process, step
by step and field by field.

The best way to learn IDIS is get hands-on practice. It is recommended that you watch the data entry tutorial and
then repeat the steps in the User Acceptance Testing or UAT region of IDIS.

The UAT region of IDIS is a copy of your real data. Don’t worry, you can make as many mistakes as you want and it
will not affect your real data.




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We will cover how to access the UAT region at the end of this module.

To access the UAT region of IDIS, you need to have an IDIS ID and you will most likely need to call the IDIS Help
Desk to reset your password for the UAT region; it’s not the same password that you normally use to access IDIS.

Slide 4
Before getting started, you may want to download and print the course materials available on the website.

These include the IDIS Online Training Manual for CDBG. Make sure you download the right version. There is a
version for entitlement grantees and a different version for states.

The slides, case studies, and additional materials are also available.

Slide 5
The next few slides will provide a short summary of how IDIS fits in with the administration of the CDBG program
and some key points to remember when entering data.

Additional information can also be found in Chapter 1 of the training manual.

Slide 6
IDIS is a real-time online database, meaning that HUD can access the information you provide as soon as it’s saved
to the system. IDIS is designed to collect data on each of the four HUD CPD-funded formula grant programs,
including CDBG, HOME, ESG, and HOPWA as well as some of the Recovery Act funding.

IDIS stands for Integrated Disbursement and Information System.

When HUD awards CDBG funds to a grantee, the funds are held in a Treasury account until the funds are
expended. IDIS acts like an ATM and allows the grantee to request disbursements from their Treasury account on
an as-needed basis.

On the Information side, IDIS provides the grantee a way to report how the funds disbursed were CDBG-eligible,
how they met a national objective, and what was accomplished with the funds. This data is used by the HUD field
office to ensure the use of CDBG funds is in compliance with the Federal regulations.

WHILE IDIS MAY SEEM LIKE A TRIVIAL PART OF THE GRANTS MANAGEMENT PROCESS, THE IMPORTANCE OF
ACCURATE AND TIMELY DATA CANNOT BE OVERSTATED.

IDIS data is used on a regular basis to evaluate the effectiveness of CDBG Program. In addition to HUD, IDIS
information is reviewed by Congress, the Office of Management and Budget, the General Accounting Office, and
the Office of the Inspector General.

It is important to note that missing, inaccurate, and incorrect data can present a misleading—and sometimes
negative—picture of program accomplishments.

Slide 7
Let’s review the data entry tasks for a typical program year. The order of the process is important because you
must do Task A before doing Task B. For example, you must create a project before adding an activity. Chances are
you will only be tasked with completing some of the steps in the overall process. Clear communication with your
co-workers in terms of roles and responsibilities is an important piece of using the system.



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The first thing you’ll need to do is add projects for the new program year. The projects in IDIS will typically mirror
the List of Proposed Projects (Table 3C) in the Action Plan. Projects provide you a way to organize your data. You
will see that there is not a lot of data collected at the project level.

For each project, you will set up at least one activity. Most of the CDBG program data is entered at the activity
level. At the beginning of the program year, you will need to complete the Setup Detail pages for an activity. Once
you have the setup information entered for an activity, you can move to the next step: Activity Funding.

Funding activities is part of the budgeting process. You are taking CDBG funds from a funding source, such as your
entitlement grant or program income, and committing a portion of those funds to a specific activity. Once you
commit funds to an activity, you will be able to request a drawdown of those funds to pay for CDBG-eligible
expenses.

As expenses are incurred throughout the year, you can use IDIS to request drawdowns to pay for the expenses.
Once the drawdown is approved in IDIS, the funds are typically wire-transferred to the grantee’s bank account
within two or three days.

At the end of the program year, you need to provide accomplishment data for each open CDBG activity on the
Accomplishment Detail screens. Even if the activity will continue into the next program year, you need to report
accomplishments at the end of the program year. If the activity has drawn all of its funds and you have input all of
the required beneficiary data, you can also update the status of the activity to complete.

On the next few slides, we will cover some of the key points of creating new activities and updating
accomplishment data.

Slide 8
It is important to understand what an IDIS activity represents.

That’s what we mean by defining the scope of an activity.

For example, the activity may represent the grantee’s entire rehabilitation program. On the other hand, the
activity may represent a single property assisted by the grantee.

There are some cases where HUD dictates the number of activities you must set up. In other cases, the grantee has
a choice as to how many activities they use. For each of the case studies, we will talk about the number of
activities you will need to use to demonstrate program compliance.

When trying to determine how many activities you need, a good rule of thumb is to ask the question, “How many
activities are necessary to document compliance with the selected national objective?”

The Matrix Code and the National Objective field are the two most important fields you will see during Activity
setup.

The system will show you different screens based on the matrix code and national objective selected. For example,
if you select Low Mod Area, the system will ask you for census tracts in the target area receiving a CDBG benefit.

Matrix Codes are used to describe how the activity is an eligible use of CDBG funds. A key point is to select the
most appropriate matrix code.




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During setup, you will also need to indicate how the activity will meet a national objective. Every use of CDBG
funds, other than planning and administration, must meet a national objective.

If you are new to CDBG, it is recommended that you download a copy of the CDBG Guide to National Objectives &
Eligible Activities, also referred to as the CDBG Desk Guide. Having a good grasp of the CDBG program will make
IDIS data entry easier and more understandable.

A quick note regarding CDBG-R. An IDIS activity cannot be funded with both CDBG and CDBG-R. If the same project
or scope of work is funded with both CDBG and CDBG-R, you need to setup two separate IDIS activities, one for
CDBG-R and one for CDBG. Don’t worry about double-counting beneficiaries.

Slide 9
In most cases, you will be able to use one activity report on the accomplishments and national objective
compliance for a CDBG-funded project.

In some cases, you may need more than one activity to demonstrate eligibility or compliance with a national
objective.

The following examples highlight when this is necessary.

For the rehabilitation of a multifamily property, the most common national objective used would be Low and
Moderate Income Housing or LMH. To demonstrate compliance with the LMH national objective, the grantee will
have to show that at least 51% of the units are occupied by a low- or moderate-income household.

If the grantee provides assistance to more than one multifamily property, each property would need to be entered
as a separate IDIS activity since each property has to demonstrate compliance with the 51% threshold on its own.

For activities that meet the Low Moderate Income Area or LMA national objective, each non-contiguous area has
to be reported under a separate IDIS activity. For example, if the grantee does street improvements in two
separate and distinct target areas, one neighborhood on the north side of town and in another neighborhood on
the south side of town, the grantee would need a separate IDIS activity for each neighborhood.

In cases where the grantee provides direct financial assistance to a for-profit business in order to meet the Low-
Moderate Income Job or LMJ national objective, the grantee must demonstrate that 51% of the jobs created by
each business were given to or made available to low- and moderate-income persons. To report this in IDIS, the
grantee would need to set up a separate IDIS activity for each business assisted.

Slide 10
Matrix Codes are used to describe how the IDIS activity is an eligible use of CDBG funds.

At the end of this slide, pause the video and take a moment to review Appendix A of the training manual.

The first page in Appendix A provides a nice summary of all the matrix codes and groups them into categories.

Take a close look at the matrix codes in the Public Facilities. You will see they begin with “03” and most are
followed by a letter, such as 03A or 03B, and identify very specific types of facilities. 03A is used for Senior Center
Facilities and 03B is used for Facilities that serve the Disabled. The last code listed “03”, is a general code for
facilities that do not fall into any of the more specific categories. This 03 general code should only be used as a last
resort.



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If you look at the Public Services category, you will see a similar pattern. There are lots of specific codes and one
“catch-all” general code, 05, for public service activities that do not fit with any of the more specific codes.

Choosing the most correct code is an important part of good reporting.

If you are unsure which matrix code to use, Appendix A contains a short definition and guidance for each code. If
you need additional guidance, refer to the CDBG Desk Guide or discuss the matter with your local HUD field office
representative.

Slide 11
Every CDBG-funded activity other than planning and administration must meet a national objective. This slide lists
the most commonly used national objectives. Please refer to Appendix B of the training manual for a complete list.

A major reason for entering accomplishment data into IDIS is to demonstrate compliance with a national objective.
The data needed to demonstrate compliance will be different for each national objective. Given this, the
Accomplishment Detail screens will look different for each national objective.

At the end of this slide, pause the video and look at the Table of Contents for the training manual. You will see that
there is a separate chapter in the manual for each of the national objectives.

This course will cover the Low Mod Housing, Low Mod Area, Limited Clientele, and Low Mod Jobs national
objectives. Slum Blight and Urgent Need national objectives are covered in the manual but are not part of this
online course.

Slide 12
At the end of each program year, you will need to provide accomplishment data for each CDBG activity that was
open during the program year.

If time permits, you may find it helpful to update accomplishment data throughout the program year. By doing so,
you can verify that you are collecting all the required information for each activity. You may also be able to cut
down on the amount of data entry needed at the end of the program year.

At the very minimum, annual updates are required. The data entry for the program year should be entered in time
so that it may included in the annual performance report, the CAPER, that is due to HUD within 90 days of the
close of the program year.

It is important to note that all CDBG accomplishment data is tracked by the Program Year in which the
accomplishment occurred or the benefit was realized. So if a facility that was funded in 2005 is completed and
opened in 2010, the new facility would be reported as a 2010 accomplishment in IDIS.

It is also important to note that IDIS will not require you to enter data in every field. Some fields may or may not
apply to the activity you are working on. It is up to you, the grantee, to ensure that data is entered when it is
appropriate. When in doubt, refer to the training manual.

The data collected for national objective compliance, as well as other data such as general accomplishment data
and performance measurements, will change based on the matrix code and national objective selected. We will go
into greater detail regarding accomplishment data as part of each module.




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Slide 13
At this point, let’s learn how to Log In to IDIS and learn some of the basic navigation techniques you will need to
get around in the system.

Slide 14
If you want to follow along in IDIS, open another browser window, and navigate to the web address listed on this
slide. Some people simply go to Google and search for HUD IDIS. The IDIS Log In page is usually the first result.

To access your real data, you will click on the link toward the top of the page that reads To log on to IDIS OnLine,
click here.

For this course, we will use the UAT TEST region. The TEST region is a copy of your real data. Don’t worry, you can
make as many mistakes as you want, and it will not affect your real data.

In order to use the TEST region, you must already have an IDIS ID. If you do not yet have an ID, the webpage
includes instructions on how to obtain one.

Unless you have used the TEST region before, you will need to call the IDIS Help Desk to reset your password for
the TEST region. Your normal IDIS password will not work. The Help Desk is available at the number listed on the
webpage.

Please note that it may take the Help Desk one or two days to update your password. Keep in mind when the Help
Desk resets your password for the TEST region, this will not affect your normal IDIS password.

Screenshot
To access the UAT TEST region of IDIS, scroll down to the section titled “Training on the UAT Test Server” and click
on the link labeled External Users.

Once you log in, you may be prompted to change your password. Your new password must be at least eight
characters long, contain one lower case letter, one upper case letter, and one number. Try to avoid passwords you
have used in the past. Once you have changed your password, click the Continue to IDIS button.

Slide 16
The biggest rule in navigating IDIS is to avoid using the browser buttons. Only use the links and buttons included in
IDIS to move from page to page.

Keep in mind that the system will slow down during busy periods. Try to be patient if the system is slow. Clicking
on a link or button while the system is already processing a request may cause the system to work even slower or
worse, freeze the system.

Users on the East Coast may find the system works faster in the morning and users on the West Coast will find the
system is faster at the end of the day.

The system is organized according to the BLUE tabs across the top of the page: Projects & Activities, Funding &
Drawdown, Grant, Grantee & PJ, Admin, and Reports. Depending on the access privileges associated with your
User ID, you may not see all of the tabs.

Once you click on one of the tabs, you will see additional navigation links appear on the left side of the screen.




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On the course website, there is a navigational map that details how all the functions are organized. There is also a
Navigational Tip Sheet with more tips and tricks on getting around the system.

When you are finished with IDIS, be sure to logout properly by clicking on the log out link. If you close the browser
window without logging out, the system will prevent you from logging back in for at least twenty minutes.



Module 2: Projects – Training Slides

This is module 2 of IDIS online training for CDBG grantees covering projects and I am Pam Buchenaur, another one
of your trainers. In module 2 we will be discussing the role and function of projects in IDIS Online and practice
setting up a project, editing a project, and copying a project. If you haven’t already done so, you may want to
download and print the course materials that are available at the Web site. In the companion manual that
accompanies the slides, please refer to chapter 2 at page 2 dash 1.

Projects in IDIS Online serve two purposes. First they link the information in IDIS to the information presented in
your Annual Action Plan that you show on your table 3c in the submission. If you’re the person tasked with setting
up the projects in IDIS at the beginning of the program year, you would need a copy of that Action Plan to enter
your projects into IDIS Online. Second, projects provide an organizational framework for your IDIS activities. So if
you use a visual that for the program year 2010, you have a file cabinet and you have a file drawer for each type of
project that you’re doing, and the activities that are being carried out under each of those projects is a file folder
within each of those file drawers. That may help you to distinguish between projects and activities and the level of
detail between projects and activities that you actually enter.

HUD has not provided guidance on how to structure CDBG-funded projects. They are more concerned that the
data at the activity level is entered correctly. So this gives you, the grantee, some flexibility in how you wish to use
projects to organize your data. For example, if you have four different types of housing programs, you could create
one project called “housing” and group all of your housing activities under the same projects. Or you could have
four different projects with the different housing programs organized underneath each of those, and the activities
associated with each one. This makes it easier to find the information in the system and will organize the
information in a logical manner on your reports. By how you set your projects up when we take a look at the PRO 2
report, we have a sample for you; you can see that by project under your program year, your activities that are
associated with the project are going to be listed under that project. So your first column is going to be the project
and then you’ll have all of the activities that tally up to the total of what was expended under that project. Once
we log-in to the practice region, be sure to search through your projects and see how your projects have been set
up in the past.

You typically only need to enter data at the project level at the beginning of your program, except if there’s an
amendment to a project, or new projects need to be added. Unlike activities, you do not have to come back to the
project level and adjust funding or mark a project as complete. Once the project is added, you are then able to set
up activities underneath the project. As Bill mentioned in the overview, the project is what is linked to your Action
Plan and it’s at the project level that you will also be reporting at Caper time on what occurred. The activities that
are associated with the project will tally up to what are your accomplishments for the Caper. When we walk
through the example, you will see that the projects do not capture a lot of information. Most of the information
you need to provide is entered at the activity level.




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A quick note on some of the changes from the old version of IDIS to IDIS Online. Under the old system, a user had
to approve a project before adding activities. You don’t need to do that step anymore. Once the project is saved,
you can then add activities underneath that project. IDIS Online also has a project copy feature that allows you to
copy one or more projects from an older year to the current year. This was something that was greatly desired in
the old IDIS, and it was incorporated into the new system. If a project is amended, be sure to show that change in
IDIS Online, and also, something that has happened within the project module as of December of 2010, IDIS Online
now allows you to uncancel a project that may have been cancelled in error, so that you’re not having to go back
and re-setup the project. You’re just able to go back in and uncancel it.

Let’s go into the system now and practice adding some projects. For my example I’m going to use the information
in the Case Study #1, which is titled Adding Projects. Alternatively, you may use your copy of your most recent
Action Plan to enter those projects into the system for your use. We will for the training modules be using activities
that are associated with the projects that are on the Case Study #1 list. So just bear that in mind.



Module 2 – Navigating through IDIS: Project Setup

Okay, we’re now on the page with IDIS. We’re going to be selecting the Projects/Activities tab and with that we
then get the listing of the navigational links on the left-hand side of the screen and notice Activity is the first
heading and then Project. We want to add a project so we are going to select the Add underneath the Project
heading. With that the Add Project screen comes up, and to be sure, just as a note, just to be sure that you’re
always using UAT, please check that you have UAT written at the top of the screen in the blue header. You don’t
want to be adding in your real data, so just to be sure, be sure you’re in the UAT region.

Under the Add Project screen, you have a number of fields to complete, the first being for what program year are
you adding projects, and right next door to that field is Add New Program Year. So if this is the first time that
you’re entering projects in for the program year, you’ll need to be adding the program year here. You’d enter a
check mark in the box, enter the program year, and then go on about entering all of our project information and
when it’s saved it will then add that program year into your dropdown list to choose from for any future times you
come in to add projects.

Notice that the Project Title is asterisked. Everything that is required in the setup of adding a project is asterisked.
So your IDIS Project is asterisked, the Program Year is asterisked. So you have to have a program year, you have to
have a project title. The optional field is the Grantee PJ Project ID, and the description. However the description, it
can be copied directly from your Action Plan. So you can have your Action Plan open, copy the description as you
have written it there, and paste it right into the description field here.

You then enter in the estimated amount for the project. So in this particular case, the first project that we are
adding is the Housing Rehab, and we’re going to be using the year 2010. So the first thing that we’re going to be
entering is your program year, the project title can be Housing Rehab, or you may want to put in more detail than
that depending upon how you wish to organize your data. If you put in the year, it lets you know, it gives you some
hints when you’re setting up your activities, are you setting up the activity under the correct project in the correct
program year because you often have repeated programs from one year to the next. Also you may wish to have an
indication of how this project is going to be funded. Will it be HOME or CDBG, and then the title of the project and
you may wish to add geographic information as well as other information to the project title. In my case, I’m going




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to put in the program year 10, that it’s being funded with CDBG funds, and in IDIS CDBG is recognized by the letter
“B” like in bicycle, and then I’m going to enter in Housing Rehab.

The Grantee/PJ Project ID is an optional field; it’s for you to use or not to use. It does show up on reports now and
it’s a search feature as well. So this may be something that you may wish to link it to a contract number, a general
ledger number; there may be internal issues that you’d like to address, who is the program manager, who is the
subrecipient. So you may have your own coding that you wish to do. I’m going to be using, I’m going to just use the
program year, and the program, the same B, and then I’m going to use a general ledger number that I’m right now
just making up in my mind, instead of a real general ledger number. The housing rehab description is right there in
your case study. So we would be entering in that it’s a housing program with two components—a comprehensive
rehab program (CRP) and an emergency repair program, and that it’s going to be providing up to $25,000 at a low-
interest loan of 3% for 10 years for the CRP program, and for the Emergency Grant component it would be $5,000
for emergency repairs.

Now that that’s entered, we’ll go ahead and indicate on the section below under Estimated Amount (Including
Program Income) the amount that the project is to be funded for. Notice that it does indicate including program
income, so you want to be sure that you are addressing your anticipated program income as you are working
through your projects table so that the timeliness deadline is not going to become an issue for you as a grantee.
Notice that the field above the Estimated Amount indicates Allow Another Organization to Set up Activities under
this Project. If you are going to be allowing a subrecipient to enter their data, this is where that would happen.
We’re not going to go into that level of detail for a local grantee as this is more likely to be used by states.

Please note at the bottom of the screen, we are going to go ahead and press the Save key, and notice that it will
then pop the screen up to the top of the screen and in red it will indicate the project has been saved. And, notice it
then asks you, it’s now giving you a new action button, two new ones actually. You’ve got the Save button, you
have the Return to Projects, and you have a Cancel Project. So if you’ve set something up and you looked and said
“Oh I shouldn’t have done that,” you’re able to cancel the project. And remember, you’re now able to uncancel
projects as of this past December in 2010. Notice the additional action button is Return to Projects, and that
allows you, because at the time that you’re setting up projects at the beginning of the year, you’re normally going
to set them up all together, and ideally set up all of your CDBG projects together, and any other formula grant
funds that you receive try to set up you know, if you receive HOME or Emergency Shelter grant or Housing
Opportunities for Persons with AIDS that those are all set up together so you’re not doing a seek and search for
your projects by program area. So we would return to the project and that allows, that gives you then a new blank
screen and you can continue through, just as we have in our case study, adding the projects, going through the
next project to enter. For example, our next project would be Brightwood Neighborhood Street Improvements,
and it is CDBG funds combined with state and local resources to construct deteriorated streets. So they’re giving
you a lot of information, and often times from your Action Plan you’re sorting through and reading through the
description to identify all of the details that may or may not need to be included as your description. So we’re
going to go ahead and stop there, on Adding a Project, and let you go ahead and enter in numbers two through
five. So you’re going to enter in Brightwood Neighborhood Street Improvements, Business Loan Program, Public
Services, and Administration and Planning.




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Module 3: Housing – Training Slides
Slide 23
This is Module 3 of IDIS Online Training for CDBG Grantees.

In Module 3, we will learn how to provide activity-level data for a housing activity. Examples of housing activities
include rehabilitation, downpayment assistance, and site acquisition.

First we will review a set of slides that discuss some key points of data entry for a housing activity.

Next we use a case study to demonstrate the data entry process.

Both the slides and the case study are available for download from the course website. If you have not already
done so, you may want to download and print the course materials available on the website.

Let’s get started.

Slide 24
On this first slide we see a list of all the eligible housing activities for CDBG and their corresponding matrix codes.
Matrix codes are how we report to HUD that an activity is eligible for CDBG. If you don’t know which matrix code
to use, refer to Appendix A of the training manual. Appendix A will list all of the matrix codes and provide
descriptions and guidance for each. You may also want to talk with your CPD HUD representative and discuss the
issue with them.

Slide 25
There are some cases where grantees will want to set up a separate IDIS activity to track the program delivery
costs of their housing rehab. There are three different ways to handle this in IDIS, depending on how the program
is funded. If the housing rehab program is funded out of the CDBG program, this means there will be other
activities in IDIS, other than the program delivery activity, that are tracking the accomplishments. If this is the case,
the grantee doesn’t want to report accomplishments under the program delivery activity. If they did, they would
be double counting the beneficiaries. Instead the grantee will answer “Yes” when the system asks if the
accomplishments will be reported under other activities. We’ll see this question when we go through the case
study. If the housing rehab program is funded from non-CDBG funds and CDBG is only being used for the program
delivery, this means there are no other activities in IDIS where the grantee could report the beneficiaries. In this
case, the grantee must report the accomplishments under the program delivery activity in order to get credit for
the work. If the housing rehab program is funded out of the HOME program, the grantee can use 14J as the matrix
code for housing services. These units would be reported under HOME-funded activities in IDIS. However, in order
to get credit for the CDBG program, the grantee must report the accomplishments under the program delivery
activity as well. While it may look like double counting from the grantee point of view, HUD views HOME and CDBG
separately in terms of performance measurement. If you don’t report accomplishments under the CDBG-funded
program delivery activity, CDBG would not get any credit. Housing services can be used to pay for the delivery
costs of most HOME-funded projects, not just rehab admin. For more information, you’ll want to refer to the CDBG
Statute, specifically Section 5305(a)(20). This is one of the few instances where it’s better to refer to the statute
instead of the regulations. Again, use Appendix A in your course manual when you have questions about which
matrix code to use.




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Slide 27
One of the most common mistakes grantees make is using the wrong matrix code for housing counseling. For
activities that only provide counseling, you’ll want to use 05U which is a public service matrix code. When using
05U you’ll report the number of persons receiving counseling. For activities that provide any sort of direct financial
assistance, that’s when you’ll use 13 or 05R and you’ll report the number of households receiving financial
assistance. If you have an activity that provides both financial assistance and housing counseling, you can report
both uses as 13 or 05R, but when it comes to reporting you’ll only report the number of households receiving
financial assistance. There will be a separate performance measurement screen where you can report the number
of households that receive housing counseling.

Slide 28
The most common national objective for housing activity is Low Mod Housing. When showing that you’ve met the
national objective, you’ll be counting households, not residents or families. Households are all the occupants of the
unit, related or unrelated. There are different thresholds for this national objective, depending on the type of
property you’re assisting. When you’re assisting a single-family property, the unit must be occupied by a low- or
moderate-income family. If you’re assisting two units in a duplex, one of the two units must be occupied by a
low/mod household. And anytime you’re assisting a multifamily property with three or more units, at least 51% of
the units must be occupied by low/mod households. Grantees will often ask about rehabs where the work is
limited to a specific unit within a multifamily property, a condominium for example. If the scope is limited to the
one unit, you can treat this as a single family. If the scope includes work on common areas or items that affect
multiple units, such as a roof or heating system, you’ll need to include all the affected units to determine the
national objective. Some housing activities can use the Slum/Blight Area Basis or Spot Basis as the national
objective. We’re going to focus on low/mod housing in this module. If you want more information on the
Slum/Blight Area Basis or Spot Basis go ahead and look at Chapter 13 in your manual.

Slide 29
This slide lists some key points to keep in mind when entering data for housing activities in IDIS. First, HUD
encourages you to set up a separate IDIS activity for each property assisted. By doing so, HUD will be able to map
out where CDBG funds are being spent in the community. At this time, this is not a requirement for single-family
housing programs. Grantees could set up one activity for their single-family housing rehab program and report all
units they assist under that one activity. In the address location field for the activity, the grantee would use
community-wide or the name of a specific target area. In a future upgrade, grantees will be able to report multiple
addresses for one activity, but that’s not available at this time. When entering multifamily properties, grantees
should add a separate IDIS activity for each property. Can you think why multifamily is handled differently than
single family? For multifamily properties, HUD needs to see that each property meets the 51% threshold. If all
multifamily properties are reported under the same activity, HUD would not be able to make this determination.
Regardless of how many activities you are using, you never want to use the address of the program administrator
in the address location field. If you’re using a separate IDIS activity for each activity, use the property’s address. If
you’re lumping all the properties under a single IDIS activity, use something like community-wide. Most of the
information you enter at the activity level for CDBG will appear in the year-end reports that are published as part
of your Caper. Given this, HUD recommends not to use the family name within the IDIS activity name, instead use
the address of, or an internal tracking number and this will ensure some level of privacy for that assisted
household. Finally, HUD strongly encourages grantees to update accomplishment and beneficiary data throughout
the program year. Do not wait until the project is complete to report accomplishments. At a minimum, grantees
are required to update the accomplishment data at the end of the program year.




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Slide 30
This slide previews all of the screens we will see when we add a new housing activity and when we update and
complete a housing activity. To add a housing activity that uses low/mod housing or LMH as the national objective,
we need to complete three screens of data entry. If you want to follow along in your manual, refer to Chapter
Three CDBG Activity Set Up. To update or complete a low/mod housing activity, we will need to complete two
screens of data entry under CDBG accomplishment detail. The information you need to provide on page two will
vary based on the type of housing activity you are completing. Chapter 11 of the course manual does a good job of
explaining the required data for each type of housing activity. For the data entry portion of this module, you’ll be
using Case Study 2. Take a moment to read through Case Study 2 and respond to the discussion questions. When
you’re done, log into the UAT version of IDIS and follow along. The best way to learn IDIS is to get hands-on
practice.



Module 3 – Navigating through IDIS: Activity Setup for Housing
This is the data entry portion of Module 3 of IDIS Online Training for CDBG Grantees.

In this video, we will walk through the process of adding a housing activity to IDIS and also how to update and
complete a housing activity.

I want to encourage you to follow along with the video and practice entering the data yourself in the UAT version
of IDIS. The best way to learn IDIS is to get hands-on practice.

You can switch back and forth between this video and IDIS by holding down the Alt key on your keyboard and then
pressing the Tab key.

Go ahead and pause the video at this time and log in to the UAT version of IDIS. You’ll know if you are in the UAT
version if you see UAT at the top of the screen. There are directions on accessing the UAT version of IDIS at the
bottom of the log-in page and in Module 1 of this course.

I will be using the data found in Case Study 2. You can use the data from the case study or simply make it up as you
go along. Assignment 1 of the case study says that we are two weeks into the program year and the rehab
manager tells us that she completed an emergency repair at 456 South Cedar Avenue. It’s up to us to add the
activity to IDIS so we can draw down funds and reimburse the city for all eligible costs.

IDIS Home Page
Here we are at the Home page of IDIS. To add an activity, we will click on Projects/Activities in the Navigation
Menu.

The system by default shows the Search Activities. This is used to find existing activities in the system. We don’t
want to look for an existing activity; we need to add a new activity.

If you look to the left you will see all of your options under the Project/Activities module. You should see under
Activity a link labeled Add. If you don’t see this, your user profile may not have permission to add activities, in
which case you would need to talk to your local administrator to obtain this permission.

Once you click on the link, the system will take you to the Add Activity page where we can start entering data. If
you are following along in your course manual, we are on page 3 dash 2.




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Data Entry Add Activity Page
Most users can skip past the Activity Owner field as it will default to the correct grantee.

The next field is Program Year. Click on the dropdown arrow and select the year you want. If you don’t see the
correct year, this most likely means you have not yet set up projects for that year. You need to add your projects
first, then come back and add your activities.

In the case study, we set up our projects under 2010.

In the next field you will select the project that you want to associate with this activity. If you completed Module 2
of this course, you should see the projects you added. I am going to select this housing rehabilitation project. If you
did not complete Module 2, you can select any project.

The next field is Activity Name. It’s a good idea to establish a naming convention that will help you quickly identify
what each activity is. In the case study, our activity is representing emergency repairs at 456 S Cedar.

Since we are setting up a separate activity for each property you assist, we could use the address in the Activity
Name. To protect the privacy of the assisted household, HUD recommends against using the person’s name as the
Activity Name.

The Grantee/PJ Activity ID is another field that can help you identify the activity. This is an optional field; HUD
does not require it. Many grantees populate this field with information that will help them reconcile their IDIS
information and their local financial records, such as a contract number, purchase order number, or local
accounting code.

The next field is a big one. If you click on the Activity Category field for CDBG, you’ll see a long list of all of the
eligible uses of CDBG and their corresponding matrix codes. It is really important to select the most appropriate
matrix code here because the system will prompt us for different sets of information based on the matrix code we
select here.

For our case study, the most appropriate matrix code is 14A – Rehab of Single-Unit Residential housing.

The next field is environmental assessment. You will want to check with whomever in your office is responsible for
environmental review. For the case study, we will select Underway.

To the right of Environmental Assessment you see a field called allow Another Organization to access this Activity.
You only need to provide this information if you will be giving IDIS access to a subrecipient, so they can add their
own data to the system. 99.9% of CDBG grantees don’t provide IDIS access to their subrecipients and therefore
skip past this field.

The last field is the Description field. HUD has not provided any guidance on the amount of detail you need here so
just use common sense. The main audience for this information is your HUD CPD representative so you may want
to discuss with them the level of detail they would like to see.

For the case study, I’ll put in a short sentence describing how CDBG funds will be used. If you have the description
in another document on your computer, you can use Copy and Paste. For example, I have the description in a
Word document that I can copy and paste:

CDBG funds will provide a grant to a low-income homeowner to make needed emergency repairs to his home,



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including repair of a burst pipe and damaged drywall.

Once you are done providing the data, let’s click Save at the bottom. If you provided all of the required data, you
should see an Activity Saved message at the top of the screen. If you missed a required field, the system will
prompt you for that information before it will let you save the screen.

A quick note about required fields. The fields marked as required are the fields that the system will make you
populate before saving the screen. There are many fields that are not required by the system that your HUD CPD
Representative will want to see answered so they can get a full picture of how the funds are being used.

Once this first page is saved, the system will assign an IDIS Activity ID to the activity. You may want to write down
this number in your project file as it is a quick way to find the activity in the system.

You will also see that the system added some additional fields, including the Activity Status, which defaults to
Open, the Completion Date, the Initial Funding Date.

You will see a column in the Activity Category Table called Ready to Fund. In the row for CDBG it says Ready to
Fund is No. This means we still need to provide more data and complete activity setup before we can commit
funds and draw money against this activity.

To complete activity setup, we’ll click on the button in the Setup Detail column for CDBG called Add CDBG.

Data Entry Add CDBG Setup Detail Page 1
Here is the first of two pages of the Setup Detail.

In the manual, we are on page 3 dash 5.

Take note that the system is displaying the matrix code in big, bold letters across the top of the page. As noted
earlier, the fields we see and the data we need to input on the setup and completion pages will depend on the
matrix code we selected.

The type of data we need to collect will also depend on the national objective we select, which is the first field on
this page. It is extremely important to select the most appropriate matrix code and national objective.

If you click on the dropdown for national objective, you will see a list of the national objectives available for the
selected matrix code. The system will limit your choice of national objective based on the matrix code we selected
on the first page. If you don’t see the national objective you want, chances are you selected the wrong matrix
code.

There is a nice help feature built in to the system here. If you click on the Lookup Table, the system will open a
cross-reference table in a new window. A printed version of this table is also included in Appendix C of the course
material. The table has three columns, matrix codes, national objective, and accomplishment types.

To use the table, you will find your matrix code. In the case study, we selected 14A for single-unit residential rehab.
Once we find 14A, we look in the middle column to see the different national objectives we could use for this
activity. Once we select a national objective, the third column will tell us what accomplishment types we can use
for the activity.

For our case study, we will use Low Mod Housing (LMH). Notice on the chart there is more than one LMH. There is
LMH and LMLHSP. How do I know which to choose? Appendix B in your course manual lists all of the national


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objectives, a short description, and a regulatory citation where you can get more information.

In most cases, grantees should use the three letter codes such as LMH, LMA, and LMC, although it’s good to know
that these other codes are available. If you have questions about which code to choose, be sure to discuss it with
your HUD CPD Rep.

Our next field is Accomplishment Type. You will see that the system is not giving us a choice here. Its saying that
based on our selected matrix code and national objective, we have to measure housing units.

HUD allows grantees to space the proposed benefits over more than one year if the grantee feels that the project
will take more than one year to complete. For example, assume the activity is to rehab a 100-unit apartment
building and, based on the level of work, the contractor can do half this year and half next year. You would insert
the current program year and put 50 in the count, then press the Add Another Year button and the system would
give you a new row to input the goal for the second year.

In our case study, our activity is representing a single unit, so we’ll type 1 and be done.

The next two fields relate to HUD’s performance measurement framework. If you want more information on
performance measurement, there is a lot of material on the HUD CPD website. This information should also be
included in your Annual Action Plan, so you may want to reference your plan.

The objective is used to indicate why you are undertaking the activity. For this activity, we will choose the housing
option. So our objective is to provide decent affordable housing.

The outcome is used to indicate what we hope to achieve by undertaking the activity. For this activity, we will
choose affordability. Again, there is no right or wrong answer here. I would urge you to try to be consistent with
the information provided in your action plan.

Next comes the Address field. For our case study, we can provide the address of the house we plan on repairing. If
you were setting up one activity to represent your entire rehab program and all areas of your city were eligible to
participate, you could put “community wide.” HUD would not want to see the address of the program
administrator here. They want to use this information to determine what areas of the community are receiving a
benefit.

Once you have provided the address information, you will want to click on the Validate this Address field. If the
system is able to validate the address, you can click on this icon and get some information about the address
provided, including a link to a Google map of the area. In some cases, the system will not be able to validate the
address, in which case you can skip the validation process at this time.

The next section is labeled Activity Purpose and contains four Yes/No questions that describe who will benefit
from the activity. Answer Yes or No based on the type of activity you are carrying out. In our case study, we can
leave everything as NO.

On the right side of the screen is a section labeled Associate to Another Activity with the question “Will
accomplishments be reported at another activity?” You can use this field when you have more than one activity in
IDIS for the same scope of work. For example, if we set up 20 IDIS activities to represent 20 housing rehab loans
and an extra activity to represent our rehab program delivery costs, we would report all the beneficiaries under
the 20 activities. If we reported the 20 units under program delivery too, we would be double-counting our
accomplishments. Instead, we would answer Yes to this question for the program delivery activity, and specify an



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activity number for one of the other activities. By doing so, the system will let us complete the activity without
providing accomplishment data.

You will use the next section to indicate who is carrying out the activity. If the grantee is carrying out the activity
with its own staff or through contractors, you will answer YES to this first question and then choose one of the
selections from the dropdown. If the activity is being carried out by a subrecipient or other entity, you will answer
NO to the first question. When you do so, you will see the information below become active, at which point you
can click on the Select Organization button to choose your subrecipient and select the type of organization from
the dropdown on the right.

Selecting an organization is fairly straightforward. When searching for an organization, try typing just a portion of
the name instead of the exact name and you will get better results. You may see an organization listed more than
once. If that’s the case, choose the one with the most recent information. If you cannot find the organization in the
system, you will have to add it. Keep in mind that you will need to know the DUNS number of the organization
when you add it to the system. For more information on adding an organization, please see Appendix D of your
course manual.

For the case study, we will select Yes to the first question and answer Grantees and Contractors to the dropdown.

The next section is Target Area. While the field is not required, it is important to provide this information when it is
applicable. You will see three target areas available from the dropdown: CDFI, Local, and Strategy. There is more
information on each in Appendix E of your manual.

CDFI stands for Community Development Financial Institution and is the least common target area. You will only
select it if a CDFI is carrying out the activity and is utilizing the regulatory flexibility provided for CDFIs under the
CDBG regulations.

The local target areas are defined by the grantee and do not require HUD approval. A local target area would be
any area where the grantee is making a concentrated effort to improve the area. Grantees may want to refer to
their Action Plan, which should list any target areas. If a grantee uses this feature, the PR84 report will summarize
your accomplishments for each target area.

Grantees will only select strategy area when the activity is undertaken as part of a Neighborhood Revitalization
Strategy Area or NRSA. NRSAs are approved by HUD as part of the Con Plan or Action Plan.

For the case study, let’s assume the house we are repairing is located within a local target area in the Brightwood
neighborhood where the city is carrying out aggressive code enforcement, housing rehabilitation, and public
facility improvements.

I’ll select local target area from the dropdown. If the target area has already been added to the system, you’ll see it
on the Area Name dropdown. I don’t see it so I click Add New Area.

[PAUSE FOR SCREEN RELOAD]

The next screen lists all of the existing target areas. I will click on the Add button to add an area to the list.

[PAUSE FOR SCREEN RELOAD]

On the next screen I will give the area a name, indicate the type of target area, and click Save. When I return to the
setup detail screen, I should now see that target area as a choice. I will see this choice for all of my other activities


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as well.

The next section is called Special Characteristics and you simply check the box next to each field if it applies. If you
are not sure if they apply or not, refer to page 3-9 in your manual. Grantees in states that border Mexico will see
an additional choice for Colonias.

If you place a check next to Brownfield Redevelopment, the system will prompt you to indicate how many acres
are being remediated.

The next section is a collection of check boxes that relate to specific regulatory requirements of the CDBG
program. If the activity will involve One-for-One replacement or displacement, you will see some narrative fields
during the completion of the activity that can be used to describe how the grantee complied with these
requirements.

You should see special assessments and favored activity are greyed out. Special assessments apply to facilities and
infrastructure and favored activity is for economic development. The system knows, based on our housing matrix
code, that these would not apply. The two other choices are revolving loan and float funded, which could apply to
this activity. Go ahead and check them if they apply, based on the funding of your program. If you check float
funded, the system will prompt you for additional information regarding the float funding at the bottom of the
screen.

Once you’re done, you’ll see our options at the bottom. If we click Save, the system will save the data and return
us to the previous screen. However, we still have one more page of data entry, so we want to click Save and
Continue. This will bring us to Page 2 of Setup Detail. If we hit cancel, the system will not save any of our changes
and it will take us back to the previous page.

Data Entry Add CDBG Setup Detail Page 2
Here is the last page of the Setup Detail. Once we complete it, we will be done with the Activity Setup.

Again, notice the matrix code listed at the top of the page. The fields that the system is displaying are based on the
matrix code we selected.

For our housing activity, we see two housing related questions: Does the activity involve multifamily or rental
housing. For our case study, we’ll answer no to both.

The next section asks for the budget of the activity. Notice that the CDBG field is greyed out. Once you draw funds
against this activity, the system will populate that field for you.

You’ll also notice that these fields are not required by the system to complete the screen. This is because some
activities are fully funded by CDBG and these fields would be blank. If the activity does have other funds involved,
it is really important to provide this information. One of the ways the CDBG program is evaluated at the Federal
level is its ability to leverage funds. If filled out correctly, this section helps demonstrate that CDBG funds are in
fact leveraging other available dollars. Our case study states that the activity will receive $1,000 from a local
housing trust fund.

At the time of activity setup, you may not know the final budget for an activity. HUD has stated that is permissible
to provide budget estimates at this point.

Once you have provided information here and the activity has drawn CDBG funds, the system will calculate a



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leveraging ratio for the activity.

The next section collects data on how the CDBG funds are being distributed. In our case study, this activity
represents a grant given to a homeowner, so we will put 1 in the grant field. If you providing a loan instead, you
would want to fill out this table as well, including the average interest rate, amortization period, and total amount
of funds loaned. If the loan is payable only upon sale or transfer of the property, grantees can put in 99 in the
amortization period.

If the activity involves multi-unit housing, you would fill out the next table, indicating the number of units at the
start and the units expected at completion.

Finally, the last section collects additional information regarding housing rehabilitation. This information will help
HUD distinguish between minor repair programs and comprehensive repair programs. Read the section carefully. It
states Indicate if the activity is LIMITED to one or more of the following. If the activity’s scope is beyond the items
listed, you will leave this section blank. In our case, we will check Perform emergency housing repairs.

When we’re done, we will click Save. This saves the second page and takes us back to the page we started at.

[Pause for reload]

If everything went well, we now see that the activity is Ready to fund.

The system gives you a button that will take you straight to activity funding screen for this activity.

At this point, go ahead and fund the activity. Then, create a drawdown for the activity. If you want to follow the
case study, the drawdown should be for $900.

The next video will demonstrate how to report accomplishments and complete this housing activity.

For step-by-step guidance for the activity funding and drawdown, refer to the video for the funding and drawdown
module.




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Module 3 – Navigating through IDIS: Reporting
Accomplishments for Housing
Introduction to Housing Activity Accomplishments
This is the data entry portion of Module 3 of IDIS Online Training for CDBG Grantees.

In this video, we will walk through the process of reporting accomplishments for a housing activity in IDIS.

The best way to learn IDIS is to get hands-on practice. I want to encourage you to log on to the UAT version of IDIS
and enter the data as you follow the video.

You can pause the video at any time by clicking the pause button in the lower left hand corner. You can switch
back and forth between this video and IDIS by holding down the Alt key on your keyboard and then pressing the
Tab key.

If you are not already logged into the UAT version of IDIS, pause the video at this time and do so now. You’ll know
if you are in the UAT version if you see UAT at the top of the screen.

There are directions on accessing the UAT version of IDIS at the bottom of the log-in page and in Module 1 of this
course.

This video is Part 2 of the housing module. If you want to do the data entry for this tutorial, you need to first
complete the housing activity setup exercise.

I am using the data found in Case Study 2. You can use the data from the case study or simply make it up as you go
along.

In the previous video, we set up the housing activity for emergency repair at 456 South Cedar Avenue.

We then funded the activity and created the drawdown. It’s up to us to edit the activity accomplishment data and
update its status to complete.

IDIS Home Page
As always, we start at the Home page of IDIS. If you want to follow along in the manual, we are in Chapter 7 for the
first few screens and then we will skip to Chapter 11 for the housing-specific screens. Right now we are on page 7
dash 1.

Okay, to report accomplishments for our activity we need to go to the Projects/Activities module in the Navigation
Menu.

The system by default shows the Search Activities. This is used to find existing activities in the system.

If you know the IDIS activity number, that’s the fastest way to find the activity. If you don't know it, you can use
any combination of the other search fields or simply click Search to get a list of all your activities.

Once the results come back, you will see your options on the right in the Action column. We should see Edit and



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View. The View function will let you look at the data but you won’t be able to change anything. We want to be able
to input accomplishment data, so we will choose Edit.

Edit Activity Page
This is the same page we saw when we added the activity.

We have two fields we need to update here, the Activity Status and the completion date. However, the system
won’t let us update these until we provide the accomplishment data, so let’s do that first.

If we scroll down a bit to the table in the center of the screen, we will see some buttons for CDBG. The system
does a nice job of separating out the data needed for setup and the data need for accomplishments. At this point,
we want to report accomplishments.

Add CDBG Accomplishment Detail (Page 1)
If you are following along in your manual, we are in chapter 11.

If you look at the first page in chapter 11, you will see that the manual lists the screens you have to complete
based on the type of activity. For owner-occupied rehab, we will be completing two screens of data. Guidance for
the first screen starts on page 11 dash 3.

The first thing we have to do on this page is specify the Program Year in which the benefits were REALIZED. This is
an important point to keep in mind when reporting accomplishments for CDBG. It doesn’t matter what grant year
the activity is funded out of, it doesn’t matter what Action Plan the activity is listed in. If the house was rehabbed
in 2010, we will use 2010 in this field.

The rest of the data we enter on this page and the next will be counted as 2010 accomplishments.

The next field is the Accomplishments Narrative field. HUD does not have specific guidance for this field. The best
source of guidance for the narrative is your local CPD representative, as it will be this person who will be reading
the narrative.

In general, you can use the Narrative to tell “the story behind the numbers” that are provided in the other fields. In
some cases, the work may be nearly complete but you cannot report any beneficiaries yet. For example, you may
have used CDBG to rehabilitate a rental property but the units are still vacant. You could use the narrative to
explain the status of the activity and when it is expected to be complete.

You can also use the narrative to provide details on stalled and cancelled activities. If the activity is still stalled and
has not spent any money in the program year, you may want to use the narrative to give an explanation.

The next field lists the Accomplishment Type, in this case Housing Units, and the proposed number of units for the
Program Year we selected. The system will provide this number once we save this screen.

The next section will collect Direct Benefit Data for the beneficiaries of the activity, including Race/Ethnicity data,
Head of Household, and Income.

We are now on page 11-5 of the manual.

You can see the system prompts us to count households as opposed to people for this activity.

Our case study states the beneficiary was White Hispanic. To report this, we select White from the dropdown, and


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type 1 in the Total Owner column and 1 in the Hispanic/Latino column.

If there was another beneficiary of a different race, we would click on the Add Another Race button and the
system would give us a second row to input additional data.

At the bottom of the Race table is a row to report the number of Female-Headed Households assisted. In the case
study, the household is not Female-Headed so we can leave this blank.

The next section collects income data. Our case study tells us the beneficiary was low income, so we type a 1 in
this field.

Let’s click Save and Continue.

When we try to save the data, the system will check the Race and Income totals to see if they match. If they don’t
the system will return an error and prompt you to correct the data.

If all is good, the system will move us to Page 2.

Add CDBG Accomplishment Detail (Page 2)
If you are following along in your manual, we are on chapter 11 on page 11 dash 9.

This second page collects performance measures. Performance measures provide more detail about who the
beneficiaries are and what type of work was done. These will change based on the type of activity you undertake.
For owner-occupied rehab, there are five additional performance measures.

The first asks, of the total units assisted, how many are occupied by elderly households. HUD defines elderly as 62
and older.

Next, the system asks how many of the units were moved from substandard condition to standard condition. In
other words, how many units had code violations that have been resolved through the rehab.

When reporting Section 504 units, keep in mind that the threshold for reporting under owner-occupied rehab is
different than for rental rehab. For owner-occupied rehab, HUD wants you to report any unit where the unit is
made more accessible through the removal of architectural barriers. For rental rehabs, HUD only wants you to
report the unit if it meets the Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards, which is a much higher standard.

The next field is Units that qualify as Energy Star. HUD only wants you to report the units if it is CERTIFIED, which
means the unit has been inspected and certified by an energy auditor. There is a handout on the course website
that provides additional guidance on reporting Energy Star units.

The final field asks you to report units brought into compliance with lead safety rules. You will follow Lead Safety
Rules for all of the units you rehab. What HUD really wants you to report here is the number of units that had lead
and as a result of the rehab were made lead-safe. This means you won’t report any units that were free of lead
paint or units where the rehab did not address all the surfaces that could pose a lead hazard.

Going back to our case study, it appears that none of these fields apply, in which case we can leave them blank.
While they may not apply in this particular situation, you need to make sure that your data collection forms and
process is able to capture when they do apply.

Now that we are finished, we will click on the Save button. This takes us back to the first page where we can finish



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updating the activity.

Edit Activity – Changing the Status to Complete
So we are done updating the accomplishments for the activity. If the activity is complete, meaning you do not need
to draw any more funds and there are no additional accomplishments to be reported, you can update the activity’s
status to complete in IDIS.

Before we change the status to complete, the system wants us to check that all the required fields have been
completed. To do this, we will click on the Check CDBG button. You may have to scroll over to the right to see it.

The system will refresh the page and give you a message at the top. If there are no errors, the system will display
“CDBG activity pathway is complete,” Otherwise, the system will list any problems that need to be corrected
before completing the activity.

The final step is to change the activity status field to complete, put in a completion date, and click the Save button.
We will get a few errors here if the drawdown is still being processed or if the completion date is the same as the
funding date. These are issues that occur during training because we are doing everything the same data; chances
are you won’t see these errors when entering your data throughout the program year.




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Module 4: Public Facilities – Training Slides
Now moving to Module 4 Public Facilities and Improvements, the purpose of this module is to provide a basic
overview of how public facilities and improvement activities are funded and tracked under IDIS Online. For the
manual materials, refer to Chapter 9. These Chapter 9 pages cover those activities that are completed with a
national objective code of low moderate area.

This next slide begins to show the various matrix codes to be used for public facilities and improvement activities.
Note that each one represents a different type of either public facility or an improvement activity. HUD’s desire is
that you use the most specific matrix code. Note that the 03 code is not listed first. It’s actually the last option and
only used if no other more specific matrix code applies. See Appendix A for the matrix code list, and then page
beginning on A-3 for the matrix code definitions.

This second screen of matrix codes finishes up the list with 03 at the very end, meaning for other public facilities
and improvements where nothing else more specific would apply. An example for 03 would be an Americans with
Disabilities Act compliance for general government buildings that would be otherwise ineligible to be covered by
CDBG funds, and you would be sure to set up each activity individually.

Now as we look at our next slide, infrastructure improvements would typically qualify under the low/mod area
benefit national objective code, keeping in mind that the area must be primarily residential, the activity
undertaken must benefit all residents of the area. Facilities for persons with special needs may qualify under the
low/mod limited clientele national objective code. However, other national objective codes are available, such as
some may fit the slum/blight area, the low/mod jobs national objective codes. So, when in doubt, refer to the
cross reference handout at Appendix C.

So, some key points to keep in mind. One, be sure that you are using the most specific matrix code, that way you
are accurately reflecting the use of the funds and what type of activity is being undertaken. Do avoid combining
different public facilities under one activity. Why, because once again, the matrix code would not be reflective of
the use of funds. For example, if you’re doing a youth center, a senior center, and a neighborhood center, those
should be three separate activities; one with youth and the funds being spent for that, one under senior center,
one under neighborhood facility. With other types of activities for the CDBG program, you may report on
accomplishments, for example from housing, if you’re doing 10 housing units under one activity you’ll be reporting
on the progress of that activity, so maybe there are two housing units that have been completed within a year and
there’s still eight left to go. In the public facility and improvement activity type should be reflected only when the
activity is actually completed and thus the benefit being realized. Quarterly and annual updating in the narrative
section allows progress to be noted until the activity is ready for completion, but it doesn’t impact the
accomplishment numbers. A second area is in the reporting units of service versus number of unduplicated
persons. For example, a transitional housing facility serves 20 people over the course of the year; the number of
persons served should equal 20, not one person per night of shelter for the year. To report on the LMA universe,
you’ll want to be referring to the census data which can be found at: www.hud.gov/offices/CPD/census. Download
the spreadsheet, add filters, and then filter the spreadsheet for those tracks with over 51% low/mod. That will help
you identify what areas are actually eligible.

Now we’ll take a look at the LMA screens and what to expect. Adding a new activity, first you’ll start out with a
screen that everyone, regardless of the program area, will complete, and then we’ll proceed down the CDBG



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screens that will require specific program area detail. For public facility or improvement activities you’ll notice that
the detail page 3 requires the low/mod area county, on page 4 we’ll then be looking for the census tract, and on
page 5 the low/mod area block group or groups. Keep in mind; you’ll need to remember to click the “Calculate the
Low/Mod Percentage” button that is on page 3. There really isn’t a prompt, so we will highlight that at the time
that we work on the case study. Only when all of the required information is provided, will the activity show ready
to fund.

Now let’s take a look at the updating or completing an LMA activity, specifically for public facilities or
improvements. You’re going to be, once again refer to your Chapter 9 in the manual. On page one of the updating
or completing is the narrative. On page two it’s going to vary based on the type of activity that you’re undertaking.
Then you’ll take a few minutes, about five, to answer the four discussion questions. Then we’ll come back to go
over those answers. Once we finish that, at that time we will then read through and answer the case study
assignment as a group in IDIS Online, setting up our activity and taking it to completion.



Module 4 – Navigating through IDIS: Activity Setup for Public
Facilities
Introduction to Public Facilities Setup
This is the data entry portion of Module 4 of IDIS Online Training for CDBG Grantees.

In this video, we will walk through the process of adding a public facility activity that meets the low mod area
national objective.

The best way to learn IDIS is to get hands-on practice. I want to encourage you to log on to the UAT version of IDIS
and enter the data as you follow the video.

You can pause the video at any time by clicking the pause button in the lower left hand corner. You can switch
back and forth between this video and IDIS by holding down the Alt key on your keyboard and then pressing the
Tab key.

If you are not already logged into the UAT version of IDIS, pause the video at this time and do so now. You’ll know
if you are in the UAT version if you see UAT at the top of the screen.

If you do not know how to access the UAT, there are directions at the bottom of the IDIS log-in page and also in
Module 1 of this course.

I will be using the data found in Case Study 3 of the course materials. You can use the case study or simply make it
up as you go along. Assignment 1 of our case study states you are in the beginning of your 2010 program year and
you need to add the Brightwood street improvements activity to IDIS and fund it.

In Assignment #2, we will report accomplishments for the street improvements over multiple years.

IDIS Home Page
We’ll start at the Home page of IDIS. To add an activity, we will click on Projects/Activities in the Navigation Menu.

The system by default shows the Search Activities. This is used to find existing activities in the system. We don’t
want to look for an existing activity; we need to add a new activity.


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If you look to the left, you will see all of your options under the Project/Activities module. You should see under
Activity a link labeled Add. If you don’t see this, your user profile may not have permission to add activities, in
which case you would need to talk to your local administrator to obtain this permission.

Once you click on the link, the system will take you to the Add Activity page where we can start entering data. If
you are following along in your course manual, we are on page 3 dash 2.

Data Entry Add Activity Page
Most users can skip past the Activity Owner field as it will default to the correct grantee.

The next field is Program Year. Click on the dropdown arrow and select the year you want. If you don’t see the
correct year, this most likely means you have not yet set up projects for that year. You need to add your projects
first, then come back and add your activities.

In the case study, we set up our projects under 2010.

In the next field you will select the project that you want to associate with this activity. If you completed Module
2 of this course you should see the projects you added. I am going to select this public service project. If you did
not complete Module 2, for the purpose of this training you can select any project.

The next field is Activity Name. It’s a good idea to establish a naming convention that will help you quickly identify
what each activity is. In the case study, our activity is representing a street improvement project in the Brightwood
neighborhood. The Activity name does show up on a lot of the public CAPER reports so try to use a descriptive
name that an average person reading the CAPER would be able to understand.

The Grantee/PJ Activity ID is another field that can help you identify the activity. This is an optional field; HUD
does not require it. Many grantees populate this field with information that will help them reconcile their IDIS
information and their local financial records, such as a contract number, purchase order number, or local
accounting code.

The next field is a big one. If you click on the Activity Category field for CDBG, you’ll see a long list of all of the
eligible uses of CDBG and their corresponding matrix codes. It is really important to select the most appropriate
matrix code here because the system will prompt us for different sets of information based on the matrix code we
select here.

The public facility and infrastructure matrix codes begin with 03. For our case study, the most appropriate matrix
code is 03K Street Improvements. If you are having trouble choosing the matrix code, refer to Appendix A of the
manual for some guidance and descriptions of each code. If you can’t find a code that fits nicely with your public
facility activity, you can use 03 – Public Facilities General, but HUD only wants you to use this code as a last resort.

The next field is Environmental Assessment. You will want to check with whoever in your office is responsible for
environmental review. For most public services, the activity will be Exempt.

To the right of Environmental Assessment you see a field called Allow Another Organization to access this
Activity. You only need to provide this information if you will be giving IDIS access to a subrecipient so they can
add their own data to the system. CDBG grantees usually don’t provide IDIS access to their subrecipients so let’s
skip past this field.

The last field is the Description field. HUD has not provided any guidance on the amount of detail you need here so



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just use common sense. The main audience for this information is your HUD CPD representative so you may want
to discuss with them the level of detail they would like to see.

For the case study, I’ll put in a short sentence describing how CDBG funds will be used. If you have the description
in another document on your computer, you can use Copy and Paste.

$250,000 of CDBG funds will be used to make street improvements in the Brightwood neighborhood. The city has
secured additional funding of $750,000 from state and local sources.

Once you are done providing the data, let’s click Save at the bottom. If you provided all of the required data, you
should see a Activity Saved message at the top of the screen. If you missed a required field, the system will prompt
you for that information before it will let you save the screen.

A quick note about required fields. The fields marked as required are the fields that the system will make you
populate before saving the screen. There are many fields that are not required by the system that your HUD CPD
Representative will want to see answered so they can get a full picture of how the funds are being used.

Once this first page is saved, the system will assign an IDIS Activity ID to the activity. You may want to write down
this number in your project file as it is a quick way to find the activity in the system.

You will also see that the system added some additional fields, including the Activity Status, which defaults to
Open, the Completion Date, the Initial Funding Date.

You will see a column in the Activity Category Table called Ready to Fund. In the row for CDBG, it says Ready to
Fund is No. This means we still need to provide more data and complete activity setup before we can commit
funds and draw money against this activity.

To complete activity setup, we’ll click on the button in the Setup Detail column for CDBG called Add CDBG.

Data Entry Add CDBG Setup Detail Page 1
Here is the first of two pages of the Setup Detail.

In the manual, we are on page 3 dash 5.

Take note that the system is displaying the matrix code in big, bold letters across the top of the page. As noted
earlier, the fields we see and the data we need to input on the setup and completion pages will depend on the
matrix code we selected.

The type of data we need to collect will also depend on the national objective we select, which is the first field on
this page. It is extremely important to select the most appropriate matrix code and national objective.

If you click on the dropdown for national objective, you will see a list of the national objectives available for the
selected matrix code. The system will limit your choice of national objective based on the matrix code we selected
on the first page. If you don’t see the national objective you want, chances are you selected the wrong matrix
code.

There is a nice help feature built in to the system here. If you click on the Lookup Table, the system will open a
cross-reference table in a new window. A printed version of this table is also included in Appendix C of the course
material. The table has three columns, matrix codes, national objective, and accomplishment types.




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To use the table, you will find your matrix code. In the case study, we selected 03K Street Improvements. Once we
find our matrix code, we look in the middle column to see the different national objectives we could use for this
activity. Once we select a national objective, the third column will tell us what accomplishment types we can use
for the activity.

For our case study, we will use Low Mod Area (LMA).

Our next field is Accomplishment Type. You will see that the system is not giving us a choice here. Its saying that
based on our selected matrix code and national objective, we have to measure people.

Specifically, HUD wants us to measure the total number of persons who live in the service area of the activity.
Make sure to include all people who live in the area, not just the low- and moderate-income population. If you are
basing the national objective on census data, you can use the population of your targeted census tracts and block
groups for this field.

HUD allows grantees to space the proposed benefits over more than one year if the grantee feels that the project
will take more than one year to complete. You can space the goals over multiple years by pressing the Add
Another Year button and the system would give you a new row to input the goal for the second year. For our
streets project, let’s assume that we estimate the project will be finished in the next program year, 2011.

The next two fields relate to HUD’s performance measurement framework. If you want more information on
performance measurement, there is a lot of material on the HUD CPD website. This information should also be
included in your Annual Action Plan, so you may want to reference your plan.

The objective is used to indicate why you are undertaking the activity. For this activity, I will choose Suitable Living
Environment. There is no right answer here and it’s somewhat subjective. You will want to be consistent with how
you classified the activity in your Action Plan.

The outcome is used to indicate what we hope to achieve by undertaking the activity. For this activity, we will
choose availability/accessibility. Again, there is no right or wrong answer here. HUD will accept your selection as
long as you have a rationale for your choice.

Next is the Address field. For this field, HUD wants to know what area of the community is receiving a benefit. For
our streets project, we can put in the range of blocks of the street work.

Once you have provided the address information, you will want to click on the Validate this Address field. If the
system is able to validate the address, you can click on this icon and get some information about the address
provided, including a link to a Google map of the area. In some cases, the system will not be able to validate the
address, in which case you can skip the validation process at this time.

The next section is labeled Activity Purpose and contains four Yes/No questions that describe who will benefit
from the activity. Answer Yes or No based on the type of activity you are carrying out. In our case study, we can
leave everything as NO.

On the right side of the screen is a section labeled Associate to Another Activity with the question “Will
accomplishments be reported at another activity?” You can use this field when you have more than one activity in
IDIS for the same scope of work. This feature is not often used for public facilities. Its more common to use it for
program delivery activities associated with housing or economic development.




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You will use the next section to indicate who is carrying out the activity. If the grantee is carrying out the activity
with its own staff or through contractors, you will answer YES to this first question and then choose one of the
selections from the dropdown. If the activity is being carried out by a subrecipient or other entity, you will answer
NO to the first question. When you do so, you will see the information below become active, at which point you
can click on the Select Organization button to choose your subrecipient and select the type of organization from
the dropdown on the right.

For the case study, we will answer YES to the first question and select GRANTEES AND CONTRACTORS from the
dropdown.

The next section is Target Area. While the field is not required, it is important to provide this information when it is
applicable. You will see three target areas available from the dropdown: CDFI, Local, and Strategy. There is more
information on each in Appendix E of your manual.

CDFI stands for Community Development Financial Institution and is the least common target area. You will only
select it if a CDFI is carrying out the activity and is utilizing the regulatory flexibility provided for CDFIs under the
CDBG regulations.

The local target areas are defined by the grantee and do not require HUD approval. A local target area would be
any area where the grantee is making a concentrated effort to improve the area. Grantees may want to refer to
their Action Plan, which should list any target areas. If a grantee uses this feature, the PR84 report will summarize
your accomplishments for each target area.

Grantees will only select strategy area when the activity is undertaken as part of a Neighborhood Revitalization
Strategy Area or NRSA. NRSAs are approved by HUD as part of the Con Plan or Action Plan.

For the case study, let’s assume the street project is part of a larger redevelopment project where the city is
carrying out aggressive code enforcement, housing rehabilitation, and other public facility improvements in the
Brightwood neighborhood.

I’ll select local target area from the dropdown. If the target area has already been added to the system, you’ll see it
on the Area Name dropdown. I don’t see it, so I click Add New area.

The next screen lists all of the existing target areas. I will click on the Add button to add an area to the list.

[PAUSE FOR SCREEN RELOAD]

On the next screen I will give the area a name, indicate the type of target area, and click Save. When I return to the
setup detail screen I should now see that target area as a choice. I will see this choice for all of my other activities
as well.

The next section is called Special Characteristics and you simply check the box next to each field if it applies. If you
are not sure if they apply or not, refer to page 3-9 in your manual. Grantees in states that border Mexico will see
an additional choice for Colonias.

If you place a check next to Brownfield Redevelopment, the system will prompt you to indicate how many acres
are being remediated.

The next section is a collection of check boxes that relate to specific regulatory requirements of the CDBG
program. If the activity will involve One-for-One replacement or displacement, you will see some narrative fields


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during the completion of the activity that can be used to describe how the grantee complied with these
requirements.

Go ahead and check them if they apply, based on the nature of your project. If you check float funded, the system
will prompt you for additional information regarding the float funding at the bottom of the screen.

Once you’re done, you’ll see our options at the bottom. If we click Save, the system will save the data and return
us to the previous screen. However, we still have one more page of data entry, so we want to click Save and
Continue. This will bring us to Page 2 of Setup Detail. If we hit cancel, the system will not save any of our changes
and it will take us back to the previous page.

Data Entry Add CDBG Setup Detail Page 2
Here is the second page of the Setup Detail. Again, notice the matrix code listed at the top of the page. The fields
that the system is displaying are based on the matrix code we selected.

For our low mod area activity, we see a question asking Census or Survey. The system is asking how we determined
that our service area meets the Low Mod Income threshold. For our case study, we’ll answer Census. If you
following along with your own data, you will want to determine some eligible block groups in your jurisdiction.

The next section asks for the budget of the activity. Notice that the CDBG field is greyed out. Once you draw funds
against this activity, the system will populate that field for you.

You’ll also notice that these fields are not required by the system to complete the screen. This is because some
activities are fully funded by CDBG and these fields would be blank. If the activity does have other funds involved,
it is really important to provide this information. One of the ways the CDBG program is evaluated at the Federal
level is its ability to leverage funds. If filled out correctly, this section helps demonstrate that CDBG funds are in
fact leveraging other available dollars.

Our case study states that $750,000 of additional funding from state and local sources will be leveraged for this
activity.

At the time of activity setup, you may not know the final budget for an activity. HUD has stated that is permissible
to provide budget estimates at this point.

Once you have provided information here and the activity has drawn CDBG funds, the system will calculate a
leveraging ratio for the activity.

The next section collects data on how the CDBG funds are being distributed to BENEFICIARIES, the key word being
BENEFICIARIES.

In our case study, the funds will be used by the grantee to pay its contractors. None of the beneficiaries will receive
grants or loans, so we can leave this section blank.

When we’re done, we will click Save. This saves the second page and takes us to the third page.

Data Entry Add CDBG Setup Detail Page 3
The third, fourth, and fifth pages of Setup are only used for Low Mod Area activities. On these pages, you will
specify the service area of your Low Mod Area activity.




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Step 1 is to select the county. Once you select the county, click the Save Page button. When the page reloads, you
will see an opportunity to edit the Census Tracts and Block Groups for that county. Click the Add/Edit Census Tract
button.

Data Entry Add CDBG Setup Detail Page 4
On the fourth page, the system displays all of the census tracts in the county selected. Select the census tracts that
you want to include in your service area and move them to the Selected column by clicking the Select button.

Once you have selected your census tracts, click on the Select Block Groups button to move to the next page.

Data Entry Add CDBG Setup Detail Page 5
On the fifth page, the system displays all of the census tracts selected. On this page, you will indicate what portions
or block groups of the census tract are within the service area by placing a check next to each that applies. If the
entire census tract is within the service area, click ALL and don’t check any of the specific block groups. If only a
portion of the census tract is within the service area, place a check next to each block group that is part of the
service area.

When finished, click the Save and Return to Previous Page button. You will be taken back to page 4. Click on Save
and Return to the Previous Page again to return to Page 3.

Data Entry Add CDBG Setup Detail Page 3 - Revisited
Back on the third page, the bottom section will calculate the Low Mod percentage of the selected area. Click on
the Calculate % Low Mod. When the system refreshes, the percentage will be displayed. If all went well, it will be
over 51% (or if you are an upper quartile grantee, whatever your upper quartile threshold is.)

The final step is to click Save to return to the first page.

If everything went well, we now see that the activity is Ready to fund.

The system gives you a button that will take you straight to the Activity Funding screen for this activity.

At this point, go ahead and fund the activity. Then, create a drawdown for the activity.

The next section of this module will demonstrate how to report accomplishments and complete this activity.

For step-by-step guidance for the activity funding and drawdown, refer to the video for the funding and drawdown
module.



Module 4 – Navigating through IDIS: Reporting
Accomplishments for Public Facilities
Introduction to Public Service Activity Accomplishments
This is Part 2 of the data entry portion of Module 4 of IDIS Online Training for CDBG Grantees.

In this video, we will walk through the process of reporting accomplishments for a public facility activity that meets
a low mod area, or LMA, national objective.




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The best way to learn IDIS is to get hands-on practice. I want to encourage you to log on to the UAT version of IDIS
and enter the data as you follow the video

You can pause this video at any time using the pause button in the lower left hand corner.

You can switch back and forth between this video and IDIS by holding down the Alt key on your keyboard and then
pressing the Tab key.

If you are not already logged into the UAT version of IDIS, pause the video and do so now. You’ll know if you are in
the UAT version if you see UAT at the top of the screen.

If are unsure of how to access the UAT, there are directions on accessing the UAT version of IDIS at the bottom of
the log-in page and in Module 1 of this course.

This video is Part 2 of the public facility module. If you want to do the data entry for this tutorial, you need to first
complete the public facility activity setup exercise.

I am using the data found in Case Study 3 of the course material. You can use the data from the case study or
simply make it up as you go along.

In the previous video, we set up a street improvements activity for the Brightwood neighborhood. We will now
walk through the steps to report accomplishments for this activity.

IDIS Home Page
As always, we start at the Home page of IDIS. If you want to follow along in the manual, we are in Chapter 7 for the
first few screens and then we will skip to Chapter 9 for the screens specific to low mod area activities. Right now
we are on page 7 dash 1.

Okay, to report accomplishments for our activity we need to go to the Projects/Activities module in the Navigation
Menu.

The system by default shows the Search Activities. This is used to find existing activities in the system.

If you know the IDIS activity number, that’s the fastest way to find the activity. If you don't know it, you can use
any combination of the other search fields or simply click search to get a list of all your activities.

Once the results come back, you will see your options on the right in the Action column. We should see Edit and
View. The View function will let you look at the data but you won’t be able to change anything. We want to be
able to input accomplishment data, so we will choose Edit.

Edit Activity Page
This is the same page we saw when we added the activity.

We have two fields we need to update here, the Activity Status and the Completion Date. However, the system
won’t let us update these until we provide the accomplishment data, so let’s do that first.

If we scroll down a bit to the table in the center of the screen, we will see some buttons for CDBG. The system
does a nice job of separating out the data needed for setup and the data need for accomplishments. At this point,
we want to report accomplishments.




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Add CDBG Accomplishment Detail (Page 1)
If you are following along in your manual, we are in chapter 9.

If you look at the first page in chapter 9, you will see that the manual lists the screens you have to complete, based
on the type of activity. For our activity, the manual refers us to page 9 dash 2.

The first thing we have to do on this page is specify the program year in which the benefits were REALIZED. This is
an important point to keep in mind when reporting accomplishments for CDBG. It doesn’t matter what grant year
the activity is funded out of, it doesn’t matter what Action Plan the activity is listed in. If the work was done in
2010, we will use 2010 in this field.

The rest of the data we enter on this page and the next will be counted as 2010 accomplishments.

The next field is the Accomplishments Narrative field. HUD does not have specific guidance for this field. The best
source of guidance for the narrative is your local CPD representative, as it will be this person who will be reading
the narrative.

In general, you can use the Narrative to tell “the story behind the numbers” that are provided in the other fields.
You can use the narrative to better describe the benefit and outcome of the funded program. You can also use the
narrative to provide details on stalled and cancelled activities. If the activity is still stalled and has not spent any
money in the program year, you may want to use the narrative to give an explanation.

For our activity, we spent funds in the program year but we cannot report any accomplishments since the street
work is not finished; no one has received a benefit to date. We can use our narrative to explain to HUD where we
are in the overall process and when we hope to complete the activity.

The next field lists the Accomplishment Type, in this case People, and the proposed number of units for the
Program Year we selected. The system will provide this number once we save this screen.

Let’s click Save and Continue.

Add CDBG Accomplishment Detail (Page 2)
If you are following along in your manual, we are in chapter 9 on page 9 dash 6.

This second page collects performance measures. Performance measures provide more detail about who the
beneficiaries are and what type of work was done. These will change based on the type of activity you undertake.

You can see that the system carried forward the total number of persons served from the previous page. On this
screen, the system is asking to you categorize the benefit they received as new access, improved access, or access
to a facility that is no longer substandard. The manual provides examples of when to use each category.

Again, since the activity is not yet complete, there are no beneficiaries to report. HUD has stated in scenarios like
this to wait until the activity is complete to report all beneficiaries. So to report on this activity that’s still underway
without beneficiaries, all we needed to do was update the narrative.

Click on the Save button. This takes us back to the first page.

Edit Activity – Adding a Second Accomplishment Year
We are now finished updating the accomplishments for the activity for that program year.



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Since many public facility and infrastructure3 projects take more than one year to complete, let’s walk through
adding another program year for reporting accomplishments.

Let’s assume one year has gone by, and we receive a report from Public Works that the Brightwood street activity
is now finished.

Click on the Accomplishments button to go back to the Accomplishment screens.

By default, the system will display the most recent year of accomplishments. We don’t want to simply update the
year displayed. If we did so, chances are, you would not get credit since HUD only reviews and counts the most
current year of accomplishment data.

Instead, we will use the Add New Accomplishment Year button. By doing so, we get a fresh set of accomplishment
screens to report on our 2011 accomplishments.

Let’s quickly go through and enter the data for the people living in the service area.

Edit Activity – Changing the Status to Complete
So we are done updating the accomplishments for the activity. If the activity is complete, meaning you do not need
to draw any more funds and there are no additional accomplishments to be reported, you can update the activity’s
status to complete in IDIS.

Before we change the status to complete, the system wants us to check that all the required fields have been
completed. To do this, we will click on the Check CDBG button. You may have to scroll over to the right to see it.

The system will refresh the page and give you a message at the top. If there are no errors, the system will display
“CDBG activity pathway is complete.” Otherwise, the system will list any problems that need to be corrected
before completing the activity.

The final step is to change the activity status field to complete, put in a completion date, and click the Save button.
We will get a few errors here if the drawdown is still being processed or if the completion date is the same as the
funding date. These are issues that occur during training because we are doing everything the same data; chances
are you won’t see these errors when entering your data throughout the program year.



Module 5 Public Service Slides
Slide 39
This is Module 5 of IDIS Online Training for CDBG Grantees.

In Module 5, we will learn how to provide activity-level data for a public services activity that meets the Limited
Clientele national objective.

First we will review a set of slides that discuss some key points of data entry for public services and Limited
Clientele activities.

Then we will use a case study to demonstrate the data entry process.




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Both the slides and the case study are available for download from the course website. If you have not already
done so, you may want to download and print the materials from the course website before watching the module.

If you’re ready to go, let’s get started.

Slide 40
This first slide starts to list the types of public service activities eligible under CDBG. There are more on the next
slide.

To the left of each eligible public service is a matrix code.

The matrix code is how we will indicate our activity is eligible for CDBG funds.

You may have noticed that almost all of the public service matrix codes begin with 05. There is one exception, 03T,
which is used for the operating costs of homeless programs and programs for persons with HIV/AIDS.

The key point to understand when selecting a matrix code for a public service activity is HUD wants you to select
the most specific matrix code available.

If you are unsure of which matrix code to use, Appendix A in the course manual will give a short definition of each
matrix code and some guidance.

If you are still unsure which code to use, you will want to discuss your selection with your HUD CPD representative.

Slide 41
This slide lists the rest of the public service matrix codes.

HUD will occasionally add new matrix codes to accommodate the types of public services grantees are
undertaking. For example, 05V and 05W are relatively new.

Grantees are not limited to the specific public services listed here. If the grantee funds a service that is not listed
here, the correct choice would be 05, which is Other Public Services.

However, try to rule out using the other more specific matrix codes first. Grantees should only use 05 for a public
service if no other matrix code is appropriate.

Slide 42
This slide lists the national objectives that correspond with service activities, the most common being Limited
Clientele or LMC.

Grantees will want to use Limited Clientele when, as the name implies, the benefits are limited to a particular
group of persons.

To meet this national objective, the grantee must document that at least 51% of the beneficiaries qualify as low-
moderate income.

Two common examples of public service activities meeting a Limited Clientele national objective are youth services
and homeless services.




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To cut down on the amount of income documentation required for public services, HUD allows the grantee to
presume certain public services will meet the national objective if they limit the service to a certain population,
such as elderly people. This is called a presumed benefit. We will discuss this further on the next slide.

If the service will benefit all of the residents of an area and that area is primarily residential and low mod income,
the low mod area national objective may be used. For example, a crime prevention program that targets a specific
low-income neighborhood would qualify under LMA. For more information on Low Mod Area activities, refer to
Module 4.

The LM housing, LM jobs, and Slum and blight area national objectives are possible for some public services but
are not common.

Our focus in this module will be on Limited Clientele activities.

Slide 43
As mentioned on the previous slide, HUD allows grantees to automatically meet the Limited Clientele national
objective when they serve one of the presumed benefit populations, including abused children, battered spouses,
severely disabled adults, homeless persons, illiterate adults, persons with AIDS, migrant farm workers, and elderly
persons (who by HUD definition are 62 and older).

Even though grantees do not need to collect income data for these populations, they still need to input income
data in IDIS. To account for this, HUD has developed the following assumptions for each presumed benefit
population. For example, if you carry out a homeless program and serve 100 persons, you would report all 100
persons as extremely low income in IDIS.

A common mistake by grantees is to report everyone under presumed benefit as moderate income. Instead, use
the income levels on this chart.

Slide 44
This slide lists some key points to keep in mind when entering service activities in IDIS.

First, use the most specific matrix code. You only want to use the generic 05 as a last resort.

When reporting on beneficiaries, do not report everyone as moderate income. This misrepresents the actual
impact of the CDBG program in reports submitted to Congress and other government bodies.

If a service is carried out for more than one program year, make sure to report beneficiaries in the correct program
year. To do this, the grantee can insert a new program year on the CDBG Accomplishment Detail screens. We will
see how this is done in the data entry portion of this module.

When reporting beneficiaries, try to report unduplicated persons served. For example, if you provide counseling to
a homeless person once a month for twelve months, you would report this person once instead of 12 times.

Slide 45
Here we have a list of the screens we will need to complete when adding and completing a public service activity.

To add a service activity that will meet the limited clientele national objective, we need to complete three screens.
If you want to follow along in your manual, refer to Chapter 3: Activity Setup.




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To update or complete a Limited Clientele activity, we will need to complete two screens of data under CDBG
Accomplishment Detail. The information you need to provide on page 2 will vary based on the type of service
activity you are updating. Chapter 10 does a good job of explaining what data is required for each type of public
service.

For the data entry portion of this module, we will be using Case Study 4. Take a moment and read through case
study 4 and try to answer the discussion questions. When you are done, log in to the UAT version of IDIS and
follow along. The best way to learn IDIS is to get hands-on practice.




Module 5 – Navigating through IDIS: Activity Setup for Public
Services
Introduction to Public Service Setup
This is the data entry portion of Module 5 of IDIS Online Training for CDBG Grantees.

In this video, we will walk through the process of adding a public service activity that meets the Limited Clientele
national objective.

The best way to learn IDIS is to get hands-on practice. I want to encourage you to log on to the UAT version of IDIS
and enter the data as you follow the video.

You can pause the video at any time by clicking the pause button in the lower left hand corner. You can switch
back and forth between this video and IDIS by holding down the Alt key on your keyboard and then pressing the
Tab key.

If you are not already logged into the UAT version of IDIS, pause the video at this time and do so now. You’ll know
if you are in the UAT version if you see UAT at the top of the screen.

If you do not know how to access the UAT, there are directions at the bottom of the IDIS log-in page and also in
Module 1 of this course.

I will be using the data found in Case Study 4 of the course materials. You can use the case study or simply make it
up as you go along. Assignment 1 of our case study instructs us to input the data for a Head Start child care
program. Once we successfully add the activity, we will be able to fund it and create drawdown vouchers for
expenses that the program incurs.

In Assignment #2, we will report accomplishments for the Head Start program and update the activity status to
complete.

IDIS Home Page
We’ll start at the Home page of IDIS. To add an activity, we will click on Projects/Activities in the Navigation Menu.

The system by default shows the Search Activities. This is used to find existing activities in the system. We don’t
want to look for an existing activity, we need to add a new activity.




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If you look to the left you will see all of your options under the Project/Activities module. You should see under
Activity a link labeled Add. If you don’t see this, your user profile may not have permission to add activities, in
which case you would need to talk to your local administrator to obtain this permission.

Once you click on the link, the system will take you to the Add Activity page where we can start entering data. If
you are following along in your course manual, we are on page 3 dash 2.

Data Entry Add Activity Page
Most users can skip past the Activity Owner field as it will default to the correct grantee.

The next field is Program Year. Click on the dropdown arrow and select the year you want. If you don’t see the
correct year, this most likely means you have not yet set up projects for that year. You need to add your projects
first, then come back and add your activities.

In the case study, we set up our projects under 2010.

In the next field you will select the project that you want to associate with this activity. If you completed Module 2
of this course, you should see the projects you added. I am going to select this public service project. If you did not
complete Module 2, for the purpose of this training you can select any project.

The next field is Activity Name. It’s a good idea to establish a naming convention that will help you quickly identify
what each activity is. In the case study, our activity is representing a Head Start child care program. The Activity
name does show up on a lot of the public CAPER reports, so try to use a descriptive name that an average person
reading the CAPER would be able to understand.

The Grantee/PJ Activity ID is another field that can help you identify the activity. This is an optional field; HUD
does not require it. Many grantees populate this field with information that will help them reconcile their IDIS
information and their local financial records, such as a contract number, purchase order number, or local
accounting code.

The next field is a big one. If you click on the Activity Category field for CDBG, you’ll see a long list of all of the
eligible uses of CDBG and their corresponding matrix codes. It is really important to select the most appropriate
matrix code here because the system will prompt us for different sets of information based on the matrix code we
select here.

All except one of our public service matrix codes start with 05. For some reason, homeless services are coded as
03T. For our case study, the most appropriate matrix code is 05L – Child Care Services. If you are having trouble
choosing the matrix code, refer to Appendix A of the manual for some guidance and descriptions of each code. If
you can’t find a code that fits nicely with your public service activity, you can use 05 – Public Services General, but
HUD only wants you to use this code as a last resort.

The next field is Environmental Assessment. You will want to check with whoever in your office is responsible for
environmental review. For most public services, the activity will be Exempt.

To the right of Environmental Assessment you see a field called allow Another Organization to access this Activity.
You only need to provide this information if you will be giving IDIS access to a subrecipient so they can add their
own data to the system. CDBG grantees usually don’t provide IDIS access to their subrecipients so let’s skip past
this field.




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The last field is the Description field. HUD has not provided any guidance on the amount of detail you need here so
just use common sense. The main audience for this information is your HUD CPD representative so you may want
to discuss with them the level of detail they would like to see.

For the case study, I’ll put in a short sentence describing how CDBG funds will be used. If you have the description
in another document on your computer, you can use Copy and Paste.

CDBG funds will provide operating expenses to a Head Start child care program to hire an additional aide and
purchase classroom equipment.

Once you are done providing the data, let’s click Save at the bottom. If you provided all of the required data, you
should see an Activity Saved message at the top of the screen. If you missed a required field, the system will
prompt you for that information before it will let you save the screen.

A quick note about required fields. The fields marked as required are the fields that the system will make you
populate before saving the screen. There are many fields that are not required by the system that your HUD CPD
Representative will want to see answered so they can get a full picture of how the funds are being used.

Once this first page is saved, the system will assign an IDIS Activity ID to the activity. You may want to write down
this number in your project file as it is a quick way to find the activity in the system.

You will also see that the system added some additional fields, including the Activity Status, which defaults to
Open, the Completion Date, the Initial Funding Date.

You will see a column in the Activity Category Table called Ready to Fund. In the row for CDBG, it says Ready to
Fund is No. This means we still need to provide more data and complete activity setup before we can commit
funds and draw money against this activity.

To complete activity setup, we’ll click on the button in the Setup Detail column for CDBG called Add CDBG.

Data Entry Add CDBG Setup Detail Page 1
Here is the first of two pages of the Setup Detail.

In the manual, we are on page 3 dash 5.

Take note that the system is displaying the matrix code in big, bold letters across the top of the page. As noted
earlier, the fields we see and the data we need to input on the setup and completion pages will depend on the
matrix code we selected.

The type of data we need to collect will also depend on the national objective we select, which is the first field on
this page. It is extremely important to select the most appropriate matrix code and national objective.

If you click on the dropdown for national objective, you will see a list of the national objectives available for the
selected matrix code. The system will limit your choice of national objective based on the matrix code we selected
on the first page. If you don’t see the national objective you want, chances are you selected the wrong matrix
code.

There is a nice help feature built in to the system here. If you click on the Lookup Table, the system will open a
cross-reference table in a new window. A printed version of this table is also included in Appendix C of the course
material. The table has three columns, matrix codes, national objective, and accomplishment types.


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To use the table, you will find your matrix code. In the case study, we selected 05L Child Care Services. Once we
find our matrix code, we look in the middle column to see the different national objectives we could use for this
activity. Once we select a national objective, the third column will tell us what accomplishment types we can use
for the activity.

For our case study, we will use Limited Clientele (LMC).

Our next field is Accomplishment Type. You will see that the system is not giving us a choice here. Its saying that
based on our selected matrix code and national objective, we have to measure people.

Specifically, HUD wants us to measure the number of unduplicated persons served. For example, a child
participating in this Head Start program may use the program 100 times over the course of the program year. This
would be the duplicated count of persons served since you are counting the same person more than once. In this
case, HUD would want to you count this child only once when reporting goals and accomplishments.

HUD allows grantees to space the proposed benefits over more than one year if the grantee feels that the project
will take more than one year to complete. For most public services, the term of the agreement is for one year and
you wouldn’t need to use this feature. If the term of the agreement was longer than one year, or was staggered
across two program years, you could insert goals for the second program year by pressing the Add Another Year
button and the system would give you a new row to input the goal for the second year.

Our case study states that a total of 30 children will benefit so we will use that number.

The next two fields relate to HUD’s performance measurement framework. If you want more information on
performance measurement, there is a lot of material on the HUD CPD website. This information should also be
included in your Annual Action Plan, so you may want to reference your plan.

The objective is used to indicate why you are undertaking the activity. For this activity, I will choose Suitable Living
Environment. There is no right answer here and it’s somewhat subjective. You will want to be consistent with how
you classified the activity in your action plan.

The outcome is used to indicate what we hope to achieve by undertaking the activity. For this activity, we will
choose Availability/Accessibility. Again, there is no right or wrong answer here. HUD will accept your selection as
long as you have a rationale for your choice.

Next is the Address field. For our case study, you will see two addresses: one is the administrative office and the
other is the site at which the service will be performed. HUD does not want the address of the program
administrator. HUD wants to know where the service is being performed. They want to use this information to
determine what areas of the community are receiving a benefit.

Once you have provided the address information, you will want to click on the Validate this Address field. If the
system is able to validate the address, you can click on this icon and get some information about the address
provided, including a link to a Google map of the area. In some cases, the system will not be able to validate the
address, in which case you can skip the validation process at this time.

The next section is labeled Activity Purpose and contains four Yes/No questions that describe who will benefit
from the activity. Answer Yes or No based on the type of activity you are carrying out. In our case study, we can
leave everything as NO.




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On the right side of the screen is a section labeled Associate to Another Activity with the question “Will
accomplishments be reported at another activity?” You can use this field when you have more than one activity in
IDIS for the same scope of work. This feature is not often used for public services. Its more common to use it for
program delivery activities associated with housing or economic development.

You will use the next section to indicate who is carrying out the activity. If the grantee is carrying out the activity
with its own staff or through contractors, you will answer YES to this first question and then choose one of the
selections from the dropdown. If the activity is being carried out by a subrecipient or other entity, you will answer
NO to the first question. When you do so, you will see the information below become active, at which point you
can click on the Select Organization button to choose your subrecipient and select the type of organization from
the dropdown on the right.

Selecting an organization is fairly straightforward. When searching for an organization, try typing just a portion of
the name instead of the exact name and you will get better results. You may see an organization listed more than
once. If that’s the case, choose the one with the most recent information. If you cannot find the organization in the
system, you will have to add it. Keep in mind that you will need to know the DUNS number of the organization
when you add it to the system. For more information on adding an organization, please see Appendix D of your
course manual.

For the case study, we will select No to the first question and select Head Start as the subrecipient. For the
purpose of this exercise, if you do not have Head Start listed as one of your subrecipients, you can select another
organization.

The next section is Target Area. While the field is not required, it is important to provide this information when it is
applicable. You will see three target areas available from the dropdown: CDFI, Local, and Strategy. There is more
information on each in Appendix E of your manual.

CDFI stands for Community Development Financial Institution and is the least common target area. You will only
select it if a CDFI is carrying out the activity and is utilizing the regulatory flexibility provided for CDFIs under the
CDBG regulations.

The local target areas are defined by the grantee and do not require HUD approval. A local target area would be
any area where the grantee is making a concentrated effort to improve the area. Grantees may want to refer to
their Action Plan, which should list any target areas. If a grantee uses this feature, the PR84 report will summarize
your accomplishments for each target area.

Grantees will only select strategy area when the activity is undertaken as part of a Neighborhood Revitalization
Strategy Area or NRSA. NRSAs are approved by HUD as part of the Con Plan or Action Plan.

For the case study, we will not select a target area. For instruction on adding and selecting target areas, please
refer to the Housing or Public Facilities module.

The next section is called special characteristics and you simply check the box next to each field if it applies. If you
are not sure if they apply or not, refer to page 3-9 in your manual. Grantees in states that border Mexico will see
an additional choice for Colonias.

If you place a check next to Brownfield Redevelopment, the system will prompt you to indicate how many acres
are being remediated.




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The next section is a collection of check boxes that relate to specific regulatory requirements of the CDBG
program. If the activity will involve One-for-One replacement or displacement, you will see some narrative fields
during the completion of the activity that can be used to describe how the grantee complied with these
requirements.

You should see special assessments and favored activity are greyed out. Special assessments apply to facilities and
infrastructure and favored activity is for economic development. The system knows that these fields would not
apply to our activity based on the matrix code we selected. The two other choices are revolving loan and float
funded which could apply to this activity. Go ahead and check them if they apply, based on the funding of your
program. If you check Float funded, the system will prompt you for additional information regarding the float
funding at the bottom of the screen.

Once you’re done, you’ll see our options at the bottom. If we click Save, the system will save the data and return
us to the previous screen. However, we still have one more page of data entry, so we want to click Save and
Continue. This will bring us to Page 2 of Setup Detail. If we hit cancel, the system will not save any of our changes
and it will take us back to the previous page.

Data Entry Add CDBG Setup Detail Page 2
Here is the last page of the Setup Detail. Once we complete it, we will be done with the Activity Setup.

Again, notice the matrix code listed at the top of the page. The fields that the system is displaying are based on the
matrix code we selected.

For our Limited Clientele activity, we see two questions:

Will the activity serve a population that HUD classifies as a Presumed Benefit?

Will the activity satisfy the LMC national objective based on its Nature/Location?

By answering yes to either of these questions, you are indicating to HUD that based on the target population or the
nature of the activity, it is not necessary to verify the income of each beneficiary to document compliance with the
Limited Clientele national objective.

You can use presumed benefit when the service will exclusively cater to one of the populations HUD has identified
as likely to meet the 51% low-moderate income threshold. These include: abused children, battered spouses,
homeless, severely disabled adults, illiterate adults, persons with AIDS, migrant farm workers, and elderly persons.

You can use nature/location if the based on the activity’s nature and location that it may be safely assumed that at
least 51% of the activity's clientele will primarily be low- and moderate-income persons. Since this is subjective, it
is recommended that you check with your field office representative to make sure that they agree with your
assumptions.

If you decide to use nature/location, make sure to describe your assumptions and rationale in the narrative section
provided.

For our case study, we’ll answer No to both.

The next section asks for the budget of the activity. Notice that the CDBG field is greyed out. Once you draw funds
against this activity, the system will populate that field for you.



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You’ll also notice that these fields are not required by the system to complete the screen. This is because some
activities are fully funded by CDBG and these fields would be blank. If the activity does have other funds involved,
it is really important to provide this information. One of the ways the CDBG program is evaluated at the Federal
level is its ability to leverage funds. If filled out correctly, this section helps demonstrate that CDBG funds are in
fact leveraging other available dollars.

Our case study does not provide any information regarding leveraging, but it is unlikely that CDBG is the only
funding source for this program. You would want to get this information from the project file.

At the time of activity setup, you may not know the final budget for an activity. HUD has stated that is permissible
to provide budget estimates at this point.

Once you have provided information here and the activity has drawn CDBG funds, the system will calculate a
leveraging ratio for the activity.

The next section collects data on how the CDBG funds are being distributed to BENEFICIARIES, the key word being
BENEFICIARIES.

HUD doesn’t care how the funds are distributed to the subrecipient.

In our case study, the funds will be used by the subrecipient. None of the beneficiaries will receive grants or loans,
so we can leave this section blank.

When we’re done, we will click Save. This saves the second page and takes us back to the page we started at.

[Pause for reload]

If everything went well, we now see that the activity is Ready to fund.

The system gives you a button that will take you straight to activity funding screen for this activity.

At this point, go ahead and fund the activity. Then, create a drawdown for the activity.

The next section of this module will demonstrate how to report accomplishments and complete this activity.

For step-by-step guidance for the activity funding and drawdown, refer to the video for the funding and drawdown
module.



Module 5 – Navigating through IDIS: Reporting
Accomplishments for Public Services
Introduction to Public Service Activity Accomplishments
This is Part 2 of the data entry portion of Module 5 of IDIS Online Training for CDBG Grantees.

In this video, we will walk through the process of reporting accomplishments for a public service activity that
meets a Limited Clientele, or LMC, national objective.

The best way to learn IDIS is to get hands-on practice. I want to encourage you to log on to the UAT version of IDIS



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and enter the data as you follow the video

You can pause this video at any time using the pause button in the lower left hand corner.

You can switch back and forth between this video and IDIS by holding down the Alt key on your keyboard and then
pressing the Tab key.

If you are not already logged into the UAT version of IDIS, pause the video and do so now. You’ll know if you are in
the UAT version if you see UAT at the top of the screen.

If are unsure of how to access the UAT, there are directions on accessing the UAT version of IDIS at the bottom of
the log-in page and in Module 1 of this course.

This video is Part 2 of the public service module. If you want to do the data entry for this tutorial, you need to first
complete the public service activity setup exercise.

I am using the data found in Case Study 4 of the course material. You can use the data from the case study or
simply make it up as you go along.

In the previous video, we set up the public service activity for a Head Start child care program. We will now walk
through the steps to report accomplishments for this activity.




IDIS Home Page
As always, we start at the Home page of IDIS. If you want to follow along in the manual, we are in Chapter 7 for the
first few screens and then we will skip to Chapter 10 for the screens specific to Limited Clientele activities. Right
now we are on page 7 dash 1.

Okay, to report accomplishments for our activity we need to go to the Projects/Activities module in the Navigation
Menu.

The system by default shows the Search Activities. This is used to find existing activities in the system.

If you know the IDIS activity number, that’s the fastest way to find the activity. If you don't know it, you can use
any combination of the other search fields or simply click search to get a list of all your activities.

Once the results come back, you will see your options on the right in the Action column. We should see Edit and
View. The View function will let you look at the data but you won’t be able to change anything. We want to be
able to input accomplishment data, so we will choose Edit.

Edit Activity Page
This is the same page we saw when we added the activity.

We have two fields we need to update here, the Activity Status and the Completion Date. However, the system
won’t let us update these until we provide the accomplishment data, so let’s do that first.

If we scroll down a bit to the table in the center of the screen, we will see some buttons for CDBG. The system
does a nice job of separating out the data needed for setup and the data need for accomplishments. At this point,
we want to report accomplishments.



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Add CDBG Accomplishment Detail (Page 1)
If you are following along in your manual, we are in chapter 10.

If you look at the first page in chapter 10, you will see that the manual lists the screens you have to complete
based on the type of activity. Page 1 will be different if you are counting persons or households. Page 2 will list
different performance measures based on the nature of the activity. Guidance for the first screen starts on page 10
dash 2.

The first thing we have to do on this page is specify the program year in which the benefits were REALIZED. This is
an important point to keep in mind when reporting accomplishments for CDBG. It doesn’t matter what grant year
the activity is funded out of, it doesn’t matter what action plan the activity is listed in. If the kids received child care
in 2010, we will use 2010 in this field.

The rest of the data we enter on this page and the next will be counted as 2010 accomplishments.

The next field is the Accomplishments Narrative field. HUD does not have specific guidance for this field. The best
source of guidance for the narrative is your local CPD representative, as it will be this person who will be reading
the narrative.

In general, you can use the Narrative to tell “the story behind the numbers” that are provided in the other fields.
You can use the narrative to better describe the benefit and outcome of the funded program. You can also use the
narrative to provide details on stalled and cancelled activities. If the activity is still stalled and has not spent any
money in the program year, you may want to use the narrative to give an explanation.

The next field lists the Accomplishment Type, in this case People, and the proposed number of units for the
Program Year we selected. The system will provide this number once we save this screen.

The next section will collect Direct Benefit Data for the beneficiaries of the activity, including Race/Ethnicity data,
Head of Household, and Income.

We are now on page 10-4 of the manual.

You can see the system prompts us to count people as opposed to households for this activity.

I’ll use the beneficiary data in the case study to populate these fields. The first category listed is white. First we
report the total White, then we report the White beneficiaries who also identified themselves as Hispanic.

To add another row to this table, we need to click on the Add Another Race button.

The next category listed is Black/African American. We report the total first. In the case study, none of the
beneficiaries identified as Black-Hispanic, so we can leave that field blank.

I’ll repeat the process for Asian and then move on to the income table.

A quick note regarding income, public services, and presumed benefit. When reporting income for presumed
benefit activities, make sure to use the guidance provided on page 10-6 of your manual. DO NOT automatically
report everyone served as moderate income.

Our activity did not use presumed benefit so we collected income data. Let’s take a second and populate these
fields based on our case study.



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Let’s click Save and Continue.

When we try to save the data, the system will check the Race and Income totals to see if they match. If they don’t
the system will return an error and prompt you to correct the data.

If all is good, the system will move us to Page 2.

Add CDBG Accomplishment Detail (Page 2)
If you are following along in your manual, we are in chapter 10 on page 10 dash 9.

This second page collects Performance Measures. Performance measures provide more detail about who the
beneficiaries are and what type of work was done. These will change based on the type of activity you undertake.
For our child care public service we will be tracking the performance measures on page 10 dash 11.

You can see that the system carried forward the total number of persons served from the previous page. On this
screen, the system is asking to you categorize the benefit they received as new or continuing access, improved
access, or access to a service or benefit that is no longer substandard. The manual provides examples of when to
use each category.

Some grantees fund the same public service providers every year. In this case, the beneficiaries should reported
under the first category as having continuing access.

Now that we are finished, we will click on the Save button. This takes us back to the first page where we can finish
updating the activity.

Edit Activity – Changing the Status to Complete
So we are done updating the accomplishments for the activity. If the activity is complete, meaning you do not need
to draw any more funds and there are no additional accomplishments to be reported, you can update the activity’s
status to complete in IDIS.

Before we change the status to complete, the system wants us to check that all the required fields have been
completed. To do this, we will click on the Check CDBG button. You may have to scroll over to the right to see it.

The system will refresh the page and give you a message at the top. If there are no errors, the system will display
“CDBG activity pathway is complete.” Otherwise, the system will list any problems that need to be corrected
before completing the activity.

The final step is to change the activity status field to complete, put in a completion date, and click the Save button.
We will get a few errors here if the drawdown is still being processed or if the completion date is the same as the
funding date. These are issues that occur during training because we are doing everything the same data; chances
are you won’t see these errors when entering your data throughout the program year.



Module 6 – Economic Development Training Slides
Slide 47
This is Module 6 of IDIS Online Training for CDBG Grantees.




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In Module 6, we will learn how to provide activity-level data for an economic development activity that meets the
Low Mod Jobs or LMJ national objective.

First we will review a set of slides that discuss some key points regarding economic development and the Low Mod
Jobs national objective.

Then we will use a case study to demonstrate the data entry process.

Both the slides and the case study are available for download from the course website. If you have not already
done so, you may want to download and print the materials from the course website before watching the module.

If you’re ready to go, let’s get started.

Slide 48
This first slide starts to list the types of economic development activities eligible under CDBG.

To the left of each eligible public service is a matrix code.

The matrix code is how we will indicate our activity is eligible for CDBG funds. If you are unsure of which matrix
code to use, Appendix A in the course manual will give a short definition of each matrix code and some guidance.

If you are still unsure which code to use, you will want to discuss your selection with your HUD CPD representative.

The matrix code of 14 E is used for commercial rehabilitation programs.

The four matrix codes that begin with 17 are economic development projects carried out by the grantee or a
nonprofit. They include acquisition and disposition of land, infrastructure improvements, building acquisition,
construction and rehabilitation. Other eligible activities carried out by a grantee or a nonprofit would use the 17D
code for Other Improvements.

The three matrix codes that begin with 18 are economic development activities where a for-profit business
receives a direct benefit. 18A is the most common use of CDBG for economic development. You will use 18A when
you provide financial assistance to a business.

Use 18B when you use CDBG funds to provide technical assistance to for-profit businesses, such as workshops,
marketing assistance, and referrals. You will also use 18B for activity delivery costs eligible under special economic
development.

Use 18C for programs that cater to microenterprises, which are businesses with five or fewer employees, including
the owner.

Slide 49
The most common national objective used with economic development is the Low Mod Jobs or LMJ national
objective.

To meet this objective, grantees must document that permanent jobs were created or retained, at least 51% of
which were taken or made available to low-moderate income persons.

Some economic development projects can be qualified under national objectives other than low-mod job creation
and retention.



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For example, microenterprise activities can be qualified under the low-mod limited clientele category if the owner
of the business is low and moderate income.

Some commercial rehabilitation programs can be undertaken as a low-mod area benefit activity. The types of
businesses that are likely to qualify under the LMI area benefit national objective are retail businesses that sell
goods and services to a LMI neighborhood.

Job training activities are often undertaken pursuant to the limited clientele national objective, especially job
training programs that are funded as a public service activity. Other than job training and microenterprise, the
Limited Clientele national objective cannot be used for economic development

Finally, some economic development activities can be undertaken as an area slum and blight activity if the activity
is related to addressing the blight. Spot slum and blight is only possible for commercial rehabilitation and this
national objective limits the type and level of rehab that can be conducted.

Our focus in this module will be to report data for the Low Mod Job national objective.

Slide 50
When determining whether the national objective has been met, you want to be careful to measure Full-Time Job
Equivalents or FTEs instead of persons.

A FTE equals forty hours of work per week.

This will come into play when some of the jobs created or retained are part-time.

For example, assume a business that you assist creates one full-time and two part-time jobs. This activity is
benefiting three people, but only two full-time equivalent jobs are created. The two part-time jobs add up to one
full-time equivalent.

If we go a step further, assume that the full-time job was a manager’s position that required special training and
was not made available to or taken by a low-moderate income person and the two part-time positions were filled
by persons who meet the low-moderate income requirements.

Based on the persons served, this activity meets a national objective because 66% of the persons were low-
moderate income.

But remember the test is based on % of FTEs held or made available to low-moderate income persons. In this
situation, only 50% of the FTEs were held or made available to low-moderate income persons and therefore has
not met the national objective of 51%.

Slide 51
Economic Development activities will require a lot of documentation both in IDIS and outside of the system as
well.

For job creation, the CDBG regulations allow a grantee to count a job as low mod if the job is made available to or
held by a low-moderate income person. The grantee will want to keep good records outside of IDIS to support the
data entered into the system.




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For each position created, you will only count the first person hired and enter that person’s income and race and
ethnicity into the system. If that person leaves the job, you do not have to update the information in IDIS.

If the business is unable to create or fill the position, you will keep the IDIS activity open until they do so. In other
words, don’t close the activity at the end of the year if the business is still in the process of trying to fill the
position.

If you encounter a case where the business fails to create the expected jobs, you will be able to cancel the activity,
even if it has drawn funds. Be sure to work closely with your HUD CPD representative in these situations to
adequately document what occurred.

For job retention, the grantee will need to document that the jobs would have been lost but for the CDBG
assistance.

Slide 52
Here are some key points to keep in mind when entering data for an activity with a Low Mod Job national
objective.

First, each instance of direct financial assistance to for-profit companies must be reported under its own IDIS
activity. For example, if a grantee distributes 10 loans to area businesses, the grantee will set up 10 IDIS activities
to represent those loans. This is because HUD needs to see that each business meets the 51% threshold on its
own.

Aggregation is allowed only in certain circumstances. For activities with a Low Mod Job (LMJ) national objective,
aggregation is allowed in the following cases:

Acquisition, development, or improvement of a real property (e.g., a business incubator or an industrial park) that
will benefit multiple businesses.

Staff and overhead costs to administer a loan program where the loans are funded with non-CDBG funds.

A Community Development Financial Institution is used to carry out activities for the purpose of creating or
retaining jobs.

Public facilities or improvements that will result in the creation or retention of jobs by more than one business.

One of the most common data entry errors for economic development activities is the double entry of job data.

Many job creation activities take multiple years to complete. Make sure you report jobs in the correct year.

Some grantees will use a separate IDIS activity to track program delivery costs. You will only report
accomplishments under the program delivery activity if they are not reported elsewhere in IDIS.

When using the LMJ national objective, you will measure number of jobs created or retained. Do not report on the
number of people who reside in the area benefiting from the economic development.

Keep in mind we are discussing CDBG regulations, not CDBG-R. The job reporting for CDBG-R is entirely different.




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Slide 53
Here we have a list of the screens we will need to complete when adding and completing an economic
development activity with a Low Mod Job national objective.

To add an activity, we need to complete three screens. If you want to follow along in your manual, refer to Chapter
3: Activity Setup.

To update or complete an activity, we will need to complete two screens of data under CDBG Accomplishment
Detail. Chapter 12 in your course manual covers the Accomplishment Detail screens for LMJ activities.

For the data entry portion of this module, we will be using Case Study 5. Take a moment and read through case
study 5 and try to answer the discussion questions. When you are done, log in to the UAT version of IDIS and
follow along. The best way to learn IDIS is to get hands-on practice.



Module 6 – Navigating through IDIS: Activity Setup for
Economic Development
Introduction to ED Setup
This is Part 1 of the data entry portion for Economic Development activities. In this video, we will walk through the
process of adding an economic development activity that meets the low mod job national objective.

The best way to learn IDIS is to get hands-on practice. I want to encourage you to log on to the UAT version of IDIS
and enter the data as you follow the video.

You can pause the video at any time by clicking the pause button in the lower left hand corner. You can switch
back and forth between this video and IDIS by holding down the Alt key on your keyboard and then pressing the
Tab key.

If you are not already logged into the UAT version of IDIS, pause the video at this time and do so now. You’ll know
if you are in the UAT version if you see UAT at the top of the screen.

If you do not know how to access the UAT, there are directions at the bottom of the IDIS log-in page and also in
Module 1 of this course.

I will be using the data found in Case Study 5 of the course materials. You can use the case study or simply make it
up as you go along. Assignment 1 of our case study instructs us to input the data for a job creation loan to
Thompson Automotive Company.

In Assignment #2, we will report accomplishments for this activity and update the activity status to complete.

IDIS Home Page
We’ll start at the Home page of IDIS. To add an activity, we will click on Projects/Activities in the Navigation Menu.

The system by default shows the Search Activities. This is used to find existing activities in the system. We don’t
want to look for an existing activity, we need to add a new activity.

If you look to the left you will see all of your options under the Project/Activities module. You should see under



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Activity a link labeled Add. If you don’t see this, your user profile may not have permission to add activities, in
which case you would need to talk to your local administrator to obtain this permission.

Once you click on the link, the system will take you to the Add Activity page where we can start entering data. If
you are following along in your course manual, we are on page 3 dash 2.

Data Entry Add Activity Page
Most users can skip past the Activity Owner field as it will default to the correct grantee.

The next field is Program Year. Click on the dropdown arrow and select the year you want. If you don’t see the
correct year, this most likely means you have not yet set up projects for that year. You need to add your projects
first, then come back and add your activities.

In the case study, we set up our projects under 2010.

In the next field you will select the project that you want to associate with this activity. If you completed Module 2
of this course you should see the projects you added. I am going to select the economic development project. If
you did not complete Module 2, for the purpose of this training you can select any project.

The next field is Activity Name. The Activity Name appears on the CAPER reports so try to use a descriptive name
that an average person reading the CAPER would be able to understand.

It’s a good idea to establish a naming convention that will help you quickly identify what each activity is. In the case
study, our activity is representing a loan made to a specific business.

I will use “ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT LOAN: THOMPSON AUTOMOTIVE” for the Activity Name.

The Grantee/PJ Activity ID is another field that can help you identify the activity. This is an optional field; HUD
does not require it. Many grantees populate this field with information that will help them reconcile their IDIS
information and their local financial records, such as a contract number, purchase order number, or local
accounting code.

The next field is very important. If you click on the Activity Category field for CDBG, you’ll see a long list of all of
the eligible uses of CDBG and their corresponding matrix codes. It is really important to select the most
appropriate matrix code here because the system will prompt us for different sets of information based on the
matrix code we select here.

Most of the Economic Development matrix codes start with 17 or 18. For our case study, the most appropriate
matrix code is 18A – Direct Financial Assistance to a For Profit. If you are having trouble choosing the matrix code,
refer to Appendix A of the manual for some guidance and descriptions of each code. You can also work with your
CPD Representative to find the right code.

The next field is Environmental Assessment. You will want to check with whoever in your office is responsible for
environmental review. For our case study, I will choose Complete.

To the right of Environmental Assessment you see a field called allow Another Organization to access this Activity.
You only need to provide this information if you will be giving IDIS access to a subrecipient so they can add their
own data to the system. In general, CDBG grantees don’t provide IDIS access to their subrecipients so let’s skip
past this field.



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The last field is the Description field. HUD has not provided any guidance on the amount of detail you need here so
just use common sense. The main audience for this information is your HUD CPD representative so you may want
to discuss with them the level of detail they would like to see.

For the case study, I’ll put in a short sentence describing how CDBG funds will be used. If you have the description
in another document on your computer, you can use Copy and Paste.

CDBG funds will be loaned to Thompson Automotive to upgrade and expand their current facility. As a result, five
new jobs will be created.

Once you are done providing the data, let’s click Save at the bottom. If you provided all of the required data, you
should see a Activity Saved message at the top of the screen. If you missed a required field, the system will prompt
you for that information before it will let you save the screen.

A quick note about required fields. The fields marked as required are the fields that the system will make you
populate before saving the screen. There are many fields that are not required by the system that your HUD CPD
Representative will want to see answered so they can get a full picture of how the funds are being used.

With that said, try to fill out every field you see if it applies to the activity you are undertaking, even if it is not
marked as a required field.

Once this first page is saved, the system will assign an IDIS Activity ID to the activity. You may want to write down
this number in your project file as it is a quick way to find the activity in the system.

You will also see that the system added some additional fields, including the Activity Status, which defaults to
Open, the Completion Date, the Initial Funding Date.

You will see a column in the Activity Category Table called Ready to Fund. In the row for CDBG it says Ready to
Fund is No. This means we still need to provide more data and complete activity setup before we can commit
funds and draw money against this activity.

To complete activity setup, we’ll click on the button in the Setup Detail column for CDBG called Add CDBG.

Data Entry Add CDBG Setup Detail Page 1
Here is the first of two pages of the Setup Detail.

In the manual, are on page 3 dash 5.

Take note that the system is displaying the matrix code in big, bold letters across the top of the page. As noted
earlier, the data we need to input will be based on in part on the matrix code we selected.

The type of data we need to collect will also depend on the national objective we select, which is the first field on
this page.

If you click on the dropdown, you will see a list of the national objectives available for the selected matrix code.
The system will limit your choice of national objective based on the matrix code we selected on the first page. If
you don’t see the national objective you want, chances are you selected the wrong matrix code.

There is a nice help feature built in to the system here. If you click on the Lookup Table, the system will open a
cross-reference table in a new window. A printed version of this table is also included in Appendix C of the course



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material. The table has three columns, matrix codes, national objective, and accomplishment types.

To use the table, you will find your matrix code. In the case study, we selected 18A Direct Financial Assistance to a
For Profit. Once we find our matrix code, we look in the middle column to see the different national objectives we
could use for this activity. Once we select a national objective, the third column will tell us what accomplishment
types we can use for the activity.

For our case study, we will use Low Mod Jobs or LMJ. You may notice that there is more than one LMJ national
objective. In most cases, you will use the three letter code. For more information on selecting national objectives,
you can refer to appendix B of your manual, which will provide descriptions and references to the appropriate
section of the CDBG regulations.

Our next field is Accomplishment Type. You will see that the system is not giving us a choice here. Its saying that
based on our selected matrix code and national objective, we have to measure jobs.

HUD allows grantees to space the proposed benefits over more than one year if the grantee feels that the project
will take more than one year to complete. For many economic development projects, it may take the businesses
several years to satisfy the job creation requirements. To spread the proposed goal over more than one year, we
can add a year by pressing the Add Another Year button. For our case study, let’s assume the business proposed
to create three jobs in the first year and two additional jobs in the second year.

The next two fields relate to HUD’s performance measurement framework. If you want more information on
performance measurement, there is a lot of material on the HUD CPD website. This information should also be
included in your Annual Action Plan, so you may want to reference your plan.

The objective is used to indicate why you are undertaking the activity. For this activity, I will choose Create
Economic Opportunities. There is no right answer here and it’s somewhat subjective. You will want to be
consistent with how you classified the activity in your action plan.

The outcome is used to indicate what we hope to achieve by undertaking the activity. For this activity, I will choose
Sustainability. Again, there is no right or wrong answer here. HUD will accept your selection as long as you have a
rationale for your choice.

Next is the Address field. We will use the address of the business where jobs will be created. HUD will use this
information to determine what areas of the community are receiving a benefit.

Once you have provided the address information, click on Validate this Address. If the system is able to validate
the address, you can click on this icon and get some information about the address provided. In some cases, the
system will not be able to validate the address, in which case you can skip the validation process at this time.

The next section is labeled Activity Purpose and contains four Yes/No questions that describe who will benefit
from the activity. Answer Yes or No based on the type of activity you are carrying out. In our case study, we can
leave everything as NO.

On the right side of the screen is a section labeled Associate to Another Activity with the question “Will
accomplishments be reported at another activity?” You can use this field when you have more than one activity in
IDIS for the same scope of work.

For example, some grantees choose to track their program delivery costs for the economic development program



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under a separate IDIS activity. They may have 10 IDIS activities to represent the 10 loans they issued and an 11th
activity for program delivery. In order to avoid double-counting of beneficiary data, you can answer this field YES
for the program delivery activity and then reference one of the other 10 activities here.

You will use the next section to indicate who is carrying out the activity. If the grantee is carrying out the activity
with its own staff or through contractors, you will answer YES to this first question and then choose one of the
selections from the dropdown. If the activity is being carried out by a subrecipient or other entity, you will answer
NO to the first question.

When you do so, you will see the information below become active, at which point you can click on the Select
Organization button to choose your subrecipient and select the type of organization from the dropdown on the
right.

For the case study, we will select YES to the first question and select GRANTEE EMPLOYEES in the dropdown on
the right.

The next section is Target Area. While the field is not required, it is important to provide this information when it is
applicable. You will see three target areas available from the dropdown: CDFI, Local, and Strategy. There is more
information on each in Appendix E of your manual.

CDFI stands for Community Development Financial Institution and is the least common target area. You will only
select it if a CDFI is carrying out the activity and is utilizing the regulatory flexibility provided for CDFIs under the
CDBG regulations.

The local target areas are defined by the grantee and do not require HUD approval. A local target area would be
any area where the grantee is making a concentrated effort to improve the area. Grantees may want to refer to
their Action Plan, which should list any target areas. If a grantee uses this feature, the PR84 report will summarize
your accomplishments for each target area.

Grantees will only select strategy area when the activity is undertaken as part of a Neighborhood Revitalization
Strategy Area or NRSA. NRSAs are approved by HUD as part of the Con Plan or Action Plan.

For the case study, we will not select a target area. For instruction on adding and selecting target areas, please
refer to the Housing or Public Facilities module.

The next section is called Special Characteristics and you simply check the box next to each field if it applies. If you
are not sure if they apply or not, refer to page 3-9 in your manual. Grantees in states that border Mexico will see
an additional choice for Colonias.

If you place a check next to Brownfield Redevelopment, the system will prompt you to indicate how many acres
are being remediated.

The next section is a collection of check boxes that relate to specific regulatory requirements of the CDBG
program. If the activity will involve One-for-One replacement or displacement, you will see some narrative fields
during the completion of the activity that can be used to describe how the grantee complied with these
requirements.

A common method for funding economic development activities is through a revolving loan (RL). If you use a
revolving loan for your loan program, be sure to check this box. Later on, when you fund the activity and create



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receipts, you will be using the RL fund type.

If you check float funded, the system will prompt you for additional information regarding the float funding at the
bottom of the screen.

Once you’re done, you’ll see our options at the bottom. If we click Save, the system will save the data and return
us to the previous screen. However, we still have one more page of data entry, so we want to click Save and
Continue. This will bring us to Page 2 of Setup Detail. If we hit cancel, the system will not save any of our changes
and it will take us back to the previous page.

Data Entry Add CDBG Setup Detail Page 2
Here is the last page of the Setup Detail. Once we complete it, we will be done with the Activity Setup.

The matrix code and the national objective are listed at the top of the page. The data we need to enter is based on
the matrix code and national objective we selected.

This section asks for the budget of the activity. Notice that the CDBG field is greyed out. Once you draw funds
against this activity, the system will populate that field for you.

You’ll also notice that these fields are not required by the system to complete the screen. This is because some
activities are fully funded by CDBG and these fields would be blank. If the activity does have other funds involved,
it is really important to provide this information. One of the ways the CDBG program is evaluated at the Federal
level is its ability to leverage funds.

If filled out correctly, this section helps demonstrate that CDBG funds are in fact leveraging other available dollars.

At the time of activity setup, you may not know the final budget for an activity. HUD has stated that is permissible
to provide budget estimates at this point.

Once you have provided information here and the activity has drawn CDBG funds, the system will calculate a
leveraging ratio for the activity.

The next section collects data on how the CDBG funds are being distributed to BENEFICIARIES, the key word being
BENEFICIARIES.

In our case study, the business is considered a beneficiary. Let’s report 1 in the loan field. Once we populate the
loan field, the system will want details regarding the loan in the section below, including the interest rate,
amortization period, and total amount.

For the case study, let’s assume the interest rate is 0, the amortization period is five years, and the amount loaned
is $100,000.

In cases where there is no set amortization period, such as when a loan is due upon sale or transfer, you can use 99
for the amortization period.

This last section collects data on the number and type of jobs expected to be created or retained.

For the two columns related to full-time jobs, report the number of jobs that will be created.

For the two columns related to part-time jobs, report the number of weekly hours that will be worked by the part-



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time jobs. The system will divide the number of weekly hours by 40 to calculate the number of full-time
equivalents or FTEs.

For the case study, I will put in 4 full-time positions, three of which are expected to be available to low-moderate
income, and two part-time positions that will work 20 hours per week. Since the system wants weekly hours, I
want to put 40 here.

And I will assume that both part-time jobs will be low mod.

When we’re done, we will click Save. This saves the second page and takes us back to the page we started at.

[Pause for reload]

If everything went well, we now see that the activity is Ready to fund.

The system gives you a button that will take you straight to the Activity Funding screen for this activity.

At this point, go ahead and fund the activity. Then, create a drawdown for the activity.

The next section of this module will demonstrate how to report accomplishments and complete this activity.

For step-by-step guidance for the activity funding and drawdown, refer to the video for the funding and drawdown
module.



Module 6 – Navigating through IDIS: Reporting
Accomplishments for Economic Development
Introduction to Economic Development Accomplishments
This is Part 2 of the data entry portion of Economic Development.

In this video, we will walk through the process of reporting accomplishments for an economic development activity
that meets a low mod job, or LMJ, national objective.

The best way to learn IDIS is to get hands-on practice. I want to encourage you to log on to the UAT version of IDIS
and enter the data as you follow the video

You can pause this video at any time using the pause button in the lower left hand corner.

You can switch back and forth between this video and IDIS by holding down the Alt key on your keyboard and then
pressing the Tab key.

If you are not already logged into the UAT, pause the video and do so now. You’ll know if you are in the UAT
version if you see UAT at the top of the screen.

If are unsure of how to access the UAT, there are directions toward the bottom of the IDIS log-in page and also in
Module 1 of this course.

This video is Part 2 of the economic development module. If you want to do the data entry for this tutorial, you
need to first complete the activity setup exercise in Part 1.


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I am using the data found in Case Study 5 of the course material. You can use the data from the case study or
simply make it up as you go along.

In the previous video, we set up an activity for a loan to Thompson Automotive. We will now walk through the
steps to report accomplishments for this activity.




IDIS Home Page
As always, we start at the Home page of IDIS. If you want to follow along in the manual, we are in Chapter 7 for the
first few screens and then we will skip to Chapter 12 for the screens specific to the low mod job national objective.
Right now we are on page 7 dash 1.

Okay, to report accomplishments for our activity we need to go to the Projects/Activities module in the Navigation
Menu.

The system by default shows the Search Activities. This is used to find existing activities in the system.

If you know the IDIS activity number, that’s the fastest way to find the activity. If you don't know it, you can use
any combination of the other search fields or simply click search to get a list of all your activities.

Once the results come back, you will see your options on the right in the Action column. We should see Edit and
View. The View function will let you look at the data but you won’t be able to change anything. We want to be
able to input accomplishment data, so we will choose Edit.

Edit Activity Page
This is the same page we saw when we added the activity.

We have two fields we need to update here, the Activity Status and the Completion Date. However, the system
won’t let us update these until we provide the accomplishment data, so let’s do that first.

If we scroll down a bit to the table in the center of the screen, we will see some buttons for CDBG. The system
does a nice job of separating out the data needed for setup and the data need for accomplishments. At this point,
we want to report accomplishments.

Add CDBG Accomplishment Detail (Page 1)
If you are following along in your manual, we are in chapter 12.

If you look at the first page in chapter 12, you will see that the manual tells you which pages to reference based on
the national objective and matrix code you are using. Guidance for the first screen starts on page 12 dash 2.

The first thing we have to do on this page is specify the Program Year in which the benefits were REALIZED. This is
an important point to keep in mind when reporting accomplishments for CDBG. It doesn’t matter what grant year
the activity is funded out of, it doesn’t matter what action plan the activity is listed in. If the job was created in
2010, we will use 2010 in this field.

At that point, the rest of the data we enter on this page and the next will be counted as 2010 accomplishments.

The next field is the Accomplishments Narrative field. HUD does not have specific guidance for this field. The best



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source of guidance for the narrative is your local CPD representative, as it will be this person who will be reading
the narrative as part of your CAPER.

In general, you can use the Narrative to tell the activity’s story. For example, if the activity is stalled and has not
spent any money in the program year, you may want to use the narrative to explain why. For economic
development, it would be helpful to explain the number of jobs created to date, the number that still need to be
created, and an expected completion date.

The next field lists the Accomplishment Type, in this case Jobs, and the proposed number of units for the Program
Year we selected. The system will provide this number once we save this screen.

The next section will collect Direct Benefit Data for the beneficiaries of the activity, including Race/Ethnicity data
and Income.

We are now on page 12-4 of the manual.

I’ll use the beneficiary data in the case study to populate these fields. Two of the beneficiaries were White, one of
whom was also Hispanic.

To add another row to this table, we need to click on the Add Another Race button.

Let’s use the case study to complete the Income Table as well. Remember that when classifying the beneficiaries
for Low Mod Job activities, you will use the household income before they got the job.

The final section of this page collects data on the number of jobs created and retained. Just like the table we saw
during activity setup, we will report the number of jobs for the full time column and the number of weekly hours
for the part-time columns.

For the case study, let’s assume that two of the jobs are full-time, one of which is taken by a low-moderate income
person. The other two jobs are part-time at 20 hours per week. We will report 40 in the part-time column, and
report both part-time jobs as low-moderate income.

Once you’re done entering the data, you will see the system calculate the low-mod percent and the number of
Full-Time Equivalents.

Let’s click Save and Continue.

When we try to save the data, the system will check the Race and Income totals to see if they match. If they don’t
the system will return an error and prompt you to correct the data.

If all is good, the system will move us to Page 2.

Add CDBG Accomplishment Detail (Page 2)
If you are following along in your manual, we are in chapter 12 on page 12 dash 8.

This second page collects Performance Measures. Performance measures provide more detail about who the
beneficiaries are and what type of work was done. These will change based on the type of activity you undertake.

For our job creation activity, the system is collecting the number of jobs that receive employer-sponsored health
care and the number of persons who were unemployed prior to taking the jobs created by this activity.



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The system also wants you to categorize the type of jobs created. For definitions of each category, please refer to
Appendix G of your manual.

For the case study, I will report one manager, one office and clerical, and two technicians.

The next section collects data on the business assisted. Indicate if the business is new or existing. If the business
existed at the time of assistance, indicate if the business expanded or relocated as a result of the assistance.

In the next two fields, indicate if the business rehabilitated their building or façade as part of the assistance and if
the business provides goods or services to the community.

The final section collects the DUNS number for the business. This information is required. Therefore, you should
require businesses to include their DUNS number as part of their loan application.

Business should not need to pay a fee in order to receive a DUNS number. To request a free DUNS number, they
can visit this website: http://fedgov.dnb.com/webform

When finished entering your data, Click on the Save button to return to the first page.

Edit Activity – Adding a Second Accomplishment Year
We are now finished updating the accomplishments for the activity for that program year. However, the business
has not yet created all of the jobs so we cannot yet mark the activity as complete.

Since many businesses take more than one year to satisfy their job creation requirements, let walk through adding
another program year for reporting accomplishments.

Let’s assume one year has gone by, and we receive a report from Thompson Automotive that they created an
additional job.

Click on the Accomplishments button to go back to the Accomplishment screens.

By default, the system will display the most recent year of accomplishments. We don’t want to simply update the
year displayed. If we did so, chances are, you would not get credit for the additional job, since HUD only reviews
and counts the most current year of accomplishment data.

Instead, we will use the Add New Accomplishment Year button. By doing so, we get a fresh set of accomplishment
screens to report on our 2011 accomplishments.

Let’s quickly go through and enter the data for the final job based on the information in the case study.

I want to show you one more feature on the Previous Page.

Now that you have multiple report years for the activity you can view specific years using this selector, or you can
use the View Total Years to see a summary of everything.

And now that the business has satisfied the job creation requirements, we can return to the first page and update
the activity status to complete.

Edit Activity – Changing the Status to Complete
By completing an activity in IDIS, you are stating that no additional funds will be drawn and there are no additional



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accomplishments to be reported.

Before we change the status to complete, the system wants us to check that all the required fields have been
completed. To do this, we will click on the Check CDBG button. You may have to scroll over to the right to see it.

The system will refresh the page and give you a message at the top. If there are no errors, the system will display
“CDBG activity pathway is complete.” Otherwise, the system will list any problems that need to be corrected
before completing the activity.

The final step is to change the activity status field to complete, put in a completion date, and click the Save button.
We will get a few errors here if the drawdown is still being processed or if the completion date is the same as the
funding date. These are issues that occur during training because we are doing everything the same data; chances
are you won’t see these errors when entering your data throughout the program year.




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Module 7 – Reports Training Slides
Slide 1
This is Module 7 of IDIS Online Training for CDBG Grantees.

In Module 7, we will learn how to generate and use some of the reports available to CDBG grantees.

After some introductory slides, we will walk through the steps of generating a report using Microstrategy.

The slides for this module are available for download from the course website. If you have not already done so,
you may want to download and print the materials from the course website before watching the module.

Please note that there is NOT a Reports section in the Training Manual. Instead, there is a separate reference guide
called “How to Run Reports in IDIS Online.”

On the log in page of IDIS, at the top in the IDIS Resource section, you should see a link to How to Run Reports in
IDIS Online that provides detailed direction on all of the features available in the reports module. The resource
also provides a short summary on the contents of each report. While we will not refer to it throughout the
training, it is a valuable resource you will want on your bookshelf.

If you’re ready to go, let’s get started.

Slide 2
The reporting function in IDIS serves two main functions:

First, IDIS reports can present the system data in meaningful ways to help you manage your CDBG program on a
daily basis. For example, you can use the List of Activities Report to identify slow spending activities. You can use
the Drawdown Voucher Report to help you reconcile your local expenditures with the drawdown requests
processed in IDIS.

Second, IDIS reports give grantees a chance to review the data that has been entered and make sure it accurate
and complete before submitting it to HUD for review as part of their CAPER.

Data integrity refers to accuracy, completeness, and timeliness. By using and reviewing reports, grantees can help
ensure the data integrity of CDBG data.

Slide 3
The system has dozens of reports to choose from. This slide lists some commonly used reports by CDBG grantees.
There are several other useful reports, so I want to encourage you to spend some time generating different reports
and finding some that you like. The reference guide, How to Run Reports in IDIS Online, available on the log-in
page of IDIS has a short description of the available reports.

The two reports we will highlight in this module are the PR03: Activity Summary Report and the PR26: CDBG
Financial Summary Report. These two reports include information that is required as part of your end of year
CAPER report.




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Slide 4
The process for generating a report is fairly straightforward. After generating one or two reports, you should feel
comfortable with the process.

The reports are actually maintained in a separate system called Microstrategy. Every night IDIS will send all of its
data to Microstrategy. This is important to note since all of the data you will see on the report is “as of yesterday.”

If you make updates to your data, those changes will not appear on the reports until the next day.

It’s also important to be aware of being “timed out of IDIS” while you are in Microstrategy. IDIS will end your
session if you are inactive for 20 minutes. If your IDIS session ends, you will be forced to end your Microstrategy
session as well. Given this, it’s a good idea to save often in Microstrategy and also to switch back to IDIS every so
often and navigate to a different page in order to stay active and reset the 20-minute clock.

Slide 5
Once you have generated the report you want, it is recommended to print or save a copy of the report. The
reports provide a “snapshot” of your current data. To save a copy of the current data or snapshot, you have to
export the report as a PDF or an Excel file and then save that file on your computer. There is no way to save a
snapshot in Microstrategy.

You will see some other options in Microstrategy such as History List and Save to My Reports. The History List will
allow you to temporarily save the current data and we will talk about this more when we go through the process.
However, the History List is meant to be a temporary place and is deleted every once in awhile.

When you use the Save to My Reports, you are actually saving a report template, not the current data set. This is a
nice feature if you want to customize a report, but again it will not save the “snapshot”, only the formatting of the
report. When you re-open a report in the My Reports folder, it will refresh the report with the most current data.

Slide 6
PR03: The PR03 report is the CDBG Activity Summary Report (GPR). This report is a required part of your CAPER
and contains large amounts of beneficiary data for each CDBG activity that was active within the selected program
year. HUD reviews this report to gauge eligibility and compliance with national objectives as well as monitor
program performance.

The report will include all active CDBG activities, including:

Activities with a status of Open and a funded date in the program year.

Activities with a completion or cancellation date during the selected program year.

Activities with a drawdown during the program year.

Each activity included on the report will include most of the data entered on the accomplishment detail screens
and financial information.

You should run this report at the beginning of the CAPER process and review it for completeness. If you identify
any omissions, make sure to update the activity’s information in IDIS before submitting the report to HUD.




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In this module, we will walk through the process of downloading the BOSMAC version of this report into Excel to
quickly identify any missing information.

Most CPD representatives will want a narrative describing what occurred during the program year for each activity
that is included on the report. If the activity did not move forward during the program year, use the narrative to
explain why and what you will do to remedy the situation.

When updating the information, remember that the reports reflect the data in the system as of yesterday. This
means any updates you make will not appear on the report until the following day.

Slide 7
The PR26 report is the CDBG Financial Summary Report.

This report is also a required part of your CAPER and one of the reports grantees have the most problems with.
Some problems occur because the grantee cannot determine how the system came up with a number since
everything is summarized at the grant level. And some problems occur because the grantee must make
adjustments to the report in order to demonstrate compliance.

The PR26 provides data about compliance with three CDBG rules: (1) the Low/Mod Benefit Test, (2) the Public
Service Cap, and (3) the Planning and Admin Cap. It also provides a summary of the CDBG resources and
expenditures for a specific program year.

The report is divided into five parts: (1) Summary of CDBG Resources, (2) Summary of CDBG Expenditures, (3)
Low/Mod Benefit Test, (4) Public Service Cap Calculation, and(5) Planning /Admin Cap Calculation.

As part of this module, we will download the report and learn how to use the PR03 BOSMAC report to identify
adjustments we may need to make.

Slide 8
In summary, IDIS reports can be extremely useful in helping grantees manage their CDBG programs on a day-to-
day basis and they also are useful in ensuring the integrity of their data.



Module 7 – Navigating through IDIS: Generating Reports
In this video, we will walk through the steps on generating a report in IDIS using Microstrategy.

We will start at the home page of IDIS. Let’s click on Reports in the main navigation.

Look to the left and you will see a link on the left for View Reports. Click on the link to open a new browser
window with Microstrategy.

On the next screen you will see a folder for IDIS. If you read the description, you will see that the data is current as
of yesterday. Click on the IDIS folder.

On the next page, you will see a number of options, including Shared Reports, My Reports, History List, and My
Subscriptions. You may also see some other icons such as Create Report and Preferences. For this module, we will
limit our discussion to the Shared Reports folder, which is where HUD has saved all of the pre-formatted reports.

Let’s click on Shared Reports.



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In Shared Reports you will see all of the reports available to you. You will not need to become familiar with all of
the reports. Most grantees only use four or five reports on a regular basis.

For this exercise, we will be generating a PR03 CDBG Activity Summary Report. The steps for generating the other
reports are fairly similar, so if you are following along and would like to select a different report, go ahead and do
so.

In each report folder you will see one or more icons. In some cases, this is because one report is for HUD
Headquarters staff, another is for CDBG entitlement grantees, and another is for CDBG state grantees. In some
cases, there will be more than one icon because the report has been divided into different sections or because
there is more than one version of the report. Be sure to read the title of each report carefully and choose the most
appropriate report.

In the case of the PR03, the report that you will generate for inclusion with your CAPER is listed here. Before you
generate this version, you may want to generate the BOSMAC version, which will help you review the data and
identify any potential omissions. The BOSMAC version can also help you tie this data to the PR26 Financial
Summary Report.

For today’s exercise, I will generate a BOSMAC version of the report.

I am going to choose the original version, which will give me a spreadsheet of all of the activities. For each of these
icons, I can click on the title of the report, I can Export the report to Excel, or generate a PDF of the report. By
clicking on the title of the report, the report will be displayed in Microstrategy, at which point I can still Export to
Excel or to PDF, so I will typically click on the title instead of going directly to Excel or PDF.

The next screen is the Parameters screen. This screen will differ based on the report you selected because each
report has different parameters. Every parameter screen will include the first section where you need to indicate
which grantee or grantees to include on the report. Click on the plus sign to the left of each choice, you will have to
go down about six levels, until you get you see your grantee name.

Click on the grantee name to select it and then click the right button to move the grantee to the Selected column.

For my selected report, I also need to indicate the program year for which I want the report and need to specify
CDBG or CDBG-R.

Once I have selected all of the required parameters (some reports will have optional parameters) I will click the
Run Report button.

Depending on the number of other users on the system, the report could come up very quickly or it could take a
few minutes. You will see a link on the “Processing Request” page to add the report to your History List. I will
always add my reports to the History List. This way, if I get kicked out of the system or the report is taking too long
to generate, I can close out of the system and instead of starting all over, I simply go to History List and the report
is usually ready.

When the system has finished generating the report, it will display the report in the browser. Microstrategy has
some different tools and options across the toolbar at the top of the page. These tools allow you to alter how the
information is presented. You can change to sort order, filter the results, move, hide, and group columns of data.
There is even some graphing functionality. If you make any changes to the formatting of the report and want to




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save the formatting changes, you can use the Save to My Reports feature. This way you do not need to make the
same formatting changes every time you generate this report.

In order to save a copy of this data as it looks today, you need to print the report, save the report as a PDF, or
export the report to Excel. If you click on the Print icon, the system generates a PDF of the report that you can then
print. There is not much difference between printing and saving the report as a PDF.

In the case of the BOSMAC report, it’s not very helpful to print in its current format. It will be only useful if we
export it to Excel, so let’s do that.

This is the icon to Export it to Excel. If you rest your mouse over each icon, it will give a you tell you what the
button does. The system will open a pop-up window asking you to select the formatting for the report. I typically
choose Excel with formatting.

When the system is finished, you should get a chance to Open or Save the report. I will typically Save the file.

The next video in this module, we will walk through some of the formatting steps in Excel.

Once you have the BOSMAC version of the PR03 report downloaded and saved to your computer, the first thing
you want to do is double-check that it is saved as an Excel file. To do this, go to File-Save As and make sure the
selected File Type is an Excel document and not a web page.

This can be a large spreadsheet, which makes it hard to read. To make this report more user-friendly, I am going to
make four edits. You can customize the report in any way that’s helpful to you, but these are some basic things you
will most likely want to try:

Remove text wrap

Hide and expand some columns

Freeze my column headers and the Activity Name column in place

Add a data filter and

Add some subtotals at the bottom of the table.

First we will remove the text wrap. This will minimize the length of the report. Click on this area above the row
numbers and to the left of the column letters to select the entire spreadsheet. Right click the mouse and choose
Format Cells. Under the Alignment tab, uncheck Wrap Text and click OK.

Next we will hide some columns to cut down on the width of the report. To hide a column, simply right click on the
column letter and choose Hide. I can also expand some columns if I cannot see all of the data. To expand a column,
click and drag the bars between the column letters.

I want the Activity Name Column and my Header Row to always appear on the screen. I can freeze these in place
by placing my cursor in the cell to the right of Activity Name and below my column header. Then, go to View –
Freeze Panes and choose Freeze Panes. The command should be in a similar place in other versions of Excel. Now I
can scroll to the right and still see my activity names and scroll down and still see my column headers.




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Now I want to filter my data and use Subtotals to automatically total some columns based on the filter results.
First, I highlight the row that contains my column headers. Now, go to Data and click Filter. Again, this command
should be in a similar place for earlier versions of Excel.

This will add a dropdown filter for each column header. For example, if I wanted to see a list of all of the activities
on the report without a narrative, I can do use that filter. These are activities where I should update the narrative
before submitting the report to HUD. To clear a filter, simply click the dropdown and choose Clear Filter.

Now I want to limit the results of my data set so that I am just looking at my public service activities. I can click on
the dropdown next to the matrix code column and place a check next to each public service.

If I wanted to get the total funding and drawdowns for my public services, I can add subtotals to the report. I will
click on the cell below the funding column, and then click on the Sum tool and Excel will automatically fill in the
formula for me.

Again, you can customize this in any way that you find helpful.

In summary, I highly recommend using this BOSMAC version of the PR03 as a tool to help you during your CAPER
process. You can use it to determine what information is missing and you can also use it to verify the numbers on
other reports, such as the Financial Summary Report.

In this video, we will walk through the process of generating the PR26 CDBG Financial Summary Report. There are
also line-by-line directions for the PR26 online in the IDIS library. From the IDIS log-in page, look to the menu on
the left for a link labeled Library. Under the Guidance section of the Library, you will see a link to guidance for the
CDBG Financial Summary.

Let’s start at the Home Page of IDIS and click on the Reports module.

Before you generate the report in Microstrategy, you first have to set the parameters on the Reports Parameters
page of IDIS. You should see the PR26 listed here. Let’s click on Add-Edit.

At the top of the next page, it will indicate the year you are viewing. If this the wrong year, you can change it or
Add a new year. In this case, I will add a new year.

This screen lists all of the ADJUSTMENTS that you can make to the PR26. All of the other fields on the report will be
pulled from the system or calculated.

This first adjustment that 99% of the grantees need to use is Line 01: Unexpended CDBG funds at end of previous
reporting period. This is the amount of unspent carry-over CDBG grants you had at the end of your previous
program year. The best way to determine this number is to look at Line 16 of your previous year’s PR26.

Again, almost all grantees should provide a number for Line 01. For many grantees, this is the only adjustment they
need to make. Two other common adjustments are Lines 17 and 18.

For grantees with a CDFI or NRSA area, you will most likely need to adjust Line 17.

For grantees with projects that involve multi-unit housing, you will need to adjust Line 18.




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Other adjustments may be made if program income was credited to the wrong program year and if there are
unliquidated obligations that must be accounted for. We will talk about these in more detail once we open the
report.

Any time you do make adjustments, it is good practice to explain in an attachment to the PR26 or in the CAPER
narratives the basis for making the adjustments.

Once you are done making adjustments, be sure to save the parameters screen. At this point we can go ahead and
generate the report.

Here is the final product. Let’s walk through each section of the report.

The first section is a Summary of the Resources available during the program year. The system will automatically
insert the grant amount and will calculate the amount of program income based on the receipts that occurred
during the program year. If you were not able to receipt income until after the close of the program year and
needed to include it on the report, you would need to use Line 07 to make an adjustment. It’s up to the grantee to
enter Line 01, the carry over.

The second section is the Summary of Expenditures. The first three lines of this section are used to determine the
basis for the Low/Mod Benefit Test in Section 3, that is to say all expenditures except for planning, administration,
and 108 repayments. The system than adds those expenditures back in and comes up with a total expenditures for
the program year and a balance to expend at the end of the program year in Line 16. The number in Line 16 will be
used for Line 01 for the next year’s report.

Part 3 calculates a grantee’s Compliance with the Low/Mod Benefit Test. Each grantee certifies that at least 70%
of their CDBG funds will go toward meeting a low mod national objective (as opposed to slum and blight or urgent
need national objectives). Grantees have a choice of meeting this requirement over a period of one two or three
years. If you are unsure what your compliance period is, look at the signed certifications in your action plan.

If you are using a two- or three-year certification, you will need to complete Lines 23, 24, and 25 on the
parameters screen.

For grantees with a CDFI or NRSA area, you will need to also run the Line 17 detail report, available in the PR26
folder, and determine what amount to provide on Line 17 in the parameters screen. Essentially, you will only count
expenditures that benefitted low- and moderate-income households. The system will not calculate this for you.

For grantees who use CDBG for multi-unit activities, you will need to also run the Line 18 detail report, available in
the PR26 folder, and determine what amount to provide on Line 18 in the parameters screen. Essentially, you will
only count expenditures that benefitted low- and moderate-income households. The system will not calculate this
for you.

The end goal is for Line 22 (Line 26 for multi-year certifications) to be greater than 70%.

Section 4 of the report calculates Compliance with the 15% Public Service Obligation Cap. It is important to
understand the exact rule here: Grantees are not allowed to OBLIGATE more than 15 percent of their grant plus 15
percent of their PRIOR YEAR program income. Many grantees think the rule is that they cannot SPEND more than
fifteen percent, which is incorrect.




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The first line in the section does list the amount disbursed against public services (which is based on matrix code)
during the program year. Two adjustments are then made to account for obligations made this year that will not
occur until next year. And to account for obligations made in previous years that were disbursed this year. You can
see that Line 31 adds in unliquidated obligations for the current year and then subtracts unliquidated obligations
from prior years.

If you have any public service activities that extend beyond one year and you DO NOT make these adjustments,
you will most likely be under your cap this year and over your cap next year. The BOSMAC version of the PR03
report is helpful in determining your unliquidated obligations.

Section 5 of the report calculates Compliance with the 20% Planning and Administration Obligation Cap. Like the
public service cap, there is misunderstanding about the exact rule, which is: Grantees are not allowed to OBLIGATE
more than 20 percent of their grant plus 20 percent of their CURRENT YEAR program income. The test is based on
obligations, not expenditures.

Also like Section 4, you must make adjustments to the unliquidated obligation line items if you have any planning
and administration activities that extend beyond one year. For example, let’s say the grantee procures a planning
firm in 2010 as part of their 2010 planning and administration budget and the contract extends into 2011. The
balance remaining on the contract at the end of 2010 would be reported as an unliquidated obligation on Line 38
on the 2010 PR26 and again on Line 39 on the 2011 PR26.



Module 8: Activity Funding – Training Slides
Slide 1
This is Module 8 of IDIS Online Training for CDBG Grantees.

In Module 8, we will learn how to fund an activity with CDBG funds.

After this brief introduction to activity funding, we will walk through the process in IDIS.

If you have not already done so, you may want to download and print the materials from the course website
before watching the module.

Slide 2
Once you have provided all of the required setup details of an IDIS activity, you can use the Activity Funding
module to commit CDBG funds to the activity.

You must fund an activity before you can request drawdowns for the activity.

Updating an activity’s funding is done in three simple steps. These steps are the same whether you are funding an
activity for the first time or adjusting the funding levels for a funded activity.

Step 1: Choose the Activity you want to fund.

Step 2: Choose a funding source, such as entitlement, program income, or revolving loan fund.

Step 3: Update the amount of funds committed to the activity.




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Program income adds some complexity to the process. Program income is covered in detail in Module 10.



Module 8 – Navigating through IDIS: Activity Funding
Introduction to Activity Funding
This is data entry portion for Activity Funding. In this video, we will walk through the process of funding an activity.

The best way to learn IDIS is to get hands-on practice. I want to encourage you to log on to the UAT version of IDIS
and enter the data as you follow the video.

You can pause the video at any time by clicking the pause button in the lower left hand corner. You can switch
back and forth between this video and IDIS by holding down the Alt key on your keyboard and then pressing the
Tab key.

If you are not already logged into UAT, pause the video and do so now. Make sure that UAT appears at the top of
the screen.

If you do not know how to access the UAT, there are directions at the bottom of the IDIS log-in page and also in
Module 1 of this course.

If you want to follow along in your manual, we will be in Chapter 4.

IDIS Home Page
We’ll start at the Home page of IDIS. To fund an activity, we will click on Funding/Drawdown in the Navigation
Menu. This process will be the same whether you are funding an activity for the first time or adjusting the funding
levels.

Funding an Activity is done in three straightforward steps:

First, select an Activity. Then, select a Funding source, and then enter a funding amount.

Program income adds an extra twist. We will cover program income in Module 10.

Edit Activity Funding Page 1
The system by default shows the first page of Activity Funding, which allows you to search for the activity you
want to fund.

If you know the IDIS activity number, that’s the fastest way to find the activity. If you don't know it, you can use
any combination of the other search fields or simply click search to get a list of all your activities.

For the purpose of this exercise, you can use any of the activities you set up from the other modules or any CDBG
activity with an Open status.

Once the results come back, you will see your options on the right in the Action column. We should see Edit and
View. The View function will let you look at the data but you won’t be able to change anything. We want to be
able to input accomplishment data, so we will choose Edit.

If you see the message NOT READY TO FUND in the Action column, this means that you have not completed



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activity setup. In order to fund this activity, you would need to first go back to Project/Activities to edit the setup
information for the activity.

Edit Activity Funding Page 2
The system provides a summary of the current total funding at the top of page and lists the available funding
sources below that.

The system provides filters for the funding sources, but most grantees will only have a handful of funding sources
for CDBG that should all fit on the first page.

Let’s take a look at each column of data provided in the Funding Source table.

First, you have the Recipient Name, which for entitlement grantees should be the name of the grantee.

Next we have the Program, which in this case should be CDBG.

The third column is Fund Type. Page 4 DASH 5 shows the different fund types available. Everyone will have an EN
fund, which represents the Entitlement Funds held in your line of credit account.

You may have a PI or Program Income fund. This represents a local account that receives receipts generated by
CDBG-funded activities.

You may also have an RL or Revolving Loan fund. This represents a local account that receives receipts that are
earmarked for a particular type of activity, such as economic development loans or housing rehabilitation.

We will discuss program income and revolving loans in more detail in Module 10.

Other fund types include AD for Administration and SU for Subgrant Subfund. Both of these are optional for CDBG
grantees. They provide an extra measure of control over funding sources but also require more work and
knowledge of subgrants and subfunds. For more information about these fund types, please refer to Appendix I
and J in your course manual.

Source Name and Source Type refer to the source of funds and are not that useful to the grantee.

Available for Funding represents the amount of money that has not yet committed to activities. This will be the
maximum amount of funds you can commit to the selected activity. For the purpose of this exercise, write down
the Available Amount for Entitlement.

Every year, when HUD loads your new grant into the system, you will see the Amount Available for Funding for the
EN fund type increase by the grant amount.

Every time you create a program income receipt or a revolving loan receipt, you will see the Amount Available for
Funding for PI or RL increase.

Each time increase a funding commitment to an activity, you will see the Amount Available amount go down.

Also, when you complete an activity, any balance of funds that had not been drawn will be returned to the Amount
Available column.

There are many grantees make the mistake of not including this balance of funds when determining their annual



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budget. Your goal should to have all of your available Entitlement funds committed to activities, as this is the first
step to meeting your timeliness deadlines.

The next two columns show how much is currently funded and drawn from each fund type, and column shows the
Actions you can take on each funding source.

Let’s click on Add-Edit for Entitlement.

Edit Activity Funding Page 3
On the third page, the system provides information on the activity selected and the fund type selected.

There are only two fields of data entry, the Grant Year and the Funded Amount. The Grant Year is an optional field
for Entitlements. It is required for States. HUD does not use this field, since the system works on a First-In, First Out
basis. This means that if 2008 are the oldest funds you have available, the system will automatically use these
funds, regardless of which Grant Year you input on this screen. Nevertheless, you can use this field to track the
source year for your own records. You can also split the funding over several source years by using the Add Grant
Year button.

The second field is the funded amount. Go ahead and put in a number and click the Save button.

The screen will refresh and give you a message at the top. If everything worked, the message will state Activity
Funded Successfully. You will also see the Amount Available adjusted downward by the amount you changed the
funding and the amount in the Funded column adjusted upward by the same amount.

That’s it for funding. If you increased the funding, that funding amount will now be available to drawdown against
this activity.

In summary, we took three simple steps: We selected an activity, we selected a fund type, and updated the funded
amount.




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Module 9: Drawdowns – Training Slides
Slide 1
This is Module 9 of IDIS Online Training for CDBG Entitlement Grantees.

In Module 9, we will learn how to create and approve drawdown vouchers for CDBG activities.

After this brief slide show, we will walk through the process of creating and approving draws in the system.

If you have not already done so, you may want to download and print the materials from the course website
before watching the module.

Slide 2
A drawdown in IDIS records the use of CDBG funds against a specific eligible activity.

If the drawdown includes entitlement funds, the information will be sent to the LOCCS system, which will then
wire transfer the funds to the grantee’s bank account.

Drawdown vouchers can also include program income and revolving loan funds. When these funds are drawn, you
are reporting to HUD that the program funds in your local accounts were used for a specific activity. No funds will
be wired.

All drawdowns are posted against funded activities. In order to draw funds for an activity, the activity must be
open and there must be a balance of funds to draw.

To process a drawdown voucher for payment, you will need two staff members involved. The first person will
create the drawdown voucher and the second person will review and approve the drawdown voucher. The
voucher creation and approval cannot be done by the same person.

Slide 3
This slide discusses the drawdown process in general.

Step 1 is to receipt any program income on hand that has not yet been receipted into the system. This is necessary
to comply with the cash management regulations of the CDBG program that state any program income must be
used before entitlement funds are drawn from the Treasury.

Step 2 is to create the drawdown voucher. This includes selecting the activities to be included and indicating the
fund types and amounts to be drawn. When finished the system will assign a voucher number to the drawdown
and list the status as OPEN.

Step 3 is to approve the drawdown voucher. Again, this step must be performed by someone other than the
person who created the voucher. Once the voucher has been approved, the status will update to APPROVED.

At the end of the day, IDIS will collect all draws with an APPROVED status and process them for payment. Payment
is typically made in 2 to 3 days in the form of a wire transfer to the grantee’s bank account. At this point, the
voucher status will update to COMPLETE.



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Slide 4
There are occasions where you may need to revise the drawdown information for an activity, such as when an
activity draws more funding than actually needed or when an activity is not eligible for CDBG.

When the amount in question can be used to satisfy immediate cash needs, the grantee can revise the incorrect
drawdown instead of wiring the funds back to HUD.

When the amount in question cannot be utilized quickly, the grantee may be required to wire transfer funds back
to HUD.

It is recommended that you discuss all excessive draws and repayments with your local CPD representative to
determine the best course of action.

When revising a drawdown, the grantee is able to re-assign all or a portion of the drawn amount from one activity
(the one that drew too much or was ineligible) to a different activity (typically the activity that has an outstanding
invoice).

It’s like saying, “We really didn’t spend $500 on Activity X. We actually only spent $400 on Activity X. The rest of
the money is still in our local account. We will spend this extra $100 on Activity Y.”

Slide 5
Here is an example of a drawdown revision.

Let’s assume that the grantee monitored Activity #1003 and found that the activity was ineligible.

As a result the grantee collected $6,000 in repayment from the subrecipient.

The grantee’s next drawdown should be $13,000 for Activity #1002 administrative costs.

How should the grantee report this in IDIS?

Slide 6
The first step would be to revise the existing voucher or vouchers for the ineligible activity. When revising the
voucher, the system will ask how much money will be moved and which activity should the money be moved to.

In this case, the grantee would move all $6,000 to Activity #1002, which is the next activity to need a drawdown.

Once the revision is complete, the system would reflect that the $6,000 was not used for the ineligible activity but
for administration. If the ineligible activity had no other draws, the grantee could then update the activity status to
canceled.

The grantee needed $13,000 to pay administrative costs. Since the grantee already has $6,000 in its local account
from the repayment, it creates a voucher for the difference of $7,000 to satisfy its cash needs.

Slide 7
In some cases of ineligible use or excessive draw, the grantee will be required to wire transfer funds back to HUD.
When this happens, HUD will post a NEGATIVE drawdown in IDIS to reflect the repayment of funds.




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All negative CDBG drawdowns will be posted against Activity #2, which represents all of the grantee’s CDBG
expenditures before IDIS.

Once HUD posts the negative drawdown, it is up to the grantee to revise the negative draw from Activity #2 to the
activity that originally drew down the funds. Until that happens, the grantee will not be able to utilize the returned
funds.

The next portion of this module will walk you through the process of creating and approving drawdowns.



Module 9 – Navigating through IDIS: Creating a Drawdown
Introduction to Drawdowns
This is data entry portion for Drawdowns. In this video, we will walk through the process of creating and approving
a drawdown voucher.

The best way to learn IDIS is to get hands-on practice. I want to encourage you to log on to the UAT version of IDIS
and enter the data as you follow the video.

You can pause the video at any time by clicking the pause button in the lower left hand corner. You can switch
back and forth between this video and IDIS by holding down the Alt key on your keyboard and then pressing the
Tab key.

If you are not already logged into UAT, pause the video and do so now. Make sure that UAT appears at the top of
the screen.

If you do not know how to access the UAT, there are directions at the bottom of the IDIS log-in page and also in
Module 1 of this course.

If you want to follow along in your manual, we will be in Chapter 5.

IDIS Home Page
We’ll start at the Home page of IDIS. To create or approve a drawdown voucher, we will click on
Funding/Drawdown in the Navigation Menu.

The system will by default show the first page for Activity Funding. To get to the drawdown screens, look to the
module menu on the left. Under Drawdown, you should see links for Create Voucher, Search Voucher, and
Approve Voucher. If you do not see one of these links, it means that your user profile does not have the privileges
for that function. If you need to change your system privileges, you need to work with your local IDIS
administrator.

For the first portion of this exercise, we will create a Voucher.

Create Voucher Page 1
On this page, we will enter the activity numbers for each IDIS activity we want to include on the drawdown
voucher.

The first two fields, Voucher Created For and Activity Owner, should both default to the grantee, which for most
CDBG grantees is correct.


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The third field at the top is Requested Submission Date. If left blank, this will default to the date that the voucher
is approved and sent to LOCCS. Grantees can post-date this field so that the draw request is not sent until a future
date. This can be useful to schedule a known future draw when the staff authorized for drawdowns will be out of
the office.

In the next section, you enter the IDIS Activity ID for each activity you want to include on the draw. If you do not
know the IDIS activity numbers, you can click on Search for Activities to find them.

The Search page is just like others you have seen in the system, with the exception that this search will only return
OPEN activities.

For the purpose of this exercise, go ahead and select two or three open CDBG activities by checking the box in the
SELECT column for each.

When finished, click Add Selected Activities to return to the previous page. You should now see the fields
populated with the IDIS Activity Numbers you selected.

Click on Continue to move to the next page.

Create Voucher Page 2
On this page, the system will display each activity selected and provide you an opportunity to enter a draw amount
for each.

The first section will provide information for the first activity selected. It will also list each funding source where
the activity has a balance to draw.

In the draw amount column, enter the draw amount.

If you are creating the drawdown within 90 days of the close of your program year, you can mark the drawdown as
a Prior Year draw. By answering Yes to the prior year draw field, you are indicating the cost was incurred in the
prior program year and should therefore be included on the prior year’s reports.

Using this field has important implications for public service and planning and administrative activities which are
subject to obligation caps.

If you included more than one activity on the voucher, you will see a list of the other activities in the next section.
To enter draw amounts for the other activities, click the Next Activity button and enter draw amounts until all of
the activity numbers are listed in the Entered row. If for some reason you cannot draw funds for activity (the most
likely cause is that there is a $0 balance to draw for the activity), the system will automatically place in the INVALID
row.

Once you have put a draw amount for each activity, click the Confirm Voucher button.

Create voucher Page 3
The third page gives you a final opportunity to review the information you provided before creating the voucher. If
everything looks good, click on Generate Voucher. If something is incorrect, click CANCEL VOUCHER.
Unfortunately, you cannot click BACK and only correct one thing. You will have to start over again from the
beginning.




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Create voucher Page 4
Once you click Generate Voucher, the system will create the voucher in the system and assign it a voucher
number. The person tasked with creating the voucher has now finished their job and needs to pass the information
along to the person tasked with Approving the Voucher.

Any easy way to do this is to print this page and attach it to package of drawdown information.

The next video will cover the process of approving a drawdown voucher.



Module 9 – Navigating through IDIS: Approving a Drawdown
IDIS Home Page
We’ll start at the Home page of IDIS. To create or approve a drawdown voucher, we will click on
Funding/Drawdown in the Navigation Menu.

The system will by default show the first page for Activity Funding. To get to the drawdown screens, look to the
module menu on the left. Under Drawdown, you should see links for Create Voucher, Search Voucher, and
Approve Voucher. If you do not see one of these links, it means that your user profile does not have the privileges
for that function. If you need to change your system privileges, you need to work with your local IDIS
administrator.

For this exercise, we will Approve a Voucher.

If you are following along in the manual, we are on page 5 DASH 9.

Approve a Voucher Page 1
On this page, we will search for the voucher we want to approve.

The fastest way to find a specific voucher is to use the voucher number. If you do not know the voucher number,
you can use the other search fields or simply click search to generate a list of all open vouchers.

When the system refreshes the page, you will see a list of all of the open voucher LINE ITEMS.

Depending on the number of results, you may need to page through the results. You can also click on the column
headers to sort the results.

Find a line item from the voucher you want to approve and click on the MAINTAIN-APPROVE link.

The next page will list all of the line items for the voucher selected.

You can approve each line item individually or you can use the APPROVE ALL LINE ITEMS button at the bottom of
the screen. If you click on the Approve link for a specific line item, the system will display another page to review
and confirm the approval.

Let’s click on the APPROVE ALL LINE ITEMS button.

When the screen refreshes, the LINE ITEM STATUS will now read Approved. The status will remain Approved until
the end of the day when IDIS submits the voucher for processing to the LOCCS system.



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Most vouchers are paid within 2 to 3 business days. Once the voucher has been paid, the status will automatically
update to complete.




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Module 10: Program Income – Training Slides
Slide 1
This is Module 10 of IDIS Online for CDBG Entitlements. In Module 10, we will discuss the data entry necessary to
report the receipt and use of CDBG program income and revolving loan fund income.

In the first video of this module, we will review the concepts and key points about reporting program income in
IDIS.

In the second video, we will walk through the data entry step by step.

Slide 2
You will need to manage program income in three areas of the system.

First, to report to HUD that you have program income in your local accounts, you will create a receipt.

One of the most important points on program income is the timing of the data entry. To stay in compliance with
the cash management rules of the grant, you should receipt any program income you have on hand before doing a
drawdown.

Some HUD representatives encourage their grantees to receipt program income monthly, at a minimum.

When creating receipts, you do not have to create a separate receipt for each check you receive; you have the
option of BATCHING receipts, which is to create one IDIS receipt to represent multiple payments you receive. For
example, you may create one IDIS receipt to enter all of the housing rehabilitation loan payments you received in a
month.

Once you have reported the receipt of the income, you will need to report its use for an eligible activity. To do so,
you will first fund an activity with program income and then create a program income drawdown for the activity.
Please note that this is different from the previous version of IDIS.

The drawdown process for program income is just like the normal drawdown process, except HUD will not send
you any funds from your line of credit. When drawing program income, you are reporting to HUD the use of the
income as opposed to requesting funds from your treasury account.

Slide 3
There are three different types of CDBG receipts in IDIS: program income, revolving loans, and repayments.

Program income is the gross amount of income received by a CDBG grantee or subrecipient directly generated
from the use of CDBG funds. The most typical form of income comes from loan repayments, but it can include
other sources such as the proceeds from the sale and rental of property.

Revolving loan receipts are funds that are earmarked to be reinvested into the same activity that generated them
(hence the name revolving). Two common examples of revolving loan programs are homeowner rehabilitation
loan programs and economic development loan programs. If you are unsure if your program is a revolving loan,




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check with your CPD representative, since revolving loan funds are treated differently in the CDBG regulations than
normal program income.

The third type of CDBG receipt in IDIS is a repayment. Please note that repayments are not program income.
Program income and revolving loan receipts are generated from eligible activities whereas repayments occur when
an activity is repaying ineligible costs or excessive draws.

Repayments are handled differently than program income. With program income, you will create a receipt, fund
an activity, and then create a new drawdown. With repayments, you typically need to revise the drawdown that
originally drew the money. In this module, we will focus on program income and revolving loans. If you need to
process a repayment, work with your local CPD representative and the IDIS Technical Assistance Unit.

Slide 4
The most important thing to keep in mind when dealing with program income is, per the CDBG regulations, you
must use it first before requesting additional funds from your line of credit.

The best way to stay in compliance with this rule is to include the receipt process as part of your drawdown
process.

This will have the effect of netting the income you already have on hand out of the total amount requested from
Treasury.

For example, if you have $4,000 in program income receipts and invoices for $10,000, you will create

a program income receipt for $4,000,

a program income drawdown for $4,000 and

$ draw the remaining 6,000 of funds from entitlement.

When subrecipients are allowed to keep program income to fund additional eligible activities, this income must
also be receipted and drawn in IDIS, even if no funds are sent to the grantee. When subrecipients are allowed to
keep income, they are treated just like the grantee where they should use any income on hand first before
requesting additional funds from the grantee. In IDIS, grantees should fund the subrecipient’s activity with the
receipted funds to make sure the funds are credited to the subrecipient. Alternatively, IDIS now allows grantees to
create separate pots of program income using the subgrant function.

Now that we have a background on what program income is and how it should be treated, let’s log in to IDIS and
walk through the steps to create a receipt and record a program income drawdown.



Module 10 – Navigating through IDIS: Program Income
Introduction to Program Income
This is data entry portion for Program Income. In this video, we will walk through the process of creating a program
income receipt and reporting the use of program income by creating a drawdown. If you have a revolving loan, the
process in IDIS will be the same as program income.

The best way to learn IDIS is to get hands-on practice. I want to encourage you to log on to the UAT version of IDIS



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and enter the data as you follow the video.

You can pause the video at any time by clicking the pause button in the lower left hand corner. You can switch
back and forth between this video and IDIS by holding down the Alt key on your keyboard and then pressing the
Tab key.

If you are not already logged into UAT, pause the video and do so now. Make sure that UAT appears at the top of
the screen.

If you do not know how to access the UAT, there are directions at the bottom of the IDIS log-in page and also in
Module 1 of this course.

If you want to follow along in your manual, we will start in Chapter 6.

IDIS Home Page
We’ll start at the Home page of IDIS. To create a receipt, we will click on Funding/Drawdown in the Navigation
Menu.

The system will by default show the first page for Activity Funding. To get to the receipt screens, look to the
module menu on the left. Under Receipt, you should see links for Add, Search, and Search Accounts. If you do not
see one of these links, it means that your user profile does not have the privileges for that function. If you need to
change your system privileges, you need to work with your local IDIS administrator.

For the first portion of this exercise, we will create a program income receipt. Let’s click on the Add link.

Add Receipt Page 1
All the data we need to enter to create a receipt is on this page.

Before we start entering data, let’s first discuss the TIMING of entering program income receipts. Some HUD
representatives have stated that they would like to see program income receipted at least on a monthly basis.

The regulations state that any income on hand should be used before additional funds are drawn from the
Treasury account. In terms of timing, this means you should make the receipting process the first step of your
drawdown process.

That may seem like a lot of work, especially if you have a large portfolio of loans that make monthly payments.
However, HUD has stated that you can “batch” multiple receipts into one IDIS receipt. For example, you are
allowed to create one IDIS receipt to represent all of the CDBG income you received in a month.

We will fill out the left side of the screen first and then fill in the right. You can the fields on the left are grouped
into two sections, one labeled THIS FUND, and one labeled FUND FROM SUBGRANT. In general, CDBG does not
utilize subgrants. This exercise will not cover creating receipts for subgrants. For additional assistance on
subgrants, please refer to Appendix I and J.

We will fill out the fields in the section labeled THIS FUND and skip the section labeled FUND FROM SUBGRANT.

The first field asks us to indicate the program that generated the income. For this exercise, we will choose CDBG.

The program year is the year in which in the income was receipted, not the year of the activity that generated the
income. Take note that the CDBG Financial Summary Report (PR26) does not use this field to determine which year


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to credit the program income. This is important because the amount of program income receipted for a specific
year will affect the public service cap and the planning and administration cap.

Instead of this field, the PR26 uses the date on which the receipt was created. Given this, make sure to create a
receipt on the last day of your program year in order to receipt any unreported income on hand. This will ensure
that the income is credited to the correct year.

The next field is Source Type. CDBG States will use DC, cities will use MC, and Urban Counties will use UC.

The next field is Fund Type. For income, you will use PI for program income or RL for Revolving Loan. Program
income is income generated from a CDBG-funded activity and can include loan repayments, rental receipts, or the
sale of land. A revolving loan is a special type of income where the receipts are earmarked for activity similar in
nature to the activities generated the income. The CDBG regulations treat the receipt and handling of program
income and revolving loan differently. You may want to check with your CPD representative to see what fund type
you should use.

The Amount field is self-explanatory. For this exercise, I will assume that the receipt represents all of the loan
receipts I received in a month. I will use $10,000 for the amount.

The next field, Comments, is an optional field but it is HIGHLY recommended that you use it as it will make the
reconciliation process between IDIS and your local financial records much easier.

Moving over the right side of the page, the next field is Receipt Type. The Receipt Type should only be used when
creating a Repayment Receipt as opposed to a Program Income receipt. For this exercise, we will leave this field
blank.

Although not marked as a Required Field, you will be required to enter an IDIS Activity ID. This field is used to
indicate which IDIS activity generated the income. In some cases, you may not be able to determine the correct
IDIS activity that generated the income. For example, the repayment may be coming from a loan that pre-dates
IDIS and is therefore not in the system. HUD has stated that it is permissible to use any CDBG-funded activity when
creating a CDBG receipt.

For any CDBG-R program income, make sure you indicate a CDBG-R funded activity number here.

The next field is Matrix Code. The Matrix Code is only required for Revolving Loan receipts. This makes sense if you
remember that Revolving Loan receipts are earmarked for activities similar in nature to the activity that generated
the income.

The next field is Estimated Amount. This field is only required the first time you create a receipt for a fund type
each program year. It is asking you to estimate the amount of income that will be receipted in the selected
program year for the selected fund type. These estimates should be included in your annual action plan.

The final field is the Grantee Receipt Number. This field is optional and gives you a chance to put in a number or
code to tie this IDIS record back to a record in your local financial record.

Now that we’re finished, click the Save button. If all goes well, the system will refresh the page and give you a
confirmation page of the receipt with a receipt number. It is good practice to print this screen and keep it with a
copy of the checks receipts and other relevant documentation.




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Program Income Drawdown
Now that you know how to report to HUD that you have received program income, let’s walk through the process
of reporting on the use of program income. To report the use of income in IDIS, you will create a drawdown
voucher using the PI fund type.

In the previous version of IDIS, any income receipted in the system would automatically show up during the
drawdown process. In the current version of IDIS, you first have to fund an activity with program income before
you can create the drawdown.

Let’s go to the Activity Funding screen.

For the purpose of this exercise, we can use any open CDBG activity. In the real world, you should only fund an
activity with program income in preparation for a creating a program income drawdown. There are some
exceptions to this, such as when a subrecipient is allowed to retain program income, but in general, don’t fund an
activity with program income unless you know that the activity will be the next activity to request a drawdown.
Some grantees want to commit the program income to the activity that received a budget increase due to the
receipt of the income.

THIS IS INCORRECT. If you commit the program income dollars to one activity and in the meantime draw
entitlement dollars against others, you would be in violation of the “Use Program Income First” cash management
rule.

In the Funding Sources table, the Amount Available in the PI Fund Type will include the amount you just
receipted.

I will assume I need to drawdown $500 for this activity. Since I need to use program income before using
entitlement funds, I will have to fund this activity with PI.

Notice that once I increase the funding for program income, the Total Funded Amount is increased as well. The
purpose of adjusting the activity’s budget wasn’t to increase the total budget but to ensure it can draw program
income funds.

In order to correct this, I need to now decrease the entitlement funding by an equal amount.

When I adjust the amount of entitlement funding, you can see that I now have additional funds in the Amount
Available column. This newly available entitlement funds can be used for the activity that receives the budget
increase.

Now that you made all of the necessary funding adjustments, you can create the drawdown voucher to reflect the
use of program income.

We will go to create drawdown and select the same activity that we just adjusted the funding for.

On the next page, you should see two funding amounts, entitlement and program income. Again, you would want
to use all the available program income before using any of the entitlement dollars. The system will not force you
to do this.

The rest of the process is similar to the regular drawdown process, except that when the drawdown is approved,
HUD will not send you any funds.



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That’s all there is to program income. To report to HUD the receipt of new income, you will create a program
income or revolving loan receipt. To report the use of program income for an eligible activity, you will first adjust
the activity’s funding and then create a drawdown from the PI fund type.

Remember that the timing of the receipts and drawdowns is important. The rule to remember with program
income is to use it first before drawing additional entitlement funds from your line of credit.




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