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									  CROCKHAM HILL NEWSLETTER
               PUBLISHED BY THE PARISH CHURCH OF THE HOLY TRINITY

FROM THE VICARAGE                                                                       FEBRUARY 2011

                                        ROMAN HOLIDAY
“You must have seen la Bella Vita – it’s an absolute classic; one of my favourite films,” he said. When
I paused before responding, he began to look amazed. “Surely you must have seen la Bella Vita – it’s
one of Fellini’s classic films about Roman life – a decadent fantasy, if ever there was one.”
   “Do you mean la Dolce Vita?” I replied. “I certainly have and it brings back memories of my first
visit to Rome in the early seventies. I remember hoping to see a glamorous film star walking on the
Via Veneto followed by ever-hopeful paparazzi. But it had all faded by the time I first sat at a street
caffe, dreaming as I watched the passers by.”
   There is a sense in which everything in Rome has already happened; of just having missed the
glory that was Rome in the days of its empire; in the astonishing building programme of renaissance
and baroque Popes – their nepotism in promoting members of their families, together with their
extravagent commissioning of art, which we now admire. Despite all this it is the persons and the
works of artists and architects we now remember much more than their patrons; coming to Rome
the past is irrefutably made present!
   My appetite for church-crawling was not ameliorated by the sheer quantity of them - there are
said to be over a thousand. No doubt their builders and patrons believed they were making the city
a visual testament to the Christian faith, building, as they often did, over or within the pagan
temples of ancient Rome. The church next to my hotel was built on the site of a temple dedicated to
Minerva! After a while I hesitated about trying to get into another church before the midday closing
time; I rationed myself to one or two monuments in a session before finding an inviting caffe or
lunch-stop and to indulge in a little people-watching. A visit to my favourite gallery in the Palazzo
Doria Pamphili and to its antique caffe occupied a whole morning of foot-slogging.
   Now, as I reflect on what has just been my 19th visit to Rome, I begin to ask myself whether I’ve
been a stranger, a pilgrim or just a tourist. For a priest, any visit to Rome has an element of
pilgrimage about it; after all the apostle Paul wrote several of his letters from there and for many
centuries it was the centre of the Christian world – those churches in every street of the historical
centre are a constant reminder. I cannot say I look for any religious indulgencies, but I value the
sense of connection with the early church. I’m a stranger too in another country, my Italian being
basic, fluent conversation is difficult, but because I am also a tourist, it doesn’t matter. But … I’m
not quite the same person I was in 1972, though I didn’t feel inclined to explain to the stranger in the
pub who had drawn me into conversation about his ex-pat life in Greece, though I did admit that
my Arcadia was further south in Italy and on the Amalfi coast, about which I dream on cold winter
days, but do not inhabit!

Your friend and priest
Fr Bob

Clergy:
 The Rev’d Dr Stephen Mitchell, The Vicarage, Edenbridge                     Off duty: Tuesday    862258
 The Rev’d Bob Jones, The Vicarage, Oakdale Lane, Crockham Hill              Off duty: Thursday   866515
Pastoral Assistant: Mrs Trish Proctor, Guildables, Guildables Lane                                866219

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Churchwardens:   Mr Ian Maple, 41 Highfields Rd, Marlpit Hill         863144
                 Mr Christopher May, Froghole Oast House, C. Hill     867077
PCC Secretary:   Mrs Jo Banks, Rivonia, Oakfield Road, Marlpit Hill   860509




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                           CHURCH SERVICES FOR FEBRUARY 2011
FEB 6           th
               5 BEFORE LENT                      Theme: Sent out to be different
 8.00am        Holy Communion at EDENBRIDGE
10:00am        Family Eucharist                   Sidesman:    D Hodges
               (Sunday Club)                      Readers:     A Proctor & Clergy
                                                  Intercessor: I Maple

FEB 13         4th BEFORE LENT                                  Theme: The new commandments
8.00am         Holy Communion (CW)                              Sidesman:    M Maple
11.15am        Mattins                                          Sidesman:    A Davies
               (Sunday Club)                                    Readers:     A Davies & Clergy
                                                                Intercessor: M Whitlock

FEB 15         WEEKDAY EUCHARIST at 9:30am

FEB 20         3rd BEFORE LENT                                  Theme: Going the extra mile
 8.00am        Holy Communion at EDENBRIDGE
10.00am        Family Eucharist                                 Readers:       A Lancastert & Clergy
               (Sunday Club)                                    Intercessor:   J Naismith

FEB 27         2nd BEFORE LENT                                  Theme: After the big bang
 8.00am        Holy Communion (BCP)                             Sidesman:     T Brown
11.15am        Family Eucharist                                 Sidesman:     C Stockdale
               (Sunday Club)                                    Readers:      Clergy
                                                                Intercessor:  D Hodges

MAR 6          LAST BEFORE LENT                                 Theme: Mountain-top encounters
 8.00am        Holy Communion at EDENBRIDGE
10.00am        Family Eucharist                                 Sidesman:      S Cash
               (Sunday Club)                                    Readers:       A Proctor & Clergy
                                                                Intercessor:   T Proctor

Should anyone need a lift to church, please telephone Trish or one of the wardens who will be happy to
arrange it.
                           SERVICES IN EDENBRIDGE PARISH CHURCH
EVERY SUNDAY 8:00am Holy Communion                    9:30am Family Eucharist       6:30pm Evensong
WEDNESDAYS 10:30am Holy Communion (BCP) THURSDAYS 7:30pm Holy Comunion (CW)

FLOWER ROTA
JAN 30/FEB 6 Mrs Campbell & Mrs Bishop                 FEB 13/20        Mrs Stapleton & Mrs J Davies
FEB 27/MAR 6 Mrs Proctor & Mrs Court

CLEANING ROTA
FEB 5          Mr & Mrs Whitlock                       FEB 12           Mrs Reynolds & Miss Dilley
FEB 19         Mr Stafford & Mrs Blatherwick           FEB 26           Mrs Court & Mrs Ellis

LATIN AMERICA EVENING
For those who receive their Newsletter in time, please note that from 5-6pm on Saturday January
29th Crockham Hill’s Latin America specialist, David Gilmour, along with filmaker Louise
Martindale, will be holding a fundraising event in the Village Hall in aid of the LATA Foundation, a


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charity set up by the Latin America Travel Association. Some short films made by Louise and
journalist Ali McClymont whilst on their travels across South America, will be showcased. With
raffle prizes, Latin American drinks and canapes, please join them for a very worthy cause. For
further information, please contact David Gilmour on 01732 867421                       or via
dgilmour@latafoundation.org

WOMEN’S INSTITUTE
Unfortunately 2010 ended with the cancellation of our Christmas meeting due to the heavy snowfall.
Fortunately our 2011 programme started on a high note; a return visit by Kev Reynolds with his talk
The Best of Kent. With his wonderful slides and descriptive commentary, he took us on a walk
through Kent. Starting on Mariners Hill he took us past stately homes, castles, village churches, the
North Downs, river Medway, Canterbury Cathedral and on to the Channel coast. It made us all
appreciate what a beautiful part of this country we live in – and all so near to London.
   Our next meeting, on Wednesday 2nd at 2:30pm, will have Ian Currie, the Weather Man, with a
talk entitled The Colourful State of the Weather from Blue Moons to Red Snow. Please come along if you
would like to hear this talk. Members are reminded to bring their ACWW ‘Pennies for Friendship’
tins.                                                                                     Linda Brown

OXTED & LIMPSFIELD FLOWER SOCIETY
On Wednesday 9th Hazel McGregor will be the guest demonstrator with her theme being: Elementz.
The Society meets on the second Wednesday of each month at 2pm in St Peter’s Church Hall,
Limpsfield, and would welcome new members. If interested, please contact the Secretary, Veronica
Beckitt on 01883 625468 for details.

HARRY THE DONKEY’S CHRISTMAS POST
Harry’s colourful postal service round the village at Christmas raised the grand total of
£1178 on behalf of the Kent Air Ambulance and Hospice in the Weald. Harry (and the Greenaway
family) are delighted and would like to thank everyone so very much for their overwhelming
support – for their kind donations when using the service, and when receiving their cards. Thank
you!

WOMEN’S CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
We continue our meetings on Wednesday 9th at 41 Highfield Road, Marlpit Hill, when Trish Proctor
will lead a Bible study on the story of the feeding of the five thousand, which links into the Women’s
World Day of Prayer theme. On Wednesday 23rd Mandy Maple will talk about the women in the
Bible. That meeting will be at Guildables Oast. Meetings start with coffee at 10:30am and are always
over by midday. Do come and join us.                                                         Susan Cash

WANTED: PARISH COUNCILLOR FOR CROCKHAM HILL
Dr David Jewitt will not be standing for re-election in the May 2011 local government elections. The
search is on for a replacement. All helpful suggestions, applications and list of suitable candidates,
to Alan Wesley, Chairman, Westerham Parish Council, or phone him on 01732 866242.

IT’S MURDER AT THE SCHOOL
Local actress Tamara Wilder will be performing a Murder Mystery with fellow actors and selected
members of the audience in Crockham Hill School Hall at 7:30pm on Friday 11th. Organised by the
PTA the play takes place while the audience enjoys a delicious home-made meal. Tickets are £10
from the school office or Paola Marshall (866660 paola@trimworth.co.uk). All proceeds to the school.

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THE PRAYER GROUP will meet at 2pm on Wednesday 16th at Guildables. If you would like to
come and need transport, please let me know. We are a small group who would be delighted to
welcome more people to join us in a short time of prayer, for the needs of our world and our local
community. If you can spare 30-40 minutes of your time, why not come and join us?     Trish 866219

WHAT’S UP DOC?
The most welcome sackful of Christmas cards not surprisingly revealed a certain level of confusion
over what to put on envelopes addressed to Fr Stephen. You can, of course, write what you like, but
grammatically and formally, it is the Rev’d. Dr. Stephen Mitchell, SSC. That’s just for info! Fr
Stephen or just Stephen is fine - but please don’t put ‘Rev Mitchell’. I am not American!

THE ROYAL WEDDING
There is a feeling in the village that the Royal Wedding on April 29th should not go unmarked, so an
open meeting will be held in the Village Hall at 8pm on Wednesday 16th to discuss, and to decide
how we could celebrate the occasion. Please come along if interested, bringing any ideas you may
have to make a day of it. So far the suggestion is to hire a big screen and have a traditional tea or
picnic lunch. It’s a great excuse for a party! For any more information please contact either Andy &
Jilly Murison (866224) or Alan & Morna Whitlock (866235).

THE OVER 70’s LUNCH will be on Thursday 17th at Guildables, from 12:30pm. Please let me
know if you would like to come, and we will arrange lifts for those who need them. New people are
always welcome, and we look forward to seeing you.                                   Trish
866219

C.H.I.P.S. – AGM & PARTY
Plans are afoot for the C.H.I.P.S. AGM and post-pantomime party to be held in the Village Hall.
Details will be in next month’s Newsletter. Meanwhile thanks to all the great audiences who enjoyed
The Legend of Froghole; to Karen Stafford for adapting and directing the production, and to Vivienne
Cox for the original story. Also a huge thank you to the Naismiths for storing and transporting the
scenery in awful snow and ice to enable us to have a set worthy of the production. Although figures
are not yet available, we hope that your generosity has enabled us to complete the purchase of
essential new lighting equipment. After twelve years of use, the original control board and dimmers
(purchased by an Arts Council Lottery Fund award) were worn out and in need of replacement. If
you contributed at the show, our very grateful thanks; but if you were unaware and would like to
help with a donation, please contact our treasurer, Alan Davies (866350). Thanks again. Jilly
Murison

WOMEN’S WORLD DAY OF PRAYER
Each year women around the world use a set service on a set day so that there is a 24 hour cycle of
prayer and praise to God. So often we find that there is immediate relevance to the service, even
though it may have been planned and written some time ago. This year the service has been written
by the women of Chile, long before the mining accident happened!
  Crockham Hill is hosting the service this year, and all the churches in Edenbridge will be joining
us. We hope that you too will make time to come on this very special day. The Rev’d Jean Lorimer,
who has lived in South America, will speak to us. The date? Friday March 4th at 1:30pm, so
mothers will be in time to collect their children from school. The place? Holy Trinity Church,
Crockham Hill. Everyone is most welcome, and there will be refreshments afterwards.

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THE HOT POT SUPPER
Crockham Hill’s annual Shrove Tuesday get-together takes place in the Village Hall this year on
Tuesday March 8th at 7:30pm. The usual mix of lively company, good food and local entertainment
make this one of the highlights of the village year. Places are at a premium, of course, so to avoid
disappointment phone Jo Banks on 860509, or put your name on the list at the back of the church.
Tickets are £5 each. If you are willing to make a hot pot, a pudding, or assist on the night, Jo would
love to hear from you.

THE CHURCHYARD WORKING PARTY
Perhaps a distant memory now, but on a very cold November morning an intrepid workforce from
our congregation attended at the Churchyard. The zeal and enthusiasm which they brought to their
task ensured that the collecting and burning of the ‘big trees’ leaves went forward with a happy but
determined will. At the same time ancillary work including trimming the great yew guarding
Octavia Hill’s grave concluded a most successful morning. A huge thank you to all who took part –
maybe a spring clean next?                                                          Gervaise
Burbidge

MONTHLY MARKET
A reminder that there is no market in February; the first one of the year will be on Saturday March
12th. By then, hopefully, winter will be just a memory.                                Freda McBride

RARE VISITORS FROM THE NORTH
The winter of 2010-2011 has seen an unprecedented arrival of usually rare Waxwings from
Scandinavia. Flocks over 1000 strong have been spotted even as far south as Pegwell Bay in East
Kent. About the size of a Starling, Waxwings are one of the most beautiful of European birds with
their distinctive crest, orangey-pink plumage and red, yellow and black in their wings. My luck was
in on New Year’s Day when I encountered a flock of 17 along Froghole Lane feeding in gardens near
the Buttles Steps path. We had great views as they flew down to strip the berries voraciously!
They’ll be in the country until February or March, so keep a look out for a beautiful surprise. If you
do see any (or any other birds of interest) do give me a call on 562384.                William
Oliver

CROCKHAM HILL BONFIRE SOCIETY – BEYOND THE BANGS
At least 900 people turned out to enjoy the bonfire and fireworks display last autumn. The event
cost a total of £4100, of which £2761 was spent on fireworks, £232 on torches, and £304 on insurance.
With special thanks to Geoff Boorman Fuels and the Buxton family for their support. Each year our
costs increase and we struggle to break even, so we’d like to thank the 547 adults and 259 children
who bought tickets. Around 40% of these were sold on the night, so we were lucky with the
weather. In addition we would like to thank all those who were generous with their donations for
the torches, which helped us cover our costs for the year (a marginal profit of £7.91).
   Fiona Scott has kindly agreed to have a donations and suggestions box at The Royal Oak, and we
appeal to all villagers to consider making a donation, however small. Every pound matters if you’d
like to see a procession and fireworks next year; we need your support. Finally, thanks to the
committee for all their efforts to make the evening such a success, and to villagers for supporting the
event. I will now be taking a back seat and leaving the hard work to Simon Flood. Jane Bradley-
Smith


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THANKS FROM GRAHAM HOUSE, THAMESREACH
We have received a warm letter of thanks for the various gifts donated by the village for Graham
House residents and those still living on the streets:
‘The exceptionally cold weather has meant we have been inundated with requests to take in
additional people, and at one time we had two people sleeping on mattresses on the floor in our
pool room, two in our ground floor television room, one in our clients’ computer room and one on
the floor in a room we are in the middle of turning into a new surgery for our visiting GP. All of
these extra people have multiple needs and take up a lot of staff time … BUT we would still rather
have them here than not … In the past 12 months only six people have abandoned or have been evicted
from Graham House, which is a phenominal achievement on the part of the whole team …
[Consequently] our funders have told us that Graham House is likely to stay open for at least the
next three years … but as yet the exact level of cuts in our funding is not clear. We are given to
understand that it will be in the region of 25-30%.’
  In light of the above we hope to give even greater support in 2011.          Alan Davies & David
Hodges

IN MEMORIAM
The village has recently lost two long-time former members of the community whom we remember:
  With her late husband Teddy, Audrey Waterhouse (1923-2010) lived in Deanery Road from 1947
until frailty in recent years led to her moving near her daughter Mary. Audrey was a faithful
member of our church congregation, and a good friend of the village. She leaves two daughters, five
grandchildren and six great grandchildren – and fond memories for her Crockham Hill friends.
  Jessie Prince was widowed many years ago, but enjoyed the companionship of her sister Grace
and brother-in-law Ron Gair at her home in Froghole Lane, where they were much loved by friends
and neighbours. Having moved to Roman Court in Edenbridge, Jessie suffered a number of strokes
and eventually died at the Kent & Sussex Hospital in Tunbridge Wells. She was 89.

CROCKHAM HILL ON THE WEB
If you have any news, events, sports results or comments for the Crockham Hill website
(www.crockhamhillevents.co.uk), please contact Mark Hancox at info@crockhamhillevents.co.uk

A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF DEMENTIA
The Altzheimer’s Society is keen to make a concerted effort to raise public awareness of Dementia,
as more and more people are developing it. As a carer in this field I’d like to describe some of the
problems experienced by sufferers, and to dampen public fear of the disease. I have also included
some practical tips that might help when interacting with demented people.
  It has often been said that if dementia is a disease, then the sufferer is ‘sick’. That may be
technically true, but if we view them as such, we will treat them as sick – which is not good for
them. To someone with dementia a common greeting such as “How are you - are you alright?” may
seem negative and provoke an unsociable mood. Instead, say something like: “Hello, haven’t seen
you for some time [even if it was only at lunch time] you’re looking well, have you been to
Barbados?” While this may seem a foolish comment to make to an 88 year old, don’t be afraid to use
humour, for used with discretion humour is often the best medicine that can inspire a smile. Should
you receive a barrage in return, let it go over your head. Tone of voice is important; avoid a “poor
you” attitude, but speak as you would to anyone else.
  Demented people usually know that something has gone wrong in their brain, so the daily
interaction we use with others is the best approach; remember – they are still the same person



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you’ve always known. Rather than regarding dementia as a sickness, we must see it as a ‘disability’,
although those with dementia are not always recognised as being disabled.
   One of the main problems is a loss of self-esteem. There are likely to be other losses too: 1] Loss
of intellectual ability – short term memory, making logical connections etc 2] Reduced ability to
communicate due to poor concentration and language difficulties 3] Reduced independence
requiring supervision in activities, and problems of getting lost. These combine to create the
conditions for depression, frustration, and anxiety for the future, or a sense of failure and
discouragement. This is especially true for those given early diagnosis. Staying connected and
socialising can help maintain a sense of identity and belonging. Receiving reassurance and feeling
valued, that their life matters, is important, for they can imagine they are still able to contribute, and
are not alone.
   All this may seem a bit daunting and even scary, but it is necessary to have a better understanding
of the problem. The main thing to remember is to speak and act normally, just as you would with
any able-minded person, although with the best of intentions it is easy to get it wrong. For example,
whilst it is natural to offer help to a dementia sufferer who appears to be struggling up a slope, their
carer will know their limitations. So instead of offering aid, which will almost certainly be rejected
and resented by the sufferer, trust the carer to do the right thing, and be content with giving a bright
greeting. Try not to be put off by disagreeable outbursts, for they are not meant to offend, and in
95% of cases, the dementia sufferer has forgotten within minutes.
   Why do I do this job? There are not many gentlemen carers around, but there is a need for the
management of difficult cases where women carers are unable to take the stress (my own father was
beligerant and didn’t want to go into a home when I looked after him with cancer). One of the
modern options of dementia care is for people to stay in their own homes, and if agreed, with the
same carer to avoid change, which is confusing to the demented. It also builds up trust before
advanced nursing is required. I see my job as a spiritual ministry, a constant test of my faith and
obedience to God, and look upon the elderly with great understanding, as they always seem to get
put on the back burner!                                                                     Rob Walmisley

Copy deadline for the March issue of the Newsletter, will be Saturday February 19th. All items for
inclusion should be sent by this date to Kev & Min Reynolds at Little Court Cottage, Froghole,
Crockham Hill TN8 6TD ( 01732 866457; email: kev.reynolds@virgin.net) – or left in the box on the
shelf at the back of the church.




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