03DDay BagasseStorage by IwjKD2Q

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									Bagasse Storage




    Donal Day and Benito Stradi
        Audubon Sugar Institute
    Factory Operations Seminar 2007
The Problem
 Decreases in fiber levels experienced at
  factories can lead to shortages in bagasse
  and a decreased capacity for mills,
  shortages that can no longer economically
  be made up with alternative fuels.

 Further pressure can be expected on
  bagasse supplies in the future with the
  development of new uses for this energy
  source, ranging from electricity generation
  to alcohol production.
The Goal

  Determine      the     rate   of
   deterioration of bagasse between
   operating seasons

  Determine whether there is any
   loss of fuel value on storage
Methodology
  Quantify the changes in composition of
   biomass (i. e. carbon content) of fiber in
   bagasse over a season of storage.

  The specific approach will be to
   investigate storage under aerobic and
   anaerobic conditions.
Methods

  Monitor the temperature and humidity
   evolution inside a bagasse pile over time
  Determine      changes     in    bagasse
   composition with time

  Construction of a “split” pile that contains
   aerobic and anaerobic segments
Setting up the Bagasse
Pile
Bagasse storage set-up
Temperature and Humidity
                                27 days –no essential
                                difference between piles
Relative Humidity (%)




                        Time (hr)
Initial findings…
    After 27 days both piles
     reached the same humidity
     levels
    Both      piles had 100 %
     saturation as result of the rain.
     The aerated pile was wet but
     the non-aerated pile was really
     wet.
    The temperature in the non-
     aerated pile is lower but with
     the high humidity feels hotter
Composition Changes
                  70
                                      % Glucan
                  60
                                      aerated
  % composition




                  50
                                      %lignin-aerated
                  40
                  30                  %glucan -
                                      anaerobic
                  20
                                      % lignin-
                  10
                                      anaerobic
                  0
                       0   20    40
                           Day
Initial findings
  The non aerated bagasse seemed to
   retain water longer

  Monitoring of variation in composition will
   be continued and evaluation of heating
   values will conducted for more complete
   analysis

  There does not seem to be any rapid
   changes in composition on storage
In Progress

  Sampling and monitoring composition of
   the bagasse will continue until next season

  Calorific value of bagasse stored at
   different conditions will be determined
Acknowledgements

    Dr. G. DeQueiroz
    Eng. Victor Bazan
    Joy Yoshina
    ASI analytical facility and mechanical
     staff without whose efforts the work
     would not be possible

  The research was supported by a grant
   from the American Sugar Cane League

								
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