Graduate Student Handbook 2012

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					GRADUATE STUDENT
HANDBOOK
2012-2013




*Please note that a print version of this handbook is available from the Office of
Graduate Studies.




                                                                                     1
Dear Students,


Greetings to all graduate students and a productive and inspiring year to you all. I am thrilled to
see the continued growth of the graduate studies community and the many extraordinary
examples of research and creativity emerging from OCAD U’s various graduate programs. In the
coming year, I’d like us to share more of these success stories through social media, web pages,
and in print.


I’d like to extend a special welcome to the second cohorts of the Inclusive Design and the Digital
Futures Initiative. These two programs round out the unique learning opportunities that make
OCAD University such a special place. Learning opportunities will be considerably deepened
through research assistantship opportunities and in collaboration with industry and other
partners. Particularly promising projects will have the opportunity to engage in
commercialization initiatives through OCAD University’s business accelerator and incubator,
the Imagination Catalyst under the leadership of Executive Director Steve Billinger.


Since we have enjoyed significant growth in our graduate programs, we have now added the new
position of Associate Dean, Graduate Studies, to provide additional support to the Office of
Graduate Studies. I’d like to welcome Professor Martha Ladly to this new role.


Wishing you all an excellent year,




Helmut Reichenbächer, Ph.D.
Associate Vice-President Research and Dean Graduate Studies




                                                                                                   2
CONTACT INFORMATION

Office of Research and Graduate Studies
205 Richmond Street W, 5th floor, room 7520
Telephone: 416-977-6000, ext. 423
Fax: 647-439-4194
Email: gradstudies@ocadu.ca
Web: www.ocadu.ca/gradstudies

Mailing address:
100 McCaul Street
Toronto, ON M5T 1W1
Canada

Dr. Helmut Reichenbächer
Associate Vice President, Research and Dean, Graduate Studies
hreichenbacher@ocadu.ca
416-977-6000, ext. 464

Martha Ladly
Associate Dean, Graduate Studies
mladly@ocadu.ca
416-977-6000, ext.3849

Sarah Hildebrandt
Manager, Graduate Studies
shildebrandt@ocadu.ca
416-977-6000, ext. 455

Christine Crisol-Pineda
Manager, Special Projects
cpineda@ocadu.ca
416-977-6000, ext. 4368

Gale Allen
Graduate Studies Assistant
gallen@ocadu.ca
416-977-6000, ext. 423

Sabrina Lindo
Assistant, Digital Futures Initiative
slindo@ocadu.ca
416-977-6000, ext. 4581

Aileen O’Dowd
Online Program Coordinator (Inclusive Design)
aodowd@ocadu.ca
416-977-6000, ext. 4369




                                                                3
Allison Rowe
Graduate Program Assistant (IAMD)
arowe@ocadu.ca
416-977-6000, Ext. 4366

Frances Ryan
Assistant to the Associate Vice-President, Research & Dean, Graduate Studies
fryan@ocadu.ca
416-977-6000, Ext. 417


Graduate Program Directors

Contemporary Art, Design and New Media Art Histories
Criticism and Curatorial Practice
Dr. Michael Prokopow
mprokopow@faculty.ocadu.ca
416-977-6000, Ext. 2523

Digital Futures
Tom Barker
tbarker@faculty.ocadu.ca
416-977-6000, Ext. 2056

Inclusive Design
Jutta Treviranus
jtreviranus@faculty.ocadu.ca
416-977-6000, Ext. 3950

Interdisciplinary Master’s in Art, Media and Design
Dr. Barbara Rauch
brauch@faculty.ocadu.ca
416-977-6000, Ext. 4653

Strategic Foresight and Innovation
Lenore Richards
lrichards@faculty.ocadu.ca
416-977-6000, Ext. 438




                                                                               4
TABLE OF CONTENTS
GENERAL INFORMATION                                          8

Academic Integrity                                           8

Respectful Work & Learning Environment                       8

Research Involving Human Participants                        9

University Governance                                        9

ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES                                   12

Responsibilities of the Graduate Program Director            12

Roles and Responsibilities of Supervisors                    12

Roles, responsibilities and rights of the Graduate Student   13

COURSES AND REGISTRATION                                     14

Registration                                                 14

Registration in Undergraduate Courses                        15

Special Studies                                              16

Auditing Courses                                             17

Ontario Visiting Graduate Student (OVGS) Plan                17

Canadian University Graduate Transfer Agreement (CUGTA)      18

FUNDING                                                      19

Internal Scholarships                                        19

External Scholarships                                        20

Graduate Assistantships                                      21

Loans and Bursaries                                          23

Funding for Conference Travel                                23

FACILITIES                                                   24

Studios and Research/Study Space                             24

Experimental Space                                           25

Digital Editing Suite                                        25

Mailboxes                                                    26




                                                                  5
Computer Studios                                       26

Equipment Loans                                        27

Library and Learning Zone                              27

Graduate Gallery                                       29

RESOURCES AND SERVICES                                 30

Centre for Students with Disabilities                  30

Student Health and Wellness Centre                     30

Office of Safety and Risk Management                   31

International Student Services                         34

Writing and Learning Services                          34

Imagination Catalyst                                   36

Student Union                                          36

Housing                                                39

DATES AND DEADLINES                                    40

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS                                      46

Contemporary Art, Design and New Media Art Histories   47

Description                                            47

Program Requirements                                   48

Course Descriptions                                    50

Thesis/Major Research Paper and Supervision            55

Tuition and Fees                                       57

Criticism and Curatorial Practice                      59

Description                                            59

Program Requirements                                   60

Course Descriptions                                    61

Thesis and Supervision                                 64

Tuition and Fees                                       65

Digital Futures                                        67

Description                                            67


                                                            6
Program Requirements                                  69

Course Descriptions                                   76

Tuition and Fees                                      81

Inclusive Design                                      82

Description                                           82

Program Requirements                                  83

Course Descriptions                                   84

Tuition and Fees                                      86

Interdisciplinary Master’s in Art, Media and Design   88

Description                                           88

Program Requirements                                  88

Course Descriptions                                   94

Thesis and Supervision                                96

Tuition and Fees                                      97

Strategic Foresight and Innovation                    99

Description                                           99

Program Requirements                                  100

Course Descriptions                                   101

Tuition and Fees                                      103

GRADUATE STUDIES POLICIES                             105




                                                            7
GENERAL INFORMATION


Note: The information in this handbook is subject to change, and revisions to policies, forms,
and procedures may be made throughout the academic year. Students should consult the OCAD
U website for the most up-to-date information at: www.ocadu.ca


Academic Integrity

OCAD University (OCAD U) prides itself on fostering and promoting effective teaching, learning
and artistic creativity. OCAD U encourages its students to push the boundaries of their
creativity, to take risks and seek innovation. OCAD U believes that all research and creative
pursuits require students to hold themselves to the highest standards of ethical conduct, honesty
and academic integrity.

Academic freedom is a fundamental right in any institution of higher learning. Honesty and
integrity are necessary preconditions of this freedom. Academic integrity requires that all
academic work be wholly the product of an identified individual or individuals. Ethical conduct
is the obligation of every member of the University community and breaches of academic
integrity constitute serious offences.

Please familiarize yourself with OCAD U’s Academic Misconduct Policy, which can be found on
the OCAD U website:

http://www.ocadu.ca/students/student_policies/academic_policies.htm


Respectful Work & Learning Environment

OCAD University is committed to supporting equity, diversity, inclusion and dignity of all
people. The University promotes equity and inclusion in its learning and working environment
and in the conduct of the University’s affairs. OCAD U will not tolerate harassment of or
discrimination against any community member. Harassment and discrimination violate an
individual’s human rights and run contrary to the University’s fundamental values. OCAD U will
act promptly and efficiently to address this conduct. The University will endeavour to ensure
that individuals who believe that they have been subjected to harassment or discrimination are
able to express concerns and register complaints without fear of retaliation or reprisal. The
University will exercise care to protect and respect the rights of both the complainant and the
respondent.

OCAD U recognizes the importance of certain rights and freedoms at a university dedicated to
intellectual inquiry and creative practice. The University is committed to upholding all
fundamental human rights, including freedom of association, freedom of conscience, opinion
and belief, and freedom of thought, inquiry, artistic and creative expression.

The complete Respectful Work & Learning Environment Policy can be found on the OCAD U
website under “About OCAD U” > “Administrative Policies” at:

http://www.ocadu.ca/about_ocad/administrative_policies.htm




                                                                                                  8
Research Involving Human Participants

The institution, as well as the visual and design culture in Canada, has benefitted from the
growth and development of degree programs and research/creation programs in art and design
disciplines at OCAD U. The benefits include the advancement and dissemination of knowledge,
the enrichment of undergraduate and graduate training programs, and the examination of social
and cultural phenomena in relation to art and design disciplines. These benefits are
counterbalanced by academic obligations that require artist-researchers in the visual and design
disciplines to demonstrate the highest level of integrity and ethics in pursuit of scholarship and
research.

OCAD U's research ethics policy is based on the "Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct
for Research Involving Humans" (Version Two), Canadian Institutes of Health Research,
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and Social Sciences and
Humanities Research Council of Canada, December 2010. OCAD U supports and promotes
ethics review for research/creation involving human participants, and endorses the Tri-Council
Policy Statement. OCAD U’s research ethics policy is available online at:

www.ocadu.ca/research/research_ethics_board.htm

Graduate students will receive general information regarding the conduct of ethical research
with human participants in their research methods courses. Graduate students who conduct
research that involves human participants will likely require the approval of the Research Ethics
Board (REB) prior to the initiation of any such research. Please allow up to twenty working days
from the submission of your completed REB application until you receive either review
comments and/or approval. For more information, including the form for Application for
Ethical Review, please contact the Research Office or visit the OCAD U REB website:

www.ocadu.ca/research/research_ethics_board.htm

The Research Ethics Board includes one graduate student representative. This representative
has been established for 2012/13, but students who are interested in participating should watch
for information in the spring regarding 2013/14 nominations.

University Governance

OCAD University is governed by a Senate, which determines and regulates the educational
policy of the University.

The Senate is composed of senior academic administrators (including the President and Deans),
as well as elected Senators. Elected Senators include both faculty and students.

Senate membership includes one (1) Graduate Student Senator, elected by and from those
students of the University enrolled in a full- or part-time graduate program. Senate Elections are
managed centrally by the Chief Electoral Officer via an electronic voting process. Elections are
held annually before May 31.




                                                                                                9
Senate Graduate Studies Committee

The Senate Graduate Studies Committee (SGSC) reports to Senate and comprises the following
members:

       •   The Associate Vice-President, Research and Dean, Graduate Studies, who will serve
           as Chair.
       •   Three (3) Deans/Designates
       •   The Chairs/Directors of all Graduate Programs
       •   One (1) Graduate Studies Staff Administrator
       •   The Associate Vice-President, Students or Designate
       •   The University Librarian and Director, Library Services or Designate
       •   The Director, IT Services or Designate
       •   Three (3) faculty members
       •   Two (2) graduate students

The SGSC has the following responsibilities:

      Oversees and makes recommendations on all matters directly related to graduate
       academic programs and related policies.
      Acts as the principal advisor to the Associate Vice-President Research & Dean, Graduate
       Studies and Senate on academic priorities and the implementation of policies and
       procedures related to graduate studies.
      Makes recommendations to Senate regarding:
          o Proposals for graduate curriculum including course changes, additions and
               deletions, taking into consideration the academic philosophy of the institution,
               its planned directions, the coherence of proposed programming changes, and the
               relevant internal and external criteria for the evaluation of such curriculum.
          o Principles, policies and priorities for the development of Graduate Studies at the
               university and concerning the conduct and regulation of graduate students in
               their studies.
          o Proposals for the introduction of new graduate programs, taking into
               consideration Faculty academic priorities, the coherence of the proposed
               programs, the criteria appropriate for the evaluation of such programs, and the
               resource base they require.
          o The establishment of graduate program priorities and relationships between
               existing or proposed programs of study, admissions policies, and standards for all
               graduate programs.
          o The termination, suspension, or combination of existing graduate programs.
          o The introduction of new categories of graduate degrees and diplomas.
          o The development of teaching and learning initiatives, policies and regulations as
               they affect graduate students.
          o The development of quality assurance standards for graduate programs.
          o The development of graduate student training programs in academic integrity
               and the responsible conduct of research.
          o Annual updates to the graduate calendar, including improvements in format and
               organization, changes to program requirements, regulations, and graduate course
               bank (additions, deletions and changes in designation); and identification of
               curricular changes leading to duplication.




                                                                                              10
          o   The impact of proposals and planning of external bodies such as the Council of
              Ontario Universities (COU) and the Ontario Ministry of Training, Colleges, and
              Universities (MTCU) on OCAD U graduate programs.
          o   The impact of initiatives and changes at other institutions in the areas of new
              programs, procedures, policies, tuition changes, etc., on OCAD U graduate
              programs.


The Senate Graduate Studies Committee includes two (2) graduate student
representatives. Nominations and elections usually take place in September of each year.

Complete Senate Bylaws are available on the OCAD University website at:
http://www.ocadu.ca/about_ocad/governance/senate.htm




                                                                                            11
ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES


Responsibilities of the Graduate Program Director

The Graduate Program Director’s roles and responsibilities include:

      Advising students on course selection and program requirements
      Providing general advice concerning students’ studies and future career advancement
      Serving as a mediator in case of problems between students and their supervisors
      Being knowledgeable about program requirements, the composition of committees, the
       procedures for the thesis and the oral defence examination, and other policies related to
       graduate studies
      Establishing and meeting regularly with the Graduate Program Committee
      Overseeing and reporting on the progress of graduate students to the Associate Vice
       President Research and Dean, Graduate Studies
      Establishing program-based dates and deadlines, particularly regarding the Major
       Resesarch Project/Paper and thesis, and being sensitive to students’ graduation
       deadlines
      Overseeing space administration and allocations
      Chairing the Admissions Committee for the program


Roles and Responsibilities of Supervisors

Except in the case of Graduate Diploma programs, each student will work with a Supervisory
Committee, including a Principal Advisor, to guide his/her program of study and culminating
thesis project or Major Research Paper/Project (MRP). Members of the Supervisory Committee
must be appointed members of OCAD U’s Graduate Faculty. .

Supervisors advise students on all aspects of their graduate work. The advising process is
monitored by the Office of Graduate Studies and the Graduate Program Director. To ensure that
all students are treated equitably, any questions or problems with the advising process should be
addressed to the Graduate Program Director.

All Supervisory Committee members are expected to contribute to the progress and
development of the graduate student on a regular basis throughout the graduate student’s
residency period. The following basic principles should apply:

       •   Regular meetings – not less than once per semester. More frequent contact is
           strongly encouraged.
       •   Timely review of submitted material.
       •   Adequate notice of prolonged absence.
       •   Adequate notice of impending deadlines.
       •   Courteous, respectful, and clear communication.

Students are responsible for setting up regular appointments with their Principal Advisors.




                                                                                              12
Roles, responsibilities and rights of the Graduate Student

As a graduate student at OCAD U, you will assume a number of roles, which may include:

      Student. By taking courses and conducting research, you will gain new skills and
       knowledge that will help you complete your degree and contribute to society through
       your work after graduation, whether this is inside or outside academia.
      Researcher. As a graduate student, you will be responsible for contributing original
       research to your field. This means you will be responsible for designing and carrying out
       a research project.
      Research Assistant (RA). During your graduate career, you may hold a paid position
       supporting an OCAD U faculty member’s research.
      Teaching Assistant (TA). You may have the opportunity in your graduate career to be
       a Teaching Assistant, whereby you will lead undergraduate discussion seminars or studio
       classes or otherwise participate in undergraduate teaching. Teaching will provide
       valuable experience, especially if you want to pursue a career in academia. It also can be
       a valuable source of funding.
      Member of the broader academic community. By participating in conferences,
       collaborating on research, publishing etc., you make yourself a part of the broader
       academic community, both within and outside of OCAD U.

Graduate students at OCAD U also have rights and responsibilities including:

      Being treated with respect by your Supervisory Committee, other faculty, students and
       OCAD U staff.
      Conducting graduate work free from harassment by any member of the OCAD U
       community.
      Having sufficient access to your Principal Advisor and, when applicable, members of
       your Supervisory Committee so that you are able to complete your program
       requirements in a timely fashion. Adequate accessibility means that you can expect
       scheduled meetings to take place, phone calls and emails to be returned, adequate
       meeting time, and reasonable turnaround time for getting comments on your written
       work.
      Communicating openly with your supervisor(s) in the event that your working
       relationship or other aspects of your graduate program need to be discussed or
       renegotiated.
      Discussing problems with your supervisor(s) without fear of retribution.
      Changing Principal Advisors if you are unsatisfied with your student-supervisor
       relationship, decide to pursue another area of study, or for any other valid reason. Please
       note that changing supervisors is subject to approval by the Graduate Program Director
       and may only take place within established deadlines.
      Treating your Principal Advisor, members of your department and faculty, other
       students and staff of OCAD U offices with respect.
      Keeping informed of and working within program requirements and deadlines
      Communicating regularly with your Principal Advisor and (when applicable) your
       Supervisory Committee members.




                                                                                               13
COURSES AND REGISTRATION


Registration

Information on the Student Information System (SIS) is sent to all newly-accepted graduate
students in their Welcome Package. Detailed instructions on how to use the online registration
system are available below and at:

http://www.ocadu.ca/students/records_registration/course_calendar/1213/graduate/graduate
_registration_guide/register_courses.htm

Instructions also appear online on each page of the registration system, which is accessed at:

https://ocadsis.ocad.ca/ocadasp/

Course information, including program requirements and course descriptions, is available
online in the Academic Calendar in the “Students” section of the OCAD U website:

http://www.ocadu.ca/students/records_registration/course_calendar/1213.htm

Please note that you must successfully register in all of your courses within the
deadlines established by the Registrar. Failure to do so will result in you having to
petition to the Office of the Registrar for late registration and pay an associated fee. There is no
guarantee that your petition will be successful. The petition policy can be found at:

www.ocadu.ca/Assets/pdf_media/ocad/students/office_of_the_registrar/1018+Student+Petiti
ons+Policy.pdf

If you have any questions regarding the registration process, please contact the Office of the
Registrar at 416-977-6000, ext. 235 or by email at regservices@ocadu.ca.

Student Information System
Unless indicated otherwise, the on-line course registration system is open 24 hours a day during
the published registration period. Go to www.ocadu.ca and click on ‘Students’ and then click on
‘My Records’. Read the information on the Welcome Screen and then click on the bottom
LOGON line. If you encounter any accessibility issues when registering please contact the Center
for Students with Disabilities.

Logon: Enter your student number and PIN in the designated boxes and click on ‘Sign in’.
If you are signing in for the first time, you will use your birth date to activate your account. You
will then be transferred to the ‘Change PIN’ screen where you can choose your PIN.

Student Access Menu Options

Registration: Select this menu option when you are ready to register for your courses. If you are
registering for a session for the first time, you will be required to complete an on-line
Declaration to verify and confirm your program of study and your immigration status. This
verification serves as your signature and eliminates the need for a registration form. You will
also be assigned an OCAD U email address.




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Course Times and Locations: This screen lists your registered courses as of the previous
business day. Courses are listed by day and time and are shown with their section number, class
type (studio, liberal studies, etc) and room location. Course conflicts are identified in the Notes
column. Course locations will be displayed a week before classes begin. Should there be a room
change, you can find the new location on-line immediately. If you want a copy of your schedule,
simply print screen [Ctrl-P - Landscape].

Courses and Marks: Here you will find the record of all of the courses you have taken at the
University. Note that you will not see newly registered courses until the next business day. A few
weeks after the end of a session, you may look up your marks on-line. If you want a copy of your
final grades, simply print screen [Ctrl-P - Landscape].

Fees Account: Check your account balance at any time. It is your responsibility to ensure that all
fees due are paid before the published deadline. Remember that transactions are not recorded
until the following business day, so it is best to review your account the first weekday following
your registration changes.

Address: This screen displays both your local and permanent mailing addresses and allows you
to update your local mailing address and telephone number. It is your responsibility to ensure
your mailing address is current. Changes to your permanent address must be submitted in
writing to the Office of the Registrar.

Computer Account Agreement: Your username (computer ID) for the Student Portal and your
personal OCAD U email address are recorded here. As well, the Acceptable Use Guidelines are
located here for your reference. To access the Student Portal, go to www.ocadu.ca and click on
‘Students’, then click on ‘My Services’.

Computer Account Password: This page will allow you to set up or change your password for the
Student Portal (where you access your OCAD U email account). This is not your student PIN.

T2202A (Tuition, Education and Textbook Amounts Tax Certificate): Select a year from the drop
down box and click ‘launch PDF’ to view your T2202A form for the corresponding year. If you
want a copy of your T2202A, simply click the ‘printer icon’ and follow the instructions.

Exit System: To ensure the privacy and confidentiality of your data, you must always exit the
system when you have finished viewing your records or registering. If you forget, the system will
eventually time out, but you run the risk of someone else accessing your records.

Registration in Undergraduate Courses

With the appropriate approvals, graduate students may take a 300- or 400-level course as an
elective for their program. To take an undergraduate course as an elective, graduate students
must work with the instructor to establish an augmented program of study to bring the course
up to the graduate level. This may include supplementary readings and/or a more extensive
paper or project. Students should consult their program guidelines in this handbook for more
information.

Students must obtain the approval of the following, in the order given:
      1. the course instructor
      2. the instructor’s Associate Dean (or designate)
      3. the student’s Graduate Program Director



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The completed form must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar before the end of the first
week of classes. The form is available on the website at:

www.ocadu.ca/programs/graduate_studies/forms_policies_handbook.htm

The Registrar’s Office will inform students if they are accepted into the class, and will manually
register graduate students.

Special Studies

Special Studies courses (Independent Study, Internships and Residencies) offer graduate
students the opportunity to earn credits outside of the scheduled curriculum.

   i) Independent Study

Independent Study courses provide graduate students with the opportunity to undertake studies
of significance to their educational objectives, where otherwise not available through the regular
university curriculum. Independent studies are supervised and evaluated by OCAD U faculty
members.

       ii) Internship

Internships provide graduate students with opportunities to gain experience in the professional
worlds of art, design, criticism and curating that will complement their studies. On-site work is
performed under the guidance of the internship sponsor and the internship credit is supervised
and evaluated by an OCAD U faculty member.

       iii) Residency

Residencies provide graduate students with the opportunity to study in new environments and
communities and to work with new technologies that are programmatically relevant and
pedagogically transferrable. On-site work is performed under the guidance of the residency host
(as applicable) and the residency credit is supervised and evaluated by an OCAD U faculty
member.

Students may apply for approved residencies, or may submit a residency opportunity for
approval by their Graduate Program Committee.

Application forms for Special Studies courses can be found on the OCAD U Graduate Studies
website under “Forms, Policies and Handbook” at:

http://www.ocadu.ca/programs/graduate_studies/forms_policies_handbook.htm

Please see “Graduate Studies Policies” in this handbook for the complete Special Studies policy.




                                                                                                16
Auditing Courses

As per Academic Council Policy # 2002:

      To audit a course is to attend classes without working for or receiving academic credit.
       Audit students are not required to complete course assignments, take examinations or
       attend tutorials and do not receive an evaluation, critique or grade. Audit students may,
       with the approval of the instructor, participate in class discussions.

      Not all courses may be audited. Audit courses do not count towards full-time status,
       graduation requirements or eligibility for any financial aid.

      An audited course will be recorded on the student’s academic transcript with a notation
       indicating whether or not the student attended classes.

      An audited course may not subsequently be claimed for credit. Students registered in a
       course for credit may not subsequently request a change to audit status.

Graduate students may audit any course provided the required permissions have been granted.
By mutual agreement with the course instructor, graduate students may participate in class
discussions and engage in class activities.

Graduate students must present a Request for Permission to Audit form to the course instructor
at the first or second class for approval (the form is available on the OCAD U Graduate Studies
website under “Forms, Policies and Handbook”). If the instructor approves the request, the
student must present the signed form to the instructor’s Associate Dean (or designate) for
Faculty approval and then, if approved by the Associate Dean, to their Program Director for final
approval. The form must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar before the end of the second
week of classes. Students should pay close attention to the deadlines for registration.

Course withdrawal procedures and deadlines are the same as for regular credit courses.

Course audit fees for graduate students are included in their program fees. Costs of field trips
and incidental expenses must be paid by the students.

The complete policy can be found on the OCAD U website at:

http://www.ocadu.ca/Assets/pdf_media/ocad/students/office_of_the_registrar/2002+Auditin
g+Courses.pdf


Ontario Visiting Graduate Student (OVGS) Plan

The Ontario Visiting Graduate Student Plan allows a graduate student of an Ontario University
(Home University) to take graduate courses at another Ontario University (Host University)
while remaining registered at his/her own university. The plan allows the student to bypass the
usual application for admission procedures and resultant transfer of credit difficulties. The
student pays fees to his/her Home University and is classed as a “visiting graduate student” at
the Host University where he/she pays no fees.




                                                                                                   17
OCAD U graduate students interested in taking a graduate course at another Ontario University
under the OVGS plan must complete the OVGS application form found on the OCAD U
Graduate Studies website under “Forms, Policies and Handbook” at:

http://www.ocadu.ca/programs/graduate_studies/forms_policies_handbook.htm


Canadian University Graduate Transfer Agreement (CUGTA)

The Canadian University Graduate Transfer Agreement provides students in good standing
enrolled in a graduate degree or diploma program at a CAGS (Canadian Association for
Graduate Studies) member university the opportunity to avail themselves of courses offered at
another member institution (host) for transfer credit to the program at their institution (home).

The definition of “home” is the institution in which the student applicant is enrolled and is
expected to provide the graduate degree or diploma. The “host” is defined as the institution at
which course credits can be obtained that can be counted toward a degree or diploma at the
home institution.

Students covered by the Agreement will pay tuition for the course concerned and applicable
incidental fees at the host institution.

An application form and more details about CUGTA are available on the OCAD U Graduate
Studies website under “Forms, Policies and Handbook” at:

http://www.ocadu.ca/programs/graduate_studies/forms_policies_handbook.htm




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FUNDING

Internal Scholarships

 Graduate Scholarships
A limited number of Graduate Scholarships may be available to full-time students in the
following four programs:

          MA in Contemporary Art, Design and New Media Art Histories
          MFA in Criticism and Curatorial Practice
          Master's in Digital Futures
          Interdisciplinary Master's in Art, Media and Design

All applicants will automatically be considered for any available scholarships. The precise
amount of the scholarship is normally communicated to incoming graduate students in their
offer of acceptance into the program. Scholarships for the second year of study are normally
announced in February of the first year of study.

Scholarships are not currently available for part-time students.

In cases where a graduate student receives a sizable external award (over $10,000), such as the
SSHRC or OGS (please see below), the OCAD U Graduate Scholarship shall not exceed $500 per
semester.

 President's Scholarship
The President's Scholarship is valued at $7,500 per academic year for a period of two years. The
Scholarship is currently offered to one full-time student per year of admission in each of the
following four programs:

          MA in Contemporary Art, Design and New Media Art Histories
          MFA in Criticism and Curatorial Practice
          Master's in Digital Futures
          Interdisciplinary Master's in Art, Media and Design

The scholarship is offered to the top incoming student to the program, as determined by that
program's Admissions Committee. All applicants are automatically considered for this
scholarship. The President's Scholarship may be offered in addition to another scholarship, such
as the Graduate Scholarship, or as a stand-alone scholarship.

Recipients of the President's Scholarship must maintain a grade average of 80% throughout the
duration of their studies to remain eligible for the scholarship.

 OCAD U India Scholarship
The OCAD U India Scholarship is valued at $10,000 per academic year for a period of two years.
The Scholarship will be offered to the top Indian applicant each year to any one of the following
programs:

          MA in Contemporary Art, Design and New Media Art Histories
          MFA in Criticism and Curatorial Practice
          Master's in Digital Futures
          MDes in Inclusive Design


                                                                                               19
          Interdisciplinary Master’s in Art, Media & Design

The scholarship is offered to the top incoming Indian student, as determined by a Scholarship
Committee. All applicants who are residents of India and who do not have Canadian citizenship
are automatically considered for this scholarship.

Recipients of the OCAD U India Scholarship must maintain a grade average of 80% throughout
the duration of their studies to remain eligible for the scholarship.

 Inclusive Design International Student Scholarship
The Inclusive Design International Student Scholarship is valued at $3,500 per year for both
years of the program. The scholarship is offered to the top international applicant to the
program, as determined by that program's Admissions Committee. All applicants are
automatically considered for this scholarship.

Recipients of the Inclusive Design International Student Scholarship must maintain a grade
average of 80% throughout the duration of their studies to remain eligible for the scholarship.
This scholarship is not affected by the receipt of external awards such as SSHRC or OGS
scholarships.

   Ontario Graduate Fellowship (OGF)
OCAD University has received funding from the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities
to fund one or more Ontario Graduate Fellowships (OGF).

The amount of the fellowship varies from year to year, but will not exceed $4,000 per term.

The Fellowship will be granted to the graduate student with the highest Grade Point Average at
the conclusion of their first year of study (i.e. April). Full-time students in the following
programs are eligible:

              MFA in Criticism and Curatorial Practice
              MA in Contemporary Art, Design and New Media Art Histories
              Master’s in Digital Futures
              Master of Design in Inclusive Design
              Interdisciplinary Master’s in Art, Media & Design

The Fellowship will not affect any internal scholarships granted by OCAD University and will
not be affected by the receipt of external awards such as SSHRC or OGS scholarships.


External Scholarships

Students may be eligible for a variety of external scholarships. The responsibility of researching
such opportunities lies with the graduate student. The Office of Graduate Studies will apprise
students of any known opportunities through Weekly Update emails, postings on the website
and/or in the glass display cases outside of the office.

Eligible graduate students are strongly encouraged to apply for Federal and Provincial
Graduate Scholarships, including:




                                                                                                  20
       The Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarships Program of the Social
        Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC). This program seeks to
        develop research skills and assist in the training of highly qualified personnel by
        supporting students in the social sciences and humanities who demonstrate a high
        standard of achievement in undergraduate and early graduate studies. These
        scholarships are valued at $17,500 over 12 months (non-renewable) and are
        open to Canadian citizens or permanent residents only. For more information, please
        visit the SSHRC website at: http://www.sshrc-crsh.gc.ca/funding-
        financement/programs-programmes/fellowships/cgs_masters-besc_maitrise-eng.aspx

       The Ontario Graduate Scholarship (OGS) program encourages excellence in graduate
        studies at the master’s and doctoral levels. The scholarship is valued at $5,000 per
        academic term for either two or three consecutive terms and is open to Canadian
        citizens, permanent residents, and international students in Canada on a student visa.
        For more information, please visit: https://osap.gov.on.ca/OSAPPortal/en/A-
        ZListofAid/PRD1346626.html

*Note that you cannot hold an OGS scholarship and a SSHRC scholarship in the same academic
year (but you can apply to both).

The Office of Graduate Studies will host an information session in the Fall for OCAD U students
wishing to apply for the 2013/14 awards. OGS applications are normally due to the Office of
Graduate Studies in late October and SSHRC applications in late November. The exact deadlines
will be confirmed as soon as timelines are provided to the University by the funding agencies.


Graduate Assistantships

Full-time graduate students may apply for a Graduate Assistantship, in the form of a Teaching
Assistantship (TA) or Research Assistantship (RA) in the Faculties of Art, Design, or Liberal Arts
& Sciences.

Teaching and Research Assistantships are not guaranteed and are subject to availability and
awarded through a competitive application process based on the compatibility of students’ skills
with Faculty needs and individual faculty research projects.

Research and Teaching Assistantships are employment contracts. If a Research or Teaching
Assistantship is not completed or the offer of employment is declined, no guarantee can be made
for other funding.

Students who wish to apply for Teaching Assistantships must complete a form provided by the
Office of Graduate Studies and in some cases, apply directly to the Faculty posting the position.
If a student is hired, a contract will be issued by the appropriate Faculty Office. The Faculty
Offices will also coordinate supervision, work schedules, and payment.

Available Research Assistantships will be posted on the OCAD U job board as they become
available; students may apply directly. The job board can be accessed at:

www.ocadu.ca/about_ocad/human_resources/employment_opportunities.htm




                                                                                                 21
 i.   Teaching Assistantships

      As per the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between OCAD University and the
      Ontario College of Art & Design Faculty Association (section 37.4.1), the responsibilities
      of a Teaching Assistant may include but are not limited to:

            working within 1 or more OCAD U Faculties, directly supervised by 1 or more
             faculty members with administrative supervision by 1 or more Assistant Deans;
            working with Assistant Deans, Chairs, faculty members and other academic staff
             in support of the University’s educational goals and objectives;
            meeting these educational goals by assisting with course preparation and
             delivery, i.e. organizing teaching and learning materials, and other resources,
             based on curricular outlines provided by a supervising faculty member, or by
             providing group instruction in specialized techniques;
            assisting in the evaluation of student work, using criteria established by the
             supervising faculty members;
            supporting students in their learning, i.e. through individual or small group
             instruction and/or assisting with assignments;
            conducting separately scheduled tutorial classes;
            working with Technicians, class assistants and/or monitors, where relevant, by
             ensuring the appropriate and safe use of materials, equipment and/or facilities;
             and
            participating in the provision of a safe and secure environment for all members of
             the University community and its facilities.

      As per the MOA (section 34.5), the hiring of Teaching Assistants takes place as follows:

            Current Teaching Assistants who seek a work assignment for the following
             Academic Year must indicate their interest in writing to the Assistant Dean of
             Faculty or supervising faculty member no later than February 1.
            The appointment process for Teaching Assistants is conducted by the Associate
             Dean of Faculty or designate in consultation with the supervising faculty
             member. Teaching Assistant opportunities are assigned to the University’s
             graduate students on a priority basis. A list of vacancies is posted on the
             University’s website, with further advertising conducted as appropriate.

      Please note that as per the MOA (section 29.4.3), Teaching Assistantships are not
      normally renewable beyond three years. Students who have been employed at OCAD U
      as a Teaching Assistant prior to starting their graduate program may therefore not be
      eligible for a Teaching Assistantship.

ii.   Research Assistantships

      As per the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between OCAD University and the
      Ontario College of Art & Design Faculty Association (section 37.4.2), the responsibilities
      of a Research Assistant may include but are not limited to:

            working within 1 or more OCAD U Faculties, directly supervised by 1 or more
             faculty members;




                                                                                              22
              working with assistant Deans, Chairs, and/or faculty members and other
               academic staff in support of the University’s research goals and objectives;
              meeting these research goals by assisting with data collection, literature searches,
               data compilation, processing, entry and analysis, and experimental systems
               design, fabrication and maintenance;
              assisting with supervision of research activities in the lab, classroom, and within
               the field;
              assisting with preparation of proposals, progress and final reports, and
               promotion of research activities;
              providing project coordination, budget management, and administration of
               research activities;
              participating in the hiring, scheduling and supervision of Teaching Assistant I
               (Undergraduate Research Assistant), Class Assistants, and/or Student Monitors,
               where relevant;
              working with Technicians, class assistants and/or student monitors, where
               relevant, by ensuring the appropriate and safe use of materials, equipment
               and/or facilities; and
              participating in the provision of a safe and secure environment for all members of
               the University community and its facilities.

Loans and Bursaries

The Financial Aid and Awards Office provides a variety of programs and services for students,
including information on loans and bursaries (non-repayable grants given on the basis of
financial need and other criteria). For information and application forms relating to the Ontario
Student Assistance Program (OSAP), the Ontario Trust for Student Support (OTSS) Graduate
Studies Bursary, and other bursaries, please visit the “Financial Matters” section of the OCAD U
website at:

http://www.ocadu.ca/students/financial_matters.htm.


Funding for Conference Travel

Full-time graduate students who wish to attend or present their work at a conference may apply
for funding in support of travel and conference fees from their graduate program.

Funding is limited to a maximum of $500 per student per year (June-May) and is subject to the
availability of funds and the approval of the Graduate Program Director.

Applications must be submitted to the Graduate Program Director at least 60 days in advance of
the conference date. The application form is available on the OCAD U Graduate Studies website
under “Forms, Policies and Handbook” at:

http://www.ocadu.ca/programs/graduate_studies/forms_policies_handbook.htm




                                                                                                23
FACILITIES


Studios and Research/Study Space

All full-time graduate students (except students in online delivery programs) will be assigned
individual or shared space for research and study, with 24 hour access to these spaces (by access
card and/or key). Room 7415 has been reserved for students in the Interdisciplinary Master’s in
Art, Media and Design as a shared space for construction and assembly work.

Graduate students who are assigned shared or individual work-study or office spaces must pay a
$200 deposit before receiving a key to access the space. The student is responsible for the space
and its furnishings and must return them to their original condition upon completion of the
program (barring normal light wear and tear) and return the key, otherwise the deposit is
forfeited. Other students may be required to pay a $50 key deposit to acquire a key to their office
spaces.

Repairs must be completed at the student’s expense, including but not limited to repairing or
replacing furnishings, patching holes in the walls, removing waste and/or extra furnishings, and
repainting the walls as necessary. The appropriate paint colour must be used, and can be
ordered through OCAD U.

Graduate student spaces at 205 Richmond are NOT ventilated for the use of:

          aerosols
          spray foams
          epoxy resins
          epoxy paint
          oil paint artistic
          oil paint domestic
          solvents of any kind
          gasoline
          soldering
          silicone adhesives
          spray adhesives
          spray fixatives
          products that produce noxious fumes or require a PPE (Personal Protective
           Equipment)
          work that produces fine particles/dust

At 100 McCaul, graduate students will have access to OCAD U’s well-equipped Fabrication
Studios during regular operating hours for the construction of three-dimensional pieces as well
as to the Printmaking, Photography, Integrated Media, and Material Art and Design Studios.
The use of aerosol-based materials (spray adhesives, fixatives, etc) is limited to the spray booth
facilities located in rooms 517, 475 and 132.

Regular operating hours for the studios at 100 McCaul are available on the “Shops and Studios”
section of the OCAD U website at:




                                                                                                24
http://www.ocadu.ca/about_ocad/shops_studios.

The studios have extended hours for all students in November and December and in March and
April. Summer access to studios is limited and details will be announced in April.

A studio orientation and health and safety training will take place at the beginning of
September.

For more information on accessing the studios, please contact:

Emily Gowan, Coordinator, Studio Management
416-977-6000, ext. 2268
egowan@ocadu.ca


Experimental Space

Located on the ground floor at 205 Richmond (room 7106), the Experimental Space is available
as an exhibition space (see Graduate Gallery below) or for short term use for experimentation,
critiques, etc. A key may be signed out from the Office of Graduate Studies for short term use.
Please refer to Graduate Gallery policies for booking guidelines.

Digital Editing Suite

Located on the ground floor at 205 Richmond (room 7109), the Digital Editing Suite is
accessible by card reader (i.e. with your access card) on a first come, first served basis. Facilities
include:

       Mac Pro with keyboard and Apple Mighty Mouse
       Dell 24” Ultrasharp Displays (x 2)
       Tannoy Studio Monitors (x 2)
       Mackie Micro Series 1202-VLZ Mixer
       Epson Perfection V500 Photo Scanner
       AKG Studio Headphones

As well as the following software:

       Final Cut Pro 7
       After Effects
       Adobe Creative Suite
       Aperture 3
       Logic Pro
       Cubase
       Reason
       AutOCAD U Mechanical
       AutOCAD U Architecture
       AutOCAD U
       AutoDesk Auto Loader
       AutoDesk Vault
       AutoDesk Design Review
       AutoDesk Inventor Pro



                                                                                                    25
       AutoDesk Inventor Suite
       AutoDesk Inventor Routed Systems Suite
       AutoDesk Inventor Simulation Suite
       Google: Sketchup 6 & Layout
       Revit Architecture


Mailboxes

Graduate student mailboxes are located next to the Office of Graduate Studies (205 Richmond,
5th floor, room 7515). Full time students have individual mailboxes and shared mailboxes are
available for part-time students. Please check your mailbox regularly.

Computer Studios

IT Services supports computing for the entire OCAD U community with four Academic
Computing Studios, research labs, computer clusters, the Library and the IT Info Commons, and
a very successful Laptop Program

A full list of these facilities as well as details of the software available can be found on the OCAD
U website at:

http://www.ocadu.ca/about_ocad/technology_media/it_services/computer_studios.htm

Laptop Program in DFI and IAMD

OCADU University runs one of the most successful laptop programs in Canada, bringing mobile
digital tools to over 2000 students, including the IAMD and Digital Media graduate programs.
The Laptop Program is an ownership-based program where software is provided to students by
OCAD U through a mandatory annual fee. More information is available at:

http://www.ocadu.ca/about_ocad/technology_media/it_services/mobile_computing/program
_guide.htm

IT Help Desk
The IT Help Desk is open Monday to Friday 8:30am – 5:00pm. Contact the IT Help Desk if you
are having trouble with...

      Email
      My Courses
      Printing
      Computer Studios
      Any OCAD U IT related problem

The Help Desk can be reached at:
ITHelp@ocadu.ca
416-977-6000, Ext. 277

For computer support at 205 Richmond, please call x4655.




                                                                                                   26
Equipment Loans

A variety of audio-visual equipment is available for sign-out from the South Campus Help Desk
at 205 Richmond, located on the 7th floor. Equipment available includes cameras and
accessories, projectors, lighting kits, computers (e.g. for showing installation based work),
microphones, etc.

Students and faculty are responsible for following the Equipment Loan Guidelines and other
related policies available at:

www.ocadu.ca/about_ocad/technology_media/it_services/support/IT_Policies___Guidelines.
htm

The South Campus Help Desk at 205 Richmond can be reached at:

southcampushelpdesk@ocadu.ca
416-977-000, Ext 4655


Library and Learning Zone

The Dorothy H. Hoover Library is open approximately 72 hours per week during the fall/winter
semesters and provides a variety of wireless study areas, including quiet/group study rooms, an
Information Commons and a Learning Zone. Registered students, faculty and staff have access
to the library’s print and electronic collections.

The print collection is small but highly specialized. The electronic collection is significantly
larger and broader in its coverage - currently the library licenses almost 36,000 e-journals and
more than 100,000 e-books. These e-resources are supplemented by core indexing and
abstracting databases and a range of specialized digital collections of images, media and
material samples. Graduate students are encouraged to spend time familiarizing themselves
with the library’s licensed resources which are accessible from off campus using an OCAD U
username/password.

The OCAD U Library is a member of the Canadian Research Knowledge Network and the
Ontario Council of University Libraries. Through the OCAD U Library website and Scholars
Portal (www.scholarsportal.info), the OCAD U Library offers graduate students research content
and tools including: RACER (interlibrary loan), RefWorks (reference management), Journals
(digital content), Books (digital content), SFX (link server), ODESI (statistics data), and Search
(database aggregator). In the near future, Scholars Portal will be rolling out a Geospatial and
Health Data Portal.

Reference Services
OCAD U has a team of professional librarians who acquire academic and research collections
through purchase or licensing. There are fully staffed Circulation and Reference Desks in the
Library. Graduate students may drop by at any time or make an appointment with a librarian to
discuss research interests and needs in more detail. For more information contact: Daniel Payne
at dpayne@ocadu.ca or ext. 217.




                                                                                               27
Circulation Services
Graduate students at OCAD U are accorded the same circulation privileges as teaching faculty.
The loan period for circulating print materials is usually 14 days but the library allows 5
renewals (for a total of 84 days). It is possible, through successive renewals, for graduate
students to keep some books for an entire semester – providing that no other student has
requested them. Students can negotiate loans of up to one week for reference or quick reference
books and media items. For further information on the library’s access policies and services
offered, please view the “Policies” page available at the OCAD U Library
website:www.ocadu.ca/library/ocadu_library/policies.htm

Interlibrary Loans
By setting up an online Interlibrary Loan account, students have access to circulating materials
from most Canadian academic and public libraries, and selected international collections. Note
that some libraries may charge students for Interlibrary Loan services. Interlibrary Loan
policies, a PDF guide, and links are available on the library homepage under “Library Tools.”

AGO Faculty Affiliate Borrowing
OCAD U graduate students have the unique opportunity to set up Faculty Affiliate borrowing
privileges at the Art Gallery of Ontario’s E.P. Taylor Research Library and Archives. With an
AGO issued ID card, students are given full access to the collections Monday to Friday, 9:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m, with additional browsing privileges for the print collections. For more
information, contact Robert Fabbro at rfabbro@ocadu.ca or ext. 343.

Direct Borrowing
Under the terms of the Canadian University Reciprocal Borrowing Agreement, graduate
students with a valid OCAD U ID card may borrow circulating materials in person from any
university in Canada, with the exception of the University of Toronto (see below). Direct
Borrowing is generally subject to the following terms:

      Limited to circulating print books.
      Does not include reference, periodical or reserve items.
      Does not include Inter-Library Loan, Document Delivery, or AV Booking Services.
      Does not include access to electronic resources (such as periodical databases, e-journals,
       e-books, digital images, e-media, etc.). These resources are restricted by vendor license
       agreements.
      In some cases libraries may charge for borrowing privileges.

Please note that the University of Toronto has implemented a charge for the privilege of taking
materials out of their libraries. The current fees to acquire a U of T Research Reader & Direct
Borrower Card are:

       12 months              $250.00
       6 months               $160.00
       3 months               $100.00
       Seniors (12 mos.)      $110.00

As a U of T external borrower, you will be able to sign out up to 100 books. The loan period is 14
days with 2 renewals (for a total of 42 days). For more information, please visit the University of
Toronto Library website:

http://onesearch.library.utoronto.ca/external-researchers


                                                                                                28
For further information on the library’s access policies and services offered, please visit the
“Library” section of the OCAD U website at:

http://www.ocadu.ca/library.htm

The Library is located at: 113 McCaul Street, 2nd Level (rm. 1215)

Hours of Operation:

http://www.ocadu.ca/library/ocadu_library/hours.htm


Graduate Gallery

The Graduate Gallery is available for use by OCAD U graduate students and faculty. All requests
for use of the space will be vetted by the Graduate Gallery Advisory Committee and will be
administered through the Office of Graduate Studies.

The Gallery can be booked for a single evening or for up to three weeks. Priority is given to
graduate students. The space is available for exhibitions, lectures, think-tanks, discussions,
performances, screenings, conferences and experiments. Priority will be given to thesis research
and/or faculty-led research between May-August. The gallery is also reserved for specific
annual events such as thesis exhibitions, the IAMD Annual First-Year Graduate Exhibition, the
Digital Futures CFC prototype exhibition and CCP/IAMD portfolio exhibition, and is used
occasionally for guest lectures and other special events.

The Graduate Gallery is a DIY exhibition space; students and faculty using the space are
responsible for installation, gallery sitting, striking, booking security and obtaining a Special
Occasions Permit from the LCBO. Graduate students may apply for up to $300 funding per
exhibition, subject to approval and availability of funds. Requests for funding will require an
outline of costs and expenses. Funding is administered upon submission of receipts for
reimbursement.

The Gallery is located at 205 Richmond Street West, ground floor. Application forms and
instructions can be found on the OCAD U website at:

http://www.ocadu.ca/about_ocad/galleries/gallery/information.htm

Applications are accepted on an ongoing basis throughout the year. Applications can be
submitted in person to the Office of Graduate Studies or by email to gradstudies@ocadu.ca.

The Graduate Gallery Advisory Committee Committee is composed of both faculty and graduate
students. A call for student volunteers to sit on this Committee will take place in September.




                                                                                                    29
RESOURCES AND SERVICES


Centre for Students with Disabilities

OCAD University’s Centre for Students with Disabilities (CSD) provides academic
accommodation and support to students with the following temporary and permanent
documented disabilities:

      Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
      Autism Spectrum
      Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing
      Learning Disabilities
      Medical, Sensory and Physical Disabilities
      Mental Health Disabilities
      Visual Disabilities

Students must provide formal medical/psychoeducational documentation from a registered
psychologist or their primary medical practitioner(s). The CSD can assist students with
obtaining new, updated or additional medical/psychoeducational documentation. All medical
documentation includes specific formal learning/academic accommodations for each student.
These academic accommodations may include: learning strategy and assistive technology
training and support, audio recording of classes, note-taking support, sign language
interpreters, advanced access to presented materials (e.g. overheads, PowerPoint slides, etc.),
reserved seating, and test/exam accommodations (e.g. additional time, use of a computer, etc).
Other academic accommodations may be approved with the appropriate
medical/psychoeducational documentation.

For more information on the Centre for Students with Disabilities, please visit the OCAD U
under “Students” and “Disability Services” or enter the following URL:
http://www.ocadu.ca/students/disability_services.htm

Location:
The Student Centre
51 McCaul Street
2nd Floor (Adjacent to the Health & Wellness department)
(Wheelchair accessible via elevator on south side of 1st floor)

Hours of Operation:
Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Contact:
Telephone: 416-977-6000, Ext. 339
Fax: 647-438-9731


Student Health and Wellness Centre


The OCAD U Health & Wellness Centre provides primary health care and counseling to
currently registered students. Services are provided by a multidisciplinary team including a


                                                                                               30
Registered Nurse, Nurse Practitioner, mental health clinicians, and physicians whose
commitment is to clinical excellence. The Centre is student focused, maintains strict
confidentiality, and offers the following services:

 * Assessment, diagnosis and treatment of acute episodic illness
 * Assessment and treatment of mental health concerns
 * Annual physical health exams, sexual health care, wellness and nutritional counseling, and
PAP tests for females
 * Vaccinations
 * Verification of Illness Certificates

For information or to book an appointment, please call 416-977-6000, ext. 260 or email
hwc@ocadu.ca. The Health and Wellness Centre website can be viewed under the ‘Students’
section at http://www.ocadu.ca/students/health_wellness.htm

Location:
The Student Centre
51 McCaul Street
2nd Floor (Wheelchair accessible via elevator on south side of 1st floor)

Contact:
Phone: (416) 977-6000 Ext. 260
Fax: (416) 977-5465
Student Health and Wellness Centre

Hours of Operation:
Monday to Friday, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm


Office of Safety and Risk Management

INSURANCE & RISK

Liability Insurance
OCAD U’s comprehensive insurance program protects you from third party liability arising from
your work which you conduct under the auspices and/or direction of OCAD U, as long as you are
working in good faith within the scope of your duties.

HEALTH & SAFETY
OCAD University is committed to providing a safe and healthy working and learning
environment for all members of the University community. OCAD U follows a set of principles,
expectations and requirements consistent with legislation and appropriate practices relating to
health and safety. By following safe work practices and taking an active role in protecting the
health and safety of all others, including students and visitors, you are an important role model
when fulfilling this responsibility.

Safety Considerations:
Safety in the studios and shops requires the same kind of continuing attention and effort that is
given to research and teaching. Both our employees and students must be aware of the potential
hazards, and ask themselves if they are observing safety precautions and procedures, for
instance:



                                                                                               31
General Safety:
1. Do I have adequate training for this particular process/piece of equipment?
2. Am I wearing appropriate Personal Protective Equipment
3. Do I know where the emergency stop button, exits, and fire extinguishers are?
4. Have I tied back my hair and removed my jewellery before entering the studio?
5. How could I or others around me be injured if something goes wrong?
6. Is there a safer way of doing this, and still get the same result I want?
7. Do I know where the nearest emergency phone, emergency eye wash and shower equipment
   are?

Chemical Safety:
1. Have I read the MSDS for the chemical I am using?
2. Is the ventilation system working properly
3. Aerosol Spraying Indoors – I am spraying inside a spray booth?
4. Am I following the posted safe operating procedures for handling this chemical
5. Am I using the safest solvent available? Can I substitute to solvent-free?

Hand and Power Tools Safety:
1. Have I inspected my tools and asked for them to be replaced or sharpened by the Studio
   Tech if needed?
2. Is my work held securely?
3. Am I wearing proper safety glasses?
4. Are all sharp or pointed objects pointed away from my body before using them?
5. Is my work set up so that I have proper balance and appropriate stance?
6. For power tools - have I checked to see if the tool is off before plugging it in?
7. Have I returned all hand tools to the proper location after using them?
8. Is my area free of tripping hazards e.g. electrical cords?

Woodworking Safety:
1. Am I adequately trained to use this equipment?
2. Have I inspected my piece of wood to see if it is free of nails, screws etc that could damage
   the saw blade?
3. Is the machine guard in place?
4. Am I wearing the proper Personal Protective Equipment?
5. Have I made sure that the outfeed table and machine beds are clear of debris?
6. Is there anyone around me that I should ask to move (or wear Protective Equipment) before
   I turn on the machine?
7. Am I using formaldehyde free, water-based, instead of solvent-based glues?
8. Have I tied back hair and removed jewellery before using equipment?
9. Is the floor clean and free of sawdust or other debris to ensure I have proper footing while
   using this equipment?

Welding and Metalworking Safety:
1. Am I adequately trained to use this equipment?
2. Have I inspected all electrical cables and gas hoses for damage/defects before turning on
   welding equipment?
3. Am I wearing appropriate Personal Protective Equipment?
4. Have I checked to see if equipment is off before plugging it in?
5. Is the welding shop clear of all flammable materials and substances before I start?
6. Is the welding floor clean and dry before turning on equipment?



                                                                                               32
7. Do I have a firewatcher for my welding project and are they trained to use a fire
   extinguisher?

Ceramics Safety:
1. Am I adequately trained to use this equipment?
2. Am I wearing appropriate Personal protective Equipment (respirators must be fit-tested)?
3. Have I read the MSDS for the chemicals and/or materials I am using?
4. Have I tied back my long hair and removed my jewellery?
5. Have I cleaned up the ceramics studio using wet methods, now that I am finished?

Foundry Process Safety:
1. Am I wearing adequate Personal Protective Equipment to be involved with or watch the
   pouring process?
2. Am I wearing appropriate Personal protective Equipment (respirators must be fit-tested)?

Sculpture and Mouldmaking Safety:
1. Have I received proper training in this process?
2. Have I supplied the Studio Tech and my Instructor with an MSDS for the material I want to
   use?
3. Do I have the proper Personal Protective Equipment needed for using this material or
   chemical?
4. Have I checked to see if the tool is off before plugging it in?
5. Is there anyone close around me that I should ask to move or put on PPE before I start using
   this material or chemical?
6. Is there a safer substitute for the material/chemical I could use instead for the same effect or
   result?
7. Have I obtained permission to install temporary student artwork ?
   http://www.ocad.ca/Assets/pdf_media/ocad/about/policies/administrative_policies_5008
   _temporary_installation_of_student_art_work.pdf

Painting Safety:
1. Have I read the MSDS for the pigments and solvents I will using?
2. Am I following safe practices for disposal, storage and clean up of my materials and painting
    supplies?
3. Am I practicing solvent recycling?
4. Have I consulted with Risk Management on any new processes I am using?
5. Have I considered safer substitutes for the chemicals I am using?
6. Am I practicing good personal hygiene to limit skin contact of pigment and solvents?
7. Do I have clean up materials on hand before I begin painting?
8. Have I obtained permission to install temporary student artwork?
    http://www.ocad.ca/Assets/pdf_media/ocad/about/policies/administrative_policies_5008
    _temporary_installation_of_student_art_work.pdf
9. Do I know the proper clean up procedures for dry and liquid drawing media?
10. Have I washed my hands before leaving the studio after handling drawing media?

Printmaking Safety:
1. Have I received proper training on how to use this chemical properly?
2. Do I have adequate Personal Protective Equipment needed for using this chemical?
3. Have I washed my hands before leaving the studio to take a break or eat?
4. Is there anyone close around me that I should ask to move or put on PPE before I start using
   this chemical?



                                                                                                33
5. Have I cleaned up the area I was using (making sure to clean glass slab of all ink) and any
   tools I was using before leaving?

Photography Safety:
1. Am I wearing adequate Personal Protective Equipment (respirator, gloves, apron, and
   goggles)?
2. Do I know where the nearest eyewash fountain and emergency shower is located?
3. Is there adequate ventilation for mixing chemicals?
4. Are my acids stored on low shelves, not stored in glass containers, and labeled?

Location:

115 McCaul Street
Rosalie Sharp Pavilion Rm. 2210 – 2nd Floor

Contact:

Geeta Sharma
Director, Risk Management
Ext. 2920, gsharma@ocad.ca

Kyle Nhan
Assistant, Risk Management
Ext. 615, knhan@ocad.ca

International Student Services

International Student Services offers individual and group support, services and referrals
pertaining to immigration, health, employment and cultural adaptation for international
students, mobility/exchange students and all students wishing to make meaningful global
connections.

For more information on services available for international students, please visit the OCAD U
website under “Students” at:

http://www.ocadu.ca/students/international_students.htm

Location:
International Student Services Office
Student Centre, 51 McCaul Street, Level 1

Hours of Operation:
Monday to Friday, 8:30am to 4:30pm

Contact:
Phone: 416-977-6000, Ext. 293
Email: international@ocadu.ca


Writing and Learning Services




                                                                                                 34
The Writing & Learning Centre (WLC) is OCAD University's primary academic resource and
support centre in the areas of writing, critical thinking, critical reading, and study skills. The
WLC provides a range of free programs to both OCAD U students and faculty. Our tutors are
trained in effective writing pedagogy and provide friendly, student-centred services for all skill
levels.

We work with students at all stages of the writing process to develop a variety of learning and
academic skills – you can work on essays, artist statements and proposals, critical reading
strategies, critique preparation, time management, organizing ideas, research methods, thesis
writing, and more. While we do not edit student work, we will work with students so that you
learn to edit your own work.

Resources for all OCAD U students include:

      Writing and Learning Skills Tutoring Appointments
      Daily Writing Drop-In
      ESL Mini Series and Tutoring
      Writing and Learning Skills Handouts
      Study Groups for selected first year Liberal Arts and Sciences Courses
      On-line Resources
      OCAD U Style Guide (MLA)
      Workshops on Writing, Avoiding Plagiarism and Integrating Sources, and Critique Skills

The WLC has Tutors available with graduate level education to work specifically with OCAD U
graduate students. When making an appointment, please identify that you are a graduate
student so that you are paired with an appropriate tutor. We also offer the following specialized
services for graduate students:

      Thesis Writing Consultations
      Option for the tutor to “pre-read” your work in advance of your appointment to allow for
       a more in-depth consultation of lengthier writing assignments
      Studio Visits

Graduate students who are employed as Teaching Assistants may also take advantage of some of
the following resources for OCAD U teaching staff:

      Customized Workshops
      Teaching and Learning Consultation Services
      Books on Writing
      On-line Resources
      Resources on using academic sources
      Advice on supporting ESL students

Additional resources for graduate students are currently under development; please continue to
check our website or drop by the WLC for further information.

Website:

http://www.ocadu.ca/students/wlc.htm



                                                                                                  35
Location:
Room 1510, Level 5, 113 McCaul Street

Contact:
Phone: 416-977-6000, Ext. 229
Email: wlc@ocadu.ca


Imagination Catalyst

The Imagination Catalyst coordinates OCAD U’s current, various entrepreneurial & innovation
activities (Digital Futures Accelerator, MEIC Incubator, Design Research Centre) under one
physical and “virtual” support system, and broadens and deepens integration with faculty,
students, alumni, entrepreneurs/investors and industry to enhance students’ business skills.

The Imagination Catalyst provides supplementary entrepreneurial/innovation skills, resources
and advice that are required to launch and grow businesses or products, a start-up incubator
process with multidisciplinary workspace, located at second floor, 205 Richmond (room 7211)
that fosters experiential learning opportunities, establishes academic and industry/investment
community partnerships - both domestic and international; and accelerates the
commercialization of ideas for products and services.

Contact:
Steve Billinger, Executive Director, Business Development & Innovation
416-977-600 ext. 4589
sbillinger@ocadu.ca


Student Union

As the recognized representative of the student body, the OCAD Student Union (OCADSU),
serves as liaison to OCAD administration and faculty, other universities and colleges, all levels of
government, and the Canadian Federation of Students. OCADSU is responsible for ensuring the
proper representation and advocacy of the OCAD student body at large.

The Student Union (SU) is a not-for-profit corporation funded by student fees. The Executive
manages the business of the corporation on behalf of the student members, working hard to
ensure that OCADSU provides as much service to students as possible.

All students registered for a minimum of a half-credit course are members of the SU. Each
student member has free access to SU services, has the right to get involved in SU governance,
and is eligible to be elected to the SU Executive or Board of Directors. Students are welcome to
participate in SU-run projects and the decision-making process at large. Throughout the year,
the SU holds numerous meetings and strongly encourages all students to attend.

Student Advocate
The Student Advocate provides advice, advocacy and support services to all students at OCAD
University. The Student Advocate Office is located at the Student Union Office.
What issues can the Student Advocate help me with:




                                                                                                 36
   1. Academic Misconduct
      2. Appeals
      3. Understanding policies and procedures
      4. Preparing for student hearings
      5. Mediation
      6. Representation at your hearing
      7. Matters relating to your student life at University, which may include bullying,
      discrimination, harassment, sexual harassment, victimization or vilification.

Please note the Advocate does NOT provide any kind of legal advice. The SU has free lawyer
services.
The Advocate is a confidential service that can provide you with support and guidance when
dealing with difficult situations.
Book an appointment: twhan@ocadu.ca (PLEASE title your subject line Student Advocate)
Office Hours: Monday 11am – 2pm
SU Office: 51 McCaul st, Ground Level
Phone: 416-977-6000 ext. 341

Legal Services at the Student Union

The OCADSU has a part-time, in-house lawyer. The lawyer will provide legal advice and
assistance to both the Student Union and to our individual members. If you are an OCAD U
student, you are eligible to meet with the lawyer to discuss any personal legal issue, ranging
from family law matters through landlord and tenant, employment or debt problems to criminal
charges, as well as accident claims, immigration applications and other dealings with the
government, and corporate, commercial or intellectual property issues.

Mbuso G. Nkosi will gladly meet with you to discuss any legal issue you may have including
family law, landlord issues, debt collection and civil litigation, employment problems and
immigration law matters. Mbuso is also available to draft and review legal documents, notarize
or commission documents, and make notarized true copies.

The lawyer’s office hours are every Friday 9am – 12noon

To book an appointment with the lawyer contact:

Tre Whan, Office Manager
Phone: 416-977-6000, ext 341
Email: twhan@ocadu.ca

Food Programs and Services

Campus Cupboard

Campus Cupboard is a student-run, not-for-profit bulk food store that provides minimally
packaged, minimally processed, affordable, wholesome and organic food to OCADU students,
faculty and staff. Campus Cupboard opened for the first time in September 2010.




                                                                                             37
Campus Cupboard has had an extremely successful first year and we are looking forward to
expanding our products. Nearly all items are organic, fairly traded and whenever possible
Canadian. We purchase bulk amounts and repackage into user friendly amounts.

The majority of our products are purchased from the Ontario Natural Food Co-op. We also
purchase some of our items from local, ethical and sustainably minded companies.

Campus Cupboard is not for profit. All items are sold for close to cost with a slight increase to
assist in covering store costs. The long term dream is transition into a student-run food co-op.

Bulk buying promotes the use of the 3 R's: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle.

Products sold include: grains & seeds, pasta, herbs, legumes, sauces & spreads, cereal, flour &
sugar, snacks, beverages (coffee + tea + milk substitutes), household items, and pads and
tampons.

Location:
Student Union, The Student Centre
51 McCaul, ground floor

Hours of Operation:
Every Tuesday and Thursday between 10am – 4pm.

SU Potluck

The student union runs a bi-weekly vegan & gluten free meal. This is a great opportunity to
connect with other students over a delicious and healthy meal. If you are interested in getting
involved we are always looking for new cooks. If you would like to learn more about cooking
healthy, cheap easy to prepare meals, this is a great way to learn.

Meals will be served in room 187 which will be transformed into a café.

To get involved contact: outreachandevents@ocadsu.org

Good Food Box Program

The student union runs a bi-weekly fresh food program, through Food Share. Economical, local
and organic options are delivered straight to you, through the student union.

The Good Food Box runs like a large buying club with centralized buying and co-ordination.
Customers pay between $13 and $34 for their box, depending on the version that they choose.
Each box contains the same mixture of food, though the contents change with each delivery,
depending on what is in season and reasonable at the time. FoodShare truck drivers deliver the
boxes to OCADSU and our FoodShare coordinator ensures that customers pick up their boxes.

Food Share chooses Ontario-grown products for the box whenever possible because we want to
know where and how our food is produced, to support local farmers and reduce the fossil fuels
burned when we import food. Customers pay the cost of the food itself, while distribution
overheads are subsidized.



                                                                                                  38
To order a Good Food Box, simply drop by the Student Union Office between the ordering hours
with your cash. You then return the following Thursday with your own bags and take home your
delicious fresh produce.

Food Bank: Starving Artist Pantry

The Student Union has a Food Bank for all of OCAD U students. There is no needs assessment
to access the food bank. You simply drop by the Student Union office, inform an employee that
you would like to use the food bank and select 3 items.

This is an anonymous service. We do not record your personal details.

These items vary from instant meals to ingredients to make a meal. We also have a supply of
sanitary items and baby food.

If you require urgent assistance, please let us know and we will make sure you are referred to the
right department to best assist you.

We do not provide TTC tokens or Metro Passes.

Location:
Student Centre, 51 McCaul Street, Level 1

Contact:
416-977-6000, Ext. 341
http://www.ocadsu.org/


Housing

OCAD U does not have its own residences. OCAD U is located in the core of Toronto, Ontario,
and has close links with Ryerson University and the University of Toronto. For information
relating to housing in Toronto, please visit the OCAD U website under “Students” at:

http://www.ocadu.ca/students/campus_life/housing_information.htm




                                                                                               39
DATES AND DEADLINES

Note: dates and deadlines are subject to change. For updates, please visit the OCAD U website:

http://www.ocadu.ca/students/dates_deadlines_2012.htm

Program-specific dates and deadlines will be provided by the Graduate Program Director.


Dates & Deadlines 2012/2013

Friday June 22 – Saturday July 1
Registration period for Summer Intensive (INCD)
Thursday, June 28
2012 fall and 2013 winter registration opens at 9:00 a.m. for graduate students.

Monday, July 2
Canada Day holiday. University closed.
Tuesday July 3
Last day for fee payment for INCD Summer term without a late fee. Students who have not paid
their fees in full, submitted a Student Loan Deferment Form to the Financial Aid & Awards
Office, OR provided proof of sponsorship to the Student Accounts Clerk by this deadline will
incur a $50 late payment fee.
Monday July 9 – Friday July 20
Inclusive Design program Summer Intensive, Year One
Monday July 16 – Friday July 27
Inclusive Design program Summer Intensive, Year Two
Friday, July 20
Deadline to submit Special Studies (Independent Study, Internship or Residency) registration
and proposal forms for 2012 fall semester (duration 2) credit.
Recommended deadline to apply for OSAP to ensure funds will be available in September.

Monday, August 6
Civic holiday. University closed.
Friday, August 31
Last day for Fall/Winter fee payment without a late fee. Students who have not paid their fees in
full, submitted a Student Loan Deferment Form to the Financial Aid & Awards Office, OR
provided proof of sponsorship to the Student Accounts Clerk by this deadline will incur a $50
late payment fee.
Students who register for courses after Friday, August 31 must pay their fees in full by the next
business day. Students who have not paid their fees in full by the next business day of
registering will incur a $50 late payment fee.



                                                                                              40
Saturday, September 1 to Friday, September 14
Late registration period for new registrants for 2012 full year (duration 1) and fall semester
(duration 2) courses, with a late fee. Students who do not pay their fees in full by the next
business day of registering will incur a $50 late payment fee.
Monday, September 3
Labour Day. University closed.
Tuesday September 4 – Friday September 7
Graduate Student Orientation
Monday, September 10
First day of 2012 full year (duration 1) and fall semester (duration 2) classes.
Office of the Registrar open from 8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Tuesday, September 11
Office of the Registrar open from 8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Friday, September 14
Last day to withdraw from full year (duration 1) and fall semester (duration 2) courses with
100% refund (does not apply to graduate students in programs with program-based fees).
Last day for full year (duration 1) and fall semester (duration 2) late course registration.
Registration closes for full year (duration 1) and fall semester (Duration 2) adds, drops and
course changes.
Saturday, September 15 to Friday, September 28
Withdrawal period for fall semester (duration 2) courses with 65% tuition refund (does not
apply to graduate students in programs with program-based fees). Course withdrawal request
forms must be completed and submitted to the Office of the Registrar during regular office
hours.
Saturday, September 15 to Friday, October 12
Withdrawal period for full year (duration 1) courses with 65% tuition refund (does not apply to
graduate students in programs with program-based fees) Course withdrawal request forms must
be completed and submitted to the Office of the Registrar during regular office hours
Monday, September 24
Deadline to request a deferred examination for full year (duration 1) and fall semester (duration
2) courses on the basis of religious obligations and exam conflicts.
Friday, September 28
Last day to withdraw from fall semester (duration 2) courses with 65% tuition refund (does not
apply to graduate students in programs with program-based fees). Course withdrawal request
forms must be completed and submitted to the Office of the Registrar by 4 p.m.
Deadline to submit a waiver to opt out of the Student Benefit Plans (Dental and/or Health) or
for students to opt into one or both of these plans (part-time student or family coverage).




                                                                                              41
Monday, October 1 to Friday, October 12
Withdrawal period for fall semester (duration 2) courses with 50% tuition refund (does not
apply to graduate students in programs with program-based fees). Course withdrawal request
forms must be completed and submitted to the Office of the Registrar during regular office
hours.
Wednesday, October 10
Final deadline to apply for Full-time OSAP (for students registered full-time in the fall semester
only).
Friday, October 12
Last day to withdraw from fall semester (duration 2) courses with 50% tuition refund (does not
apply to graduate students in programs with program-based fees). Course withdrawal request
forms must be completed and submitted to the Office of the Registrar by 4 p.m.
Last day to withdraw from full year (duration 1) courses with 65% tuition refund (does not apply
to graduate students in programs with program-based fees). Course withdrawal request forms
must be completed and submitted to the Office of the Registrar by 4 p.m.
Monday, October 8
Thanksgiving Day. University closed.
Saturday, October 13 to Friday, November 9
Withdrawal period for fall semester (duration 2) courses (no refund). Course withdrawal request
forms must be completed and submitted to the Office of the Registrar during regular office
hours.
Withdrawal period for full year (duration 1) courses with 50% tuition refund (does not apply to
graduate students in programs with program-based fees). Course withdrawal request forms
must be completed and submitted to the Office of the Registrar during regular office hours.

Friday, November 2
Deadline to submit Special Studies (Independent Study, Internship or Residency) registration
and proposal forms for 2013 winter semester (duration 3) credit.
Final deadline to apply for Part-time OSAP (for students registered part-time in the fall
semester only).
Friday, November 9
Last day to withdraw from fall semester (duration 2) courses (no refund). Course withdrawal
request forms must be completed and submitted to the Office of the Registrar by 4 p.m.
Last day to withdraw from full year (duration 1) courses with 50% tuition refund (does not apply
to graduate students in programs with program-based fees). Course withdrawal request forms
must be completed and submitted to the Office of the Registrar by 4 p.m.
Saturday, November 10 to Friday, February 8
Final withdrawal period for full year (duration 1) courses (no refund). Course withdrawal
request forms must be completed and submitted to the Office of the Registrar during regular
office hours.




                                                                                               42
Monday, December 3
Last day of regular fall semester (duration 2) classes.
Tuesday, December 4 to Saturday, December 15
Final examination and critique period for fall semester (duration 2) classes. Student attendance
is required.
Friday, December 14
2013 winter semester (duration 3) course registration closes at 4 p.m. and will re-open on
Wednesday, January 2, 2013 at 9 a.m.
Saturday, December 15
End of 2012 fall semester.
Monday, December 24 to Tuesday, January 2 (inclusive)
Holiday break. University closed.

Monday, January 7
First day of 2013 winter semester classes.
Office of the Registrar open from 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Tuesday, January 8
Office of the Registrar open from 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Friday, January 11
Deadline for grade changes, including incomplete grades for 2012 fall semester (duration 2)
courses.
Last day to withdraw from winter semester (duration 3) courses with 100% refund (does not
apply to graduate students in programs with program-based fees).
Last day for winter semester (duration 3) late registration. Registration closes for winter
semester (duration 3) adds, drops and course changes.
Saturday, January 12 to Friday, January 25
Withdrawal period for winter semester (duration 3) courses with 65% tuition refund (does not
apply to graduate students in programs with program-based fees). Course withdrawal request
forms must be completed and submitted to the Office of the Registrar during regular office
hours.
Monday January 14
Last day to deliver supervisory paperwork for supervision beginning in the Winter 2012 term.
Friday, January 18
Final deadline to apply for full-time OSAP (for students registered full-time in the fall & winter
semesters).
Monday, January 21
Deadline to request a deferred examination for winter semester (duration 3) courses on the
basis of religious obligations.
Friday, January 25
Last day to submit grade appeals for 2012 fall semester (duration 2) courses.
Last day to withdraw from winter semester (duration 3) courses with 65% tuition refund (does


                                                                                                 43
not apply to graduate students in programs with program-based fees). Course withdrawal
request forms must be completed and submitted to the Office of the Registrar by 4 p.m.
Saturday, January 26 to Friday, February 8
Withdrawal period for winter semester (duration 3) courses with 50% tuition refund (does not
apply to graduate students in programs with program-based fees). Course withdrawal request
forms must be completed and submitted to the Office of the Registrar during regular office
hours.

Friday, February 1
Last day to submit applications for spring 2013 graduation to the Office of the Registrar without
a late fee.
Last day for second installment fee payment without a late fee due by 4 p.m. Students who have
not paid their fees in full OR provided proof of sponsorship to the Student Accounts Clerk by
this deadline will incur a $50 late/extended payment fee.
Wednesday, February 6
Final deadline to apply for full-time OSAP (for students registered full-time in the winter
semester only).
Friday, February 8
Last day to withdraw from full year (duration 1) courses (no refund). Course withdrawal request
forms must be completed and submitted to the Office of the Registrar by 4 p.m.
Last day to withdraw from winter semester (duration 3) courses with 50% tuition refund (does
not apply to graduate students in programs with program-based fees). Course withdrawal
request forms must be completed and submitted to the Office of the Registrar by 4 p.m.
Saturday, February 9 to Friday, March 15
Final withdrawal period for winter semester (duration 3) courses (no refund). Course
withdrawal request forms must be completed and submitted to the Office of the Registrar during
regular office hours.
Friday, February 15
Deadline to submit OSAP appeals to the Financial Aid & Awards Office.
Monday, February 18
Family Day. University closed.
Monday, February 18 to Friday, February 22
Study Week. No classes scheduled.

Friday, March 8
Final deadline to apply for Part-time OSAP (for students registered part-time in the winter
semester only).
Friday, March 15
Last day to withdraw from winter semester (duration 3) courses (no refund). Course withdrawal
request forms must be completed and submitted to the Office of the Registrar by 4 p.m.




                                                                                              44
Friday, March 29
Good Friday. University closed.

Monday, April 1
Deadline to submit Special Studies (Independent Study, Internship or Residency) registration
and proposal forms for 2013 summer semester credit.
Monday, April 8
Last day of regular winter semester classes.
Tuesday, April 9 to Friday, April 19
Final examination and critique period for full year (duration 1) and winter semester (duration 3)
classes. Student attendance is required.
Tuesday, April 16
Study Day. No examinations/critiques scheduled.
Friday, April 19
End of 2012 winter semester.
Friday, April 26
Final deadline to apply for full-time or part-time OSAP (for students registered in the summer
semester).

Thursday, May 2 (opening night) to Sunday, May 5
98th Annual Graduate Exhibition.
Monday, May 6
Deadline for grade changes, including incomplete grades, for full year (duration 1) and winter
semester (duration 3) courses.
Monday, May 20
Victoria Day. University closed.
Tuesday, May 21
Last day to submit grade appeals for full year (duration 1) and winter semester (duration 3)
courses.

Thursday, June 6 (TBC)
Spring Convocation. Office of the Registrar closed.




                                                                                                 45
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS




                    46
CONTEMPORARY ART, DESIGN AND NEW MEDIA ART HISTORIES


Description

The MA program in Contemporary Art, Design and New Media Art Histories prepares
students to investigate the breadth and complexity of today's creative cultural activity. Artists
and designers in the 21st century often employ unconventional and hybrid strategies that can
challenge traditional forms of analysis. Examinations of contemporary art, new media and
design therefore require flexible and creative conceptual approaches. Through historical
contextualization, scholarly rigour, and cross-disciplinary methods, this program supports the
production of pioneering research into newly emerging art and design practices.

This unique and innovative academic program offers students three fields of specialization:

      Contemporary Art History (VISA courses)
      Design History (VISD courses)
      New Media Art History (VISM courses)

Because they all draw from the discipline of art history and share analytical techniques, theory
and terminology, these three fields form a complementary affiliation. Yet they also bear their
own distinctiveness, which will be emphasized in field-specific seminars (courses offered within
each of the above fields of specialization) and independent study. While students may take
courses in any of the specializations, one field will be selected as the focus for the degree.

The objectives of the MA in Contemporary Art, Design and New Media Art Histories are:

      To cultivate original research into the analysis of contemporary art, design and new
       media art
      To provide students with advanced writing and research skills for historical, critical and
       theoretical investigations
      To prepare students for employment by galleries, museums and other art institutions
      To prepare students for continuing research in PhD programs

Students entering the program will augment their existing knowledge through a program of
study that facilitates exploration and analysis of contemporary art, design or new media art.




                                                                                                47
Program Requirements

Curriculum: 45 credits


Major Research Paper (MRP) Stream

Fall 2012                 Winter 2013                 Summer 2013              Fall 2013             Winter 2014 (15
(9 credits)               (9 credits)                 (3 credits)              (9 credits)           credits)
CADN 6B01: Methods        CADN 6B02:                  CADN 6B09:               CADN 6C02:            CADN 6D01:
and Theory in Art         Contemporary Art            MRP/Thesis Proposal      MRP/Thesis            Major Research
History (3)               Theory (3)                  Writing (3)              Research (6)          Paper Writing (9)

Field-specific Seminar*   Field-specific Seminar*                              Field-specific
(VISA, VISD, or VISM)     (VISA, VISD, or VISM)                                Seminar* (VISA,
(3)                       (3)                                                  VISD, or VISM) (3)


                                                                               Fall and Winter
Elective (3)                                                                   CADN 6C01: Writing and Professional
                          Elective (3)
                                                                               Practices (6)


*One Field-specific Seminar for each field will be offered each semester. Students in Contemporary Art History must take the VISA
course; students in Design History must take the VISD course; and students in New Media Art History must take the VISM course,
unless otherwise noted in the Academic Calendar

Part-time students will develop a program plan in consultation with the Graduate Program Director.




                                                                                                                                    48
Thesis Stream**

                                                      Summer 2013
Fall 2012                 Winter 2013                                          Fall 2013             Winter 2014 (18
                                                      (3 credits)
(9 credits)               (9 credits)                                          (6 credits)           credits)
CADN 6B01: Methods        CADN 6B02:                  CADN 6B09:               CADN 6C02:             CADN 6E01:
and Theory in Art         Contemporary Art            MRP/Thesis Proposal      MRP/Thesis            Thesis Writing
History (3)               Theory (3)                  Writing (3)              Research (6)          (12)

Field-specific Seminar*   Field-specific Seminar*



                                                                               Fall and Winter
                                                                               CADN 6C01: Writing and Professional
Elective (3)              Elective (3)
                                                                               Practices (6)


*One Field-specific Seminar for each field will be offered each semester. Students in Contemporary Art History must take the VISA
course; students in Design History must take the VISD course; and students in New Media Art History must take the VISM course,
unless otherwise noted in the Academic Calendar.

**Students may enter the thesis stream only with the permission of the student's Principal Advisor and the Graduate Program
Director.

Part-time students will develop a program plan in consultation with the Graduate Program Director.




                                                                                                                                    49
Electives

At least one elective must be chosen from a field other than the student’s chosen field. For
example, a student in the Contemporary Art History field must take at least one elective from
either the Design History or New Media Art Histories fields.

For additional elective choices, students may choose from:

   a) Courses in other fields within the CADN program
   b) Approved graduate-level courses in other OCAD U graduate programs. Approved elective
      choices will be published annually in the Academic Calendar, which is available on the
      OCAD U website at
      www.ocadu.ca/students/records_registration/course_calendar
   c) A 300- or 400-level Liberal Arts and Sciences course with the approval of the instructor
      and the Graduate Program Director. Students should consult the Academic Calendar for
      undergraduate course offerings and must complete a “Request to Enroll in an
      Undergraduate Course as an Elective” form and secure the appropriate permissions
      before they will be allowed to register. Please see “Courses and Registration” in this
      handbook for more information.
   d) A graduate course at another university through the Ontario Visiting Graduate Student
      Plan (OVGS) or the Canadian University Graduate Transfer Agreement (CUGTA).
      Information on this process is available in this handbook under “Courses and
      Registration” and on the OCAD U website at www.ocadu.ca/gradstudies.

Students must meet with their Graduate Program Director for advising on the selection of
elective courses. A record of student advising will be kept in the student file and students are
advised to keep a copy for their records.

Course Descriptions

Note: not all courses are offered every term

CADN 6B01 Methods and Theory in Art History (3 credits)
This course charts out the range of methodological strategies used by art historians to analyze,
interpret and critique works of art. While formal, stylistic and iconographic methods are
traditionally central to art historical practice, diverse theoretical perspectives and specialized
terminologies have been developed in recent decades that complexify the art historical
enterprise. Approaches to be discussed include Marxism, psychoanalysis, post-structuralism,
cultural studies, feminism and post-colonialism. One objective of this course is to assist students
in identifying theories and methods that are pertinent to their own research interests.

CADN 6B02 Contemporary Art Theory (3 credits)
This course focuses on the major theories and issues that have shaped the analysis of
contemporary art since the 1980s. Examining key writings by theorists and historians of the last
25 years, discussions will cover the debates and shifts in perception that have contributed to
recent developments in art theory and praxis.

CADN 6B03 Canadian Art, Design and New Media Art History (3 credits)
This course addresses contemporary artistic, new media art or architectural/design practices in
Canada. Depending on the instructor’s specialization, the course may analyze case studies of
particular artists, designers or architects; specific art and design scenes in the country’s regions



                                                                                                   50
and metropolitan centres; Canadian arts institutions, policies and representation in
international projects; criticism and theory; and issues such as nationalism, sovereignty and
multiculturalism.

CADN 6B05 Contemporary Indigenous Art, Design and New Media Art History (3
credits)
This course will survey pioneering and contemporary work by Aboriginal artists, new media art
practitioners, or architects/designers. The rich heritage of First Nations’ culture continues as
artists and designers translate traditional values and approaches into modern and postmodern
contexts. Such work serves multiple functions: asserting Aboriginal voices and methodologies,
critiquing Western aesthetics and politics, and forging alternative theories and cultural analyses.

CADN 6B07 Special Topic Seminar (3 credits)
Depending on the instructor’s specialization, this course engages with core and visiting faculty’s
interests in the current debates and controversies affecting art history, the art world and its
institutions.

CADN 6B09 MRP/Thesis Proposal Writing (3 credits)
Under the guidance of the Principal Supervisor, students will work on and complete their
proposals for a major research paper or thesis.

CADN 6C01 Writing and Professional Practices (6 credits)
This seminar is designed to assist students during the writing of their MRP or thesis.
Discussions will cover the structure and format of MRPs and theses, research practices, and
guidelines for good writing. Other topics include writing grant applications, presenting at
conferences, and publishing in academic venues. The course will also oversee the organization of
the CADN Graduate Student Conference.

CADN 6C02 MRP/Thesis Research (6 credits)
This is a directed study course to pursue research and reading in connection with the individual
student’s major research paper or thesis project.

CADN 6D01 Major Research Paper Writing (9 credits)
Under the guidance of the Principal Advisor, students will work on and complete their major
research paper.

CADN 6E01 Thesis Writing (12 credits)
Under the guidance of the Principal Advisor, students will work on and complete their thesis.

      Contemporary Art History Field-Specific Seminars (not all courses are
       offered each year)

VISA 6B01 Modernist Legacies: Contextualizing the Contemporary (3 credits)
While contemporary art, design and new media practices since the 1980s have been discussed in
relation to the postmodern condition, modernist influences are as important for their
interpretation and context. This course examines key issues of modernism and texts that
address the contemporary's ghosts, ruins and legacies, including the relevance of the avant-
garde, the scope of multiple modernities, and the Duchampian turn in the production and
reception of culture. The course considers whether it was postmodernity or modernity itself that
called into question the relationship of art, design and new media to society, politics, mass
culture, and the crisis in representation.



                                                                                                51
VISA 6B02 The History of Art History (3 credits)
This seminar traces the evolution of art history as an intellectual discipline with a focus upon the
major figures who have contributed to the definition and practice of art history. From the
discipline’s origins to the present day, figures such as Giorgio Vasari, J.J. Winckelmann,
Heinrich Wölfflin, Henri Focillon, Erwin Panofsky, Meyer Schapiro, T.J. Clark and Griselda
Pollock, among others, will be studied. The historical shifts in concepts such as originality, style,
periodicity, movement and artistic subject will also be examined.

VISA 6B04 Issues in Contemporary Artistic Practice (3 credits)
This course will consider the traditions and tensions in European pictorial practice from the
1960s onward. Among other things, students will look at the post-war artistic and philosophical
fascination with memory, origin(s), extinction, archive, and identity (imagined or not). Specific
examples of artistic practices and discussions of critical texts will enable students to interrogate
the tense engagement of several European artists with an archival mode of thinking and
painting in post-1960 Europe.

VISA 6B05 Post-colonial Issues in Visual Culture (3 credits)
This course reflects upon the issues generated by colonialism and its post-colonial after-effects
in art and society. The historical legacy of colonialism still deeply inflects visual culture,
requiring both the critique and deconstruction of persistent stereotypical notions such as race,
centre/periphery and ethnocentrism. By considering the concepts of hybridity, resistance,
appropriation, mimicry and transnationalism in the work of contemporary artists and theorists,
this course will underscore the significance of cultural agency in the 21st century.

VISA 6B07 Art in the Public Sphere (3 credits)
As the mythic narratives of collective unity, nationalism and progress have faltered in the era of
postmodernity, what then is the public role of art? This course will examine contemporary art as
it critiques and reformulates the notions of monument, memory, audience and community.
While art may serve the ideological interests of institutions, there also lies the potential for
intervention and activism, as well as a more critical relationship with popular culture.

VISA 6B08 Issues in Art History and Culture (3 credits)
New social contexts, theoretical frameworks, and objects of analysis challenge conventional
notions of art historical practice. Potential topics range from developments in art history as it
exists within academia (e.g., its relation to post-disciplines, such as Visual Studies or Cultural
Studies) to art history in the expanded sense as it relates to the broader cultural landscape, such
as literature, performance and cinema.

VISA 6B11 Politics of Power in the Artworld (3 credits)
Despite the decentralization of the art world in the past few decades, the influence of institutions
such as art schools, museums, corporations and governments persists and has evolved into ever
more complex formations of power. This course combines art historical, sociological and critical
perspectives to examine how artists and artworks are situated not only within the cultural
sphere, but also in the commercial, entertainment, media, and information industries. As the
contexts of production and consumption increase, so too do the possibilities of artist-generated
responses to and critiques of such power structures, which this course will also address.

      Design History Field-Specific Seminars (not all courses are offered each
       year)




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VISD 6B02 Contemporary Architectural Theory (3 credits)
This course covers canonical and contemporary texts by architectural historians, theoreticians
and practitioners. The work, ideas and methodologies presented here will form a conceptually
organized foundation for architectural intellectual discourse. Architectural theory, in this
context, simultaneously provides a parallel to the precepts of art history and an example of a
counter-discourse.

VISD 6B03 Issues in Communication Design (3 credits)
Over the past 50 years, communication design has moved from the design of static typography,
graphic design and illustration destined for print (which nonetheless remains a key medium), to
a diverse field of practices in kinetic and temporal media, digital and interactive graphics, and
innovative modes of advertising, branding and marketing. Addressing both contemporary issues
and practices in communication design, along with their historical precedents, specific topics
may include: the contemporary return of ornament, graphics and popular culture, data
visualization and information design, animation, and advertising in the expanded field.

VISD 6B04 Living with Things (3 credits)
Although all human-made and human-altered things (buildings, field stone walls, suburban
family rooms and the contents of the Dollar Store) are expressions of culture and operate as
texts, the engagement with the material world is difficult and poses interpretive challenges. This
course, interested in the roles of objects in everyday life, will investigate both the theory and
practice of studying everyday material culture. The categories of ideology, identity, nostalgia,
style and stylistic change, class, semiotics, and aesthetics, among others, will be considered.

VISD 6B05 Case Studies in Design History (3 credits)
This course investigates the history of design history, its emergence as a scholarly field, and the
development of a design-specific methodology. As well, it provides an opportunity for case
studies in modern and pre-modern design practice. As a young discipline, design history has
sought to establish a critical framework distinguished from art history and material culture
where the study of designers and their work has long resided. Challenged by the culturally-
charged idea of “design” replete with valorizing narratives, famous actors and fetishized objects,
the study of design’s history offers an example of academic culture in the context of advanced
capitalism.

VISD 6B06 Contemporary Issues in Design History (3 credits)
Addressing art history and its application to contemporary design practices, this course
considers recent developments and emerging sites in contemporary design, architecture and
urban space.

VISD 6B07 Issues in Environmental Design (3 credits)
Environmental design today includes a diverse range of interventions and practices acting on
architecture, urbanism, landscape, and interior design, as well as hybrid practices spanning
combinations of these as well as spatial engagements from art and other design fields. This
course explores contemporary issues in environmental design, along with their historical
precedents. Specific themes and topics will vary according to individual faculty member’s
interests, but may include: urban ecologies, ambient experience design, digital technology and
the built environment, spatial politics, and the legacies of modernism.

      New Media Art History Field-Specific Seminars (not all courses are offered
       each year)




                                                                                                53
VISM 6B01 Hybrid Media and Interactivity (3 credits)
As new technologies become ever more enmeshed in art-making practice, they also merge with
and assimilate multiple forms of media from the domains of entertainment, mass media, the
sciences and elsewhere. Whether this merging is due to integration, convergence or
recombination, it demonstrates the dynamic and protean nature of artistic utilization of
technology. Such hybridity often involves interactivity and directly solicits participation, shifting
the nature of the art audience from viewer to user and maker. Contrary to the purity, autonomy
and distance privileged in modernism, this course analyzes the theoretical and aesthetic
significance of hybridity, interactivity and engagement.

VISM 6B02 Digital Aesthetics (3 credits)
This course examines the effect of digital presence on contemporary visual culture and the
rethinking of aesthetics. It will foster a critical attitude to digital culture and consider issues
such as sensual stimulation, interface aesthetics, surface appearance, digital composition and
artifice, illusion and simulation, among others. Through readings and case studies, the course
will draw upon digital art, collaborative digital practices and new, creative technological
developments.

VISM 6B03 New Technologies, New Critical Perspectives (3 credits)
The burgeoning fields of digital and new media bring forth unexpected challenges to the practice
of art history and criticism. New technologies, whether utilizing the Internet, telepresence,
virtual or augmented reality, cross-disciplinary boundaries bring art into integral relationships
with science, engineering, artificial intelligence, robotics and biotechnology. This course will
develop critical perspectives, terminology and theory relevant to post 1990 technologies and
their use by artists.

VISM 6B04 New Media Art History (3 credits)
New media art has a complex triangulated ontology derived from the fields of science, art and
technology. Beginning in the 19th century, this course will trace these distinct histories coupled
with emerging theoretical paradigms. Certain aspects of new media now taken for granted—
immersion, interactivity, emergence—arose theoretically prior to their materialization via
technology. Hence, with particular attention paid to the way we have written our futures, the
course will also include prescient narratives from science fiction, film, and visual art.

VISM 6B05 Digital Historiography and Screen Documents (3 credits)
This course focuses on the impact of digital technologies on traditional screen representational
regimes. What happens when the universality of digital documentation encounters the infinite
mutability of digital documents? The course will examine a range of philosophical approaches to
digital screen documents as historical evidence. Contemporary theorists in this emerging field of
research to be considered include Peter Sloterdijk, Brian Massumi, Philip Rosen, Alex Galloway,
Bruno Latour, and Mark Poster.

VISM 6B06 Issues in New Media Art History (3 credits)
Tailored to the individual faculty member’s research interests, this course examines the issues
arising from the recent innovations in new media artistic practice and theory. Virtual museums,
data aesthetics, post-human audiences, embedded computing and gaming strategies are just a
few of the means by which technology is drastically changing the conventions of art experience,
criticism and art historical analysis.




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Thesis/Major Research Paper and Supervision

Supervision

Students in the CADN program select their Principal Advisor (PA) in the latter part of the
Winter term of their first year. In the fourth term of study (Fall of Year Two), students in both
the Major Research Paper (MRP) and Thesis streams will establish a two-member Supervisory
Committee. The Supervisory Committee consists of the Principal Advisor and one additional
faculty member, the Second Reader. The Principal Advisor and Supervisory Committee are
responsible for guiding and evaluating the student’s MRP or thesis.

The MRP stream is the default in the CADN program. The Thesis option requires special
permission of the student’s Principal Advisor and the Graduate Program Director (GPD). In
order to be admitted to the Thesis stream, the student must demonstrate superior writing and
research skills, as well as be able to articulate a research topic that justifies the extra length.

Students are advised to consult the Graduate Studies section of the OCAD U website for an up to
date list of eligible supervisors. Both the Principal Advisor and the secondary committee
member must agree to the supervision by signing the Advisor form, which must also be signed
by the Graduate Program Director and submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies by the
deadlines established by the program.


MRP/Thesis Proposal

At the end of the Winter semester, students confer with their Principal Advisor (PA) to sketch
out their MRP (Major Research Paper) or Thesis topic by drafting a one-page description and
one-page bibliography, which will guide their research over the summer. The choosing of the PA
and drafting of the description and reading list should be accomplished by May 15.

After a summer of reading and research, students prepare a 4-6 page MRP/Thesis Proposal due
on September 1st. Students should present their proposal to their Principal Advisor and get
feedback before handing it in to the Graduate Program Director. The format of the proposal is 4-
6 pages (1,000-1,500 words) not including the bibliography.

The Objectives of the MRP/Thesis Proposal include:
      -- Articulate your research topic and define its parameters
      -- Argue for its originality and significance for contemporary scholarship
      -- Discuss your methods and show that the research can be realistically accomplished
      -- Outline essential arguments and intended conclusions

The MRP/Thesis Proposal comprises several components, which can be specifically articulated
or woven into the overall text:
       -- Title: should reflect the content of the MRP/Thesis
       -- Thesis statement/objectives: identifies issue, explains why it is significant and timely,
       provides a rationale for your choice of topic, introduces the reader to an open-ended
       inquiry, proposes research questions
       -- Context: demarcates the scope of your topic, reviews the history of related research,
       provides general background in the subject area
       -- Approach/Methodology: sketches the theoretical approach you will take, what
       methods will be employed, and a schedule for completing the research



                                                                                                      55
         -- Results/Contribution: explains the new understanding you hope to achieve, articulates
         broader implications, describes impact upon contemporary scholarship
         -- 1-2 page bibliography: Cites materials you consider essential to your thesis and which
         will be consulted during your research. This list forms the basis for the reading and
         research course (CADN 6C02) in the Fall with your Principal Advisor.

Colloquium

In the Fall of Year Two, students will present their MRP and Thesis proposals to their peers and
the University community. Students will workshop their proposals in CADN 6C01 during the
month of September and then present their proposal in a colloquial setting in early October.


MRP

There should be at least one meeting of the student, PA and Second Reader (SR) in the Fall
before the student begins intensive writing. After that, the SR needs only to read and comment
on the MRP once it is in near-final shape in the Spring.

An MRP addresses a critical issue relevant to contemporary art, design, or new media art
history. Students should aim for a coherent text of 40 to 50 pages (approximately 10-12,000
words). The main difference between an MRP and a Thesis is that an MRP does not require
distinct sections on methodology and literature review, as does the Thesis. The MRP is meant to
be a text that could be published in a professional academic journal. Guidelines for the
Preparation of the MRP are published by the Office of Graduate Studies and available on the
OCAD U website.

Thesis

In the CADN program, the thesis is expected to be a sustained analysis of a topic with a length of
80 to 100 pages (approximately 20-25,000 words) or a series of thematically integrated essays
that together represent 80 to 100 pages. Guidelines for the Preparation of the Thesis are
published by the Office of Graduate Studies and available on the OCAD U website.

Students in the Thesis stream are required to defend their thesis to a committee comprising the
Program Director, the Principal Advisor and second Supervisory Committee member, an
internal faculty member, and an External Examiner (a specialist from outside of OCAD U).


Timeline for MRP/Thesis

First Year

Fall-Winter     Students concentrate on seminars and coursework.

April-May       Select a Principal Advisor (PA) and confer about a research topic and plans for
                summer research.

May 15          1-page topic description and 1-page bibliography submitted to PA. The MRP
                (Major Research Paper) is the default option for CADN. Students interested in
                taking the Thesis option need to demonstrate superior research and writing



                                                                                                  56
                skills, and must gain the approval of their PA and the Graduate Program
                Director.

Summer          Student begins reading and research related to their MRP or Thesis.

Second Year

Fall            Draft of MRP or Thesis Proposal handed to PA by September 1st. Student
                workshops with PA to finalize by October 1.

                CADN 6C02: MRP/Thesis Research (with PA)
                Expectations: Students will read extensively and produce items such as an
                annotated bibliography, literature review, or substantial outline. Depending on
                the type of research, Research Ethics Board approval may be required.

                CADN 6C01: Writing and Professional Practices
                In the first month, students will use this course to workshop their MRP/Thesis
                Proposal and prepare for the CADN colloquium in the first week of October.
                Afterwards, the course will address writing practices, editing, research ethics, etc.
                Discussions will also cover grants, conferences, academic CVs, publishing, and
                professional practices. This course will also oversee the organization of the CADN
                Graduate Student Conference.

                Student and PA choose Second Reader by the week after the colloquium, around
                October 15. At the end of the semester, the committee meets to discuss the
                student’s upcoming writing plans.

Winter          Intensive writing of MRP or Thesis. A more detailed timeline will be provided in
                Fall of Year Two.

Tuition and Fees

The MA in Contemporary Art History is normally a full-time, five semester program. Full-time
fees for this program are program-based and assessed on a per-semester basis (rather than a
per-course basis). This means that the same fees are charged to full time students every
semester, including the summer term, regardless of the number of credits taken. Fees do not
change if a student drops or adds a course. A change of status from full-time to part-time (or
vice versa) is the only instance when tuition fees are reassessed.

The chart below outlines the estimated tuition costs for the program for students starting in
2012/2013:

                   Fall        Winter     Summer          Fall        Winter       Estimated
                   2012         2013       2013           2013         2014        Program
                                                                                     Total
MA in Contemporary Art, Design and New Media Art Histories
Domestic          $3,059       $3,059       $3,181       $3,181       $3,181         $15,662
International     $7,278       $7,278       $7,569       $7,569       $7,569         $37,263




                                                                                                  57
       Notes:

       *2013/2014 Summer, Fall and Winter Fees are estimates based on the 2012/2013 tuition
       framework, and are subject to change with Provincial Government Policy and OCAD U Board of
       Governor approval. Approved fees are posted annually on the "Financial Matters" section of the
       OCAD U website at www.ocadu.ca/students/financial_matters/tuition_fees.htm. Fees for
       2013/2014 will not be finalized until April 2013.

As per the Graduate Studies Policy #6007, full time students have a maximum of 11 semesters to
complete their program, and part time students have a maximum of 14 semesters. Both full time
and part time students must pay full program fees every semester until they have completed all
requirements for the degree.

Applicable ancillary fees and other costs such as living expenses, books, etc. are not included in
the amounts above.

The most current information on fees, tuition and payment methods and deadlines is available
on the Financial Matters section of the OCAD U website at:

http://www.ocadu.ca/students/financial_matters/tuition_fees.htm




                                                                                                    58
CRITICISM AND CURATORIAL PRACTICE


Description

The Master of Fine Arts in Criticism & Curatorial Practice combines history, theory and criticism
with professional curatorial practice to explore and experiment with the breadth and depth of
contemporary art, media and design.

While the majority of curatorial and museum studies programs in Canada are streams within an
art history program leading to a Master of Arts degree, this program focuses on the professional
practices of curating and criticism in combination with theory and history, leading to the Master
of Fine Arts degree. Graduate faculty teaching in the program and adjunct faculty supervising
student internships include practicing curators and critics.

The objectives of the MFA in Criticism and Curatorial Practices are:

      To ensure that students acquire advanced research skills for visual and academic
       investigations in the areas of art, media, and design practice and critical theory.
      To contribute to new knowledge in the areas of art, media, and design research
       methodologies in criticism and curatorial practices.
      To promote the development of practices which facilitate sustainability, social
       responsibility, and diverse social and cultural perspectives.
      To develop and advance curatorial and critical practices in design.
      To promote contemporary art, media, and design practices within public contexts.
      To contribute to the development of the field of Canadian art, media, and design
       criticism.
      To contribute to the development of the field of curatorial practice in private and public
       galleries and museums and to independent curatorial practices.

Key features of the program include:

      Partnerships, internships and events at organizations such as the Art Gallery of Ontario,
       the Textile Museum, C Magazine, the Toronto Alliance of Art Critics, and various
       Toronto artist-run centres.
      The Summer Internship, which is an approximately four-week placement with a gallery,
       museum, arts publication or other relevant cultural institution in Canada or abroad. The
       internship allows students to integrate the knowledge gleaned from first year seminars
       with the practices of curating and criticism.
      The annual Artist-in-Residence program, which brings internationally renowned artists,
       designers, curators and critics to OCAD U for a one-week residency during which they
       conduct seminars, attend studio critiques, and give a public lecture/presentation.




                                                                                                59
Program Requirements

Curriculum: 60 credits

Fall (9 credits)   Winter (15 credits)        Summer (9 credits) Fall (12 credits)      Winter (15 credits)
GGRA 6B03          CRCP 6B08 Issues in        Internship and/or  CRCP 6B05 Issues       CRCP 6B07 Thesis Workshop
Critical Theory    Exhibitions, Theory and    Study Abroad (6)   in Criticism and       (3)
Seminar I (3)      Practice (3)                                  Curatorial Studies
                                                                 (3)
CRCP 6B06          CRCP 6B02 Criticism        CRCP 6B04 Thesis   CRCP6C01               CRCP 6E01 Exhibition and
Introduction to    and Critical Writing (3)   Proposal (3)       Individual             Essay (12)
Criticism and                                                    Research and
Curatorial                                                       Reading (6)            OR
Studies (3)
*GGRA 6B01         Elective (3)                                    Elective (3)         CRCP 6E02 Criticism Thesis
Contemporary                                                                            (12)
Research
Methods (3)

OR

CADN 6B01
Methods and
Theory in Art
History (3)
CRCP 6C02 Inside Curatorial Practice (6)

*Note: Students must take either GGRA 6B01 or CADN 6B01. Students must meet with the Graduate Program Director for advising
on this and other elective choices.




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Electives

Students may choose from:
   a) Approved graduate-level courses in other OCAD U graduate programs. Approved elective
      choices will be published annually in the Academic Calendar, which is available on the
      OCAD U website at www.ocadu.ca/students/records_registration/course_calendar
   b) A 300 or 400-level course in any discipline, with the approval of the instructor and the
      Graduate Program Director. Students should consult the Academic Calendar for
      undergraduate course offerings and must complete a “Request to Enroll in an
      Undergraduate Course as an Elective” form and secure the appropriate permissions
      before they will be allowed to register. Please see “Courses and Registration” in this
      handbook for more information.
   c) A graduate course at another university through the Ontario Visiting Graduate Student
      Plan (OVGS) or the Canadian University Graduate Transfer Agreement (CUGTA).
      Information on this process is available in this handbook under “Courses and
      Registration” and on the OCAD U website at www.ocadu.ca/gradstudies.

Students must meet with their Graduate Program Director for advising on the selection of
elective courses. A record of student advising will be kept in the student file and students are
advised to keep a copy for their records.

Summer Options

The MFA in Criticism and Curatorial Practice is a year-round, five-semester program, including
one Summer term. Students must make plans for their summer program in consultation with
their Program Director. Among the options available to students in this program are:

      Internship (3-6 credits)
       With the assistance of the Graduate Program Director, students will arrange either a
       curatorial or criticism internship of five to six weeks’ duration with a local, national, or
       international gallery, or a museum or journal.

      International Directed Study (3-6 credits)
       If appropriate to their thesis project, students may arrange international directed study
       or research for the summer between Years One and Two.


Portfolio Exhibition

In the first (Fall) semester of the program, as a requirement for the course CRCP 6B06:
Introduction to Criticism and Curatorial Studies, CCP students will organize and curate an
exhibition of the admissions portfolio work of the first year students in the Interdisciplinary
Master’s in Art, Media & Design (IAMD) program.


Course Descriptions

Note: not all courses are offered every term

CADN 6B01 Methods and Theory in Art History (3 credits)




                                                                                                      61
This course charts out the range of methodological strategies used by art historians to analyze,
interpret and critique works of art. While formal, stylistic and iconographic methods are
traditionally central to art historical practice, diverse theoretical perspectives and specialized
terminologies have been developed in recent decades that complexify the art historical
enterprise. Approaches to be discussed include Marxism, psychoanalysis, post-structuralism,
cultural studies, feminism and post-colonialism. One objective of this course is to assist students
in identifying theories and methods that are pertinent to their own research interests.

CRCP 6B01 History and Theory of Exhibitions
Surveying the diverse means by which art and design have been experienced since the 18th
century, this course investigates exhibitions in their social, historical and theoretical contexts.
Besides covering sites such as salons, galleries, museums and artist-generated alternatives,
discussions also address how the postmodern interest in design, performance, digital media and
site-specific work reconceives the notion of exhibition.

CRCP 6B02 Criticism and Critical Writing (3 credits)
The subject of this course is critical writing in a broad sense. Critical writing can be seen as a
large and flexible form that accompanies art and design’s production and public reception. This
broad view will enable the seminar to examine many types of texts that deal with art and design
theory, criticism, ficto-criticism, curatorial statements and texts as artworks, as well as
interviews (which though spoken, routinely appear in print). A central question for the seminar
will be the study of whether (or how) different positions in the field of art, design, curator, critic,
artist, designer, etc. create different kinds of writing.

CRCP 6B04 Thesis Proposal (3 credits)
This course will support the research and formulation of thesis proposals and finalize the
direction of students into either the Criticism or the Curatorial stream. Thesis proposals are
formulated over the summer term in consultation with the student's Principal Advisor, and are
due Sept 1st. Once they have determined their stream, students will clarify their thesis topic,
research questions, objectives, theoretical frameworks and methodologies. If students are
developing a Thesis Exhibition they will also begin to work on developing the context, budget
and location of their Thesis exhibition plans. The evaluation for the course will focus on the final
approval of thesis proposal and will be a pass/fail evaluation.

CRCP 6B05 Issues in Criticism and Curatorial Studies (3 credits)
This seminar examines the ongoing debates circulating within, and pertinent to, contemporary
criticism and curating. The course addresses the implications for criticism and curatorial
practice through analysis of the theoretical formations and shifting context of prominent issues
(e.g., representation, gender, sexuality, difference, institutional power, censorship, globalization
and media culture).

CRCP 6B06 Introduction to Criticism and Curatorial Studies (3 credits)
This introductory seminar, through readings and discussions, will introduce students to the
major critical texts, theories and debates in the burgeoning international field of contemporary
curatorial studies and criticism. Simultaneously throughout the seminar, students will attend
public exhibitions, screenings, lectures, performances and events in Toronto’s visual art and
design worlds. This ongoing examination of contemporary art and design practices within public
culture will provide students with an eclectic and critical mapping of the layers and intersections
of the visual arts, media and design in relation to their varied publics, audiences, markets, the
mass media and the scholarly community.




                                                                                                    62
CRCP 6B07 Thesis Workshop (3 credits)
This course is offered as a series of thesis workshops. Students will convene as a group to
present, review, and discuss their thesis work as a form of peer review. The workshops will be
scheduled in January/February. The course is pass/fail.

CRCP 6B08 Issues in Exhibitions, Theory and Practice (3 credits)
This seminar will explore various aspects of exhibition practices and theory, while focusing on a
particular aspect of contemporary exhibitionary practices. Potential topics range from curatorial
interventions within the gallery and institutions of art; exhibition practices related to new
media, digital and electronic arts; photography and its contemporary manifestations; and the
experiences of working in the public realm outside of traditional galleries and museums, such as
public art, social-relational aesthetics, and community art practices. The seminar will include
lectures, readings, case studies and student presentations that are intended to raise issues and
engage debate about contemporary exhibition practices and account for theoretical perspectives
and historical context.

CRCP 6C01 Individual Research and Reading (6 credits)
This is a directed study course to pursue research and reading in connection with each student’s
thesis project or critical essay, working with their Principal Advisor.

CRCP 6C02 Inside Curatorial Practice (6 credits)
This course interrogates contemporary Canadian curatorial practices. As much concerned with
critical methodologies as with practical realities, the course will introduce students to
institutional and independent curatorial environments. Students will meet with staff and
conduct independent research within large and small-scale institutions, university art galleries,
private collections, artist-run, independent, and commercial galleries. The emphasis will be on
critical original research realized through one or more public events.

CRCP 6E01 Thesis: Exhibition and Critical Essay (12 credits)
Students in the curatorial stream will be required to conceptualize and curate a public project
and write a curatorial essay, which should be of publishable quality, and complete an internal
exhibition report. The curatorial project may be in the form of an exhibition, a public
installation, a public event, a performance, a website, etc. In addition, students may wish to
produce a catalogue that includes the curatorial essay, list of works, illustrations, etc. to
accompany the curatorial project.

CRCP 6E02 Thesis: Criticism Thesis (12 credits)
Students in the criticism stream will produce a criticism thesis in the form of one long sustained
essay with chapters on a particular subject, or three shorter essays on a theme of a similar
combined length. The essay(s) should include a critical literature overview, a chapter on
methodology and a bibliography. The criticism essay(s) should demonstrate sustained research
and critical argument, as well as an awareness of the larger field of critical inquiry. The essay(s)
should indicate some level of primary research and investigation either through interviews,
exhibition visits, site visits, studio visits, etc. The critical essay(s) can focus on art, design or
media criticism as a subject in its own right or as a critical analysis of an art object, design
object, event, performance, website, etc.

GGRA 6B01 Contemporary Research Methods (3 credits)
A wide variety of methods inform research that takes as its object art, design or visual studies.
This range expands further when it includes studio practice as well as scholarship. Moreover, a
given method is inflected by the discipline within which it is applied. To sort through this array,



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this course surveys contemporary art and design research methods with reference to social
sciences, humanities and cultural studies, and then uses this knowledge to focus on the unique
issues facing students in critical, curating and interdisciplinary practices.

GGRA 6B03 Critical Theory Seminar (3 credits)
Based on a survey of critical theory, this graduate seminar provides a venue for the analysis of
texts, issues and discourses that inform contemporary visual culture. Emphasis is placed on
examining the role of critical theory in contemporary art, design, criticism and curating.


Thesis and Supervision

Supervision
Full-time students will work with a Principal Advisor beginning in their third term of study
(summer), when they enroll in CRCP 6B04 Thesis Proposal. Students will establish and begin
working with a two-member Supervisory Committee beginning in the fourth term of study (Fall
of Year Two). The Supervisory Committee consists of the Principal Advisor and one additional
faculty member. The Principal Advisor and Supervisory Committee are responsible for guiding
and evaluating the Master’s thesis.

Please refer to the Graduate Studies website at www.ocadu.gradstudies for an up to date list of
appointed graduate faculty who are eligible to supervise in this program.

Thesis Proposal
All students must submit a formal written thesis proposal for approval by their Principal Advisor
no later than September 1st following the first year of study.

The thesis proposal outlines the objectives of the critical essay or the components of the
exhibition and curatorial essay. Those students planning an exhibition must include a discussion
of exhibition planning and logistics.

Thesis Colloquia
In the Fall of Year Two, students will present their thesis proposals to their peers and the
University community in a colloquial setting.

Thesis
Guidelines for the Preparation of the Thesis are published by the Office of Graduate Studies and
available on the OCAD U website.

Students in the curatorial stream will be required to conceptualize and curate a public
exhibition and produce a curatorial essay and complete an internal exhibition report. The
combined curatorial essay and exhibition report should be in the range of 8,000 to10,000 words
in total.

The curatorial exhibition can be in the form of an exhibition, a public installation, a public event,
a performance, a website, etc. The final curatorial essay should be of publishable quality. In
addition, students may wish to produce an exhibition catalogue which includes the curatorial
essay, list of works, illustrations, etc. to accompany the exhibition.




                                                                                                   64
Individual student curated exhibitions will normally take place in the Winter term. Students
who wish to exhibit off campus are responsible for obtaining the space, installing the work and
staffing the space.

Students in the criticism stream will produce a criticism thesis in the form of one long
sustained essay with chapters (approx. 15,000 words) on a particular subject or three shorter
essays on a theme of a similar combined length. The essay(s) should include a critical literature
overview, a chapter on methodology, and a bibliography.

The criticism essay(s) should demonstrate sustained research and critical argument and an
awareness of the larger field of critical inquiry. The essay(s) should indicate some level of
primary research and investigation either through interviews, exhibition visits, site visits, studio
visits, etc. The critical essay(s) can focus on art, design or media criticism as a subject in its own
right or as a critical analysis of an art object, design object, event, performance, web site, etc.

Oral Defence

Each student is required to defend her/his MFA thesis to a committee comprising the Program
Director, the Principal Advisor and Supervisory Committee member, an internal faculty
member, and an External Examiner (a specialist from outside of OCAD U). For those students
curating an exhibition, the Oral Defence normally occurs in tandem with the exhibition.

Tuition and Fees

The MFA in Criticism and Curatorial Practice is a five semester program. Fees for this program
are program-based and assessed on a per-semester basis (rather than a per-course basis). This
means that the same fees are charged to full time students every semester, including the
summer term, regardless of the number of credits taken. Fees do not change if a student drops
or adds a course. A change of status from full-time to part-time (or vice versa) is the only
instance when tuition fees are reassessed.

The chart below outlines the estimated tuition costs for the program for students starting in
2012/2013:

                   Fall        Winter      Summer         Fall         Winter        Estimated
                   2012         2013        2013          2013          2014         Program
                                                                                       Total
MFA in Criticism and Curatorial Practice
Domestic          $3,059       $3,059       $3,181       $3,181        $3,181         $15,662
International     $7,278       $7,278       $7,569       $7,569        $7,569         $37,263


       Notes:

       *2013/2014 Summer, Fall and Winter Fees are estimates based on the 2012/2013 tuition
       framework, and are subject to change with Provincial Government Policy and OCAD U Board of
       Governor approval. Approved fees are posted annually on the "Financial Matters" section of the
       OCAD U website at www.ocadu.ca/students/financial_matters/tuition_fees.htm. Fees for
       2013/2014 will not be finalized until April 2013.




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As per the Graduate Studies Policy #6007, full time students have a maximum of 11 semesters to
complete their program. Students must pay full program fees every semester until they have
completed all requirements for the degree.

Applicable ancillary fees and other costs such as living expenses, books, etc. are not included in
the amounts above.

The most current information on fees, tuition and payment methods and deadlines is available
on the Financial Matters section of the OCAD U website at:

http://www.ocadu.ca/students/financial_matters/tuition_fees.htm




                                                                                                66
DIGITAL FUTURES

Description

“Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.”
– Arthur C Clarke

The Graduate Program in Digital Futures responds to the increasingly important and
sophisticated role of digital technology as a ‘magical catalyst’ for integrating societal, cultural
and economic change. Students in the program essentially participate in and prepare for
Renaissance 2.0 – the global digital revolution that fuses together disruptive technology and
new thought leadership. This revolution is catalyzing our innovation in digital applications,
products, media content, practices and services.

The graduate program is deeply international in terms of the student cohort and faculty, our
collaborative overseas eGlobal courses and our industry partners. Fostering a global perspective
is key to securing our graduates’ futures in the eclectic international creative digital industries –
the United Nations definition of these encompasses design, arts, culture, creative services,
media and new media.

The focus of the program is to develop “X-shaped innovators” for the creative digital industries.
Each point of the X is an expertise: in art, design, science and enterprise. Students acquire
practical knowledge in these areas but also learn to collaborate brilliantly with industry and
experts across the fields. Students at the heart of the X work with faculty to develop their own
unique creativity and solver engine. Industry is now demanding X-shaped innovators to lead the
Renaissance 2.0 into the future.

Our student-centered learning approach applies to both research and practice. This allows
participants to gain core foundation knowledge and also to explore specific areas of interest
through electives that include access to courses across the whole of OCAD University,
internships or independent study. There is an emphasis on projects and prototyping and an
enterprise component is personalized through collaborations with industry to help students
build a career runway in advance of graduating. Masters and Diploma students are encouraged
to work with industry on an individual basis during their studies. Additionally, Master’s
students can collaborate with industry during their 12 month project-based research thesis.

Most students have backgrounds in design, technology or enterprise. The program is open to
designers, artists, marketing, media and cultural industry participants, entrepreneurs,
technologists, educators, social scientists, scientists and engineers. This diversity drives peer
learning, collaboration and group working across numerous parts of the program.

The program is situated within the Digital Futures Initiative (DFI) at OCAD University. This
initiative is a set of cross-disciplinary programs in practice, research and innovation that are
related to creative digital industries. The Graduate Program also features an industry
partnership with the Canadian Film Centre (CFC) Media Lab.

The Graduate Program in Digital Futures offers both a part-time Graduate Diploma and full-
time Master’s (MA, MFA or MDes).




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The objectives of the Graduate Diploma in Digital Futures are:

      To educate innovators from industry wishing to establish or enhance their knowledge of
       digital technologies for application in the digital creative industries
      To help students engage with industry on projects with a view to enhancing enterprise
       opportunities.
      To educate and train students from a diversity of professional backgrounds to innovate
       digital applications, products, media content, practices and services.
      To encourage students to develop strategic and creative digital projects that create
       sustainable value, and address pressing societal, cultural and economic issues.
      To provide collaborative multidisciplinary digital learning experiences in combinations
       of art, design, science and enterprise through applied projects, industry engagement and
       peer activities.
      To use a project-based approach to nurture creativity and problem solving through
       reflection, discovery and experimentation.
      To promote an ethical and sustainable approach to design and the innovative uses of
       technology.

The objectives of the Master’s in Digital Futures are:

      To provide systematic and conceptual understanding and the research competence
       needed to research, frame, critique, explore, make and test approaches to technological
       innovation, creation and production.
      To help students engage with industry with a view to enhancing enterprise skills and to
       build a career runway in advance of graduating.
      To educate and train students from a diversity of backgrounds to innovate digital
       applications, products, media content, practices and services.
      To encourage students to develop strategic and creative digital projects that create
       sustainable value, and address pressing societal, cultural and economic issues.
      To provide collaborative multidisciplinary digital learning experiences in combinations
       of art, design, science and enterprise through applied projects, industry engagement and
       peer activities.
      To use a project-based approach to nurture creativity and problem solving through
       reflection, discovery and experimentation.
      To promote an ethical and sustainable approach to design and the innovative uses of
       technology.

In a world that demands multidisciplinary innovation at a fast pace, the program helps to shape
and nurture a new breed of innovator. Graduates of the program will contribute to the
development and application of new knowledge in creative digital technology practices, content
and experiences, providing insights into human needs and desires in a technologically
dependent world.




                                                                                             68
Program Requirements

Graduate Diploma in Digital Futures
Curriculum: (24-27 credits, 24 credits required)

Fall (4.5-7.5 credits)    Winter (1.5-4.5          Summer (6- 9 credits)         Fall (3 credits)          Winter (6 credits)
                          credits)
DIGF 6B01 Creative        DIGF 6B12 Digital        DIGF          *Optional*      3 credits from the        DIGF         DIGF
Techniques (3)            Theory (3) (OR DIGF      6C01 CFC      1.5 - 3         following:                6B04         6B22
(OR DIGF 6B12 in          6B01 in Fall term)       Media Lab     credits         DIGF 6B18                 Business     Interactive
Winter term)                                       Prototyping   from the        eGlobal  Ubiquitous       and          Exhibition
                                                   (6)           following:      (1.5)    Computing        Leadership   (3)
                                                                                          (1.5)            (3)
                                                                 -Internship
                                                                                 OR DIGF 6B19
                                                                 (1.5 or 3)
DIGF 6K04                 1.5 credits from the                   -               Affect and Digital
                          following:                             Independent     Emotion     Games 2
Trans- Creation and       DIGF                                   Study (1.5 or   in Practice (1.5)
Media Computation         6A08                                   3)              (1.5)
(1.5)  (3)                Digital                                                OR DIGF 6B20
                          Games 1                                                eGlobal  Digital
                          (1.5)                                                  (1.5)    Games 2
                                                                                          (1.5)
                          OR DIGF                                                OR DIGF 6B21
                          6A10                                                   Affect and Ubiquitous
                          Mobile and                                             Emotion     Computing
                          Social Media                                           in Practice (1.5)
                          (1.5)                                                  (1.5)
                          OR DIGF                                                OR Elective (3 credits)
                          6A11
                          Information
                          Visualization
                          (1.5)




                                                                                                                                69
Core (required) courses

      Transmedia
      Creation and computation
      CFC Media Lab Prototyping
      Business and Leadership
      Interactive Exhibition

Electives (not all courses are offered each year)

      Creative Techniques
      Digital Theory
      Information Visualization
      Mobile and Social Media
      Digital Games 1
      Affect and Emotion in Practice
      eGlobal
      Digital Games 2
      Ubiquitous Computing

DIGF 6B18, DIGF 6B19, DIGF 6B20 and DIGF 6B21 are paired courses: each has two
components, worth 1.5 credits each. If one of the two components is not successfully completed,
students can take a replacement 1.5 credit course with the approval of the Graduate Program
Director.

Alternatively, students may choose from:

   e) Approved graduate level courses in other OCAD U graduate programs. . Approved
      elective choices will be published annually in the Academic Calendar, which is available
      on the OCAD U website at
      www.ocadu.ca/students/records_registration/course_calendar
   f) A 300- or 400-level undergraduate course in any discipline, with the approval of the
      instructor and Graduate Program Director (supplementary readings and a graduate level
      research project or essay are to be arranged with the instructor). Students should consult
      the Academic Calendar for undergraduate course offerings and must complete a
      “Request to Enroll in an Undergraduate Course as an Elective” form and secure the
      appropriate permissions before they will be allowed to register. Please see “Courses and
      Registration” in this handbook for more information.
   g) A graduate course at another university through the Ontario Visiting Graduate Student
      Plan (OVGS), or the Canadian University Graduate Transfer Agreement (CUGTA).
      Information on this process is available in this handbook under “Courses and
      Registration” and on the OCAD U website at www.ocadu.ca/gradstudies.

Summer Options

Students must make their summer plans with the written approval of the Graduate Program
Director. Any elective credits are evaluated by an OCAD U faculty member. Summer options
available to students in the Graduate Diploma program are:




                                                                                             70
      Internship
       Internships provide graduate students with opportunities to gain experience in the
       professional worlds of digital creative industries: design, arts, culture, creative services,
       media and new media. On-site work is performed under the guidance of the internship
       sponsor and the internship credit is supervised and evaluated by an OCAD U faculty
       member.
      Independent Study
       Independent Study courses provide graduate students with the opportunity to undertake
       studies of significance to their educational objectives, where otherwise not available
       through the regular university curriculum. Independent studies are supervised and
       evaluated by OCAD U faculty members. The Independent Study proposal must be
       approved in writing by the supervising faculty member, the student’s Principal Advisor
       (if applicable), and the Graduate Program Director.

Transmedia Immersion

For all students, an introductory, two-week, cohort-based Transmedia course provides a
program and peer introduction. This prepares students by helping to facilitate collaborative ties
across both the Masters and Diploma cohort.

Exhibitions

Diploma students exhibit their program projects in two exhibitions. These are online and in
appropriate physical venues and are a mandatory component of the program. The Interim
Exhibition takes place on completion of the CFC Media Lab prototyping course in the first year
and showcases both Diploma and Masters work from that course. The Final Exhibition
concludes the Interactive Exhibition Diploma course in the second year and showcases selected
work by the Diploma students, alongside thesis work by Masters students. All work to be shown
at each exhibition requires the written approval of the Graduate Program Director.




                                                                                                 71
Master’s in Digital Futures
Curriculum: (48- 51 credits, 48 credits required)

Fall (10.5 credits)           Winter (7.5 credits)           Summer (12-15 credits)           Fall (9 credits)             Winter (9 credits)

DIGF 6L01                     DIGF 6B12 Digital Theory (3)   DIGF 6G01 MDes/MFA Thesis        DIGF 6G01 MDes/MFA           DIGF 6G01 MDes/MFA
                                                             Stage 1: Foundation and          Thesis Stage 2:              Thesis Stage 3: Production,
Trans    Creation and         DIGF 6K01
                                                             Industry (6 )                    Experimentation and          Reflection and Exhibition
-        Computation (6)
                              Mobile and     Discovery (3)   OR                               Development (6)              (6)
Media
                              Social Media                   DIGF 6G02 MA Thesis Stage 1      OR                           OR
 (1.5)
                              (1.5)                          (6)                              DIGF 6G02 MA Thesis          DIGF 6G02 MA Thesis
                                                                                              Stage 2 (6)                  Stage 3 (6)
         DIGF 6B01 Creative   OR DIGF 6K02                                                    3 credits from the           DIGF
         Techniques (3)       Digital Games Discovery (3)                                     following:                   6B04
                              (1.5)                                                                                        Business
                              OR DIGF 6K03                   DIGF 6C01     *Optional*         DIGF 6B18                    and
                                                             CFC Media     1.5 - 3 credits                                 Leadership
                              Information   Discovery (3)                                     eGlobal (1.5)  Ubiquitous    (3)
                              Visualization                  Lab           from the                          Computing
                              (1.5)                          Prototyping   following:                        (1.5)
                                                             (6)                              OR DIGF 6B19
                                                                           -Internship        Affect and     Digital
                                                                           (1.5 or 3)         Emotion in     Games 2
                                                                           -Independent       Practice (1.5) (1.5)
                                                                           Study (1.5 or 3)
                                                                                              OR DIGF 6B20
                                                                                                         Digital
                                                                                              eGlobal (1.5)
                                                                                                         Games 2
                                                                                                         (1.5)
                                                                                              OR DIGF 6B21
                                                                                              Affect and      Ubiquitous
                                                                                              Emotion in      Computing
                                                                                              Practice (1.5) (1.5)
                                                                                              OR Elective (3 credits)




                                                                                                                                                   72
Core (required) courses

      Transmedia
      Creation and Computation
      Creative Techniques
      Digital Theory
      Discovery
      CFC Media Lab Prototyping
      Business and Leadership
      Digital Futures MDes/MFA Thesis, or Digital Futures MA Thesis

Electives (not all courses are offered each year)

      Information Visualization
      Mobile and Social Media
      Digital Games 1
      Affect and Emotion in Practice
      eGlobal
      Digital Games 2
      Ubiquitous Computing

DIGF 6B18, DIGF 6B19, DIGF 6B20 and DIGF 6B21 are paired courses: each has two
components, worth 1.5 credits each. If one of the two components is not successfully completed,
students can take a replacement 1.5 credit course with the approval of the Graduate Program
Director.

Alternatively, students may choose from:

   a) Approved graduate level courses in other OCAD U graduate programs. . Approved
      elective choices will be published annually in the Academic Calendar, which is available
      on the OCAD U website at
      www.ocadu.ca/students/records_registration/course_calendar
   b) A 300- or 400-level undergraduate course in any discipline, with the approval of the
      instructor and Graduate Program Director (supplementary readings and a graduate level
      research project or essay are to be arranged with the instructor). Students should consult
      the Academic Calendar for undergraduate course offerings and must complete a
      “Request to Enroll in an Undergraduate Course as an Elective” form and secure the
      appropriate permissions before they will be allowed to register. Please see “Courses and
      Registration” in this handbook for more information.
   c) A graduate course at another university through the Ontario Visiting Graduate Student
      Plan (OVGS), or the Canadian University Graduate Transfer Agreement (CUGTA).
      Information on this process is available in this handbook under “Courses and
      Registration” and on the OCAD U website at www.ocadu.ca/gradstudies.


Degree Choice

Students will declare their intention to pursue the Master of Design (MDes), Master of Fine Arts
(MFA), or the Master of Arts (MA) at the time of application. The outcomes of the chosen degree
are distinctive, with a focus on scholarly practice-based research creation with a supporting


                                                                                             73
thesis in the MDes/MFA; and the scholarly research thesis with a supporting creative project in
the MA.

Summer Options

Students must make their summer plans with the written approval of the Graduate Program
Director. Any elective credits are evaluated by an OCAD U faculty member. Summer options
must be relevant to a student’s thesis area of study. The options available to students in the
Master’s program are:

      Internship
       Internships provide graduate students with opportunities to gain experience in the
       professional worlds of digital creative industries: design, arts, culture, creative services,
       media and new media. On-site work is performed under the guidance of the internship
       sponsor and the internship credit is supervised and evaluated by an OCAD U faculty
       member.
      Independent Study/Research
       Independent Study courses provide graduate students with the opportunity to undertake
       studies of significance to their educational objectives, where otherwise not available
       through the regular university curriculum. Independent studies are supervised and
       evaluated by OCAD U faculty members. The Independent Study proposal must be
       approved in writing by the supervising faculty member, the student’s Principal Advisor
       (if applicable), and the Graduate Program Director.

Transmedia Immersion

For all students, an introductory, two-week, cohort-based Transmedia course provides students
a program and peer introduction. This prepares students by helping to facilitate collaborative
ties across both the Masters and Diploma cohort.

Exhibitions

Masters students exhibit their projects in two exhibitions. These are online and in an
appropriate physical venue and are a mandatory component of the program. The Interim
Exhibition takes place on completion of the CFC Media Lab prototyping course in the first year
and showcases both Masters and Diploma work from that course. The Final Exhibition
showcases the demonstration component of the Masters students’ thesis work in the second
year, alongside selected work by the Diploma students. All work to be shown at each exhibition
requires the written approval of the Graduate Program Director.

Master’s Thesis: Supervision, Industry Partners and Assessment

The MDes/MFA or MA thesis is the culminating work of the Masters program. As well as
providing academic supervisors, the program facilitates the matching up relevant partners from
industry to provide expertise, a project context, or other forms of support and can offer a 'career
runway'. The thesis includes a reflection of the process involved in developing critical thinking,
research methods, challenges, and benefits.

The Masters thesis takes place in three main stages. The first stage is called Foundation and
Industry. This stage starts at the end of the Winter semester in the first year and students
engage in the following:


                                                                                                 74
       Updated synopsis
        Students review their thesis outline made as part of the application process to the
        program. These are updated or rewritten by the students and used to help facilitate
        both industry and supervisor engagement in the thesis.
       Industry partner meetings
        Students are introduced to potential industry partners for involvement in the thesis.
        Industry support can for example include expertise, specific project contexts, access to
        data or users, equipment or funding. Industry engagement is optional but encouraged
        both from an academic and a career perspective.
       Supervisors
        Students will begin working with a Principal Advisor and secondary Committee member
        beginning in the Summer term of first year. Please refer to the Graduate Studies website
        at www.ocadu.ca/gradstudies for an up to date list of appointed graduate faculty who
        are eligible to supervise in this program.

Guidance is given at this stage to help students initiate their foundation research. Student thesis
research is expected to continue during the Summer and is ideally integrated with an internship
or independent study.

The second stage is called Experimentation and Development. This stage starts in the Fall of the
second year and is supported by studio classes, supervisors, visiting academics and industry
partners. In addition to providing feedback on students’ project work, help is provided to
orientate and prepare students to achieve a significant thesis result.

The final stage runs throughout the Winter semester in the second year and it is called
Production, Reflection and Exhibition. This stage is also supported by studio classes,
supervisors, visiting academics and industry partners. The emphasis of this stage is on
preparing any work for exhibition and completing the written part of the thesis. Students create
their final work and exhibit it physically and online. The student gives a defense presentation at
the end of the Winter semester, followed by the final submission of a written thesis by the dates
established by the Office of Graduate Studies (usually mid May). Guidelines for the Preparation
of the Thesis are published by the Office of Graduate Studies and available on the OCAD U
website.

The thesis is assessed based on three components: the exhibition, the defense presentation and
the written component. The Examining Committee for the defense consists of the Graduate
Program Director, the Principal Advisor, the Supervisory Committee member, an internal
faculty member, and an External Examiner (five members in total).

For the MDes/MFA thesis, the marks are based on: 50% for exhibition, 25% for defense
presentation, 25% for written component. This reflects a particular emphasis on the applied
project.

For the MA thesis, the marks are based on: 25% for exhibition, 25% for defense presentation,
50% for written component. This reflects a particular emphasis on the research and theory.




                                                                                                75
Course Descriptions

Note: not all courses are offered every term.

DIGF 6A08 Digital Games 1 (1.5 credits)
Digital games are an increasingly significant cultural force. This course connects contemporary
game design and the practice of game-making with the ambition of building functional
innovative game design concepts. Students iteratively design, visualize, develop and test unique
game concepts to a final proof of concept stage. This course provides a foundation in game
design both within and beyond gaming arts and culture, and the digital game industry.

DIGF 6A10 Mobile and Social Media (1.5 credits)
Smart phones, tablets, and lightweight computers have become increasingly common. Social
media applications have also experienced a rapid uptake. This course explores social and mobile
media, both from a technical and social perspective. Topics include apps, platforms, location-
based services, accessibility, privacy, environmental impact, and interoperability. Students will
explore current issues, emerging opportunities, and ideas for what is to come in the future of
social and mobile media.

DIGF 6A11 Information Visualization (1.5 credits) (Not Offerred in 2012-13)
Visualization can tell stories, reduce complexity, help decision-making as well as deceive,
misguide and confuse. As we increasingly rely on visual communication of knowledge in
engineering, science, education, medicine, humanities and social sciences it is becoming
essential for designers to know the capacities, applications and techniques of this powerful
cognitive tool. Through case studies, a hands-on project and critical reflection, students will
develop an understanding of data and information visualization, the role of computation, the
use of data sources and develop of skills in design for visual cognition.

DIGF 6B01 Creative Techniques (3 credits)
This course surveys the wide range of design and creation methods for digital media. It explores
techniques for creative elicitation, lateral thinking and group cohesion. It also explores the effect
of various techniques to move a broad concept into specific project ideas. This course is
designed to enhance the level of cross-disciplinary understanding of the field and prepare
students for work on their projects and prototypes.

DIGF 6B04 Business and Leadership (3 credits)
This course examines business creation, project management, and leadership, alongside
intellectual property (IP) issues and best practices within the context of digital media and IT.
Unifying discourses, including design thinking, use case modeling, and user scenarios have
evolved to provide common, user-centred perspectives for multifaceted team-based work. The
course introduces strategies and practical tools, methods and perspectives for cultivating
awareness of working styles, catalyzing team interactions, and effective project outcomes.

DIGF 6B12 Digital Theory (3 credits)
This course commences with an examination and mapping of the historical precedents of digital
media, taking into consideration the social, cultural and political contexts of its emergence.
Students will identify major significant movements which rapidly coincided with the shift from
analog to digital culture. In digital media, conceptual and theoretical trends tend to respond to
technical developments. Accordingly this course covers topics of digital reality, simulation and
virtuality; interactivity and agency; media archaeology and migration; subjectivity, race, gender,




                                                                                                  76
and online identity; the politics of cyberculture; indigenous interventions; globalization and the
political economy of digital media.

DIGF 6B18 eGlobal and Ubiquitous Computing
 eGlobal (1.5 credits)
Digital industries are truly global and this course is an opportunity to work collaboratively on a
project in another country. The approach is tailored each year to a particular collaboration with
institutional or industry partners in a relevant field. Themes of social and cultural difference are
critical, alongside developing a better understanding of how to work productively in a radically
different context. A component of this course is based in a host country – developing or
developed. Whether it is a mobile phone user surfing the web in sub-saharan Africa, or the latest
high-tech eatery in Tokyo, the course will help you to embrace global challenges.
Ubiquitous Computing (1.5 credits)
The ACM International Conference on Ubiquitous Computing says that "Ubicomp is an
interdisciplinary field of research and development that utilizes and integrates pervasive,
wireless, embedded, wearable, and/or mobile technologies to bridge the gaps between the
digital and physical worlds." From mesh networks to the internet of things, the recent
affordability and availability of microcontrollers has spawned an era in which ordinary objects
have become "smart", networked, and synced. Building on the skills developed in Creation and
Computation, students engage in explorations that examine how computing is embedded into
our everyday lives.

DIGF 6B19 Affect and Emotion in Practice and Digital Games 2
Affect and Emotion in Practice (1.5 credits)
The course presents an exciting evolution of past work done on studies of emotion and affect in
digital media and artistic practice. It considers emotional concepts within interdisciplinary
practice. The course examines emotion as digital process and output, how a creative concept is
developed and influenced by an individual: how does excitement, arousal, feelings of
competition, defeat, insight, etc. play into both process and production for creatives? How can
emotion be measured in a speculative, artistic, and experimental format? Can an artist construct
a transference of affect in the engagement of the work by the viewer?
Digital Games 2 (1.5 credits)
Moving forward to an advanced game development practice this course builds on game design
and development knowledge acquired in earlier electives to design and build a digital game.
Students will develop skills from paper prototyping, game modelling and game level design,
through to storyboarding, asset creation, character design and animation and game authoring.
This course blends game design innovation with a theoretical grounding to produce game demos
that engage with contemporary debate.

DIGF 6B20 eGlobal and Digital Games 2
eGlobal (1.5 credits)
Digital industries are truly global and this course is an opportunity to work collaboratively on a
project in another country. The approach is tailored each year to a particular collaboration with
institutional or industry partners in a relevant field. Themes of social and cultural difference are
critical, alongside developing a better understanding of how to work productively in a radically
different context. A component of this course is based in a host country – developing or
developed. Whether it is a mobile phone user surfing the web in sub-saharan Africa, or the latest
high-tech eatery in Tokyo, the course will help you to embrace global challenges.
Digital Games 2 (1.5 credits)
Moving forward to an advanced game development practice this course builds on game design
and development knowledge acquired in earlier electives to design and build a digital game.



                                                                                                 77
Students will develop skills from paper prototyping, game modelling and game level design,
through to storyboarding, asset creation, character design and animation and game authoring.
This course blends game design innovation with a theoretical grounding to produce game demos
that engage with contemporary debate.

DIGF 6B21 Affect and Emotion in Practice and Ubiquitous Computing
Affect and Emotion in Practice (1.5 credits)
The course presents an exciting evolution of past work done on studies of emotion and affect in
digital media and artistic practice. It considers emotional concepts within interdisciplinary
practice. The course examines emotion as digital process and output, how a creative concept is
developed and influenced by an individual: how does excitement, arousal, feelings of
competition, defeat, insight, etc. play into both process and production for creatives? How can
emotion be measured in a speculative, artistic, and experimental format? Can an artist construct
a transference of affect in the engagement of the work by the viewer?
Ubiquitous Computing (1.5 credits)
The ACM International Conference on Ubiquitous Computing says that "Ubicomp is an
interdisciplinary field of research and development that utilizes and integrates pervasive,
wireless, embedded, wearable, and/or mobile technologies to bridge the gaps between the
digital and physical worlds." From mesh networks to the internet of things, the recent
affordability and availability of microcontrollers has spawned an era in which ordinary objects
have become "smart", networked, and synced. Building on the skills developed in Creation and
Computation, students engage in explorations that examine how computing is embedded into
our everyday lives.

DIGF 6B22 Interactive Exhibition (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to work in a single class team to curate and execute an interactive
exhibition that hosts selected work by Diploma students as well as the final thesis projects by
Masters students. Participants will gain valuable experience in coordinating a complex digital
event that has a significant public presence. The interactive exhibition concept is developed by
the group and includes marketing and digital platform components, physical exhibits, and
overall narrative.

DIGF 6C01 CFC Media Lab Prototyping (6 credits)
Working in small teams, students will develop an interactive digital project in their chosen
specialty area, with analytical and practical feedback from faculty and industry at OCAD U and
the CFC Media Lab. The outcome of this intensive residential course is the development of a
digital media prototype that culminates in a public exhibition.

DIGF 6G01 MDes/MFA Thesis Stage 1: Foundation and Industry (6 credits)
DIGF 6G02 MA Thesis Stage 1: Foundation and Industry (6 credits)
Students review their original thesis outline made as part of the application process to the
program. This is followed by industry partner meetings in which students are introduced to
potential partners for involvement in the thesis. Industry support can for example include
expertise, specific project contexts, access to data or users, equipment or funding. Students then
begin working with a graduate faculty member as a Principal Advisor, as well as an additional
faculty member as a secondary supervisor. Guidance is given at this stage to help students
initiate their foundation research.




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DIGF 6G01 MDes/MFA Thesis Stage 2: Experimentation and Development (6
credits)
DIGF 6G02 MA Thesis Stage 2: Experimentation and Development (6 credits)
The purpose of this stage is to frame and undertake experimental work to test, amend and
reinforce the thesis project work. This course is supported by studio classes, supervisors, visiting
academics and industry partners. In addition to providing feedback on students’ project work,
help is provided to orientate and prepare students to achieve a significant thesis result. Written
components of the thesis are also initiated during this stage.

DIGF 6G01 MDes/MFA Thesis Stage 3: Production, Reflection and Exhibition (6
credits)
DIGF 6G02 MA Thesis Stage 3: Production, Reflection and Exhibition (6 credits)
The final thesis stage is supported by studio classes, supervisors, visiting academics and
industry partners. The emphasis of this stage is on preparing any work for exhibition and
completing the written part of the thesis. Students create their final work and exhibit it
physically and online. The student gives a defense presentation at the end of the Winter
semester, followed by the final submission of a written thesis by the dates established by the
Office of Graduate Studies (usually mid May). For the MDes/MFA thesis, marks are: 50%
exhibition, 25% defense presentation, 25% written component. For the MA thesis, marks are:
25% exhibition, 25% defense presentation, 50% written component.

DIGF 6K01 Discovery/Mobile and Social Media (Master’s)
Mobile and Social Media (1.5 credits)
Smart phones, tablets, and lightweight computers have become increasingly common. Social
media applications have also experienced a rapid uptake. This course explores social and mobile
media, both from a technical and social perspective. Topics include apps, platforms, location-
based services, accessibility, privacy, environmental impact, and interoperability. Students will
explore current issues, emerging opportunities, and ideas for what is to come in the future of
social and mobile media.
Discovery (3 credits)
This course explores how to create provocative designs by visioning futures that do not yet exist.
Themes within the course include the challenges of personal atomization, integration and
hybridization as the evolving digital age relentlessly outpaces human evolution. Working in
groups, students will take a discovery-based approach to their studies, learning from fiction and
film media, leading to service design and product mockups or experimental design
investigations that reflect on the future. The course segues into prototyping through the
subsequent course DIGF 6C01

DIGF 6K02 Discovery/Digital Games 1 (Master’s)
Digital Games 1 (1.5 credits)
Digital games are an increasingly significant cultural force. This course connects contemporary
game design and the practice of game-making with the ambition of building functional
innovative game design concepts. Students iteratively design, visualize, develop and test unique
game concepts to a final proof of concept stage. This course provides a foundation in game
design both within and beyond gaming arts and culture, and the digital game industry.
Discovery (3 credits)
This course explores how to create provocative designs by visioning futures that do not yet exist.
Themes within the course include the challenges of personal atomization, integration and
hybridization as the evolving digital age relentlessly outpaces human evolution. Working in
groups, students will take a discovery-based approach to their studies, learning from fiction and
film media, leading to service design and product mockups or experimental design



                                                                                                 79
investigations that reflect on the future. The course segues into prototyping through the
subsequent course DIGF 6C01

DIGF 6K03 Discovery/Information Visualization (Master’s) (Not Offered in 2012-13)
Information Visualization (1.5 credits)
Visualization can tell stories, reduce complexity, help decision-making as well as deceive,
misguide and confuse. As we increasingly rely on visual communication of knowledge in
engineering, science, education, medicine, humanities and social sciences it is becoming
essential for designers to know the capacities, applications and techniques of this powerful
cognitive tool. Through case studies, a hands-on project and critical reflection, students will
develop an understanding of data and information visualization, the role of computation, the
use of data sources and develop of skills in design for visual cognition.
Discovery (3 credits)
This course explores how to create provocative designs by visioning futures that do not yet exist.
Themes within the course include the challenges of personal atomization, integration and
hybridization as the evolving digital age relentlessly outpaces human evolution. Working in
groups, students will take a discovery-based approach to their studies, learning from fiction and
film media, leading to service design and product mockups or experimental design
investigations that reflect on the future. The course segues into prototyping through the
subsequent course DIGF 6C01

DIGF 6K04 Transmedia/ Creation and Computation (Diploma)
Creation and Computation (3 credits)
This course provides an introduction to current and emerging prototyping and development
tools in the realm of digital technology. It employs a hands-on, skills-based approach in a
project context. Students gain a strong foundation in the basics of programming, physical
computing, visual or screen-based computation, networking and connectivity. Specific topics are
tailored to current issues. Students will leave with the technical literacy required to embark on
more sophisticated projects and subsequent works in creative digital media.
Transmedia (1.5 credits)
An introductory two week immersion in which students work collectively on a transmedia
project based in Toronto. A project is rapidly conceived, prototyped and showcased. The course
initiates a “learning through practice” experience for new students and builds the sense of
graduate community. During the course students are also introduced to the philosophy and
practice of the Digital Futures program, the work of the faculty, and the previous year’s student
cohort.

DIGF 6L01 Transmedia/Creation and Computation (Masters)
Creation and Computation (6 credits)
This course provides an introduction to current and emerging prototyping and development
tools in the realm of digital technology. It employs a hands-on, skills-based approach in a
project context. Students gain a strong foundation in the basics of programming, physical
computing, visual or screen-based computation, networking and connectivity. Specific topics are
tailored to current issues. Students will leave with the technical literacy required to embark on
more sophisticated projects and subsequent works in creative digital media.
Transmedia (1.5 credits)
An introductory two week immersion in which students work collectively on a transmedia
project based in Toronto. A project is rapidly conceived, prototyped and showcased. The course
initiates a “learning through practice” experience for new students and builds the sense of
graduate community. During the course students are also introduced to the philosophy and




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practice of the Digital Futures program, the work of the faculty, and the previous year’s student
cohort.

Tuition and Fees

The Graduate Program in Digital Futures (both Master’s and Graduate Diploma) are five
semester programs. Fees for the programs are program-based and assessed on a per-semester
basis (rather than a per-course basis). This means that the same fees are charged to students
every semester, including the summer term, regardless of the number of credits taken. Fees do
not change if a student drops or adds a course. A change of status from full-time to part-time (or
vice versa) is the only instance when tuition fees are reassessed.

The chart below outlines the estimated tuition costs for the program for students starting in
2012/2013:

                  Fall       Winter     Summer          Fall        Winter       Estimated
                  2012        2013        2013          2013         2014        Program
                                                                                   Total
Digital Futures (MA, MDes, MFA)
Domestic         $5,076      $5,076       $5,279       $5,279       $5,279         $25,989
International    $7,278      $7,278       $7,569       $7,569       $7,569         $37,264
Digital Futures (Graduate Diploma)
Domestic         $3,456      $3,456       $3,594       $3,594       $3,594         $17,695
International    $4,320      $4,320       $4,493       $4,493       $4,493         $22,118


       Notes:

       *2013/2014 Summer, Fall and Winter Fees are estimates based on the 2012/2013 tuition
       framework, and are subject to change with Provincial Government Policy and OCAD U Board of
       Governor approval. Approved fees are posted annually on the "Financial Matters" section of the
       OCAD U website at www.ocadu.ca/students/financial_matters/tuition_fees.htm. Fees for
       2013/2014 will not be finalized until April 2013.

As per the Graduate Studies Policy #6007, full time students have a maximum of 11 semesters to
complete their program, and part time (i.e. Graduate Diploma) students have a maximum of 14
semesters. Students in both the Master's and Graduate Diploma must pay full program fees per
semester until they have completed all requirements for the degree.

Applicable ancillary fees and other costs such as living expenses, books, etc. are not included in
the amounts above.

The most current information on fees, tuition and payment methods and deadlines is available
on the Financial Matters section of the OCAD U website at:

http://www.ocadu.ca/students/financial_matters/tuition_fees.htm




                                                                                                    81
INCLUSIVE DESIGN

Description

Inclusive Design is design that is inclusive of the full range of human diversity with respect to
ability, language, culture, gender, age and other forms of human difference. The focus of the
Master of Design (MDes) in Inclusive Design is on building expertise in inclusive digital media,
information and communication technologies (ICT) and practices. This innovative program will
produce graduates with the capacity to form, lead and sustain a much-needed community of
expertise on digital inclusion, which will span multiple sectors.

The Master of Design in Inclusive Design has the following objectives:

      To graduate professionals with the necessary knowledge, skills, creativity,
       resourcefulness and intellectual agility to lead and support the critically important
       transition to inclusive information and communication systems and practices globally.
      To equip graduates to excel in a diverse and evolving new professional field in the
       Inclusive Design of ICT with a growing labour market in work domains, including health,
       education, government and other public and private sectors.
      To increase the human capacity to meet legal, policy and societal commitments to
       accessibility, diversity and inclusion at a local, national and global level.
      To produce graduates who can help to address the growing global demand for
       inclusively-designed digital technologies, products and services and the challenges faced
       by individuals who currently face barriers to participation in society, including barriers
       to meaningful economic contribution and well-being.
      To equip graduates with a systematic understanding of knowledge regarding inclusive
       design of ICT systems and processes, including relevant knowledge in a wide variety of
       related fields and a critical awareness of current problems and new insights.
      To develop graduates with the conceptual understanding and methodological
       competence in inclusive design needed to create, interpret, critically evaluate and
       advance knowledge in the field.
      To prepare potential academics to participate in future doctoral programs in inclusive
       design, for the furthering of leading-edge research and development in this area.
      To expand notions of design, development and research in disciplines involved in
       producing ICT systems and practices to be inclusive of the full range of human diversity
      To expand the research community and the community of practice devoted to informing
       and designing our IT systems for diversity and accessibility, and to fuel an economic
       cluster and a centre of excellence in inclusive design of ICT systems and practices.
      To expand the OCAD University community to include students, faculty and researchers
       with backgrounds in computer sciences, applied sciences and other digital media and
       information and communication technology disciplines.

   Graduates will apply their studies in all sectors that engage digital media and ICT systems,
   including government and education sectors, digital industries, entertainment, arts, culture,
   health, communication design, wayfinding, architectural systems design, mobile and
   interactive industries and many others.




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Program Requirements

Curriculum: 45 credits

The Master of Design (MDes) in Inclusive Design is primarily a course-based degree program
with a culminating major project. The program will be comprised of two, two-week intensive on-
site summer sessions, followed by online courses during the fall and winter semesters. It is
expected that students will complete the program in two years (six semesters with a culminating
event in the seventh semester).



Year One                                   Year Two                                    Year Three
Summer (2      Fall            Winter (    Summer (2         Fall        Winter        Summer -
week          (Online)         Online)     week             (online)     (online)      Culminating
intensive)                                 intensive)                                  Festival &
                                                                                       Graduate
                                                                                       Symposium
                                                                                       (3 day face-
                                                                                       to-face
                                                                                       event)
INCD 6B01:    INCD 6B02:       INCD        INCD 6B07:       INCD         INCD 6B05:    Presentation of
                                           Inclusive Art,                              Major project
Unlearning    Foundational     6B04:       Design and       6B06: The    Creating
and           Seminar in       Effecting   Communication    Difference   Inclusive     Inclusive
                                           (3)                                         design career
Questioning   Inclusive        Cultural                     (3)          Communities   fair with
(3)           Design (3)       Change      Year 2 Course                 Online (3)    thematic
Year 1        (synchronous     (3)         Taster                                      discussions
Course        )                            Major Project                               Inclusive
Taster                                     Planning                                    Design Forum
                                                                                       and
Major                                                                                  Unconference
              INCD 6B03:       INCD
Project
              Inclusive        6B08:
Planning
              Research         Major
              Methods (3)      Project
                               Proposal
                               (3)


              INCD 6C01: Inclusive                          INCD 6C02: Experiential
              Design Lab (6 credits)                        Research Lab (6)


                                                            INCD 6D01: Major Project
                                                            (9)




                                                                                                   83
Major Project and Supervision

The Major Research Project is the culminating work of the Master of Design in Inclusive Design.
It synthesizes the knowledge and skills learned throughout the program and applies them in the
development of a major project. Students will develop innovative approaches and
implementation strategies for defined inclusive design challenges in the private, public or
voluntary sectors.

Students will present their Major Research Project proposal during the second summer
intensive (semester 4). At this point they will establish their supervisory committee, consisting
of the Principal Advisor and one additional committee member. Students will have an
opportunity to present their work to the research community and industry participants at the
Culminating Festival and Graduate Symposium.

Guidelines for the Preparation of the Major Research Paper/Project are published by the Office
of Graduate Studies and available on the OCAD U website.

Please refer to the Graduate Studies website at www.ocadu.gradstudies for an up to date list of
appointed graduate faculty who are eligible to supervise in this program.

Course Descriptions

Note: not all courses are offered every term.

INCD 6B01 Unlearning and Questioning (3 credits)
This resident intensive will orient incoming students to the intellectual framing and approach to
be employed in the Inclusive Design program. Students will: engage in critical analysis of prior
learning and established assumptions regarding foundational knowledge and skills in design,
development, policy, education, assessment, research and evaluation; critically examine explicit
and implicit values and assumptions; practice educational engagement that encourages
divergent thinking, constructive critique and attention to the full range of human diversity
through a variety of learning experiences; engage in collaborative projects that develop inclusive
practices and provide opportunities to reflect on common conventions that support or
undermine inclusion and inclusive design; and meet mentors within a number of stakeholder
groups.

INCD 6B02 Foundational Seminar in Inclusive Design (3 credits)
This seminar course will provide an introduction to the inclusive design of information and
communication technologies and practices. The course will cover the theoretical background,
advanced computational theory, critical analysis, underpinning social and economic
motivations, design methods employed, controversies, as well as the major challenges or
problems to be addressed. Students will engage in both a review and analysis of relevant
research and the current state of the field combined with more experiential problem solving and
the application of inclusive design ICT theory and methods introduced during the course. The
course will equip students to engage in well-informed, in-depth critical analysis of inclusive
design of information systems and services and to apply rudimentary inclusive design methods.

INCD 6B03 Inclusive Research Methods (3 credits)
Students will be engaged in a critical review of common research methods and statistical



                                                                                                84
analysis techniques as they relate to the research challenges of inclusive design. Students will
apply a variety of research methods to representative research problems. The course will include
research methods that enable analysis beyond the norm and allow scrutiny of outliers and
results at the margin. The role of the research participants, inclusive research practices involving
human users, and constructive critique of research conclusions will also be covered. Students
will gain skills and knowledge in designing inclusive research methods. The course will prepare
students to plan and design the research methods to be applied in their major project.

INCD 6B04 Effecting Cultural Change (3 credits)
This online seminar will situate inclusive design in relation to social justice theory and related
cultural movements, as well as economic and social impact analysis instruments. The course will
explore: instruments and processes of cultural change with respect to institutions, communities
and larger societies; legislation, policy, and international standards along with the development
processes and factors that affect compliance; institutional cultures, societal structures,
ecosystems relevant to ICT development and implementation with an eye to how to design
cultures of inclusion within institutional frameworks;“top-down”, “bottom-up” and viral effects
and mechanisms; and diverse market models in relation to inclusive design including open
source and open access. Students will practice developing business cases that integrate inclusive
design.

INCD 6B05 Creating Inclusive Communities Online (3 credits)
Supporting the needs and preferences of a diversity of users online is dependent on
communities of production, crowd sourcing and social networks. The tools, architectures,
practices and conventions of online networks help to determine the functioning and accessibility
of these communities. A major challenge is to invite and nurture diversity while at the same time
supporting community cohesion. In this online seminar and workshop students will critically
examine social networks and how they support or undermine inclusion and diversity. Students
will examine phenomena such as the popularity echo-chamber and explore the impact of
specific actions and technical tools or metrics on online social networks and design and develop
social networks that are supportive of diversity while sustaining a sense of community and
cohesion.

INCD 6B06 The Difference (3 credits)
This course will introduce advanced computing theory and practice that supports inclusion. The
online seminar and workshop will explore both the impact of diversity/inclusion on design and
development on the one hand, and specific strategies/practices for designing for diversity on the
other. Students will also explore design and development strategies that support diversity with a
special focus on personalization, mass-customization, modularity and flexible ICT structures.
Software architectures, coding practices, project management practices, network design and
processes of data federation will be explored with an emphasis on how to support inclusive
design. The impact on and interaction with security and privacy will also be covered.

INCD 6B07 Inclusive Art, Design and Communication (3 credits)
This resident seminar and studio will serve to synthesize and explore the interrelationships of
inclusive design theory and methods with art, design and communication; how the fields of art,
design and communications inform and contribute to inclusive design especially as it relates to
the inclusive design of emerging information and communication technology. Students will also
examine how traditional art, design and communication notions and theoretical framings either
support or undermine inclusion, and will be engaged in proposing inclusive art, design and
communication methods by addressing specific ‘real world’ design challenges. The synthesized



                                                                                                 85
findings will be presented in a critical analysis of the intersecting fields, illustrated through a
designed ‘real world’ example of inclusive practice.

INCD 6B08 Major Project Proposal (3 credits)
Students will be supported in formulating a major research proposal that includes the
articulation of background knowledge, research questions, objectives, theoretical frameworks,
research methods, the project plan and research partnerships. The course will include a
literature review on the chosen major research project topic. The outcome of the course will be a
project proposal and a presentation of the plan.

INCD 6C01 Inclusive Design User Experience Lab (6 credits)
Designing for diversity requires a reframing and retooling of traditional user experience,
interaction and user interface design and usability evaluation practices. In this online lab
students will: critically examine traditional practices in these fields and how they impact on
inclusion and diversity; explore common uses of personas, scenarios, storyboards, design
patterns, wire frames, walk-throughs and other design tools; explore user interface design
research metrics and associated assumptions in the context of designing for diversity; study and
implement inclusive participatory design; individually and collaboratively formulate inclusive
design practices while addressing real world design challenges. Students will be introduced to
and practice usability and accessibility evaluation methods that support diversity and inclusion.

INCD 6C02 Experiential Research Lab (6 credits)
The Inclusive Design Research Centre is engaged in leading and participating in many multi-
sector, national and international research networks. These research networks address inclusive
design challenges in education, culture, civic engagement, health, policy, legislation, financial
inclusion and ICT application design and development. Students will participate as a research
team member in an open source project in a role of their choice. Students will be exposed to the
entire project life cycle and the functioning of a successful research and development team.
Students will be exposed to research partners around the world and from the full range of
sectors. Students will be provided with opportunities to critically reflect upon the research team
and its processes, and their role in the network.

INCD 6D01 Major Project (9 credits)
This is the culminating work of the Master of Design in Inclusive Design. It synthesizes the
knowledge and skills learned throughout the program and applies them in the development of a
major project. Students will develop innovative approaches and implementation strategies for
defined inclusive design challenges in the private, public or voluntary sectors. Students will be
mentored by a Principal Advisor and critiqued and evaluated by the Principal Advisor, plus one
additional committee member. Students will have an opportunity to present their work to the
research community and industry participants at the Culminating Festival and Graduate
Symposium.


Tuition and Fees

The MDes in Inclusive Design is a five semester program. Fees for this program are program-
based and assessed on a per-semester basis (rather than a per-course basis). This means that the
same fees are charged to full time students every semester, including the summer term,
regardless of the number of credits taken. Fees do not change if a student drops or adds a
course.



                                                                                                      86
The chart below outlines the estimated tuition costs for the program for students starting in
2012/2013:

                 Summer        Fall      Winter     Summer        Fall       Winter      Estimated
                   2012        2012       2013        2013        2013        2014       Program
                                                                                           Total
Inclusive Design
Domestic           $3,996     $3,996     $3,996      $4,155      $4,155      $4,155       $24,453
International      $5,076     $5,076     $5,076      $5,279      $5,279      $5,279       $31,065



        Notes:

        *2013/2014 Summer, Fall and Winter Fees are estimates based on the 2012/2013 tuition
        framework, and are subject to change with Provincial Government Policy and OCAD U Board of
        Governor approval. Approved fees are posted annually on the "Financial Matters" section of the
        OCAD U website at www.ocadu.ca/students/financial_matters/tuition_fees.htm. Fees for
        2013/2014 will not be finalized until April 2013.

As per the Graduate Studies Policy #6007, full time students have a maximum of 11 semesters to
complete their program. Students must pay full program fees every semester until they have
completed all requirements for the degree.

Applicable ancillary fees and other costs such as living expenses, books, etc. are not included in
the amounts above.

The most current information on fees, tuition and payment methods and deadlines is available
on the Financial Matters section of the OCAD U website at:

http://www.ocadu.ca/students/financial_matters/tuition_fees.htm




                                                                                                     87
INTERDISCIPLINARY MASTER’S IN ART, MEDIA AND DESIGN


Description

The Interdisciplinary Master’s in Art, Media & Design (IAMD) challenges students to
investigate, research, and produce creative works that combine art, design, and interdisciplinary
academic study to create new, hybrid forms of visual and social research and creative
production. The student’s primary discipline and chosen emphasis between art or design studio
practice and theoretical inquiry will determine whether the degree earned is an MFA, MDes, or
MA.

The objectives of the Interdisciplinary Master’s in Art, Media, and Design are:

      To provide a flexibly structured, advanced studio-based learning environment that
       enables students to integrate art, media, and design production, or production within
       these disciplines in combination with another discipline, through processes that combine
       theory, methodology, and practice.
      To ensure that students acquire advanced research skills for visual and academic
       investigations in the areas of art, media, and design practice and critical theory.
      To foster the development of individuals who can think, create, and practice in
       interdisciplinary ways.
      To support effective collaborations and innovative interdisciplinary research practices.
      To contribute to new knowledge in the areas of interdisciplinary art, media, and design
       methods, discourses and creative practices.
      To promote the development of practices which facilitate sustainability, social
       responsibility, and diverse social and cultural perspectives.

The program aims to achieve these objectives through a course of study that includes: a)
intensive graduate level directed study in the student’s primary and secondary disciplines; b)
seminars in critical theory and research methods; and c) elective courses, culminating in either a
major studio project supported by a written critical analysis (leading to the MFA or MDes
degree) or a standard academic Master’s thesis accompanied by a minor creative project
(leading to the MA degree).



Program Requirements

Curriculum: 60 credits

All students must complete the following:

      GGRA 6B01 Contemporary Research Methods (3)
      GGRA 6B03 Critical Theory Seminar I (3)
      IAMD 6A01 Thesis Proposal (1.5)
      IAMD 6A02 Research Creation and Colloquia (1.5)
      IAMD 6B02 Directed Interdisciplinary Studio/Academic Study II (3)
      IAMD 6B07 Graduate Seminar (3)
      IAMD 6B08 Issues in Critical Theory (3)
      IAMD 6C05 Advanced Interdisciplinary Studio/Research (6)


                                                                                               88
      IAMD 6C06 Directed Interdisciplinary Studio/Academic Study I (6)
      2 three-credit electives (6), which may include Independent study
      6 credits from the following (6):
           o Residency*
           o Independent study
           o Internship
           o Elective

Students completing an MFA or MDes degree must also complete the following:

      IAMD 6C01 MFA/MDes Individual Studio (6)
      IAMD 6E01 MFA/MDes Thesis (12)

Students completing an MA degree must also complete the following:

      IAMD 6C04 MA Individual Academic Study (6)
      IAMD 6E02 MA Thesis (12)

*Not all summer residencies are offered each year. Residencies are competitive and subject to
adjudication of student proposals and available funds, where applicable.




                                                                                                89
Full-time program timeline

Fall                 Winter                Summer               Fall                  Winter
(12 credits)          (15 credits)         (7.5 credits)        (10.5 credits)        (15 credits)
GGRA 6B01            IAMD 6B08 Issues      6 credits from the   IAMD 6C05             IAMD 6B07 Graduate
Contemporary         in Critical Theory    following:           Advanced              Seminar (3)
Research Methods     (3)                    Residency          Interdisciplinary
(3)                                         Independent        Studio/Research (6)
                                               Study
GGRA 6B03 Critical   IAMD 6B02              Internship         Elective (3)          IAMD 6E01     IAMD 6E02
Theory Seminar (3)   Directed               Elective                                 MFA/MDes      MA Thesis
                     Interdisciplinary                                                Thesis (12)   (12)
                     Studio/Academic
                     Study II (3)

IAMD 6C06            IAMD        IAMD      IAMD 6A01 Thesis     IAMD 6A02
Directed             6C01        6C04 MA Proposal (1.5)         Research Creation
Interdisciplinary    MFA/M       Individua                      and Colloquia (1.5)
Studio/Academic      Des         l
Study I (6)          Individu    Academic
                     al Studio   Study (6)
                     (6)

                     Elective (3)




                                                                                                                90
Part-time program timeline

Semester 1      Semester     Semester 3         Semester 4          Semester     Semester 6       Semester       Semester 8
                2                                                   5                             7
Fall            Winter       Summer             Fall                Winter       Summer           Fall           Winter

GGRA 6B01       IAMD         3-6 credits from   IAMD 6C06                        IAMD 6A01        IAMD 6A02      IAMD 6B07
Contemporary    6B08         the following:     Directed                         Thesis           Research       Graduate
Research        Issues in     Residency        Interdisciplinary                Proposal (1.5)   Creation       Seminar
Methods (3)     Critical      Independent      Studio/Academic                                   and
                Theory (3)       study/resear   Study I (6)                                       Colloquia
                                 ch                                                               (1.5)
                              Internship
                              Elective

Part-time students will commence the program in the Fall and must enroll in a minimum of 3 credits per semester for at least 8
continuous semesters. The chart below outlines the courses that part-time students are required to take in specific semesters. Additional
course selection is made by the student in consultation with the Graduate Program Director and based on available course offerings.

In addition to the requirements outlined in the chart, students must complete the following courses by the end of the sixth semester of
study:

      IAMD 6C05 Advanced Interdisciplinary Studio/Research (6)
      6 credits from the following:
           o Residency
           o Independent Study
           o Internship
           o Elective

In addition to the requirements outlined in the chart, students must complete the following courses by the end of the seventh semester
of study:

      GGRA 6B03 Critical Theory Seminar (3)

All other course requirements, as outlined here and published in the Academic Calendar, must be completed before the maximum
time to completion of the program (14 semesters).




                                                                                                                                      91
Degree Choice

Students completing an MFA or MDes degree must complete the following:
    IAMD 6C01 MFA/MDes Individual Studio (6)
    IAMD 6E01 MFA/MDes Thesis (12)

Students completing an MA degree must complete the following:
    IAMD 6C04 MA Individual Academic Study (6)
    IAMD 6E02 MA Thesis (12)

Full-time students must decide by the end of the first term of study whether they wish to purse
an MA, MFA, or MDes degree. This will determine their course selection in the second term.

Part-time students must decide on the degree they will pursue by the time they enroll in either
IAMD 6C01 MFA/MDes Individual Studio II or IAMD 6C04 MA Individual Academic Study (6).

Summer Options

Students must make their summer plans in consultation with their Principal Advisor and the
Graduate Program Director. Among the options available to students in this program are:

      Florence Graduate Studio Residency
       This European campus residency offers a combination of facilitated and self-directed
       study approaches to learning. While in residence in Florence, students develop, continue
       or extend a body of research, studio and/or scholarly work, in a communal studio
       setting. Art history seminars and field trips will be a component of the program, taught
       by OCAD U's resident art historian.
      Fogo Island Arts Corporation Residency
       The Fogo Island Arts Corporation is a contemporary art venue on Fogo Island and
       Change Islands off the north-east coast of Newfoundland. The Arts Corporation
       specializes in residencies for international artists and the production of art projects and
       workshops engaging both local and international participants. The Arts Corporation is
       supported by the Shorefast Foundation. Visiting artists to the islands have access to
       specially designed studios and renovated traditional buildings and homes located in
       remote and community locations across the islands.
      Banff Residency Programs
       In The Banff Centre’s powerful mountain setting in the heart of Banff National Park,
       exceptional artists and leaders from around the world create and perform new works of
       art; share skills and knowledge in an interdisciplinary residential arts environment. The
       IAMD Graduate Program Director will work with the Banff Centre to identify residency
       opportunities for OCAD U students, who are generally subject to the normal application
       and adjudication process.
      Other Residencies
       Students may apply for approved residencies, or may submit a residency opportunity for
       approval by their Graduate Program Committee. Residencies provide graduate students
       with the opportunity to study in new environments and communities and to work with
       new technologies that are programmatically relevant and pedagogically transferrable.
       On-site work is performed under the guidance of the residency host (as applicable) and
       the residency credit is supervised and evaluated by an OCAD U faculty member.
      Independent Study
       Independent Study courses provide graduate students with the opportunity to undertake


                                                                                               92
       studies of significance to their educational objectives, where otherwise not available
       through the regular university curriculum. Independent studies are supervised and
       evaluated by OCAD U faculty members who act as Independent Study Advisors. The
       Independent Study proposal must be approved in writing by the supervising faculty
       member, the student’s Principal Advisor, and the Graduate Program Director.
      Internship
       Internships provide graduate students with opportunities to gain experience in the
       professional worlds of art, design, media, criticism and curating that will complement
       their studies. On-site work is performed under the guidance of the internship sponsor
       and the internship credit is supervised and evaluated by an OCAD U faculty member.
      Elective
       Subject to available course offerings.

Not all summer residencies are offered each year. Residencies are competitive and subject to
adjudication of student proposals and available funds, where applicable.


Electives

Students may choose from:

   a) Approved graduate-level courses in other OCAD U graduate programs. Approved elective
      choices will be published annually in the Academic Calendar, which is available on the
      OCAD U website at
      www.ocadu.ca/students/records_registration/course_calendar
   b) A 300 or 400-level course in any discipline, with the approval of the instructor, the
      Principal Advisor, and the Graduate Program Director. All students wishing to enroll in
      an undergraduate elective should submit a letter of intent with their completed
      paperwork. This letter should detail the additional work that will be completed in order
      to push the course to a graduate level (an approximate increased workload of 40%). You
      must also include a grading breakdown agreed upon with the instructor that includes
      your additional assignments. Examples of acceptable coursework additions include;
      supplementary readings, graduate level research essay, a course specific body of work
      reflective of graduate level inquiry or augmented projects. Students should consult the
      Academic Calendar for undergraduate course offerings and must complete a “Request to
      Enroll in an Undergraduate Course as an Elective” form and secure the appropriate
      permissions before they will be allowed to register. Please see “Courses and Registration”
      in this handbook for more information.
   c) A graduate course at another university through the Ontario Visiting Graduate Student
      Plan (OVGS) or the Canadian University Graduate Transfer Agreement (CUGTA).
      Information on this process is available in this handbook under “Courses and
      Registration” and on the OCAD U website at www.ocadu.ca/gradstudies.

Students must meet with their Graduate Program Director for advising on the selection of
elective courses. A record of student advising will be kept in the student file and students are
advised to keep a copy for their records.

Exhibition of First-Year Graduate Work

All students participate in a Portfolio Exhibition, which takes place in the first (Fall) semester.
This exhibition is curated by students in the MFA in Criticism and Curatorial Practice program.



                                                                                                   93
In addition, students in the Interdisciplinary Master’s in Art, Media & Design mount a group
exhibition and show of work completed during the first year or, if appropriate, work-in-
progress. This exhibition normally takes place in the Winter (semester 2) for full-time students.
Part-time students will normally participate in the Winter (semester 2) or as soon as they have
achieved an introductory body of interdisciplinary work or work in progress to exhibit.

Progress Reports

Twice per year (January 15th and June 15th), full-time students will complete and the Principal
Advisor will sign off on a progress report that must be forwarded to the Graduate Program
Director, to be filed with the Office of Graduate Studies.

Part-time students must complete a progress report once per year (June 15).


Course Descriptions

Note: not all courses are offered every term.

GGRA 6B01 Contemporary Research Methods (3 credits)
A wide variety of methods inform research that takes as its object art, design, or visual studies.
This range expands further when it includes studio practice as well as scholarship. Moreover, a
given method is inflected by the discipline within which it is applied. To sort through this array,
this course surveys contemporary art and design research methods with reference to social
sciences, humanities, and cultural studies, and then uses this knowledge to focus on the unique
issues facing students in critical, curating, and interdisciplinary practices.

GGRA 6B03 Critical Theory Seminar (3 credits)
Based on a survey of critical theory, this graduate seminar provides a venue for the analysis of
texts, issues, and discourses that inform contemporary visual culture. Emphasis is placed on
examining the role of critical theory in contemporary art, design, criticism and curating.

IAMD 6A01 Thesis Proposal (1.5 credits)
This course will support the research process and the formulation of the thesis proposal. Thesis
proposals are formulated over the summer term in consultation with the student's Principal
Advisor, and are due September 1. The workshops over the summer will focus on the coming
together of practice and theory. Particular emphasis will be given to the interdisciplinary nature
of the work in progress.

IAMD 6A02 Research Creation and Colloquia (1.5 credits)
This course will support the preparations for the thesis colloquia presentations in the fall.
The Autumn Colloquium serves as a milestone for clarification of thesis background, research
questions, objectives, theoretical frameworks and methodologies. Workshop meetings and
discussions over the fall will culminate in two distinct outcomes: the thesis colloquia
presentation and a reflective report. The reflective discussion of the colloquia presentations will
give students an opportunity to reflect upon the experience and its affect on their thesis work,
and will provide appropriate strategies for addressing the thesis project as it progresses.

IAMD 6B02 Directed Interdisciplinary Studio/Academic Study II (3 credits)




                                                                                                   94
Students will continue to acquire the skill sets and to produce work in their chosen secondary
art, media, or design discipline through a combination of directed work in the OCAD U studios
and peer meetings within the context of the directed studio. Students may also continue to audit
appropriate 200-400 level studio courses. The program of study for the Secondary Studio is
determined and arranged by the individual student with the advice of their Principal Advisor. In
addition, students interact weekly with their peers in formal and informal critique
presentations.

IAMD 6B06 Special Focus: Research & Innovation Lab
Students meet weekly for guided discussions on the theoretical and practical issues surrounding
a common theme/interest. In this advanced graduate lab, students develop a methodological
framework and context appropriate for their work. The course structures students’ research and
production as an iterative and discursive process, supplemented by the analysis of relevant texts,
visits from guest lecturers, class critiques and hands-on workshops.

IAMD 6B07 Graduate Seminar (3 credits)
During the final semester, students work primarily independently on completing their theses.
The Graduate Seminar provides a weekly opportunity for students to meet for guided discussion
of their work.

IAMD 6B08 Issues in Critical Theory (3 credits)
This course engages with core and visiting faculty’s interests and current research, practices, and
debates in critical theory, according to the instructor’s specialization.

IAMD 6C01 MFA/MDes Individual Studio (6 credits)
Participants pursue self-directed studio work in their primary area of concentration in
consultation with their Principal Advisor. Students are expected to attend periodic lectures by
visiting artists, designers, theorists, and cultural critics, as well as to meet individually for studio
critiques with the invited lecturers. Regular interactions and critiques with the student’s
Principal Advisor and invited lecturers will be an important part of this course.

IAMD 6C04 MA Individual Academic Study (6 credits)
Students undertake directed study in their primary academic discipline with their Principal
Advisor, integrating elements of their secondary discipline in the formulation of an
interdisciplinary academic practice.

IAMD 6C05 Advanced Interdisciplinary Studio/Research (6 credits)
Students pursue self-directed work on the culminating creative project and or thesis research.
Biweekly meetings with the Principal Advisor are required.

IAMD 6C06 Directed Interdisciplinary Studio/Academic Study I (6 credits)
Students acquire the skill sets of a secondary art, media, design and/or academic discipline
through a combination of directed work, guest lectures, peer meetings and critiques within the
context of this directed studio seminar. The course introduces collaborative issues inherent in
interdisciplinary methods, technologies, and practices. An incoming portfolio show,
artist/designer/academic statement, and a proposal for ongoing interdisciplinary
studio/academic study and research are outcomes of this course.

IAMD 6E01 MFA/MDes Thesis (12 credits)
This is the culminating work of the Interdisciplinary Master’s Program in Art, Media, and
Design. The Master’s thesis for the MFA or MDes degrees comprises two important



                                                                                                     95
components. The central component is a body of visual work that clearly demonstrates the
student’s advanced ability to integrate elements of two disciplines toward the achievement of a
stated goal or solution. The supporting paper or written thesis a) elaborates in some depth the
theoretical underpinnings of the project; b) articulates clearly and lucidly the objectives
(problem to be solved) and the process undertaken (including false starts, unproductive
tangents, and lessons learned); and c) explains in detail the end result or creative solution.

IAMD 6E02 MA Thesis (12 credits)
This is the culminating work of the Interdisciplinary Master’s Program in Art, Media, and
Design. The Master’s thesis for the MA degree comprises the same two important elements as
for the MFA or MDes degrees, however, in reverse order of importance. The central element of
the MA thesis is the written thesis that demonstrates substantial research and explication of an
original creative idea or solution. The thesis is based on a strong, well-articulated theoretical
perspective or methodology that highlights the interdisciplinary of the project (this should also
include some discussion of the process involved in developing the critical framework or
methodology, challenges, and benefits). An original creative work accompanies and supports or
illustrates the written thesis.


Thesis and Supervision

Supervision

Full-time students will work with a Principal Advisor beginning in their second term of study,
and a two-member Supervisory Committee beginning in the fourth term of study. The
Supervisory Committee consists of the Principal Advisor and one additional faculty member.
The Principal Advisor and Supervisory Committee are responsible for guiding and evaluating
the student’s independent studio and academic work, including the Master’s thesis.

Part-time students will begin working with their Principal Advisor at the beginning of the term
in which they enroll in IAMD 6C01 MFA/MDes Individual Studio II or IAMD 6C04 MA
Individual Academic Study. The earliest that this may be is their 2nd semester. Part-time
students normally establish their full Supervisory Committee at the beginning of their seventh
semester.

Please refer to the Graduate Studies website at www.ocadu.gradstudies for an up to date list of
appointed graduate faculty who are eligible to supervise in this program.


Thesis Proposal

Full-time students must submit a formal written thesis proposal for approval by their Principal
Advisor and the Graduate Program Director no later than September 1st following the first year
of study. Part-time students must submit a formal written thesis proposal for approval by their
Principal Advisor and the Graduate Program Director no later than September 1st following their
registration in IAMD 6A01 Thesis Proposal (sixth semester).




                                                                                                 96
Thesis Colloquia

In the Fall, both full-time students and part-time students whose thesis proposals have been
accepted will present their thesis proposal to their peers and the University community in a
colloquial setting.

Thesis Exhibition

At the end of the student’s final semester, an exhibition of the thesis work will be mounted. This
exhibition may take place on or off campus; it may be a group exhibit or a solo show. Students
who wish to exhibit off campus are responsible for obtaining the space, installing the work and
staffing the space.

Guidelines for the Preparation of the Thesis are published by the Office of Graduate Studies and
available on the OCAD U website.

Oral Defence
Each student is required to defend her/his MFA/MDes/MA thesis to a committee comprising
the Program Director, the Principal Advisor and Supervisory Committee member, an internal
faculty member, and an External Examiner (a specialist from outside of OCAD U). The Oral
Defence normally occurs in tandem with the exhibition.


Tuition and Fees

Fees for the Interdisciplinary Master’s in Art, Media and Design are program-based and
assessed on a per-semester basis (rather than a per-course basis). Fees are determined based on
whether a student’s status is full-time or part-time, regardless of the number of credits taken in
an individual semester, including the summer term, Fees do not change if a student drops or
adds a course. A change of status from full-time to part-time (or vice versa) is the only instance
when tuition fees are reassessed.

The chart below outlines the estimated tuition costs for the program for students starting in
2012/2013:

                  Fall     Winter   Summer       Fall      Winter    Summer        Fall      Winter       Estimated
                  2012      2013      2013       2013       2014       2014        2014       2014        Program
                                                                                                            Total
Full time students
Domestic          $3,059   $3,059    $3,182     $3,182     $3,182        -          -           -          $15,664
International     $7,278   $7,278    $7,569     $7,569     $7,569        -          -           -          $37,265
Part time students
Domestic          $1,529   $1,529    $1,590     $1,590     $1,590     $1,654      $1,654     $1,654        $12,792
International     $3,638   $3,638    $3,784     $3,784     $3,784     $3,935      $3,935     $3,935        $30,434



         Notes:

         *2013/2014 Summer, Fall and Winter Fees are estimates based on the 2012/2013 tuition
         framework, and are subject to change with Provincial Government Policy and OCAD U Board of
         Governor approval. Approved fees are posted annually on the "Financial Matters" section of the



                                                                                                      97
       OCAD U website at www.ocadu.ca/students/financial_matters/tuition_fees.htm Fees for
       2013/2014 will not be finalized until April 2013 and fees for 2014/15 will not be finalized until
       April 2014.

As per the Graduate Studies Policy #6007, full time students have a maximum of 11 semesters to
complete their program, and part time students have a maximum of 14 semesters. Both full time
and part time students must pay full program fees every semester until they have completed all
requirements for the degree.

Applicable ancillary fees and other costs such as living expenses, books, etc. are not included in
the amounts above.

The most current information on fees, tuition and payment methods and deadlines is available
on the Financial Matters section of the OCAD U website at:

http://www.ocadu.ca/students/financial_matters/tuition_fees.htm




                                                                                                           98
STRATEGIC FORESIGHT AND INNOVATION

Description

The Master of Design in Strategic Foresight and Innovation is creating a new kind of designer: a
strategist who sees the world from a human perspective, who re-thinks what is possible and
imagines a better future state.

Recognizing the increasing importance that design thinking can play in positively impacting
society, enhancing business success and managing organizational change, students in the
program address the complex dilemmas of contemporary society. The program focuses on the
application of foresight and design innovation methods to develop solutions that are
transformative and sustainable—economically and environmentally—and that address human
needs. The program interweaves design with social science, systemic design and business while
providing the skills and knowledge to identify critical issues, frame problems and develop
innovative solutions and implementation plans. Through holistic thinking in a co-creative
environment, the designer, business person, social scientist and engineer will develop together
the skills required for innovation leadership.

The program will enable students to:

      Explore and test new methods of organization, creation and production.
      Develop strategic, innovative and anticipatory solutions (strategic foresight) and
       implementation plans for design, business or policy innovations, or for organizational or
       infrastructural change.
      Navigate complex problems through the study of systems theory and the analysis of
       relevant systems including ecological, social, economic and political organizations.
      Develop an ethical sensibility that promotes socially and ecologically sound responses to
       complex global issues.

Students will develop design thinking skills that include analysis, synthesis and strategic and
creative thinking, which are critical for professionals in the public, private and voluntary sectors.
The program will develop students’ expertise in research and innovation methodologies to a
high level and will enable them to acquire sufficient contextual knowledge to develop intelligent,
innovative, visionary and future-enhancing solutions in their culminating projects. With their
creativity and ability to navigate complex systems and guided by strong social and
environmental principles, graduates of this program will be well-positioned to make meaningful
societal change.




OCAD University Graduate Student Handbook 2012/2013                                               99
Program Requirements

Curriculum: 45 credits

The MDes in Strategic Foresight and Innovation is a part-time program. In order to support the needs of students who may be
working full or part time while completing the program, courses are normally clustered on Thursdays or Fridays. The program also
offers some flexibility in course sequencing, and students may (with the approval of the Graduate Program Director and pending the
availability of courses) follow a different sequence than that indicated below.


Semester 1        Semester 2           Semester 3           Semester 4        Semester 5 Semester 6 Semester 7
(Fall) - 6        (Winter) - 9         (Summer) - 3         (Fall) - 9        (Winter) - 6 (Summer) - (Fall) - 9
credits           credits              credits              credits           credits      3 credits  credits
SFIN 6B01:     SFIN 6B04:          3 credits from           SFIN 6B06:         SFIN 6B05:     SFIN 6B08:    SFIN 6D01:
Business and   Understanding       among the following      Strategy: Creating Business       Major Project Major Project
Design ThinkingSystems and         options:                 a Motivating       Modeling and Proposal (3)    (9)
(3)            Systemic Design (3)      Independent        Narrative from     Policy
                                           Study            Vision to          Innovation (3)
SFIN 6B03: The SFIN 6C01:               Internship         Tactic (3)
Human Factor   Research                 Elective                              SFIN 6B07:
(3)            Methodologies (6)                            SFIN 6C02:         Leading
                                                            Foresight Studio Innovation (3)
                                                            (6)

NOTE: Students have the option to complete the Major Project in Semester 6.




OCAD University Graduate Student Handbook 2012/2013                                                                            100
Electives

For elective choices, students may choose from:

   a) Approved graduate-level courses in other OCAD U graduate programs. Approved elective
      choices will be published annually in the Academic Calendar, which is available on the
      OCAD U website at
      www.ocadu.ca/students/records_registration/course_calendar
   b) A 300 or 400-level course in any discipline with the approval of the instructor and the
      Graduate Program Director. Students should consult the Academic Calendar for
      undergraduate course offerings and must complete a “Request to Enroll in an
      Undergraduate Course as an Elective” form and secure the appropriate permissions
      before they will be allowed to register. Please see “Courses and Registration” in this
      handbook for more information.
   c) A graduate course at another university through the Ontario Visiting Graduate Student
      Plan (OVGS) or the Canadian University Graduate Transfer Agreement (CUGTA).
      Information on this process is available in this handbook under “Courses and
      Registration” and on the OCAD U website at www.ocadu.ca/gradstudies.

Students must meet with their Graduate Program Director for advising on the selection of
elective courses. A record of student advising will be kept in the student file and students are
advised to keep a copy for their records.

Supervision

Students will be mentored by their Principal Advisor beginning in their 6th semester, to help
them define their Major Research Project. Students will prepare a project proposal by the end of
the 6th semester, at which time a Supervisory Committee will be arranged, consisting of the
Principal Advisor plus one additional member. Students will develop their Major Projects in
their 7th semester. Please note that students have the option to complete their Major Projects
by the end of their 6th semester with approval by the Program Director and agreement from
their Supervisory Committee.

Please refer to the Graduate Studies website at www.ocadu.gradstudies for an up-to-date list of
appointed graduate faculty who are eligible to supervise in this program.

Students are required to defend their Major Project to a committee comprising the student’s
two-member Advisory Committee and the Program Director (optional).

Guidelines for the Preparation of the Major Research Paper/Project are published by the Office
of Graduate Studies and available on the OCAD U website.


Course Descriptions

SFIN 6B01 Business and Design Thinking (3 credits)
This course will examine the design ecosystem, describing the way in which design is linked with
the disciplines of finance, law, management, marketing, science and engineering. It will provide
an overview and understanding of basic business and finance techniques, in particular those
that have proven critical in the successful commercialization of innovation. Intellectual property
rights, a critical component in new product development, will be discussed. The course will also
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demonstrate the importance of design thinking to business success. Students will review
business case studies and will discuss and apply design processes through a series of short
projects. They will have hands-on business and creative experiences through a business
simulation component and through the creation of an original work.

SFIN 6B03 The Human Factor (3 credits)
Understanding how people experience, organize, use and share information/tools as part of
their everyday activities is key to developing valuable and sustainable innovations. Drawing on
research from a variety of settings, students will study fundamental concepts in human factors
including human needs, motivations, and cultural and social dimensions of human experience.
The course will also explore human factors through the study of examples of innovation from
different contexts –product and service innovation, complex systems and information
technologies. The course includes practical training in finding, assessing and synthesizing
information from a range of sources as input to the major project proposal.

SFIN 6B04 Understanding Systems and Systemic Design (3 credits)
Students are introduced to systems theory as a method to understand and design complex social
systems. Applying systems thinking and design methods, students learn system structures,
organizing principles, functions and dynamic behavior of social systems. The perspective of
human beings as observers, designers and generators of social systems emphasizes the
outcomes of innovation, social systems design and systemic change. Social systems design and
mapping methods help identify drivers for change and design interventions. Students
participate in learning conversations and group workshops to apply the principles and theories
of social systems through case studies, readings, reflection papers and workshop participation.

SFIN 6B05 Business Modeling and Policy Innovation (3 credits)
The key instrument for successfully implementing positive change in a business setting is
business model innovation, while in the public sector it is policy innovation. A good
understanding of business modelling and policy development is therefore critical for success.
Students will be introduced to the essential components of an effective business model and the
stakeholders involved as well as a number of implementation tools. They will also be introduced
to governance structures in corporate and public organizations, and will learn how various
government levels develop policy using conventional as well as innovative policy development
processes and how they can engage in these to influence outcomes.

SFIN 6B06 Strategy: Creating a Motivating Narrative from Vision to Tactic (3
credits)
Students will develop a better understanding of the increasing need and the inherent challenges
of developing coherent strategic solutions that drive effective organizations and brands. This
course reveals the purpose and power of a strategy, gives direction on how to lead strategy
development within an organization, and how to communicate the story effectively. We will
explore frameworks and models to engage stakeholders and shape the strategic conversation.
Students will learn to refine their thinking into a comprehensive strategy and develop a
communication plan that will align organizations from vision to tactic.

SFIN 6B07 Leading Innovation (3 credits)
This studio-seminar focuses on the development of skills in leading and implementing
innovation. Students will study models of change and leadership choices. In a convergent
process, students will develop innovation blueprints and test and model implementations for the
strategic proposals developed in SFIN 6C02 Foresight Studio. Key concepts covered include:
understanding types of innovation and frameworks for change, positioning innovation (business
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entrepreneurship, social entrepreneurship, innovating inside corporations/institutions,
intellectual property), overcoming barriers to change (financial, legislative, structural,
attitudinal) and establishing the value proposition.

SFIN 6B08 Major Project Proposal (3 credits)
Students will work with their Principal Advisors to develop their major project proposals. Their
proposals will include a project/topic overview, research questions, objectives, project plan,
methodology, outcomes, annotated bibliography and required resources. The outcome will be
the development of a concise and articulate proposal outlining a convincing project rationale
based on a thorough literature review.

SFIN 6C01 Research Methodologies (6 credits)
This studio-seminar presents a range of research methods and analysis frameworks for
understanding social and human phenomena for innovation and social change. Core research
techniques draw largely on ethnographic methods, such as observation and in-depth interviews.
Learners are highly encouraged to explore more contested, contemporary and/or experimental
ones, including action research, participatory design and sense-making techniques. Working as
individuals and in teams, students will explore different methods, collect field data, elicit and
synthesize insights and analyze and present findings in a studio-learning environment. As
research is contextualized with managing innovation and change, the course emphasizes
stakeholder management and facilitation.

SFIN 6C02 Foresight Studio (6 credits)
This studio course will introduce foresight methods in the development of strategic proposals in
the private, public, voluntary or ‘for-benefit’ sector. Working in teams, students will identify an
issue in a specific sector and will begin their exploration and research in a divergent process of
signal discovery through methods such as environmental scanning, new technology research,
user research, field study, or stakeholder workshops. This phase of work frames the problem. In
a convergent process, students will apply methodologies, which include medium- to long-range
scenario planning and technology adoption modelling to develop creative insights and
implications for action.

SFIN 6D01 Major Project (9 credits)
This is the culminating work of the Master of Design in Strategic Foresight and Innovation. It
synthesizes the knowledge and skills learned throughout the program and applies them in the
development of a major project. Students will develop innovative and anticipatory strategies,
solutions and/or implementation plans for defined challenges in the private, public or voluntary
sectors. Solutions may take the form of strategic roadmaps, communications programs,
products and services, or policy frameworks. The final deliverable will include a concise written
document. Students will be mentored by a Principal Advisor and critiqued and evaluated by the
Principal Advisor plus one additional committee member.



Tuition and Fees

Fees for the MDes in Strategic Foresight and Innovation are assessed on a per-credit basis.
Semester rates vary dependent on the number of courses taken. The program is 45 credits in
total.


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The chart below outlines the estimated tuition costs for the program for students starting in
2012/2013. For 2012/2013, tuition is assessed at $1,101 (domestic) and $1,888 (international)
per three credits:

                  Fall     Winter    Summer    Fall      Winter   Summer       Fall     Estimated
                  2012      2013       2013    2013       2014      2014       2014     Program
                                                                                          Total
Strategic Foresight and Innovation
Domestic          $2,202    $3,303   $1,146    $3,437    $2,291    $1,191     $3,574     $17,145
International     $3,776    $5,664   $1,964    $5,893    $3,929    $2,043     $6,129     $29,399



         Notes:

         *2013/2014 Summer, Fall and Winter Fees are estimates based on the 2012/2013 tuition
         framework, and are subject to change with Provincial Government Policy and OCAD U
         Board of Governor approval. Approved fees are posted annually on the "Financial
         Matters" section of the OCAD U website at
         www.ocadu.ca/students/financial_matters/tuition_fees.htm. Fees for 2013/2014 will
         not be finalized until April 2013 and fees for 2014/2015 will not be finalized until April
         2014.

As per the Graduate Studies Policy #6007, part-time students have a maximum of 14 semesters
to complete their program. If students choose to take additional time beyond 7 semesters to
complete their Major Research Project, a 3-credit fee will be charged per semester. Students
must pay fees every semester until they have completed all requirements for the degree.

Applicable ancillary fees and other costs such as living expenses, books, etc. are not included in
the amounts above.

The most current information on fees, tuition and payment methods and deadlines is available
on the Financial Matters section of the OCAD U website at:

http://www.ocadu.ca/students/financial_matters/tuition_fees.htm




OCAD University Graduate Student Handbook 2012/2013                                            104
GRADUATE STUDIES POLICIES




OCAD University Graduate Student Handbook 2012/2013   105
Students can find these and other academic policies on the OCAD U website under “Students”
and “Student Policies.”


# 6001: Graduate Studies Administration

Administration

Associate Vice-President, Research, and Dean, Graduate Studies:

The Associate Vice-President and Dean is responsible for the general supervision of graduate
work at the university and chairs the Senate Graduate Studies Committee.

Reports to the President and consults with the Vice-President, Academic on all academic
matters.

Participates in university administration through membership in President’s Cabinet and
Senate, and serves as a resource to the Board of Governors.

The Office of Research & Graduate Studies facilitates the operation of graduate programs as
follows:

                     Serves as home for all graduate programs.

                     Oversees the selection of Graduate Program Directors and, with the Dean
                      of Faculty, supervises their activities.

                     Ensures that applications for admission meet university standards.

                     Is responsible for overseeing the maintenance of student records on the
                      student information system in coordination with the Office of the
                      Registrar.

                     Ensures that Graduate Studies General Policies are followed as students
                      progress through their programs.

                     Administers the establishment of criteria for, admission to, and periodic
                      review of Graduate Faculty.

                     Maintains a current file of all Ontario Council on Graduate Studies
                      (OCGS) format curriculum vitae of Graduate faculty.

                     Advises on and administers the development and approval of new
                      graduate programs, and serves as a liaison with the Quality Council.

                     Advises on and administers the periodic review of graduate programs by
                      the Quality Council.

                     In coordination with the Student Financial Aid Office, organizes
                      competitions for all internal and most external merit-based awards; keeps
                      records and administers payments; liaises with national and provincial
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                      granting agencies.

                     Facilitates the resolution of individual and program issues among
                      students, faculty members, and graduate programs.

Graduate Program Directors:

Each graduate program is chaired by a tenured or tenure-track faculty member affiliated with
the program. Graduate Program Directors are appointed by the Associate Vice-President,
Research, & Dean, Graduate Studies on the recommendation of the Dean of Faculty or, for
interdisciplinary programs, the Deans of Faculties in which the program is taught.

Committees:

The committees responsible for the supervision of graduate students are the Supervisory
Committee, the Graduate Program Committee, and the Senate Graduate Studies Committee.
The functions of these committees in relation to individual students are as follows:

Supervisory Committee: The student’s Supervisory Committee helps the student define and
develop a program of study, research, and thesis/Major Research Paper/Project (MRP) and/or
final exhibition, and reports on the student’s progress to the Graduate Program Committee. The
Supervisory Committee is chaired by the student’s Principal Advisor and forms part of the
student’s final examination committee. (Cf. Graduate Studies General Policies, Section 6:
Supervision, for further details.)

Graduate Program Committee: Each Graduate Program Committee is chaired by its Graduate
Program Director. Committees normally consist of a minimum of five graduate faculty members
associated with that particular program, including the Graduate Program Director, and up to
two students. Students are not to be present during the discussion of scholarship allocation and
the review of student progress.

                     Roles and Responsibilities: The committee is responsible for admissions
                      decisions; scholarship allocation (when applicable); reviewing student
                      progress; curriculum development; and providing advice to the Graduate
                      Program Director on matters related to the graduate program. On the
                      advice of the Graduate Program Director, the committee may form sub-
                      committees to address specific elements of its mandate. Committee
                      members must attend regularly scheduled meetings of the committee.
                      Members must maintain the confidentiality of all proceedings.

                     Terms of Appointment: Graduate Program Committees are normally
                      appointed for a period of up to three years, based on the academic year
                      (July 1 to June 30). Appointments are renewable. The Graduate Program
                      Director is responsible for recommending to the Associate Vice-President,
                      Research, and Dean, Graduate Studies, as well as to the Dean of Faculty
                      (or Faculties in the case of inter-Faculty programs) the names of
                      individuals and their terms. The Associate Vice-President, Research, and
                      Dean, Graduate Studies will forward letters of appointment to individuals
                      selected. Committee membership is public and will be published in the
                      Graduate Student Handbook.

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Senate Committee on Graduate Studies: This committee has the final authority on admissions
and the administration of regulations concerning graduate work.



# 6002: Graduate Studies Faculty

Graduate Faculty

Membership in the Graduate Faculty:

Faculty members at OCAD University do not automatically have supervisory or teaching
privileges in graduate programs. Authority to teach or supervise graduate students is a separate
category of appointment with different criteria.

Responsibility for directing all elements of graduate teaching and supervision rests with
members of the graduate faculty.

In order to be appointed to the graduate faculty, an individual normally must hold a faculty
appointment at OCAD U (tenured, tenure-track, or continuing) or status-only positions such as
retired senior scholar or adjunct professors.

All tenured and tenure track and CLTA faculty members who teach and supervise graduate
students must be members in good standing of the Graduate Faculty. This designation does not
affect the home Faculty status of the faculty member. Graduate course and supervision
assignments are arranged by the Graduate Program Director in consultation with the Dean or
designate of the faculty member’s home Faculty. Similar to cross-Faculty appointments, the
Graduate Program Director contributes to the tri-annual Performance Review and any tenure
and promotion decisions regarding the faculty member conducted by his/her home Faculty.

From time to time, a Graduate Program Director may recommend the appointment of non-
OCAD U faculty to teach and/or participate on a graduate student’s committee. Such
individuals must meet the requirements for appointment to the Graduate Faculty.


Categories of Appointment:

Appointments as Graduate Faculty are made in one of three categories:

Full members may:

   a. Act as Principal Advisor of a master’s thesis or Major Research Paper/Project (MRP),
      and as a member of thesis or MRP committees;
   b. Serve as chair or voting member of a final oral examination committee, where such
      examinations are required, and perform all associated duties; and
   c. Teach, set, and mark examinations for a graduate course and give such other graduate
      direction as may be required.

Associate members shall be permitted to undertake all the duties of a full member but shall not
serve as a Principal Advisor or chair a final oral examination committee.

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Senior Scholar Graduate Faculty Appointees shall be permitted to:
   a. Chair a final oral examination
   b. Serve as a member of a thesis or MRP committee and as a voting member of a final oral
       examination;
   c. Teach, set, and mark examinations for a graduate course;
   d. Continue to act as Principal Advisor master’s thesis or MRP;
   e. Take on new master’s supervision with the approval of the Graduate Program Director;
       and
   f. Assume additional responsibilities only if he or she remains actively engaged in research
       and is accessible to graduate students.

The General Criteria for Membership in the Graduate Faculty are:

Full Membership

     a. Nomination by an OCAD U graduate program;
     b. Highest degree in their field (such as Ph.D., MFA or M. Arch) or equivalent
        qualification appropriate to the discipline;
     c. Tenured, tenure-track, or continuing appointment or retired professor;
     d. A track record of peer-reviewed research publications or other evidence of peer-
        reviewed scholarly, professional and/or creative productivity appropriate to the
        discipline;
     e. An established program of research, performance, creative or design practice and,
        where appropriate, research funding from an external source and/or publication of at
        least one externally refereed article or book, or peer reviewed/curated exhibition of
        artistic work in the past five years; and
     f. A record of successful participation in graduate education (such as teaching a graduate
        course, serving on a supervisory committee or thesis examining committee.)

Associate Membership

     a. Nomination by an OCAD U graduate program;
     b. Highest degree in their field (such as Ph.D., MFA or M. Arch) or equivalent
        qualification appropriate to the discipline;
     c. Tenured, tenure-track, or continuing appointment or appointment as Adjunct
        Professor;
     d. An appropriate scholarly, professional and/or design or creative record commensurate
        with program activities and responsibilities such as publication or acceptance for
        publication of at least one externally refereed article or book, or peer reviewed/curated
        exhibition of artistic work in the past five years.


Membership in the Graduate Faculty does not constitute an agreement by the university to
assign the faculty member either graduate courses to teach or graduate students to supervise.

Procedures for Appointment:

The Deans and the Graduate Program Directors (GPDs) will make recommendations for
appointment as members of the Graduate Faculty to the Graduate Faculty Appointment
Committee. All such recommendations require endorsement from the Dean of the Faculty in
which the Graduate Program resides. Recommendations must indicate specifically the way in
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which the nominee’s research or design and creative practice offers resources for OCAD U’s
graduate programs and be accompanied by an up-to-date curriculum vitae.

The Graduate Faculty Appointment Committee comprises the Vice-President Academic, the
Deans of the Faculties and is chaired by the Dean of Graduate Studies. Upon the committee’s
positive decision to appoint a candidate, typically for a period of five years, to the Graduate
Faculty, the Office of Graduate Studies sends a letter of appointment to each faculty member
outlining the terms of the appointment including the category, duties, and the appointment start
date and end date.

Non-OCAD U faculty members may be appointed to Graduate Faculty as an Associate member.
These individuals need to meet the required criteria for appointment as an OCAD U faculty
member and possess exceptional research and/or professional credentials.

End of Graduate Faculty Appointment:

An individual’s appointment to graduate faculty ends if, through death, retirement, resignation,
or for any other reason, the individual is no longer eligible for the graduate faculty or upon
expiry and non-renewal of the appointment.

Supervisory Mentors / External Supervisory Mentors:

Principal Advisors inexperienced with graduate thesis supervision may be paired with a
Supervisory Mentor and/or attend required workshops and seminars on graduate supervision.

OCAD U may supplement its pool of Supervisory Mentors with experienced graduate faculty
members from nearby universities who will participate in OCAD U’s development of supervisory
skills through a mentoring program. In instances where a student’s Supervisory Committee
includes a Principal Advisor with no or limited experience supervising a graduate thesis, a
Supervisory Mentor may be assigned to the committee as the third member. When an
appropriate internal Mentor is unavailable to serve on a Supervisory Committee, an External
Supervisory Mentor may be arranged.

External Supervisory Mentors will, along with the student’s entire Supervisory Committee, meet
with the student at the outset of the program and thereafter at least once per term. While the
primary role of the Supervisory Mentor is to mentor and advise the Principal Advisor, the
student will have benefit of the Mentor’s expertise and advice with regard to his/her program of
study.

In addition to participating on the student’s Supervisory Committee, the External Supervisory
Mentor shall meet from time to time with the Principal Advisor to discuss supervisory issues.

Supervisory Mentors as a group shall contribute to the development and delivery of a
Supervisory Skills Development Program.

External Supervisory Mentors will be appointed to the position of Adjunct Graduate Faculty for
a term of two years. The expected annual time commitment for External Supervisory Mentors
shall not exceed 13 hours per semester.




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# 6003: Graduate Studies Admission

Admission

General:

Before applying for admission, the prospective student should obtain information about
admission requirements and procedures from the relevant Program Handbook or from the
Office of Graduate Studies. Application forms are available on the OCAD University Graduate
Studies website. Applicants meeting the minimum university requirements for admission given
below are not assured admission into any graduate program. Normally each graduate program
has admission requirements in addition to the minimum published. Furthermore, program
admission is limited to students whose interests are compatible with available resources and
faculty expertise.

Admission to a Master’s or Graduate Diploma Program:

The minimum university requirements for admission to a Master's or Graduate Diploma
program are as follows:
      a. a bachelor's degree with a cumulative grade point average of at least 75% (B) from a
          recognized university, or the equivalent; and
      b. submitted evidence, including letters from qualified referees, of the student's ability
          to undertake graduate level work in the area of interest.

In exceptional circumstances, a student not meeting the minimum university requirements may
be admitted based on professional experience relevant to the proposed area of study.

(Cf. Admissions requirements of individual programs.)

Conditional Admission:

Conditional admission may be offered to an applicant who is substantially ready to undertake a
program but who has not completed all admission requirements at the time of application. An
offer of conditional admission will specify the remaining requirements to be met and a limited
time period within which to meet them. Normally, the requirements must be fulfilled either
prior to registering in the program, or within the first semester of registration.

Admission:

Applicants who meet or exceed minimum requirements for admission are not assured of
admission to any graduate program.

Normally, admission decisions may not be appealed. In exceptional circumstances, unsuccessful
applicants may appeal to the Senate Committee on Graduate Studies to review admissions
procedures. The Committee will not review an applicant’s credentials.

Part-Time Studies:

In those programs where a part-time option is available, part-time students are admitted at the
discretion of the Admissions Committee in consultation with the Associate Vice-President,
Research, and Dean, Graduate Studies. A student may change status from full-time to part-time
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or part-time to full-time subject to consultation with and the approval of the Graduate Program
Director.

Normally part-time graduate students do not receive OCAD U scholarships or needs-based
bursaries nor are they eligible for Graduate Teaching or Research Assistantships.

Part-time graduate students in studio-based programs do not normally have access to graduate
studio space.

Admission as an Exchange Student:

Graduate students at other universities who wish to take courses at OCAD U not leading to a
degree may be admitted based on the recommendation of the OCAD U Graduate Program
Director and the Dean or designate of graduate studies at the other university, with the
permission of the appropriate Graduate Program Committee and the Office of Graduate Studies.

Application for Admission:

Application forms may be obtained from the Office of Graduate Studies or from the OCAD U
Graduate Studies website. Completed forms and accompanying materials must be submitted
before the specified deadline. Applicants are advised to check with the Office of Graduate
Studies regarding application procedures and deadlines for the graduate program in which they
are interested. Applicants are advised that deadlines for applications for awards and teaching
assistantships may be earlier than the deadlines for application to a graduate program.

All decisions on graduate admissions are approved by the Associate Vice-President, Research
and Dean, Graduate Studies on recommendation from Graduate Program Committees.

Application to a Second Graduate Degree:

Applicants with a graduate degree from another university may apply for admission to a
master's degree program at OCAD U under the following constraints:
           a. no course work taken for the first degree shall count towards the second,
           b. none of the research completed for the first degree shall be replicated for the
              second.

English Language Competence:

The official language of graduate instruction at OCAD U is English.1 An applicant whose primary
language is not English or whose previous education has been conducted in another language
must demonstrate command of English sufficient to pursue their chosen program before being
accepted into the program. Applicants are required to achieve a satisfactory score on one of the
following standardized English tests that include a writing component:

TOEFL IBT (Test of English as a Foreign Language internet-based test) with an overall score of
90 and no scores below the following:
22 Reading
20 Listening
22 Writing
1
 Note: Subject to the approval of the Graduate Program Committee of the program concerned, a student may write his/her thesis
and be examined in French. Cf. Graduate Studies General Policies, Section 11: Submission and Examination of Master’s Theses.
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22 Speaking

If IBT is not available, a) minimum PBT (paper-based) TOEFL of 600 and essay of 5, or b)
minimum IELTS (International English Language Testing System) score of 7 on the academic
modules.

Transfer Credit:

With the approval of the Graduate Program Director and the Office of Graduate Studies, transfer
credit may be granted for graduate work completed in another program, provided that the
course(s) has not been credited towards another degree, diploma, certificate or any other
qualification. One half of the minimum course work of the applicable program, not including the
written thesis or thesis project/exhibition, must be taken at OCAD U.

Students participating in an approved exchange program with the approval of the Graduate
Program Director may receive transfer credit for up to 50% of the course requirements for their
degree. One half of the minimum course work of the applicable program not including the
written thesis or thesis project/exhibition, must be taken at OCAD U.

Transfer credit arrangements for exchange program participants must be approved in advance
by the Office of Graduate Studies.

Graduate Diplomas:

Students may be admitted directly to a Graduate Diploma program. The minimum admission
requirement to a Graduate Diploma program is normally an undergraduate degree.

Normally Graduate Diploma students do not receive OCAD U scholarships or needs-based
bursaries nor are they eligible for Graduate Teaching or Research Assistantships.

Graduate Diploma students in studio-based programs do not normally have access to graduate
studio or work/study space.

Graduate Diploma students may not take additional courses beyond those required for the
completion of the Graduate Diploma.

Graduate Diploma students who wish to transfer to a Master’s degree program must apply to the
Master’s degree program by the advertised application deadline. Courses taken in fulfillment of
the Graduate Diploma requirements may count towards a Master’s degree, subject to the
approval of the Graduate Program Admissions Committee.


# 6004: Graduate Studies Registration

Registration

Completion of Registration:

Registration begins two months before the start of each semester and must be completed by the
dates published by the Office of the Registrar. Students should refer to the Calendar for dates

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and deadlines. Students should consult with their Graduate Program Director for academic
advising on course selection.

Continuity of Registration:

All OCAD U graduate students must register in every semester until all requirements for the
degree have been fulfilled. A student who does not register is considered to have withdrawn
from the university.

Course Audit:

Graduate students may audit courses in accordance with OCAD U Auditing Policy, with
permission of the instructor, the relevant Associate Dean or designate (for undergraduate
courses), and the Graduate Program Director. Course audits are recorded as AU on the student's
transcript. Prior to registration, the student and instructor must agree on the requirements for
auditing the class. Audited courses will not count toward degree or diploma requirements.


# 6005: Graduate Studies Academic Standing and Grading

Academic Standing and Grading


Normal Grading System:

The following grades are used at the graduate level in the university:

Letter Grade              Numerical Scale
A+                        95-100
A                         85-94
A-                        80-84
B+                        75-79
B                         70-74
C                         60-69
F                         0-59
P                         Pass
I                         Incomplete
IP                        In Progress
W                         Withdrawn
AU                        Audit


Non-Grade Notations:

I:      Incomplete
Assigned as a final grade by an instructor on the basis of incomplete course work in special
circumstances (e.g., medical reasons or when there are no grounds for assigning a failing grade).
“I” carries no credit for the course and is not considered for averaging purposes.

W:     Withdrawal without academic penalty
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Dropped courses do not appear on the student’s transcript. See Calendar for dates that apply
each semester.

Grade Changes:

Any revision of a final grade must be submitted to the Graduate Program Director for approval.
Requests for such changes must be made using the Grade Revision Form, including a written
explanation for the change.


CGPA Required For Continuation and Graduation:

A student in a Master's or Graduate Diploma program is required to maintain a cumulative
grade point average (CGPA) of at least 75% (B+). Failure to meet the minimum CGPA is
evidence of unsatisfactory progress and the matter will be considered by the Graduate Program
Committee.

Under no circumstances will a student whose CGPA is below 75% be awarded a graduate degree.

Good Standing:

A graduate student maintains good standing by achieving at least a grade of B in all of his/her
courses, and gaining a favourable assessment on their annual progress report and on any other
reviews conducted by her/his Supervisory Committee. (Cf. Graduate Studies General Policies,
Section 9: Progress, Withdrawal, and Leave.)

Graduate Students Retaking a Course:

A graduate student may retake a course when the student wishes to improve the grade earned in
the course. Permission of the Graduate Program Director is required.

Both grades are recorded on the student's transcript with the notation that the course was
retaken to improve the grade. However, only the better grade is used in calculating the CGPA
and the credit hours for the course are used only once towards the requirements for the degree.


Course Work Extensions:

Graduate Studies sets deadlines for the completion of coursework and grade submission for all
courses taught in graduate programs. Students are expected to meet these deadlines and are
advised to plan their individual studio, self-directed learning and research projects accordingly.
Students who find themselves unable to meet the relevant deadlines may apply for extensions
for completing course work after the dates set by Graduate Studies.

Graduate programs may establish deadlines earlier than those set by Graduate Studies for the
completion of course work and may prescribe penalties for late completion of work and failure
to complete work, provided that these penalties are announced at the time the instructor makes
available to the class the methods by which the student performance shall be evaluated.




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Applications for Extensions to Complete Course Work:

The authority to grant an extension for the completion of work in a course beyond the original
deadline for that course rests with the student’s Graduate Program Director, after approval has
been granted by the instructor of the course. Students must apply for extensions using a form
provided by the Office of Graduate Studies.

The deadline for requesting an initial extension is the deadline for completion of course work as
specified in the Academic Calendar.

A student on extension who is unable to complete the required course work in the extension
period specified by the graduate program may apply to the Graduate Program Director for a
continuation of the extension (subject to the time-limits and deadlines for extensions, set out
below). The student must make such a request before the expiry date of the extension period in
place.

Grounds for Extensions:

Legitimate reasons for an extension can be academic in nature or nonacademic. In order to
ensure as much uniformity and fairness as possible in the granting of extensions (or
continuations of extensions), the Graduate Program Director must be reasonably certain that:

         a. the reasons for the delay are serious and substantiated: the student is to provide a
            statement detailing the reasons, together with a physician's letter in the case of
            illness;

         b. the student would not be granted an unfair academic advantage over fellow
            students in the course;

         c. the student would not be placing in jeopardy the normal and satisfactory
            completion of new course work; and

         d. the student does have a reasonable chance of completing outstanding requirements
            within the time to be allotted.

Time Limits for Extensions:

If a graduate program grants an extension, it must specify an extension period, which is not to
run beyond the deadline for completion of course work and grade submission for the term
following the original deadline for the course. (An extension may not be granted for a period of
more than four months beyond the original deadline for submitting course work for that
course.) The dates for these deadlines for course extensions will be listed each year in the
Academic Calendar.

Extensions beyond the deadlines will require the approval of both the Graduate Program
Director and the Office of Graduate Studies.

Grade Reporting Procedures:

The graduate program will assign the temporary grade of 'I' (Incomplete) to a student on
extension, pending receipt from the instructor of a final course grade. The final course report
OCAD University Graduate Student Handbook 2012/2013                                           116
will take the form either of a regular grade or of the non-grade notation 'I' ('Incomplete'), as
appropriate. It is due no later than the Office of Graduate Studies deadline for completion of
course work and grade submission for the term following the original one for the course. If, by
that date, a final grade is not available and the student has not submitted the outstanding course
work, then the grade of ‘I’ will be the final grade. This will be a permanent transcript entry.
(Amendments require the approval of the Senate Graduate Studies Committee.)

Graduate Studies and Home Graduate Program Notification:

Graduate programs must notify the Office of Graduate Studies of extensions no later than the
original deadlines for submitting grades for the relevant courses or, in case of continuations, no
later than the expiry dates of the original periods of extension and provide in each case the new
deadline for completion of course work.


# 6006 Graduate Studies Supervision


Supervision

General:

Except in the case of executive master’s and Graduate Diploma programs, each student will
work with a Supervisory Committee, including the student’s Principal Advisor, to guide his/her
program of study and culminating thesis project or Major Research Paper/Project (MRP). All
members of each student’s Supervisory Committee must be members of OCAD U’s Graduate
Faculty. Regular meetings (at least once per term) will be organized between the student and
his/her full Supervisory Committee.

The Supervisory Committees, which are normally identified prior to the students’ third
semester, must be formalized at the beginning of the fourth semester. The Supervisory
Committee Form must be completed and signed by all supervisors before it is submitted to the
Graduate Program Director for the Office of Graduate Studies’ official records.

It is the responsibility of the Graduate Program Committee to develop guidelines for supervisory
committee membership, including composition, and to ensure that these are consistent with
university policies and procedures. Guidelines must be approved by the Graduate Studies
Committee.

Supervisor and Student Responsibilities:

Supervisors advise students on all aspects of their graduate work. The advising process is
monitored by the Office of Graduate Studies and the Graduate Program Director. To ensure that
all students are treated equitably, any questions or problems with the advising process should be
addressed to the Graduate Program Director.

All Supervisory Committee members are expected to contribute to the progress and
development of the graduate student on a regular basis throughout the graduate student’s
residency period. The following basic principles should apply:


OCAD University Graduate Student Handbook 2012/2013                                            117
           a. Regular contact – not less than once per semester. More frequent contact is
              strongly encouraged.
           b. Timely review of submitted material.
           c. Adequate notice of prolonged absence.
           d. Adequate notice of impending deadlines.
           e. Courteous, respectful, and clear communication.

Students are responsible for setting up regular appointments with their Principal Advisors.

Change in the Supervisory Committee:

Continuity of supervision is important in all graduate work. A request for a change in the
Supervisory Committee may come from the student or any member of the Supervisory
Committee. The Graduate Program Director is responsible for the review and approval of
changes to Supervisory Committee membership.

The Graduate Program Director will report all changes to Supervisory Committee membership
to the Office of Graduate Studies in a timely manner.


# 6007: Graduate Studies Residency, Course Requirements and Time Limits

Residency, Course Requirements, and Time Limits

Residency Requirement for the Master’s and Graduate Diploma Degree:

The aim of the residency requirement is to ensure that each student spend a period of time in
contact with faculty members and other students. Except in the case of executive master’s
programs, Master’s and Graduate Diploma students must register for a minimum of three
semesters. The three-semester minimum includes approved off-campus residencies and
internships, but does not include leaves of absence.

Courses in Master’s and Diploma Programs:

The following rules apply to the minimum course work requirement:

       One half of the minimum course work of the applicable program, not including the
        written thesis or thesis project/exhibition (where applicable), must be taken at this
        university.
       None of the university minimum may be courses taken in order to qualify for admission.

A Master’s or Graduate Diploma student may apply to take one or more courses at another
university for credit towards a degree at OCAD University under the following conditions:

        a. Such applications shall be made at least two months before the course/courses start
           and shall be approved by the student's Supervisory Committee and Graduate
           Program Committee, and be sent to the Associate Vice-President, Research, and
           Dean, Graduate Studies for final approval.
        b. While taking a course/courses at another university under these provisions, the
           student shall maintain normal registration at OCAD U.

OCAD University Graduate Student Handbook 2012/2013                                           118
A graduate student may apply to have credit for graduate courses taken prior to admission
applied to the requirements for the degree, under the following conditions:

        a. Courses must have been taken within five years of starting the OCAD University
           program.
        b. Courses may not have been used to earn another credential and may not have been
           taken as part of a qualifying year.
        c. Application for transfer credit must be made at the time of application for
           admission, and must be approved by the Graduate Program Committee and the
           Associate Vice-President, Research, and Dean, Graduate Studies.

Non-OCAD University Courses and Research – Student Mobility Opportunities:

Only approved non-OCAD U residencies, internships, placements, or specialized courses taken
on Letter of Permission (LoP) or as part of Ontario Visiting Graduate Student Agreement
(OVGS), the Canadian University Graduate Transfer Agreement (CUGTA) or the Canadian
Graduate Student Research Mobility Agreement (CGSRMA) may serve as or substitute for
elements of a graduate program.

Time Limits for Degree Completion:

Except in the case of executive master’s programs, full-time Master’s students should normally
complete their program within five semesters. Once students have completed all course
requirements, except for the written thesis and/or the culminating project/exhibition or Major
Research Paper/Project, their Master’s candidacy shall continue for a maximum of an additional
two full academic years (maximum total time of eleven semesters). At the expiration of the two-
year period, candidacy status shall lapse. Once candidacy has lapsed, the student may resume
work towards a graduate degree at OCAD U only if approved by the Senate Graduate Studies
Committee and subject to the payment of any additional fees required for reinstatement of
candidacy.

Part-time students should normally complete their program within fourteen semesters. The
normal or minimum time to completion is established at the program level and published in the
Graduate Student Handbook.

When students switch their status from part-time to full-time or from full-time to part-time (cf.
Graduate Studies General Policies 6003), the effect on the time for completion requirement will
be determined in consultation with the Graduate Program Director, and an agreement in writing
shall be part of the student record.

# 6008 Graduate Studies Academic Integrity

Academic Integrity

Academic freedom is a fundamental right in any institution of higher learning. Honesty and
integrity are necessary preconditions of this freedom. Academic integrity requires that all
academic work be wholly the product of an identified individual or individuals. Ethical conduct
is the obligation of every member of the university community and breaches of academic
integrity constitute serious offences. Cf. OCAD U Academic Misconduct Policy for
Undergraduate and Graduate Students, available on the OCAD U web site.

OCAD University Graduate Student Handbook 2012/2013                                         119
# 6009: Graduate Studies Progress, Withdrawal and Leave

Progress, Withdrawal and Leave

Progress Evaluation:

The Graduate Program Director shall review and report on each student’s progress at least once
each year. This report will be sent, in writing, to the Associate Vice-President, Reseach and
Dean, Graduate Studies with a copy to the student. The evaluation of student progress in course
work will rely in part on their maintenance of a CGPA of 75%, as required by Graduate Studies
General Policy 6005.

Review of Unsatisfactory Progress:

If a student’s progress is unsatisfactory, the Principal Advisor or the Graduate Program Director
shall make a written report to the Graduate Program Committee, and provide a copy to the
student. That committee shall consider whether the student’s progress has been satisfactory.
The Graduate Program Committee, in consultation with the Supervisory Committee, may:

       a. require the student to withdraw, or
       b. inform the student of the unsatisfactory progress and require the student to improve
          in specific ways within a specific period of time.

The student concerned has the right to appear before the Graduate Program Committee when
the case is considered, and may submit any materials relevant to the case. A student who is
required to withdraw shall be informed, in writing, with copies to the Associate Vice-President,
Research, and Dean, Graduate Studies and the Office of the Registrar. If required to improve
within a specific period of time, the student shall be informed in writing as to what precisely is
required, with copies to the Associate Vice-President, Research, and Dean, Graduate Studies and
the Office of the Registrar.

Any decision of the Graduate Program Committee under the provisions of this section may be
appealed to the Senate Committee on Graduate Studies through the Associate Vice-President,
Research, and Dean, Graduate Studies. The student has the right to appear before the Senate
Committee on Graduate Studies when the case is heard. The decision of that committee shall be
final.

Withdrawal from Courses and from the University:

A student may withdraw from an individual course or from the university at any time by
completing the appropriate paperwork and submitting it to the Office of Graduate Studies. A
student who has withdrawn from the university and wishes to re-enter shall apply for
permission under the same conditions as any other applicant.

Leave of Absence:

Students are expected to maintain continuous registration (cf. Graduate Studies General Policies
6004). However, a student may apply to go on leave if both of the following conditions obtain:
       a. a situation arises which makes it necessary to interrupt the graduate program, and
       b. no substantial use will be made of university facilities.
OCAD University Graduate Student Handbook 2012/2013                                           120
Permission to register on leave must be approved by the student’s Principal Advisor and
Supervisory Committee (if applicable) and the Graduate Program Director. Students who wish
to take a Leave of Absence for more than two successive semesters must submit a written
application for approval by the Associate Vice-President, Research, and Dean, Graduate Studies.
Time spent on Leave of Absence will not be included in the calculation of time to the completion
of the degree (cf. Graduate Studies General Policies 6007)

Parental Leave of Absence:

Parental leave may be taken by an enrolled graduate student at the time of pregnancy, birth or
adoption, and/or to provide full-time care during the child's first year. Parental leave must be
completed within twelve months of the date of birth or custody. Parental leave can be taken for a
maximum of three semesters.

# 6010: Graduate Studies Human Subjects Ethics Review

Human Subjects Ethics Review

All research plans involving human subjects must be reviewed by and receive the approval of the
OCAD U Research Ethics Board.


# 6011: Graduate Studies Submission and Examination of Master’s Theses and
MRPs

Submission and Examination of Master’s Theses and Major Research
Papers/Projects

Except in the case of executive master’s programs, a candidate for a master’s degree will
undertake research and produce a thesis or Major Research Paper/Major Research Project
(MRP). (Cf. the specific requirements of each program.) Subject to the approval of the Graduate
Program Committee at the outset of the student’s course of study, a candidate may write his/her
thesis or MRP and be examined in French.

Binding arrangements are made through the Office of Graduate Studies. Students are required
to pay binding and processing costs at the time of the final submission. The thesis or MRP will
not be considered submitted until these fees have been paid.


Thesis Guidelines

Submission of the Thesis for Examination:

      Depending on program requirements, candidates must supply one paper copy of the
       thesis produced in conformity with the Guidelines for the Preparation of the Thesis, to
       each member of the Supervisory Committee and the Graduate Program Director.

      Supervisory Committee members shall review a completed version of the thesis and send
       a signed “Pre-Exam” form to the Graduate Program Director verifying that the thesis is
       of sufficient quality to proceed to formal examination and indicating three potential
OCAD University Graduate Student Handbook 2012/2013                                          121
       external examiners to participate in the thesis examination and defence. The Graduate
       Program Director shall review the thesis and sign the Pre-Exam form if the thesis is
       ready to proceed.

Examining Committee:

      The Examining Committee is named by the Graduate Program Director, in consultation
       with the Principal Advisor and the date, place, and time of the defence determined.

      The Examining Committee consists of the Graduate Program Director, the Principal
       Advisor, the Supervisory Committee member, an internal faculty member, and an
       External Examiner (five members in total).

      The External Examiner must not have any affiliation with OCAD U or the candidate that
       might be construed as creating a conflict of interest.


Preparation for Thesis Examination:

Copies of the thesis shall be distributed to members of the Examining Committee by the Office
of Graduate Studies at least three weeks prior to the scheduled date of the oral defence, along
with a covering letter explaining the status of the thesis and the range of options for its
disposition.

Thesis Exhibition and Defence:

                     Theses may culminate with a thesis exhibition/presentation reviewed on
                      site by the Examining Committee.

                     Normally the defence occurs simultaneously with the thesis exhibition.
                      Following review of the exhibition by the Examining Committee, the
                      candidate defends the thesis in an oral examination that is open to the
                      university community. In the examination, candidates will be required to
                      give evidence that they have a thorough knowledge of the discipline(s) in
                      which they have been working.

                     All graduate thesis defences will have the Examining Committee and the
                      candidate physically present at the examination. In situations where the
                      external examiner cannot attend in person, the external examiner may be
                      asked to review the thesis and provide a detailed written assessment of
                      the thesis and questions that will be asked during the defence by the
                      Graduate Program Director.

                     The Examining Committee and the defence examination will be chaired
                      by the Graduate Program Director or designate.

                     A quorum consists of 50% plus one of the Examining Committee.

                     Subject to the policy of individual graduate programs, any member of the
                      OCAD U community is free to attend an oral thesis defence.

OCAD University Graduate Student Handbook 2012/2013                                          122
                       The Chair will give priority to questions from members of the Examining
                        Committee and will adjourn the examination when the Examining
                        Committee decides that further questioning is unnecessary.

                       The deliberations of the Examining Committee are held and delivered to
                        the candidate in camera.

                       It is the responsibility of the Chair to see that a report on the examination
                        is prepared before the committee adjourns.

                       The voting is based on a simple majority.

Examination Outcomes:

Five recommendations are open to the Examining Committee:
        a. the thesis is approved as it stands, or
        b. the thesis is approved provided certain minor revisions are made by a certain date
           and approved by the Principal Advisor, or
        c. the thesis is approved provided certain major revisions are made by a certain date
           and approved by all members of the Examining Committee, or
        d. the thesis is not approved as it stands but may be resubmitted and re-examined by
           some or all of the Examining Committee (this may or may not involve another oral
           defence), or
        e. the thesis is not approved.

If revisions are required, each member of the Examining Committee must provide a written list
of required revisions, consistent with verbal feedback provided to the student, to the Graduate
Program Director within one week of the oral defence. Minor revisions are defined as
corrections that can be made immediately to the satisfaction of the Principal Advisor. Major
revisions are defined as corrections requiring structural changes, or other substantive revision.
When a thesis is accepted with major revisions, a precise description of the modifications must
be included with the Examining Committee’s report. It is then the responsibility of the
candidate’s Principal Advisor to demonstrate to the Examining Committee that the required
revisions have been made.

Final Submission:

                       The Graduate Program Director, in consultation with the Principal
                        Advisor, must verify that appropriate corrections have been made, and
                        then submit a summary report of the thesis defence and examination to
                        the Office of Graduate Studies.
                       An approved thesis may be submitted at any time following the oral
                        defence. However, candidates wishing to graduate at convocation should
                        refer to the deadlines for submission of final copies of the successfully
                        defended thesis. Candidates not meeting these deadlines are required to
                        re-register until the thesis has been formally submitted and approved by
                        the university.
                       Formal submission of the thesis to the university is made to the Office of
                        Graduate Studies, where the format, including visual documentation, will
                        be checked.

OCAD University Graduate Student Handbook 2012/2013                                              123
                       After the thesis has been formally approved, the candidate submits the
                        required copies and pays the cost for binding and microfilming/electronic
                        processing.
                       When the thesis is submitted, the candidate may choose to complete a “
                        Thesis Non-Exclusive License” form. The license enables Library and
                        Archives Canada to microfilm, reproduce and/or harvest theses for
                        inclusion in Theses Canada and other international bibliographies and
                        databases.


Major Research Paper/Project Guidelines

Submission of the MRP for Examination:

                       The Graduate Program Director will identify a two person Examining
                        Committee of Principal Advisor and Second Reader and report the
                        formation of this committee to the Office of Graduate Studies.

              Students should refer to guidelines provided by their graduate program regarding
               processes for examination, defence (if applicable), and final approval.

Final Submission:

              The Graduate Program Director, in consultation with the Principal Advisor, must
               verify that the MRP is approved and that appropriate corrections have been
               made. This verification must be provided to the Office of Graduate Studies.
              An approved MRP may be submitted at any time following final approval.
               However, candidates wishing to graduate at convocation should refer to the
               deadlines for submission of final approved copies. Candidates not meeting these
               deadlines are required to re-register until the MRP has been formally submitted
               and approved by the university.
              Formal submission of the MRP to the university is made to the Office of Graduate
               Studies, where the format, including visual documentation, will be checked.
              After the MRP has been formally approved, the candidate submits the required
               copies and pays the cost for binding and microfilming/electronic processing.


# 6012: Graduate Studies Awarding of the Degree

Award of the Degree

Application for Graduation:

Every candidate for a graduate degree or diploma is responsible for applying for graduation by
the published deadline using forms available from the Office of the Registrar.

Award of the Degree:
Award of the degree is by resolution of Senate.

Transcripts:

OCAD University Graduate Student Handbook 2012/2013                                          124
Certified official transcripts of the student’s graduate academic record may be obtained from the
Office of the Registrar. Only individually signed copies with the university seal are valid.


# 6013: Graduate Studies Appeals Process

Graduate students are encouraged to seek informal resolution of problems through discussions
with their course instructor, Principal Advisor, Graduate Program Director, and the Graduate
Studies Officer.

A grade appeal is a written request from a student that an academic decision be changed, based
on evidence supplied by the student.

A student may appeal the grade received in a course. An appeal may be filed because the
student:
       a) questions the grade assigned, or
       b) believes that the method of evaluation was not valid or reasonable in the
          circumstances, or
       c) believes that the evaluation criteria deviated substantially from the course outline
          without reasonable notice, or
       d) believes that the university’s published regulations governing evaluation were
          misapplied.

Procedure:

   1. Students may appeal the grade received in a course within the published deadlines
      in the university Calendar.
   2. Step 1: Initial Appeal to Teaching Faculty Member

Informal Stage:
           a. The student must speak directly to the teaching faculty member and attempt to
              resolve the matter informally before proceeding with a formal grade appeal.

Formal Stage:
          a. If the matter is not resolved informally, the student may submit a letter of appeal
              within the published deadlines, to the Office of Graduate Studies.
          b. The Office of Graduate Studies will forward a copy of the grade appeal to the
              teaching faculty.
          c. The teaching faculty shall respond to the student, through the Office of Graduate
              Studies, in writing, within 10 working days of receiving the grade appeal.
              The written response will include:
                      i.   The method of evaluation in terms of course objectives for the course
                           in question.
                     ii.   The manner in which the method of evaluation was applied.
                    iii.   The teaching faculty’s decision on the student appeal.
          d. If the student does not accept the response and decision of the teaching faculty,
              or if the teaching faculty is unavailable to respond, the student may request that
              the Office of Graduate Studies forward the grade appeal to the appropriate
              Graduate Program Director (GPD) within 10 working days of receiving the
              teaching faculty’s response; or, if no response was delivered, within 20

OCAD University Graduate Student Handbook 2012/2013                                          125
              working days of the date the student submitted the grade appeal to the
              Office of Graduate Studies.
           e. The Office of Graduate Studies will forward the file to the Graduate Program
              Director and will give the teaching faculty notice that the appeal has been
              forwarded.

   3. Step 2: Appeal to Graduate Program Director

           a. The appropriate Graduate Program Director (GPD) is the Director of the program
              in which the course was offered, or in the case of a shared course, the GPD of the
              program in which the student is enrolled.
           b. The Graduate Program Director may meet with the student and the teaching
              faculty separately to discuss the appeal and the teaching faculty’s response.
           c. The Graduate Program Director may:
                 i.   remit the work to be re-evaluated by the teaching faculty according to the
                      appropriate evaluation methods;
                ii.   grant no relief to the student from the grade appealed;
               iii.   alter the student’s grade by lowering or raising it;
               iv.    where the student agrees, initiate a procedure for re-evaluation of the
                      student’s work by another teaching faculty or by a panel of three teaching
                      faculty;
                v.    permit the student to submit new work or to re-write a test or
                      examination to be graded by another teaching faculty, whose decision will
                      be final.

           d. Where the GPD initiates a procedure for re-evaluation, the GPD shall appoint the
              new evaluators as soon as practicable, normally within 5 working days of the
              date of the meeting. Where a re-evaluation occurs, a written assessment of the
              student’s work by the teaching faculty will be forwarded to the GPD as soon as
              practicable.
           e. The GPD will release a decision, in writing, with reasons, as soon as practicable,
              normally within 15 working days of the appeal being forwarded, or 5
              working days following the receipt by the GPD of the written assessment
              of the student’s work in the case of an alternative evaluation, or the re-
              examination or re-submission by the student.
           f. The decision of the GPD is final and irrevocable.


Graduate Studies Committee

Where the grade appeal is not successful and only if there was procedural irregularity,
the student may appeal the decision to the Graduate Studies Committee by letter of appeal
within 15 working days of receiving the decision.

Time Limits

The time limits in this policy may be extended with the consent of the parties or by the decision-
maker at the relevant stage of the proceeding provided that the decision-maker is satisfied that
no party will be unduly prejudiced by the extension.

Progress Evaluations:
OCAD University Graduate Student Handbook 2012/2013                                           126
Progress Evaluations may be appealed to the Senate Committee on Graduate Studies.


# 6014: Graduate Studies Intellectual Property

Intellectual Property

The Copyright Act protects the expressions of ideas. When, as a requirement of an academic
program, a student submits to the university work that is eligible for copyright, the university
acknowledges the student's sole copyright ownership with the following conditions:

1. The physical document submitted to OCAD U by a student becomes the property of OCAD U.

2. OCAD U receives a non-exclusive royalty-free licence to:
 i)    circulate the thesis as part of OCAD U Library collection;
ii)    make copies or representations of the thesis for academic and scholarly research
purposes within OCAD U;
iii)   make copies of the thesis or dissertation deposited in OCAD U Library at the request of
other universities or bona fide institutions for academic and scholarly research purposes;
iv)    submit the thesis to Library and Archives Canada, in the required format (optional and
with the permission of the student) and,
v)     publish the abstract of the thesis in hard copy and electronic form.

3.     The work has not been completed as part of a third party agreement in which OCAD U
and the student are required to transfer the copyright ownership to a third party.

The student retains the exclusive right to publish the thesis or sections of the thesis as a
monograph and/or articles in professional and academic journals.

Computer programs written or partially written by a student in support of a thesis or
dissertation may have potential value as a marketable intellectual property. The university
acknowledges the student's ownership of all rights with respect to such software except as
follows:

   a) Students may be required to sign a waiver of rights to software by the academic
      department for which a supervised project or thesis is to be undertaken, or by the faculty
      supervisor of the project or thesis.
   b) The university assumes a non-exclusive, paid-up, royalty-free license to use, for the
      university's administration, education and research activities, all software written using
      university facilities or written in support of academic work at the university. This license
      does not include the right to use the software for commercial purposes or to distribute
      the software to others.
   c) Students acquire no rights to software written under supervision in the course of
      employment by the university.




OCAD University Graduate Student Handbook 2012/2013                                            127
# 6016: Graduate Studies Special Studies Courses

Special Studies

Special Studies courses (Independent Study, Internships and Residencies) offer graduate
students the opportunity to earn credits outside of the scheduled curriculum. All applications
require approval from:

   1. The faculty member supervising and grading the Special Studies course.
   2. The student’s Principal Advisor (if applicable)
   3. The Graduate Program Director.

Special Studies courses are subject to the following overall limitations:

       a) Graduate students may take the maximum number of Special Studies credits defined
       by their program.
       b) Under exceptional circumstances the Graduate Program Director may approve a
       variation of the credit limit.
       c) Only students in good standing will be considered for Special Studies.
       d) All Special Studies applications must be accompanied by a typed proposal
       demonstrating how the Special Study will advance the applicant’s overall course of study
       at the university.

Special Studies applications should be developed by the student in consultation with the faculty
member who will be supervising the Special Studies course. Completed applications must be
submitted to the Graduate Program Director in advance of the deadlines published in the
current university calendar for registration and course change periods.

Failure to meet deadlines or follow approved policies and procedures will result in a failing
grade being recorded on the student’s academic record.

   i) Independent Study

Independent Study courses provide graduate students with the opportunity to undertake studies
of significance to their educational objectives, where otherwise not available through the regular
university curriculum. Independent studies are supervised and evaluated by OCAD U faculty
members.

The Independent Study proposal must be approved in writing by the supervising faculty
member, the student’s Principal Advisor, and the Graduate Program Director. Students are
required to initiate regular contact with their supervising faculty member throughout the
semester. The evaluation criteria for the project are to be defined by the supervising faculty
member.

       ii) Internship

Internships provide graduate students with opportunities to gain experience in the professional
worlds of art, design, criticism and curating that will complement their studies. On-site work is
performed under the guidance of the internship sponsor and the internship credit is supervised
and evaluated by an OCAD U faculty member.

OCAD University Graduate Student Handbook 2012/2013                                              128
The internship proposal must be signed by the sponsor to indicate their willingness to
participate in this educational experience and to verify that qualified personnel will supervise
the student. The credit value of internships varies according to the number of hours worked and
must be indicated on the Internship Application form (see Table 1 below). Completed proposals
must be approved by the supervising faculty member, the student’s Principal Advisor, and the
Graduate Program Director.

The internship must not be at the student’s place of regular employment. Internships may or
may not be remunerated. Internships are graded as pass/fail.

                           Table 1: Credit Value of Internships


                         Minimum Hours           Credits
                         100                     3
                         200                     6
                         300                     9

       iii) Residency

Residencies provide graduate students with the opportunity to study in new environments and
communities and to work with new technologies that are programmatically relevant and
pedagogically transferrable. On-site work is performed under the guidance of the residency host
(as applicable) and the residency credit is supervised and evaluated by an OCAD U faculty
member.

Students may apply for approved residencies, or may submit a residency opportunity for
approval by their Graduate Program Committee.

The credit value of residencies varies according to the duration of the residency and must be
indicated on the application form. The credit value will be determined by the Graduate Program
Committee.

Residencies are graded as pass/fail.

Application forms for Special Studies courses can be found on the OCAD U Graduate Studies
website under “Forms, Policies and Handbook” at:

http://www.ocadu.ca/programs/graduate_studies/forms_policies_handbook.htm




OCAD University Graduate Student Handbook 2012/2013                                         129

				
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