Calling Minor, Major and Royal by 452fjT3

VIEWS: 6 PAGES: 6

									Calling Minor, Major and Royal

I've assumed Cambridge for the examples here, but the rules could be adapted for other
treble dodging methods or (with singles) for plain methods.

Another question to answer is which bell to call it from. Most of the published touches
assume that the conductor is ringing the heaviest working bell. It is possible to call the
same touches from other bells, but you either have to adapt the calling positions or start
(and end) the touch in a different place.

Cambridge S Minor




For a quarter peal, you need to call an extent (720) and a touch over 500 changes,
usually a 576 or 600. In principle, all the calls for these can be made in just two different
places, known as the Wrong (W) or Home (H).

     The Home is the dodging position when the 6th is about to become 6th place bell,
      i.e. at the course end.

     The Wrong is the other dodge in 5/6 at the lead end, when the 6th is about to
      become 5th place bell.

The order of work in the plain course for the 6th would be: 3rds place bell; 4ths place
bell; Wrong, 2nds place bell; Home.

The calls come when the Treble is in 2nds place just before it leads full, meaning that at
the Home position the 6th is lying after doing a double-dodge, and at the wrong is just
about to dodge up and become 5ths place bell (see diagram below).

For the 720, you can call WHW three times, which means that you ring the plain course
six times with the following calls:

1st    course:   Call   6th   W and H (or PPP-P-) course      end   =   45236
2nd    course:   Call   6th   W       (or PPP-PP) course      end   =   34256
3rd    course:   Call   6th   W and H (or PPP-P-) course      end   =   25346
4th    course:   Call   6th   W       (or PPP-PP) course      end   =   42356
5th    course:   Call   6th   W and H (or PPP-P-) course      end   =   35426
6th    course:   Call   6th   W       (or PPP-PP) course      end   =   23456 (rounds)
If you forget which lead you are in, you just keep calling bobs both Wrong and Home -
unless you are dodging with the 5th at Home.

The simplest 576 is the touch above augmented by calling the 6th to ring the bob (i.e.
4ths) in every course. This effectively takes out six leads (144 changes) leaving you with
a 576, making 1296 in total.

Others prefer to call a 600 using 3W and 3H, meaning that you ring the plain course five
times with the following calls:

1st   course:   Call   6th   W       (or PPP-PP)     course   end:   52436
2nd   course:   Call   6th   W       (or PPP-PP)     course   end:   35426
3rd   course:   Call   6th   W and H (or PPP-P-)     course   end:   42356
4th   course:   Call   6th   H       (or PPPPP-)     course   end:   34256
5th   course:   Call   6th   H       (or PPPPP-)     course   end:   23456 (rounds)

Basically you call a Bob three times in the same unaffected place (i.e. W), which gets
you back to the plain course after 300 changes, then you repeat this in the other
unaffected position.

You don't have to keep an eye on all of the course ends - this comes with time - but it
can be useful to keep an eye on a few things as signposts.

Cambridge S Major




Most quarter peal compositions are more complex than for Minor, in the sense that there
are more calling positions needed, and the calling-bell is usually effected by one-or-more
Bobs. The simplest touch that I've called is a 1280 (in the diary) with calls just at Before,
Wrong and Home. In notation this appears as:
1,280 Cambridge S Major

23456 B W H
------------
52436   -
23564 -
23645 -   -
42635   -
42356 -   -
34256     -
23456     -

Also works for Superlative, Yorkshire and Pudsey

This can be memorised as: Wrong; Before; Before Home; Wrong; Before Home; Home;
Home

The Bob Before (B) means that you call the 8th to run out, becoming 3rds place bell,
which means that it (and the 7th, which will be running-in) effectively skips three leads.
Basically for this touch you call seven courses (some of which will be three-leads shorter
than the plain course) as follows:

1st   course:   Call   8th   W       (or PPP-PPP)    course   end:   5243678
2nd   course:   Call   8th   B       (or P-PP)       course   end:   2356478
3rd   course:   Call   8th   B and H (or P-P-)       course   end:   2364578
4th   course:   Call   8th   W       (or PPP-PPP)    course   end:   4263578
5th   course:   Call   8th   B and H (or P-P-)       course   end:   4235678
6th   course:   Call   8th   H       (or PPPPPP-)    course   end:   3425678
7th   course:   Call   8th   H       (or PPPPPP-)    course   end:   2345678 (rounds)

You will notice that for the last three Homes, the back bells (5678) will be in the rounds
position just after the call.

Cambridge S Royal
In this, the calling positions are slightly easier than in Major in that you only need to
make calls at W and H (although you can do more). It is complicated, however, by the
fact that the calls are further apart (and therefore harder to identify) and that at least one
of the calls (for a 1282) needs to be a Single. For a 1282, the touch comes round several
blows after the lead end, which you need to bear in mind when calling: "That's All."

A basic touch (in the diary) is:

 1,282 Cambridge S Royal

 23456   W H
------------
 52436   - 3
(32456) S

Also works for Yorkshire and           Lincolnshire

This means, calling the 10th W and H, H, H, then a Single at the next W, which will
produce rounds after the lead-end dodge (at the second blow when the 10th is lying at
the back).

In practice, it means calling three-and-a-half courses as follows:

1st   course:   Call   10th   W and H            (or   PPPP-PPP-)
2nd   course:   Call   10th   H                  (or   PPPPPPPP-)
3rd   course:   Call   10th   H                  (or   PPPPPPPP-) course end: 52436
4th   course:   Call   10th   W with a Single    (or   PPPPS)

Calling other things (i.e. Grandsire)

After reading this, you may conclude that calling Triples or Doubles might be easier -
even the 1288. Some of the same principles apply, but there tend to be a few different
principles. Not least that the calls come when the Treble is at handstroke in 3rds place.

For Grandsire Doubles (or any other Doubles), you need to call ten extents (120
changes) and a 60. There is no reason why you should not call the same thing ten times
(e.g. for Grandsire with 5th observation: P-P-PSP-P-PS, with the 5th ringing 3rds and
double 4/5 up throughout), using the same calling structure for the 60 (P-P-P-). The main
problem with this is keeping count of how many extents you have called. It is possible to
do three different variations on the above pattern (i.e. P-PSP-P-PSP-, PSP-P-PSP-P-),
which can help with this.
For Grandsire Triples, the first quarter that I called is in the diary, a six part (i.e. the work
is repeated five times) 1260 that works as follows:

1,260 Grandsire Triples

    234567
    ------
S   762453   2
S   357246   2
-   573246   4
-   735246   4
-   467523   2
-   354267   1

Six part, S for final
B in 3rd and 6th parts

The notation is slightly different than from even-bell methods, with their focus on
Wrongs, Homes, etc. The number in the column on the far right indicates how many
leads between the calls, so this touch is:

PSPSPPP-PPP-P-- (x6)

With the final Bob converted to a Single in both 3rd and 6th parts.

In practice, the work can be summarised as:

7th: plain lead (4/5 up), Single into Hunt, plain lead (in hunt), Single out (double 4/5
down), three plain leads (6/7 down, 6/7 up, 4/5 up), Bob at ordinary 3rds, three plain
leads (4/5/ down, 6/7 down, 6/7 up), Bob into Hunt, plain lead (in hunt), Bob out (double
4/5 down), Bob (or single) at next lead (double 6/7 up), which brings 4, 6, 7 back into
their rounds position ... then repeat five times substituting Singles for the last Bob in the
3rd and 6th parts. I remember this as: S in and out at 2, 3rds, B in and out at 2, double
6/7 up (repeat as necessary). The tune is well known at Bathwick and many of us should
be able to ring it from any bell with our eyes shut!

The calling pattern is also fairly easy to remember on the 6th, with a regular pattern that
involves much 6/7 up dodging with the 4th. 6th: plain lead (6/7 up with 4th), Single long
3rds, plain lead (4/5 down), Single (double 6/7 up with 4th), three plain leads (4/5 up,
3rds, 4/5 down), Bob (double 6/7 up with 4th), three plain leads (4/5 up, 3rds, 4/5 up),
Bob (double 6/7 up with 4th), plain lead (4/5 up), Bob at ordinary thirds, Bob (or single)
at next lead (double 6/7down). This is slightly more repetitive, but you can work out
when the early bob comes (if you forget), because the 7th should be in the hunt.

The 1288 may be slightly easier because there is no need to switch Singles for Bobs,
and it is a four part, meaning that it is easier (in theory) to work out which part you are
currently in. There is also a lot of repetition for the two 'fixed' bells (6 and 7).

I'll assume that you already have the 'easy' guide to this one! I've never called it myself,
currently preferring an old-fashioned three-part Bobs-only 1260 that is in the diary. I
remember the 7ths work in the 1288 as: in with a Bob at one, out with a single at five,
Bob next lead (double 6/7 up), then calls in the same place (double 6/7 up) in the order:
Single, Bob, Bob, Single. I find the five repeated calls at double 6/7 up hard to
differentiate and find spending four consecutive leads in the hunt confusing, but most
Bath ringers will know the tune reasonably well.

1,288 Grandsire Triples
R William Willans

    234567
    ------
-   752634   1
s   567423   5
-   345267   1
s   543267   4
-   435267   4
-   354267   4
s   453267   4

four part


MWD, 15 May 2007

								
To top