Matt Bomer and Tim DeKay by daet

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									Matt Bomer&amp Tim DeKay Page 1

Matt:

Thank you, thank you guys for coming and doing this and helping us out. [Totally]. You tell me what to do, should I just monologue? It was great. We shot right in the middle of Columbus Circle. So, it was completely surreal and amazing and one of those moments where you feel like you’re kind of in a dream. It’s like, I never thought that I’d be filming in the plaza of Columbus Circle. Is it exciting to be able to film in New York, so you’re actually filming in the locations that you’re pretending to be at? As opposed to, you know, here at a side street in Toronto and pretend that, you know— Yeah, no, New York can’t be replicated. The energy of it, the architecture, the cabs honking and cursing you out right before they call “action.” It just can’t be replicated anywhere else and I think it’s so inherently a character in any film or TV show that takes place there. So, it’s just an unbelievable blessing to get to work here and feed off that energy. It just informs the show so much and the characters so much and the rhythm so much. What did you think of the character when you initially read the pilot episode? Like, did you like the person that you were about to play? What were your questions? What did you think about your character initially? Well, what I loved about him from the get go, was that he was flawed. He wasn’t—I mean, he had this—he has this veneer of the charming, hyperintelligent, eloquent, sly mastermind, but underneath, he was really a kind of diehard romantic who would go to any lengths to find the love of his life. Not only was that his motivating force, but it was also kind of his Achilles heel, because then it ends up getting him caught and—but I liked the fact that, even though the fun he puts on is so suave and debonair, underneath there’s somebody who is also—has a hard time—has always really relied on himself and doesn’t really trust a lot of people. Are there elements of that, that you would say match up with your own personality? I mean, what of him is already in you?

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Matt:

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[laughter] Matt: I don’t want to say zero, because I mean, I like—I guess we all like to think of ourselves as romantics. But, I like to think of myself as romantic and I guess I understood that part of him and that’s—that to me, has always been the driving force. I mean, his compliance with the FBI and all that stuff, ultimately is really so he can get closer to Kate and find her.

Matt Bomer&amp Tim DeKay Page 2 So, to me, that’s the core of the character and that’s the part that I relate to the most. The suave and debonair stuff is, you know, really fun to get to play, but I would say that I fall short of the Neal Caffrey bar in terms of that. But—I’m trying to think if there’s anything else I want to say about that. Yeah, yeah, hi. Panel: Matt: Panel: What’s up man? What’s up? I love your hair. It’s so cool. Thank you. So, he—Neal, lies with ease and sort of breezes through life without—what do you think, besides romanticism, is his—are his redeeming qualities? Because he seems like kind of a—[laughs] you know, my beautiful house and my beautiful lady [indiscernible]. Well, good, I mean, I want people to—I don’t want people to think he’s the perfect guy. I want his flaws to come out, because that’s what it means to be a human being. Human beings are good, they have shadow, every single one of us has redeeming qualities and every single one of us has qualities that people can hold against us. That’s what makes us human. I’m not interested in playing characters who are perfect or who are, you know—I think the fact that he does try to create that life for himself, is what makes him human and is his redeeming quality. Because he’s trying to cover up for ultimately a life before that that was really, as a kid, probably really unfulfilling. And, he—that’s his way of controlling and controlling his environment, controlling his life, having some sense of control. And, you know, I think he’s some—but he—I don’t think he’s somebody, he is somebody who wants to have fun in any given circumstances. So, if he has the option of $700 a month getting him a flat in the ghetto, or an amazing house with Diahann Carroll as my landlady, that’s what I’m going to choose. He finds that. He has—he—I mean, he just puts that in his circle, that’s what he finds, he finds a way to live life to the fullest on whatever he’s given. Because I think when he was younger, he did not have any of those things. I think he’s somebody who from a very early age, had to fend for himself. Panel: Matt: Panel: So, yeah, I was going to ask you, this is really [indiscernible]. And, he does with lie with ease. He’s a social engineer, that’s his job. So, what do you—like, you seem to have all this whole back story, like, are we going to see, as the season goes on, more of his back story? Like, where did he learn it all and how did he go from a guy who’s, you know, just trying to make his girlfriend happy, to [indiscernible]—

Matt:

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Matt:

You know, I hope, honestly, that that can come out in certain moments through my performance. I want the character to maintain mystery. I want him to—if I had my way, I would hope that by the end of—if we were blessed enough that by the end of the last episode of the seventh season, you still wouldn’t know everything about Neal Caffrey and you still wouldn’t know if he was playing you or if he was telling you the truth. [Indiscernible]? But, you know, his profession, I don’t like to think of it as a con artist, I think of it as a social engineer. He’s—I think he’s kind of—I’ll tell you this, I think he’s probably somebody who from a very early age, had to get his—had to find out a way to get himself to school and probably first learned how to lie to people as a kid, to get his bus fare, you know, and it only grew from there. Now as far as his role, you know, as a criminal mastermind, what type of real life research did you do? I mean, are you hanging out in a prison? Are you— [laughs]— Well, I don’t want to give away all of the secrets of the research I did, but what I can tell you is I read a lot of books. Everything from, you know, obviously Frank Avengale’s memoir, Catch Me If You Can, to a lot of just books about social engineering. Most of them written by people who were in the same circumstances. A guy named Kevin Mitnick, who wrote a book called The Art of Deception that was very informative to me and he was a social engineer who them became—he, you know, does some kind of high tec computer software engineering. Because from a very early age, he had to fend for himself and he learned how to break into all the computers before they had any kind of security that could defend against it. So now he develops that kind of software. But I read a lot of books, and then I also tried to get some inspiration from films of the same ilk and the same genre. Everything from, you know, Danny Ocean in Oceans 11, to Cary Grant’s character in To Catch a Thief, with even a little bit of Ferris Bueller thrown in there.

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So, you’re kind of thinking of that and channeling that when you were kind of getting into that lock and getting into that character, you’re putting all of that together with that background? Yeah, I mean, I think there are different elements that you use for different scenes. Like, you know, the other day I was trying to milk a little extra sympathy out of Elizabeth, Tiffani Thiessen’s character, where she’s helping me after I’ve, you know, hurt myself. And, I think that was more like Ferris

Matt:

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Bueller. Whereas when I go underground to bust the Chinese gambling ring, it’s more Danny Ocean. So, it just depends on what the given circumstances are. Panel: Matt: Panel: Matt: Panel: No brushes with the law, yourself? No, right. But, your [indiscernible]. That’s right. So in your opinion, what are some elements of White Collar that help it stand apart from other crime dramas that we see on TV? Well, I think—I always say I think before I say—please cut that out. [laughs] Because it’s just—I should just say it. The signature of USA Network is, characters welcome. So, first and foremost, you’re gong to get all the great procedural stuff. It’s really intelligently written. We’re—I’m no fool, I know this is a writer’s medium. You can put the biggest stars on the TV screen, but if the writing’s not there, the shows aren’t going to last and we’re so blessed to have Jeff Easton at the helm. Because these scripts are really smart and fun and unique. The White Collar world is unique, hasn’t really been completely explored yet and so you’re going to get all the fun procedural stuff, but at the same time, there’s going to be a lot of character elements that come into play as well. That keep it light and fun and sometimes serious. So, you do get more back story elements and a lot of interplay, fun interplay between characters that you might not get on a show that’s straight procedural. Panel: Matt: They plan to keep a lot of that humor and to break up the [indiscernible]. Yeah, oh my gosh, yeah. I mean, it varies from episode to episode, but there are always—there’s always moments of levi—there are always moments of levity in every episode, yeah. I wanted to ask [indiscernible]—

Matt:

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El TV Diablo: I think your character is really likeable, especially for the ladies. [laughs] But I mean, he is a thief and a con man, so do you think he’s a good guy? Do you think he should be liked? I mean, do you want him to be liked?

Matt Bomer&amp Tim DeKay Page 5 As an actor, you can never judge the character you’re playing. I think—I just said I think. I want, like, an electric shock that goes up my [indiscernible]. If you approach a character from a place of judgment, you’re really digging yourself a hole as an actor. So, what I try to focus on is who he is and what motivates him and play the truth of it. I really can’t concern myself whether people like him or don’t like him or think he’s a good guy or a bad guy. I can only play what’s written in the given circumstances. So, even if you’re playing a serial killer, you don’t think of—to go in from a place of judgment, you might not agree morally with who they are or what they do, but to play them truthfully, you have to try to get in their world and under their skin and look through their eyes. So, I tried to mine out some qualities with Jeff from the get go, that I thought were more redeeming. You know, I think there’s a really quixotic quality about the character and ultimately, underneath it all, he’s kind of a three-year-old. I mean, he doesn’t have a lot of impulse control. He doesn’t even understand the concept of no. There’s always a way to get into things and he’s always testing his boundaries. So, there’s a certain part of that, that I hope will come across as interesting and fun and unique and not something you’re used to seeing from a criminal mastermind. But, you know, you just try to go as deep as you can and play the truth and good, bad, nice, evil, whatever is going to play itself out. Panel: I think when you talk about the social engineering, oh my gosh, you were totally going! [laughs] Go ahead, please. Go ahead. Now I just want to talk a little bit about when you first got involved with the show. Because I know just—I wanted to know how much you knew about the character when you were first approached or, you know, when you first auditioned or how much it was and how much you kind of drew in. Because just when I got the DVD and I was reading about what it is, I immediately assumed, just based on the plot, that your character would be this rich boy who had had everything handed to him on a silver platter, yet that wasn’t enough. Because it seems like the people who commit—a lot of the people who commit white collar crimes, are the ones who have kind of always had money, but wanted more. So, I was surprised when he—when it came out that he came from a more sparse background. So, I mean, did you know that going in? I mean, what were your expectations when you were first getting involved in this? Well, a lot of my research actually indicated the contrary, in terms of white collar crimes.

Matt:

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Panel: Matt: Panel: Matt:

Well, see I [indiscernible]— Depending on what type of crime. [Indiscernible] corporate crimes, because that’s more [indiscernible]. Yeah, corporate is different. Yeah, no, this is somebody who’s been doing— who probably started out as a grifter and moved more into—one of—he—I think he didn’t have those things. I think he didn’t have all the things that would be associated with white collar, so he wanted to build that life for himself and he intentionally cultured himself and familiarized himself with art and that whole world and everything that—everything you think high society would mean. But, all I really had to go on was the pilot script, which is what I read, which changed drastically by the time we shot it. But, I fortunately had a good deal of time before we started to kind of really think a little bit deeper and talk to Jeff about certain things and go with my own impulses as well. For me, the more interesting choice was always somebody who didn’t have it and wanted to create that for himself.

Panel:

I just—I did and I found it interesting, because I did think it was going to be more of a corporate kind of Wall Street type, you know, thing when I was first hearing about the show. So—and especially since that’s in the news right now and so I really like how they kind of went in a different direction. Which I think is so interesting. Immediately I thought, once we got picked up, I was, like, all right, when’s the Bernie Maidoss [ph] coming in. That’s what I was just thinking. But, what makes Jeff such a great writer is he completely went the opposite way, into more interesting things in that world that we don’t know about. So, you know, we’re seven episodes in, I don’t know if that script’s going to come in one day, but he is such a talented writer, he sort of went the opposite way, which I thought was interesting. Can you tell us a little about how you became involved with the project and your audition process and how that all went? I just had—I mean, I’m sure they had probably a pretty big list of actors. I came in and did the initial read and then I tested once, they still weren’t sure if they wanted me for the part and then I tested again and then got the part. And then—is it okay for me to say all that stuff? [laughs] Somebody might get

Matt:

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Matt:

Matt Bomer&amp Tim DeKay Page 7 mad at me in the network. But, what’s great about the network, is they really take their time to find the people they really believe in and you really got to win them over. And, that was really, ultimately, a very rewarding process for me. Panel: Matt: At what process did you and Tim test together? I had had the part for a little bit and then we went to find Peter and from the minute Tim stepped in the room and the first word that came out of his mouth, I was, like, I said, this is our guy, you know, he’s amazing. Tim’s such a wonderful actor and such an amazing human being and a real blessing to get to work with every day. He has this Midwestern quality about him, this sort of wholesome quality that you can’t teach anybody. You can’t—you either have it or you don’t and it plays so intrinsically into the character, because as gruff as he is and as hard as he is, you also believe that his heart is soft enough that he would ultimately empathize with somebody like Neal. So, I think that’s what I recognized right away and just his playfulness and he got what was funny about the character. He got what was interesting about the character. He got what made their interplay interesting and I’m just—I feel really lucky to get to work with him. Panel: Now speaking of the interplay, I know, like, your character works more from instinct and impulse and then, you know, Burke is definitely more analytical and, you know, deliberate with everything that he does. And, that really make the characters playful and work together in the story. How do you think that translates to real life? I mean, do you feel like you’re more on the deliberate side? Or are you more on the--? Am I more on the deliberate side or am I more— More impulsive and [indiscernible]. Am I more impulsive? I would like to say that I’m not impulsive, but I’m still pretty impulsive. I think— You’re not making lists at the grocery store— No, no, I think—especially on the work schedule I’m on right now, I think I’m taking it moment to moment. But, maybe that wanes with age, I don’t know, I hope I always stay pretty impulsive, but I’m not really—yeah, I like to just go moment by moment.

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Panel:

So, would you say, between the two of you, like, each of your personalities, you actually do have an element to that in your real life, of him being a little bit more of that [indiscernible]. Yes, I would say so. Tim will always be out there waiting when the van is ready to pick him up. I might be five or ten late. How did you guys, you know, once you knew all the cast members were in place, did you guys have—like, how did you and Tim bond? Or how did you, like—because you have such a different social dynamic with each person, like you said, social engineering, you know, how did you kind of network with these people off camera, in order to build what you have on camera? Gosh, I don’t—I never really even thought of it like that. I just tried to get to know everybody and see what their process was and see what their—what they wanted to bring to the table. We had a table early on, very fortunately, so we kind of got a sense of what everybody was going to bring to the table. I mean, I did look at them in terms of—in certain terms, of a social engineer, but I tried to let all that stuff come out in terms of just the scene working, which is ultimately, there’s always some kind of agenda behind Neal’s actions. Whether he’s charming you or wooing you or, you know, confiding in you, whatever it is, there’s something else to be gained usually. So, I guess I just kind of thought about what that would be with each character. But, in terms of our personal relationships, I just tried to have fun with everybody and be playful with everybody and let them know it was a safe environment to do that, on and off camera. What’s something about you that we won’t find on, like, an IMBd page or your bio? I always try to answer this question and I always sound like an asshole. No, you don’t have to be, like, snappy, just something—like, I don’t know how people answer that question, be, like, I really—like, reruns of the Golden Girls. Like, just something [indiscernible] something about you that we’re not going to know if we, like, read your bio online. I don’t know, I mean, I’m pretty—I’m a pretty chill person. I’m kind of a homebody and I like to just hang out with friends and have dinner. I’m not, you know—I’m definitely not Neal Caffrey in the sense that I’m not, you know, drinking a $500 bottle of wine at a nightclub. I’m just—I’m pretty chill [indiscernible]. Like, what’s on your DVR? Like, I work for a pop culture website, so we— [indiscernible] watch a lot of TV, so what do you—like, what are your—

Matt:

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Matt:

30 Rock, it’s very eclectic. 30 Rock, college football, which I never watched— [Indiscernible] which team, we have to know. Well, I would love to say my alma mater, which is CMU, but they’re division three, so that’s, like, basically the same as my high school. But, my sister went to UT, University of Texas, so I got to say I hook them. You can watch a game on DVR though, like, how do you now know who won if you [indiscernible]. Well, that’s the thing, well, believe me, with the hours I’m working right now, I have no clue. But, you know, a lot of times the game is white noise, I’m not going to lie, but I’ll have that, if it’s an important game I want to see. Or, I also like—I really like—I wonder if this is our competition. [laughs] What’s—I can’t even think of it, my brain is so full of lines and monologues right now. What’s the show—Dateline, is that our competition? [Indiscernible]. No? Good, Dateline— [Indiscernible] primetime fun. Maybe I’m super morbid, I don’t know, I never got into it till this year, but Keith Morrison, is hysterical there— [Indiscernible]. He could be, like, she didn’t know. [laughs] [Indiscernible] little did he know, she was weaving a web he could never escape from. But, he’s so sardonic, he’s so—I’m, like, you are so cold. How could he be so sardonic about this? I saw it, oh my, genius, I can’t believe that it’s not more appreciated. [Indiscernible] Chris Hansen in that, To Catch a Predator [indiscernible]. Yeah, yeah, so I guess maybe that’s a little morbid, I don’t know, but— Do you watch Dollhouse? I—you know, I watch it whenever I can to support Eliza, yeah, but she’s fantastic on it. Gorgeous and hot and all the stuff she should be on that show. It’s really cool, I mean, I think Joss is obviously an amazing mind. So, the

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Matt Bomer&amp Tim DeKay Page 10 stuff they’re kind of unfolding on that show has been really interesting and cool. Panel: Are you having fun wearing all the different costumes with, like, you know, prison and then you wear these really hot, like, suits? Well, you know— You look really hot—

Matt: Panel: [laughter] Panel: Matt:

Sorry, [indiscernible] sexiness, and it’s so you. Oh, speaking of accidental sexiness, hello [indiscernible]. I have to say, I think the wardrobe really informs the character greatly. I mean, you know, when I put on one of those suits, like, you feel like one of the Rat Pack guys, you feel that kind of—yeah, and the fedora especially, when you get it down over one eye and you feel like maybe you can trust me, maybe you can’t. There’s something about that that really helped me kind of get into the skin of the character. What about the hats—what—did you already know how to do that? Or is that something you had to practice for, like, a month? No, I had to practice, yeah. I—that was something that Jeff had told me I was going to have to do and had kind of given me, like, a two second tutorial and then, like, good luck. So, I did it on my own, but then of course when we got to filming, I got the wardrobe, maybe the day of or maybe the day before. So, I think I stayed up for a good while the night before, because every hat has a different weight and balance to it. So, I was definitely spending some time trying to familiarize myself with that one, so we could get it. But, I think we ended up getting it on the first take. Perfect, first take. This can actually be for both of you. Hi welcome. Thanks. You both have had a lot of experience working with a lot of different television networks. How is working with USA? I mean, they approach [indiscernible] like you were saying, like they take—they very strongly support their dramas, you’re at what, thirteen episode thing? Like you know

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Matt Bomer&amp Tim DeKay Page 11 yourself in thirteen episodes, you’re not, you know, going to come in to work and find out some show on the CW is already cancelled. Matt: Panel: Matt: Yeah, [indiscernible]. And, how is it in terms of—obviously not [indiscernible]? No, it doesn’t, no, it doesn’t stop. No, that is a great feeling, artistically, it’s a great feeling to know that you’ve got—you know, go do thirteen, go do a bunch, as opposed to oh, we got four and they didn’t kill us yet, we got four more, they didn’t kill us yet. So, you feel, there’s a comfort there and I think they stay true to their logo, characters welcome. They—as opposed to some other networks I’ve worked on, namely HBO, it was more—HBO, interesting, they shot all of their episodes before they aired the first one. So, they were much more—they were much more concerned about the art of the entire season and—but it feels like USA is more concerned about the characters. I think that’s what drives their shows. So it’s fun, as an actor, it’s great. Tim: Yeah, I would say—and it’s going to totally sound like I’m kissing ass, but I don’t care, because I would say it whether I was on this network or not. I think—I really believe Bonnie Hammer is one of the best minds working in the entertainment industry today and I think the network, you know, it all bleeds down from the top. And, I think they really take their time with material, with casting, this—you know, this was not something that—where we were cast, we’re shooting the next day. They really believe, only pick a handful of things to do and really believe in them when they do. And, then support them when they’re there. I don’t feel like I’m on a network where there are seven pilots that have been picked up that I have to compete with for the network’s attention. We have been—they have been so hands on, they’ve been so supportive from the get go and just having that feeling to kind of bolster your confidence as an actor and knowing that they believe in you, it really does help on the set. Panel: Neal and Pete have such a—like, a married personality and a—they almost have, like a little romance kind of [indiscernible]. How will that play out as the series progresses? Like, what kind of [indiscernible] relationship will you guys explore? It’s still—I think that’s a big part of the show and it continues on, you know. We both—I’ve said that we both respect each other. There’s an odd respect that we both enjoy and we know that each other enjoys solving something. Now I—Peter looks at it different, solving something than Neal does, but

Tim:

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they—it’s—and Peter is aware of that. So, he can have Neal go do—perhaps do something that shouldn’t really be done, but he does it. And, I think that out of that, they—and deep, deep, deep down inside, they like each other. They just—they do, they do, they like each other. They say, you know, Peter will tell me, he’s a pain in the ass, blah, blah, blah, but at the end of the day, it’s, like— Panel: Tim: You’re cool. Yeah, well, there’s an episode that we’ve just shot that I think is very telling. Peter has some time off. He has some time off and very telling as to what he does with that time off. Your co-stars sound like pretty iconic roles from earlier things that they’ve done. Like, Willie Garson from Sex and the City— Do you mind if I answer that one really quick before— Oh, sorry, go ahead. I would just say, in terms of perpetuating, I would even go further and say that really, the relationship between these two characters is really the center of the show. And, I think what makes that relationship interesting and something that will continue, they’ll always have things that they clash on. I think Peter is fundamentally one way and Neal is fundamentally one way and they’re both adults, so that’s probably not going to change too drastically. But, I think they have a certain set of strengths and weaknesses that compliment each other well in terms of solving cases. And, so as the series progresses, we sort of find—we get a better idea of what those are and what is interesting is that Neal has so many things going on, but ultimately, the person who effectively ended his—ended, for now, his career as a social engineer, is also the person he really trusts more than anybody. And, I think that’s an interesting dynamic as well, because there’s the complication of he’s also the person who took something away from me. Panel: Well, I have kind of a follow up question about that, because [indiscernible] but one of the things that really struck me in the pilot, was how—I mean, because Peter hunted, for lack of a better term, you know, for years before he actually caught him four years before the pilot took place. Yet it seemed as though he really kind of agreed very quickly to team up with him. I mean, what are—like, why do you think Peter agreed to that as quickly as he did? Like, why don’t you think he tried to kind of resist it longer? I mean, it seems like their friendship really—I mean, it happened, I mean, it’s there.

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Tim:

I think he agreed because we only had that prison location for two days. [laughs] I asked myself that same thing, that’s awful quick [indiscernible]. My wife can—helps me with that, but there is—in addition to solving the cases, and in addition to liking each other and having a very close bond, very close one, there’s another element here and that’s Kate. And, I—and that was—that was a factor when Elizabeth tells Peter—Peter’s saying, there’s more to this, there’s more to this than just some lost love thing. And, she thinks—and she asks him, “Really? You think so? You wouldn’t do this for me?” What? Yeah—ah [indiscernible] it just—it’s—I—also I think for Peter, it’s that much more fun, it’s that much more fun. It’s, like, wow, I got—he’s now in the car with me! And I can ask him all these questions that I’ve been dying to ask and—even though—ah, I envy his lifestyle, to a degree. This is kind of neat. I mean, he’s—you know, Batman now can have the Joker, the Riddler, whomever you want to [indiscernible] with him.

Matt:

And, there’s the opposite too, sorry to interrupt you. There’s the opposite too in that I am—I envy and find fascinating his family—his domestic family life. I’m fascinated by what’s it like to have a real family and a life where you can just settle down and you have breakfast together in the morning and all this. Because I don’t think I ever understood those kind of things. So— It seemed like the chemistry between the two characters though was that aspect of, that, you know, you were his nemesis and he spent so long chasing you, that he came to know you and to respect you. You know, you had to put so much effort into finding him and he had to put so much effort into evading you, that it was almost a relationship built in that aspect. And, now suddenly it’s, like, what’s he really like? You’re right, we kind of knew each other, we kind of knew each other. He sent me birthday presents and—right, we kind of—cookies— [Indiscernible]. Right, we knew each other, we knew each other. And, then the other element that’s great, that’s written in this, is that there’s no—the whole element of violence is not in it. You know, so it’s—so that sense of being together could—is he going to pull a knife on me? Pull a gun—that’s just not in there. So, it’s not that— It’s also not Neal’s nature either. He’s not a gun guy, he’s not a knife guy, he’s a mind guy.

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Matt Bomer&amp Tim DeKay Page 14 I’m taking another stab at my question. Yes.

Panel: Matt: [laughter] Panel:

[Indiscernible] audience. So, yeah, you have co-stars that kind of had, like, pretty iconic projects that they were tied to before this and I mean, I’m dating myself, but, like, Tiffani as Kelly Kapowski, then Valerie on 90210 and has done a lot of other great shows since then. But, and like— That’s not dating yourself. [laughs] If you’d been, like, going back to Diahann Carroll’s show— Did you have any, like, and Willie Garson, like I said, from Sex and the City, I mean, these are characters that, like, the public sort of feels like you sort of have—you know them or you have a perception of how they’re going to be as people, because of their characters, which is completely ridiculous. But, did you guys feel like you had any preconceived notions of what they would be like from before you met them and now you’re, like, ah—[indiscernible] is my co-star. Like, it—what—I mean, how—what’s the dynamic like there? Did you think that you would take that into it? I never saw any one—either one of those shows [laughs] or the other one. Oh, I saw Saved by the Bell. You did. I saw Saved by the Bell, yeah. So, I didn’t—I certainly knew Tiffani and I knew her face and knew of her certainly. But, I didn’t know her from those other two shows. So, it was great. She walked in, I had already been cast as Peter, she walked in, we gave each other a hug and I could tell right away, oh, please, please be good. And, it’s—and we read it and she [indiscernible] and I thought, oh, I think we found her, I think we found her. I was just glad that there were famous people on the show. [laughs] [Indiscernible] I am. I think—I mean, I knew from [indiscernible] and I was kind of wondering, just when I was watching the pilot for White Collar, like, I mean, obviously as an actor, any previous role you have on your resume, kind of helps you get the next job. But, I mean, it seems like—I saw a few kind of hints [indiscernible]

Matt:

Panel:

Tim: Matt: Tim: Matt: Tim:

Matt:

Panel:

Matt Bomer&amp Tim DeKay Page 15 like, that very kind of suave—like, now I’m here, now I’m not, kind of thing going. So I mean, did you—like, do you think other than just the fact that it was something on your resume, do you think that that role kind of helped you get the [indiscernible]? Matt: Oh, I don’t think I ever could have played Neal Caffrey if I hadn’t placed Bryce Larkin because he helped me understand sort of the espionage aspect of—he showed—helped me understand the smoother—yeah, the more espionage aspects of the character and when he has to go undercover and things like that. And, sort of he’s cool under pressure and those kind of things and just maneuvering in that world and never really knowing who he can trust or if you can trust him either. So, it was definitely very helpful. Now since both shows are owned by NBC Universal and they seem to have different shooting schedules, do you think—I mean, that there’s a [indiscernible]? I think they’re already shooting Chuck right now, yeah. But, you know, they’ll probably be shooting after this is— I believe they’re doing thirteen and they’re doing seven day episodes this year. So, we might be on the exact same schedule. We left that open obviously, but I would love to come back to that show, that’s such a fun character. Well, were you surprised when he came back for the first time? I mean, because [indiscernible] like, Bryce Larkin was dead. I mean, were you—I mean, did you expect to come back, like more than you originally [indiscernible]? Well, Chris had said something to me when we were filming the pilot and he’d said something kind of off the cuff and very surreptitious about it. But, he said something about, you know, “You know he’s not dead, right?” I said, “Oh, okay.” And so, you know, that’s one of those things that you file away and go okay, and then—I knew I was coming back in flashbacks and then when they called to tell me that I was coming back to life. [laughs] I was being reanimated, I was just really pleasantly surprised and really thankful. And, so just for a fun kind of question, for both of you, do you have a favorite scene or stand out moment from the coming season of White Collar, one that kind of sticks in your head as just really fun to film? You’ve had no fun. [laughs]

Panel:

Matt: Panel: Matt:

Panel:

Matt:

Panel:

Panel:

Matt Bomer&amp Tim DeKay Page 16 No, we’ve had a blast. Too much fun. I know there’s too many to choose from right now. I really like—we have a stake out scene in one of the first episodes, it’s really, really fun. A lot of this stuff, when we go undercover together and we have to—and I, of course, get us into trouble and Peter has to bail us out or we have to use—any of that stuff where we’re just kind of given free rein to be silly and fun and playful and— we just understand the dynamics inherently, all that stuff is just criminally fun to film. No pun intended. Well, I should let Tim answer. No, I’d have to agree, I was going to say that one. There—you know, what? If I could say one scene, probably that one. I think what’s really fun are the— between Matt and myself, I feel it’s just little moments here and there. Just— and not necessarily in one particular scene, just— And sometimes it’s not planned, we don’t even know they’re there and— Yeah, they just, boom, they’re there. Those are the ones that you really look forward to. There was a scene we were shooting under the scaffolding that day where he was about to go in an undercover mission, assignment? I’m not the FBI guy. And, he—it was really dangerous and we hadn’t even really planned it this way, but I ask him, you know, like, what are you—what did you just [indiscernible] to me? I—no, we were talking about it and it’s just one of those moments where Neal and Peter take a step further into their relationship Where I was, like, wow Neal Caffrey actually cares about the well being of this person. Ah, you’re brothers. Yeah, and I—Peter asks him, what would you do? And of course there are no other FBI agents around to hear that question, but it was just one of— And, I say, I would go home and be with my wife. Yep, and Peter—it’s—we hope you find it as nice as we did. [laughs] I watched the whole first season, I didn’t get that moment. [laughs]

Tim: Panel: Matt:

Tim:

Matt: Tim:

Matt:

Tim:

Matt:

Panel: Tim:

Matt: Tim: Matt:

Matt Bomer&amp Tim DeKay Page 17

Panel:

I—actually to play off that, Matt seems—sorry, Neal seems almost as invested in Peter’s relationship with his wife as Peter is. And [indiscernible] and we saw the aspect in the pilot of Neal helping Pete, you know, discover his romantic side and, you know, how to learn more about her, how to—is that— does that continue? Is there, like, a Cyrano de Bergerac thing going on here? Yeah, I kind of [indiscernible]. Sometimes, yeah, I mean, I wouldn’t say it’s a steady theme in every episode, but it definitely happens and my—certainly my fascination with what it is to have this picket fence life, is alive. Yeah, it does continue. You know, look Peter, if he were [indiscernible] question, would say yes, I am the luckiest man in the world. I know I married up and—but there are things that—and Elizabeth is great with the way Peter is, but there are things that Neal gives to Peter every so often. Yeah, it would be kind of nice if I did this or if I did that. Do you guys read anything about yourselves ever? Like, we—I mean, we [indiscernible] things that we’re writing. Like, I wrote a review of your pilot episode, like, I get snarky comments from users trying to catch you and you’re, like, really? You sit at your computer all day and write this stuff. People do that about you guys too I mean, any project we do is sort of open to people—do you avoid—do you read things about yourselves? Do you avoid it? What’s the craziest thing you’ve ever read about yourself? I mean— I just avoid it, right. It’s tough. Because if you believe—look, it’s all wonderful, it’s all great, it’s all open. We all—we’re very aware of what comes with the territory. But, I think if you believe the good stuff, then you have to believe the bad stuff and vice versa. So, I think, you know, I welcome the fact that it’s out there for everybody to love or whatever or not and, you know, just—that’s—I think—I just try to focus on doing my job, really. It’s true, because we’re kind of trained to be open, you know, as actors. And, so— Not second guess yourself. Yeah, and so if you read what somebody else writes, because, you know, there is that part of us that’s insecure. You want to know. Oh, they thought this,

Tim: Matt:

Tim:

Panel:

Matt: Tim: Matt:

Tim:

Matt: Tim:

Matt Bomer&amp Tim DeKay Page 18

they got that scene! They got that scene! And, then you read on in the review, oh, but they didn’t like that. Oh, yeah, that is true. Matt: Tim: And, he said I—you know— You just start going in your head and it’s—and then you’re looking at yourself. Then you’re looking at yourself and you’re not just being. But, it’s not like [indiscernible] so it affects your [indiscernible]. That’s right, then it starts to be judging, to be outside [indiscernible]. Not, like, about your acting ability. Like, you read things and you’re, like really? I didn’t know that about myself, they’re totally lying or, like, oh, they—just somebody said, oh, I hate your— Oh, you mean, like, personal stuff. Like, anything that you read, but not even about, like, Neal and Peter, just, like you’re in the public eye and so you leave yourself out and so sometimes people will be, like, he was great in the show. I thought he was terrible in the show and sometimes people will be, like, he has an ugly haircut, why doesn’t someone tell him? Like, you know, like, people do that to us too, like, you don’t know what someone’s going to say. So I mean, like on any level, not just on a diplomatic, like, [indiscernible] actors thought, like, just, like, geez, calm down. I think, ironically, given that Hollywood is probably the botox capital of the world, vanity is really the enemy of artistry. Because—I’m not saying there’s not ego involved, because that would be a flat out lie, but you don’t want that—there’s a certain amount of self awareness that you have to avoid if you really want to be able to get into your character’s skin and interact in the moment and not have to worry about, oh, God, that guy said I scratched my ear, my ears are big or whatever. You know, I mean, now I better hide them in this scene with a certain hair—whatever it is. If people are talking about your—you personally or whatever, you know, look man, if people are talking about you, you must be doing something right. So, to complain about it or be—or get obsessed about it, I think would be the wrong route to go down. Fair enough. Yeah, I’d have to agree. I don’t—I try to stay away from it, because then I’m so conscious of it. Even the personal stuff, yeah. I’m too sensitive to read that shit.

Panel: Tim: Panel:

Tim: Panel:

Matt:

Panel: Tim:

Matt:

Matt Bomer&amp Tim DeKay Page 19

Tim:

I know, I am too and, you know, I have a family and so there’s that whole thing. I think I would become livid if I started reading things about my kids or something like that. Yeah, then I would—yeah.

El TV Diablo: I have a question for Tim. On Carnivàle, you played, like, a real salt of the earth, like kind of working class guy and in this show, you play that same type of character also and Matt gave you a compliment earlier, he said that that’s kind of your real life personality. So— Tim: A little bit.

El TV Diablo: Are you drawn to those characters? Because I mean, they’re kind of like—the characters that get to have, I guess, less fun. Tim: I think [indiscernible] was a good time. I have a good time playing those guys. If you mentioned Jonesy, I had a really good time playing a guy who has a limp, who has a drinking problem, who chews tobacco, who is sleeping with the—not only his friend’s wife, but his friend’s wife’s daughter. So—

El TV Diablo: I love Carnivàle. [laughter] Tim: So, I mean, so those are fun, those are rich characters. I think I’ve—you know, it’s—the path that you take and what roles you take, I’m sure there are theses, thesises, I don’t know, look it up— Thesi. Thesi? Written about—what starts to inform you as to how you live your life or certainly how you think other people see you, you know. Wow, I keep playing the bad guy who is sinister, does that start to inform you and tell you, well, that’s what will get me work. So, I’ll keep doing that, you know. But, I was—I think it—I think Jonesy and Peter are quite different. But, they are the salt of the earth, yes, they both—there is a groundedness to these guys. There you go, that’s maybe where I’m [indiscernible], there is a groundedness to these guys.

Matt: Tim:

El TV Diablo: They’re both hard workers. Tim: Yeah, there is—and what’s interesting, I feel, is when you see a grounded person be tripped up. That’s interesting and I think that’s what a lot of Neal and Peter have. Peter is very grounded, so it’s interesting to see Neal trip him up.

Matt Bomer&amp Tim DeKay Page 20

Panel: Matt: Panel:

[Indiscernible]. I want to give my co-star the floor, so is there anything else you want to ask? One quick question with Matt and then we’re going to have a little more [indiscernible]. Anything for both of us, because I want to give him— I wanted to say that [indiscernible] a point when he was telling Neal, you know, I work hard for what I have, you know, and I don’t have half as much as you do, which you get something for nothing. When he said that, I was just, like, yes! Because I was, like, watching this guy was, like, breezing through everything and it’s, like, oh, no big deal. And, he’s, like, no, this—if you’re going to be working with me, these are the realities of the situation you’re in. So, like [indiscernible]. Well, that dynamic continues, that’s a big part of what Jeff Easton is writing, and the other writers, yeah. That’s cool. Matt really quick, I wanted to know, I’m wondering [indiscernible] for the Neal character once he’s done doing what he needs to do. Do you think that he’ll try to change his life and be a, you know, a good guy? Or do you think that he’ll just revert back to being this criminal? I—you know, I would hope he’d always maintain, like I said, I hope he always maintains some of his mystery and that you’d never really a hundred percent feel like—he’d always be a little slippery. But, I would love, as the series progresses, down the road, for him to really understand, I think he’s starting to, to understand the rewards of doing what he’s doing and helping out and how he can use certain skills that he taught himself, to—for a better purpose. I think that’s the better moral story to tell, but I’m excited. You know, I trust Jeff Easton a hundred and fifty percent and wherever he wants to take the character, I’m happy to go. Thank you guys so much for [indiscernible].

Matt: Panel:

Matt:

Panel:

Matt:

[applause] Panel: Panel: My goodness sorry guys [indiscernible]. Yeah, it’s shifts, very good. More questions guys?

Matt Bomer&amp Tim DeKay Page 21

Panel:

Can you—Matt told us that he had already been cast when you were brought in, so can you tell us a little bit about how you got involved the project, your audition process? I had just come off of Tell me You Love Me, from HBO and they—you know, some scripts were being sent and I read this one. I was also—I was reading and was not offered, so I’ve got to be clear on this, but there was some interest for the show The Middle—or Middle? [Indiscernible]. The Middle, yeah, with Patty Heaton and it was right at the same time and then I got this and I was shooting New Adventures of Old Christine when I auditioned for this. And, I went in, there was a chemistry read and there were about, I don’t know, a dozen of us in the waiting room. And, you know, I won’t say any names, but you’d recognize all these guys and half of them are names. And you think—yeah, and you think oh—

Tim:

Panel: Tim:

[laughter] You know, but then there’s this odd thing where they look at you and you can tell, they’re going, ah, like, you know what I mean? There’s a—I might not have a name that somebody else does, but they look at you and they go, oh, I know that guy, oh he’s be good as Peter. Or, you know, you go there, you tend to go there, as an actor when you’re in the waiting room. You try not to. So, I went in and I read with Matt and right away, oh, oh, oh, this is mine! This is mine to lose, this is mine to lose. And, it just kept going and it just kept going. I—and so I read with Matt and then I was cast and then we read with about—then I had to read with, I don’t know, twenty or thirty women to play my wife. Panel: [laughter] Panel: Tim: Panel: Poor guy. It’s work. Did you have a favorite moment in the pilot? Like, something that really jumped out at you, as far as, you know, I really want to do this show? [Indiscernible]? Darn.

Matt Bomer&amp Tim DeKay Page 22

Tim:

There were a couple of moments. All of the moments with Matt, listen, the show—to me, the show is—it’s not me, it’s not Matt, it’s that energy in between Matt and me. So there were—yeah, there were just a lot of fun moments where we were talking and what have you. There was that, specifically I couldn’t think of one. But, I do have to say, the other fun moment for me, was when I bust through the door and I—and, you know, all the FBI agents are coming in, it’s this long dolly track. And, it’s just one of those moments where you played it out a thousand times in your backyard.

[laughter] You know, as a kid, FBI, you know, and it’s—but it was for real, you had fifteen extras in FBI gear and you were busting into a warehouse in Brooklyn. I thought, wow, this is it, this is it, this is very cool. Panel: It’s better than being a real FBI agent, because nobody’s going to shoot at you. Much, much better, it’s all pretend, it’s all pretend. Matt told us that he had, you know, really thought about his character’s back story in terms of what made him become this con artist that, you know, he never had anything and everything. Have they explored or have you thought about why did Peter become an FBI agent? What drew him to that? Yeah, I think Peter has a comb—I talked to Jeff Easton about this and he has a very specific back story about it, which I agreed with a hundred percent. But, there’s another part of Peter. I think Peter that came from a very working class background, but was incredibly smart. I say that Matt—that Peter and Neal both scored exceedingly high on their SATs. I think Neal shared it with quite a few people. Peter was embarrassed to tell people, because where he lived, it just wasn’t cool. Not that it was wrong, but it just—and when he got into a really good school and got letters from these schools, he probably told my dad, “Yeah, I don’t know if these schools, they want me to go there.” Really, you know, because in a way, it’s a comment on, I’m smarter than you dad. You know what I mean? So, there is that and because Peter has that sensitivity, I think he grew up watching people and watching behavior. So, combined with his intelligence and just cerebrally, he’s also intuitive to people. Like, when he asks the question, I think—I hope you see it, I ask a question, and it really doesn’t matter what the answer is, it’s that second right after you ask it. So, you stay with somebody and then it doesn’t matter what they say, it’s their initial reaction and I think Peter kind of grew up that way.

Tim: Panel:

Tim:

Matt Bomer&amp Tim DeKay Page 23

Plus he was really good at math and I went to school with a lot of guys who were accounting majors and then the FBI said, “Hey, do you want to help us solve white collar crimes?” But, not the glamorous, sexy ones that we solve, the ones where, you know, somebody’s embezzled some money. So—and a lot of those guys were ex-jocks too and I think Peter’s an ex-jock. Panel: Tim: Panel: And [indiscernible] he played FBI guy in his [indiscernible]. Yes, he did. Yeah, the scene where you come down the stairs and you see Matt’s character sitting on the couch with your wife and it’s kind of like, hey you just ripped off your ankle bracelet and be, like, stop dogging my wife. Right. He seems to be, clearly from everyone who’s sort of interacting with him, his character has that effect on women, but it seems like people are drawing a parallel that, as an actor, he’s kind of like, suave with the ladies. So, how much of that, just being his co-star, have you observed? Like, the cast is kind of like— Oh, you mean that Matt is suave with the ladies. Yeah, like, Caffrey in the show is, like, is slick with the ladies, but it’s also, like, yeah, well, because they—yeah. Well, first of all, Matt physically is an unattractive person.

Tim: Panel:

Tim: Panel:

Tim: [laughter] Tim: Panel: Tim:

Let’s be honest. It’s so unfortunate. Let’s just be honest. Yeah, he just is that way, you know, he’s that way and he doesn’t even know it. But, how amusing is that as a cast to, like, observe? Because a lot of times people just aren’t—are, like, oblivious to that and don’t even see it. Well, he is not suave and debonair like Neal, he’s not. Because his work ethic is unmatched. I’ve yet—I work pretty hard and I—there are very few people that I have seen who work harder than me and I don’t think Matt works harder, but he works as hard as me. So, he’s an actor first, he’s an actor who

Panel:

Tim:

Matt Bomer&amp Tim DeKay Page 24 happens to be incredibly beautiful. It’s true though, he’s an actor who—and who is equally funny. He’s as funny as he is good looking. But he’s an actor first. Panel: So, a few minutes ago you were talking about character traits within Peter. I was wondering, which one of those character traits you were best able to personally relate to? Loves to solve a good case. I love that. I used to watch Columbo with my dad and used to try to be ahead of it. You know, it’s always fun to be ahead of—I love any espionage movie, any spy movie. Like, oh, no, why did they— why did they cut to that guy? Oh, he shouldn’t have told her that. He said that because he really means this and—I love that. And, I think—and there’s a joy that Peter has in solving the crimes. You know, there’s a little—that’s why he works late, because he loves it. Do you have any favorite detectives in movie or TV history? Well, I do like Sherlock Holmes and I do like Columbo. I liked the movie Catch Me If You Can. I like To Catch A Thief, any one of them. I don’t have one particular detective, no, but any one of those, just the flavor of those movies. Did you get to talk to real life FBI agents? I did, I did. Cool, how was that? Cool, really cool, because they are—they give you some inside scoop and— the guy that I talked to, he said he would get Christmas cards from people that were in prison, that he had put in prison. And, there were times where he’d have to go to somebody’s house and arrest them and he’d knock on the door and the wife would answer and he knew the wife, because he got to know them and he said he remembers a moment where he comes in, knocks on the door, the wife answers. She says, “Oh, no.” He said, “Yeah.” He said, “You know, let’s—I’ll give you guys a few minutes, but I’ll be outside.” It’s that fine line between, you know, where you cross it all the time between the good guy and the bad guy. Did they indicate that this consulting thing, [indiscernible] was something that they do, was it common or— Oh, yeah, it’s common. It’s very common, yeah. Now it’s not—I don’t think it’s as glamorous, as sexy, you know, the heist of a, you know, Thomas

Tim:

Panel: Tim:

Panel: Tim: Panel: Tim:

Panel:

Tim:

Matt Bomer&amp Tim DeKay Page 25 Crown Affair, there’s another one. You know what I mean? That kind of world, I love it, it’s so fun. I don’t—but yeah, it happens, where you’ve got an inside—you’ve got an informant, you’ve got a guy inside and sometimes the guy will say now, my name might come up in this one. So, make sure— you know, then it becomes a deal. Panel: Tim: Panel: Do you think that Peter will have— Go ahead. Do you think that Peter will eventually truly trust Neal and not have any distractions, like finding Kate or anything else? I don’t know, I don’t know if—that’s up to the writers. I don’t know if Peter will every truly trust Neal, I don’t know. We’ll have to see, but it’s interesting you mention Kate, because I think that is the key to that. I don’t know, I don’t know. Right now, right now, I think Peter thinks, I’ll never trust that guy completely, I’ll never trust him, never trust him. And, I also think, as an actor, I need to feel that way because that keeps the tension. There seems to be some type of—you talk about Peter as a—in relation to his education and also there seems to be, like some type of deep seated, self hate in relation to academia, and throughout the pilot, there was a lot of references to, particularly Harvard, to [indiscernible] Harvard. Where does that come from? That one I guess comes from the writer, obviously. But, I think it comes from that whole sense of—to keep going back and forth, I think it’s quite possible that Peter actually went to Harvard. And, so he teases his fellow classmates. Any of you Harvard grads, you remember that one? No? What’s this, you know, because I think probably, let’s say that he did go to Harvard, I can’t decide, I can’t decide [indiscernible]. That there were probably some people at that school that were given a free ride in and didn’t work as hard as he did and doesn’t have—didn’t have that blue collar background. Yeah, it [raises] entitlement, like, the same thing with him kind of [indiscernible]. That’s right, it comes to entitlement, yeah. See I think Peter loves to learn, he loves to learn. I think just that association of entitlement is what—and he connects that to—at least in the pilot, to Harvard. Does that make sense? Are there any idiosyncrasies from your character that have crept into your real life? I mean, there’s, you know, the way you hold yourself or certain phrases

Tim:

Panel:

Tim:

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Tim:

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Matt Bomer&amp Tim DeKay Page 26 or something, some lines, has there been anything that’s kind of crept into your own life? Tim: Panel: Tim: I don’t think so, no. Not more of an FBI agent than you were before? No, no, but my kids, my kids will ask me to, you know, walk the way, like, an FBI agent. Take out the garbage or something.

[laughter] Which isn’t any different than I do. No, but it is amazing, once you put on that—the shoulder holster, you just—I mean, every—you’re just a little bit bigger. Just—it’s fun. So, no. Panel: You seem to have a pretty good relationship or you have really good chemistry with Tiffani. What’s it like kind of working with her and how do you—was that chemistry pretty much inherent from, like, the first time you met her or--? It was, the second we met, it was there. The casting director we both knew very well. And, so I think the cast—and the casting director said nice things about ourselves to the other person and it was just there. It was there and she’s a pro. I mean, she is a pro. She knows her work and does it well and she’s married, I’m married, there’s a nice—there’s a comfort there. There’s a good—there’s a comfort there. I mean, in my past show, it was intense, the relationship stuff that I had to do in Tell Me You Love Me. So, it’s—I really enjoy doing this, it’s not nearly as intense as that. How much leeway do you have with scripts or with input that you and maybe Matt have on your characters? We’ve got quite a bit of input. Jeff certainly—there’s an open door there with the other writers, but by the time it comes to us, they’ve spent a lot of time on it. So, it’s up to us to make those words work and if they really can’t, then you make a call and say hmm, this isn’t working. But, there’s always—they always give us leeway to improv in between and to snap back and forth with each other. Because that we have, so they kind of— Along those lines, it seems like there’s a lot of really good one liners that we kind of noticed in the pilot. Like, just that were very unexpected, but really kind of lift and alleviate and bring that humor to it. Any particular moments that maybe you guys brought in from an improv?

Tim:

Panel:

Tim:

Panel:

Matt Bomer&amp Tim DeKay Page 27 Did we bring in—I think calling him Deano was mine, I think it was. I can’t think of any right now. There are a few— Or any written ones maybe that were your favorite when you read it and thought, oh, this is great, I can’t wait to— Oh, one of my favorite lines was, “This is the FBI, we don’t ask, we don’t care.”

Tim:

Panel:

Tim:

[laughter] Panel: [Indiscernible] that scene because it was so funny to see Matt, like, come to the realize—or not Matt, but Neal, come to the realization that, oh my God, there’s a woman who I maybe couldn’t seduce, like that’s crazy to me. Exactly. Like, that was a really funny part, but what actually wanted to ask about was just, when you guys—you and Matt were talking about the relationship that you have and how violence isn’t a factor in it, as it would be for most, you know FBI agents and criminals that they catch. And, it’s fairly interesting, that’s how it makes the show so interesting to me, that it is, on some level, a police procedural type show, like so many other ones on television. But, it’s very different in that, I mean, it’s not blood [indiscernible] like a lot of the other ones are. I mean, there aren’t brains splattering all over the place. There aren’t. So, you know, [indiscernible] you’re filming right now. So, how— Sixth, seventh, counting the pilot. Okay, yeah, so, you know, you’re about halfway through, how does violence come into play or not come into play as the season goes on? You’ll never see—just like in the pilot, you’ll see the violence—you’ll see them—if there is a murder, you will see it after the fact. You will not have seen it happen and you’ll never flashback to have seen it happen. And if there is blood, somebody on the show will not like it, will not like to see the blood. And we—and you don’t—in the crime scene investigation, there’s an abbreviation for that, what is that, crime scene inv—CSI.

Tim: Panel:

Tim: Panel: Tim: Panel:

Tim:

[laughter]

Matt Bomer&amp Tim DeKay Page 28 There is—you never see any of that, it’s—we’re—to us, the—to solve the crime, is not in that right there, in that it’s up here, it’s up here and it’s the ego that is driven by other people. And, the other thing is, I have to say, is that you’ll see—like in the pilot, you’ll see a gorgeous part of New York. You will not see somebody killed on a stoop and then, you know, two guys in raincoats coming up and talking about it and then going and investigating. You’ll see—I mean, we were just shooting in Columbus Circle, just now and we were just—and I—like, we’ve been all over the place. It’s just ah, I’m just constantly with my camera, oh, look at this! Look, look here! Panel: Tim: You’re originally from New York, right? Ithaca, New York, upstate New York, like five hours. There you go, five— four or five hours from here. Is it good to be back in the area? It’s fantastic. I—look I love California, I love LA, I love my family and friends that I have out there, but I miss the seasons that the east offers. Because no matter how your life is going, no matter what is going on, who knows what the wind and leaves changing will bring you? I mean, I always feel that way, it’s like—something else is going to happen and you don’t kind of get that in LA. It’s just nice. You’ve done a lot of stage work, would you like to return to that at some point? I’d love to, I’d love to. Stay in New York, there’s Broadway. I know it, I know, I would love to, yeah. Limited [indiscernible] between shooting. I know, but it’s just great, because on stage, you’re in control of the story. Well, Matt said, you know, it’s television, it’s a writer’s medium and, you know, film is a director’s medium and live theatre is an actor’s medium. That’s right. Once you’re out there, it’s yours. It is, it is yours, yeah.

Panel: Tim:

Panel:

Tim: Panel: Tim: Panel: Tim: Panel:

Tim: Panel: Tim:

Matt Bomer&amp Tim DeKay Page 29

Panel:

Let’s say a few seasons from now, Jess approaches you and says, do you want to be a producer? Would you be open to that? Completely, completely, I would love to direct. Or directing. Yep, completely, mm-hmm. I think that it makes some sense because the characters drive this show. Yeah, I would love to. Do you feel a lot of pressure at all for how well [indiscernible] the work has been doing? I mean, everything you’ve launched in the past couple of years has been—I mean, got cable standard especially, you know. Do you feel a pressure? Are you now worried right now about, like, you’re not going to get good ratings when they come out and, you know--? Oh, you can’t, I can’t, oh, I can’t go there, you know. No, my job is to act, that’s my—to tell the story. No, I can’t go there. Because by then it’s too late anyway, it’s done, what am I going to do? Smile more? [Indiscernible] do you know what I mean? But, yes, so that’s a valid question and so I won’t— just try to stay away from it. I asked Matt this question before, I said what is something about you that we wouldn’t know if we, like, IMDb or googled you, that’s something—what’s something, like, telling about your personality that [indiscernible]? What did Matt say?

Tim: Panel: Tim:

Panel:

Tim:

Panel:

Tim: [laughter] Panel:

He tried to, like, side step and then I asked him what was on his DVR and he said he likes Dateline and he did a Chris Hansen impersonation. Nice. [Indiscernible] Keith Hansen? No, no, he did— No, what’s—Keith Morrison. Yes. The guy with the really [indiscernible] voice.

Tim: Panel: Panel: Panel: Panel: Panel:

Matt Bomer&amp Tim DeKay Page 30

Panel: Tim:

Just something about—not Peter, just about you. Yeah, about me. I’m a pretty active dad, I’ll be honest with you. I coach my son’s little league team— How old are your kids? They’re ten and seven and we went to the California World Series last year, pretty good team. [Indiscernible] are they still in LA? They’re in LA. So—they were here with me all through August and then they had to fly back. You know, for a second season, we’ll take another look at this, and my daughter is a big—she loves ballet and she’s now taking the flute. That just came about yesterday. She’s playing the—taking piano lessons as well and for all of my daughter’s recitals, I learn all of her steps, so she and I can go and do that. Yeah, we don’t have questions now, we’re all gobsmacked. Do their friends realize that you’re famous? Like, are you a celebrity when you go to their school? No, no, you guys—here’s what you got to realize, they go to school where, like, Andy Garcia is dropping off their kids and— So everybody’s famous. Well, not everybody, but it’s just—everybody works at the plant, when you— in LA and everybody who goes to school works at the plant in one way or another. You know, there’s—the kids are still excited. “Coach Tim! Coach Tim! We saw—I saw you last night on the--!” You know, yeah, they’re excited for that. You know, and then you ask, “Well, did you watch the whole episode?” “No, no.”

Panel: Tim:

Panel: Tim:

Panel: Panel:

Tim:

Panel: Tim:

[laughter] So, they’re excited to see you but— Panel: Well, but do you really want a seven-year-old watching Tell Me You Love Me anyway? No, you don’t, no you don’t want anybody—no you don’t, no.

Tim:

Matt Bomer&amp Tim DeKay Page 31

Panel:

Well, Peter and Elizabeth seem really happy, but is that going to change at all? Are they going to have— No, I don’t think so. I think it’s important that they stay grounded and happy. I mean, there may be positive changes to their relationship— Is there gong to be kids? I don’t know and I don’t—I said that, like I don’t know—

Tim:

Panel: Tim: [laughter]

No, I don’t know, I don’t know. Panel: [laughter] Tim: I don’t know, but they’ll remain grounded and good. There will be conflict of course with—you’ll never question anything. Although this is a fun episode, Peter has to go undercover and kind of flirt with somebody, yeah, and he does—he’s not good at it. Right, right, I heard.

[laughter] Panel: Tim: Panel: Tim: Panel: [Indiscernible]? No, Elizabeth does. Oh, [indiscernible] wife, that’s an awesome wife. It’s fun, it’s fun. Now we [indiscernible] Neal and his effect on women, in the scene where Peter comes down and sees, you know, Neal talking to Elizabeth, I really didn’t get the sense that it was, like, oh my God, he’s flirting with my wife. That it’s, like, wait, no you’re my work life, what is my work life doing in my living room? Yes, and what do— And, I don’t—and I never got the feeling that there was going to be any sort of triangle there, at all.

Tim: Panel:

Matt Bomer&amp Tim DeKay Page 32

Tim: Panel: Panel: Tim:

No, no, no. Which is good, I thought. Yeah, that’s good. No, that’d be too easy as well. No, no triangle. No, what are you doing in my house? You’re a criminal that has an anklet device there, what are you doing here? It’s not—now that’s the other thing about it, see I—Peter’s not worried at all. He knows that there’s a good thing going there, for a number of reasons. Smooth.

Panel: [laughter] Tim: Panel:

No, but you know what I mean? Yeah, I’m glad you saw that and not— She’s just, you know, [indiscernible] calling him cute and just like, you know, like, oh, it’s cool, my husband’s, you know, ex criminal partner is sitting on my couch chatting with me. She’s so easy going about his job, you know, it’s like— Well, I guess they’ve been married for ten years, you kind of have to [indiscernible]. It’s like, you know, usually you see a wife and she’s ticked off because he’s late, you know, and there’s fights being started. But it’s so refreshing to see a wife supporting her husband and, like, understanding, this is your [indiscernible]. Well, and we also wanted to make sure Tiffani is not the, “When are you coming home?” That’s so easy to play, to do that role as well. Right, and it also led to a really funny scene, with that very apparently well trained dog, [indiscernible]. That was amazing, wasn’t it? And we just caught that, like, it— Seriously? Oh, yeah, and it wasn’t in the script or anything, it was just, like—caught— did we get that—could we get the dog in, in the broccoli? Yes. [Indiscernible] that was one that [indiscernible].

Panel:

Panel:

Tim:

Panel:

Tim: Panel: Tim:

Panel:

Matt Bomer&amp Tim DeKay Page 33

Tim: Panel:

That was an adlib, “Chew your food,” that’s an adlib. Right, that was—and that was pretty early on, that was in—and that’s when I—when the show kind of changed for me a little bit, because you really saw it, oh, this is going to be kind of funny too. That was—that’s a great scene, I [indiscernible] a lot. A couple more questions guys? Are you more of a romantic than Peter is? Am I more? Knowing that your wife will probably read this. Well, I’m much more of a romantic than Peter, that’s a big character—that’s character work for me. Oh, I’m a hopeless romantic. I love romantic comedies, I love—probably one of my favorite movies is, It’s a Wonderful Life. Oh, yeah, oh, I’m a sap. Oh, yeah.

Panel: Panel: Tim: Panel: Tim:

El TV Diablo: You talked about the education and intellect of Peter and I think that Neal also is pretty smart. Tim: Oh very.

El TV Diablo: Who do you think is smarter? Tim: This is how I answer this. I think we both—I was going to say that we both scored the exact same number on our SAT scores, but Neal did better—now maybe—now it’s different, but back when I took SATs, there was verbal and math. I think Neal scored better on the verbal and Peter scored better on the math. But together, they had the exact same. Guys, I think we’re almost out of time on this. You guys, thanks so much for blogging, thank you so much.

Panel: Tim: [applause]

Audio run time = 79:25


								
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