Five Year Progress Report of Cranston High School West

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					              Five Year Progress Report of Cranston High School West
                                   Cranston, RI
                                  March 1, 2012

Section I – Detailed Responses to Highlighted Recommendations

1.       Identify the indicators by which the school will assess the school’s progress in
         achieving the school’s civic and social expectations and establish a process for using
         data from those indicators to assess the school’s progress in achieving the school’s
         civic and social expectations.

Classification: Completed

Response: In the Cranston Public School District, there exists a philosophy that all Cranston
High School graduates receive the same diploma; therefore, they should all be exposed to the
same curriculum, reform initiatives, PBGR system, academics, and civic and social expectations.
As a result, all work on such expectations and initiatives is done collaboratively with
representation from all the city’s high schools as well as the central office administration. The
resulting expectations are applied uniformly and consistently to all high school students in the
city of Cranston, not only at Cranston High School West. The following information is taken
from the Cranston High School Diploma Handbook:

     CRANSTON HIGH SCHOOLS – SOCIAL EXPECTATIONS
     The Cranston High School Graduate is a respectful, ethical, responsible, and courteous
     individual who can work both independently and cooperatively by following the rules
     outlined in the Cranston Public Schools Student Handbook.
      Evidence of meeting this social expectation will be found in the annual collection of
         individual student information related to:

            Citizenship
            Effort
            Attendance and
            Discipline

     CRANSTON HIGH SCHOOLS – CIVIC EXPECTATIONS
     The Cranston High School Graduate is a contributing member of his/her community, and
     as such, functions as an informed, involved citizen who advocates for positive changes in
     our community and surrounding environments.
      Evidence of meeting this civic expectation will be found in the annual collection of
         individual student information related to:

            Participation in various school activities
            Completion of Community Service
     Additionally, evidence may be found in the Community Service requirements.

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5. COMMUNITY SERVICE ACTIVITY
The following information describes the Class of 2012 community service graduation requirement.
Please read the information, but understand that the community service requirement is being
phased in.
Service Learning/Community Service Plan
Complete hours 20 hours of community service over 4 years of high school. It is
  anticipated that all students complete the Community Service Requirement by the 2nd
  quarter of Grade 12.
The Process for 20 Community Service Hours 
Students will advise their parent(s) or legal guardian about their Service Learning/Community Service
    work.
Organization(s) verifies, by signature, that the service has been completed by signing an Hourly Log
    Sheet as hours are completed. Please see Appendix D for copy of Hourly Log Sheet.
Verified Hourly Log Sheets are stored by the student in their ILP files for use in the Senior Portfolio
    Presentation. Hard copy of Hourly Log Sheet to be kept in student’s ILP file for the 4 years of high school.
Community Service/Service Learning will be part of the Senior Portfolio Presentation at which time the
    student will present their verified Hourly Log Sheets and orally reflect on the experience(s).

WHAT ARE ACCEPTABLE AND UNACCEPTABLE HOURS OF SERVICE FOR GRADUATION?
ACCEPTABLE:
• Any service-learning activity whose chief purpose is to directly address human needs in areas
  such as health, education, the environment, or public safety, even if done in conjunction with a
  religiously affiliated agency or institution, can be counted toward the service-learning graduation
  requirement.
• Any service-learning activity whose chief purpose is to collect food, clothing, or other items
  necessary to benefit others and meet human needs, even if done in conjunction with a religiously
  affiliated agency or institution, can be counted toward the service-learning graduation
  requirement.
• Any service-learning activity whose chief purpose is to serve the school community itself.
• Service-learning activities whose purposes are to extend the benefit of the service activity to
  individuals or families in need, other than the student’s own family, may be counted toward the
  service-learning graduation requirement.
• All acceptable service-learning activities require a signed and approved Project Proposal Form.

Note: A listing of possible and approved Service Learning/Community Service sites is available in
the Guidance Offices. This is not an exclusive listing. Other organizations may be approved.

UNACCEPTABLE:
• Any service-learning activity whose chief purpose is to serve the student’s own family and which
  does not extend the benefit of the service activity to other families in need cannot be counted
  toward the service-learning graduation requirement.
• Any service-learning activity that violates federal or state law which prohibits discrimination on
  the basis of race, color, sex, age, national origin, religion, or disability cannot be counted toward
  the service-learning graduation requirement.
• Any service-learning activity whose chief purpose is to increase the amount of revenue for a
  private, for profit business or to generate new revenue for that business cannot be counted
  toward the service-learning graduation requirement.



Description of Requirements, Cont’d:
                                                                                                              2
• Unacceptable Hours of Service, Cont’d

• Any service-learning activity that replaces a paid staff worker of the participating agency or
 institution with a student earning service-learning credit cannot be counted toward the service-
 learning graduation requirement.

• Any service-learning activity that compensates a student with money, goods, or services such that
  the service-learning activity is performed in expectation of both the service-learning credit and
  the money, goods, or services cannot be counted toward the service-learning graduation
  requirement.

• Any service-learning activity whose chief purpose is to convert others to a particular religious,
  moral, or spiritual view and/or which denigrates the religious, moral, or spiritual views of others
  cannot be counted toward the service-learning graduation requirement.

• Any service-learning activity whose chief purpose is to help prepare and/or participate in the
  performance of a religious service cannot be counted toward the service-learning graduation
  requirement.

2.     Ensure that teachers in all departments are aware of the academic expectation
       for which their department has assumed responsibility.

Classification: Completed

Response: All teachers in all departments are aware of their responsibility for the school’s
academic expectations. All departments met on several occasions and discussed and determined
which of the school’s twenty-five (25) academic expectations were a primary or secondary
responsibility to address in their classes. The final product of this work was a chart indicating
which department had the primary or secondary responsibility of addressing each of the
academic expectations. This chart has been distributed to all teachers.

3.     Ensure that all curriculum documents are aligned with the school-wide
       academic expectations so that all students have sufficient and equitable access
       and opportunity to practice and achieve the school’s academic expectations.

Classification: Completed

Response:       During the past two years, the Cranston School Department has dedicated
significant time and money into the development and implementation of our PBGR/High School
Diplomas System and the review and development of Curriculum in all content areas. A process
and calendar of curriculum review and development was developed and implemented during the
2010-2011 school year and extends through the 2015-2016 school year. Several departments
have completed curriculum work while others are currently in progress. In both curriculum
documents and in all aspects of the High School Diploma System, all of the school’s academic
expectations are consistently referenced. It is required that academic expectations are referenced
in all lesson planning, instruction, and assessment. For each of the twenty-five (25) academic
expectations, there is an accompanying school-wide rubric for assessing each expectation.

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4.       Develop a plan to ensure that teachers in all classes consistently use instructional
         strategies that personalize instruction, make connections across disciplines, engage
         students as active learners, engage students as self-directed learners and promote
         self-assessment and self-reflection.

Classification: Completed

Response:      The following strategies and programs have been fully implemented in recent
years. This is an on-going effort that will continue to be expanded upon over time.

        Professional development opportunities for differentiated instruction communicated to
         and provided for all teachers.
        The results of informal classroom visits and walk-throughs are communicated to
         individual teachers and to the faculty in general with recommendations for improvement
         in their area.
        Through the formal teacher evaluation process, these recommendations are addressed
         with faculty members. Beginning with the 2011-2012 school year, a new teacher
         evaluation tool has been implemented. This new evaluation system has a much greater
         focus on personalizing instruction, student engagement and real-world connections and
         21st Century skills.
        Interdisciplinary instruction continues to be strongly encouraged, as well as opportunities
         being provided for all staff to make connections across disciplines.
        In addition to monthly faculty meetings, department meetings, and common planning
         periods for teachers who are team teaching, an additional four (4) hours of common
         planning time per month has been added for teachers to plan, share, collaborate, and
         review student work.
        Teachers are encouraged to participate in learning walks and/or make individual visits to
         fellow teacher classrooms to observe activities and teaching practices. The administration
         encourages all teachers to engage in this practice and will provide coverage and make
         arrangements to accommodate such requests.
                                                                                                       F
         aculty meeting time, in many instances, is dedicated to providing professional
         development opportunities for teachers in a variety of areas such as interdisciplinary
         instructions, RTI, differentiated instruction, Autism, etc.
                                                                                                       A
         pplied learning activities and assessments are required in all classes. This emphasis on
         applied learning and 21st century skills has become a central focus in recent years in light
         of high school reform initiatives, the High School Diploma System, and the new teacher
         evaluation tool.




5.       Develop a plan to fully integrate the use of technology as a tool for teaching and
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         learning.

Classification: In Progress

Response:      Despite the difficult economic times, we believe that we have made significant
strides during the past three years to integrate technology into teaching and learning here at
Cranston High School West. To provide increased access to technology for our teachers and
students, we provided the following:

        There is at least one (1) computer in every classroom and many have multiple computers.
        We have brought the number of LCD projectors up to twenty-three (23); many are
         permanently mounted in classrooms; we are presently in the process of purchasing
         several more to make available through each department as needed.
        We have refurbished several existing computer labs with all new computers. We
         currently have fifteen computer labs that are specific teaching stations and have added a
         third thirty (30) station computer lab that teachers may reserve as needed. Additionally,
         we have three mobile labs available upon teacher request (the third one added this school
         year). The projected budget for the 2012-2013 school year also includes plans for the
         purchase of thirty (30) new computers to refurbish one of the existing labs.
        Additional equipment such as overhead projectors, Elmos, etc. have also been purchased
         recently and plans exist within the 2012-2013 budget to purchase additional equipment.

As a result of this recent infusion of technology, we have witnessed an increased use of
technology. Our intentions are to continue to encourage teachers to incorporate technology into
their teaching and to provide them not only increased access to technology but professional
development opportunities in this area as well.

6.       Develop a process to assess school wide and individual progress in achieving the
         academic expectation in the mission based on the use of school-wide rubrics.

Classification: Completed

Response:      As previously mentioned in highlighted recommendation #3, reference to the
school-side academic expectations is required in all teacher planning, instruction, and
assessment.     Students’ demonstration of proficiency on these academic expectations is a
graduation requirement clearly outlined in the High School Diploma Handbook. School-wide
rubrics for each of the twenty-five (25) academic expectations exist and are required to be used
in all assessments of student proficiency on the school’s academic expectations.

7.       Ensure that for each learning activity, teachers clarify to students the relevant
         school-wide expectations that will be assessed.

Classification: Completed

Response:     The School-Wide Academic Expectations are posted on the school’s website, in
classrooms and are listed in both the student handbook and the High School Diploma Handbook.
Both the academic expectation and the accompanying rubric for each expectation incorporates
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the language of the state’s GSEs. Teachers are required to make reference to and use of these
expectations and rubrics in planning, instruction, and assessment. Teachers reference the
expectations that are being addressed and assessed routinely during the presentation of units of
study and individual lessons and activities.

8.     Assess the effectiveness of grouping patterns in light of current research on best
       practice in grouping.

Classification: In Progress

Response:      As we near the completion of the full implementation of our curriculum revision
work and the implementation of our High School Diploma System, work has begun to research
and assess the effectiveness of our grouping patterns through the PBGR Coordinator/Curriculum
Coordinator, Nancy Sullivan, at the central office. She is currently developing a gap analysis of
all measures of student proficiency which includes common tasks; teacher generated (validated)
tasks and Comprehensive Course Assessments (CCAs). The intent of this work is to provide us
with information relative to access and opportunity for all students that will impact their
academic success.

9.     Establish and implement a formal procedure for the evaluation of services in
       health/nursing, special education, guidance, and library/media.

Classification: In Progress

Response:       As previously mentioned in this report, this year is the first year of a new teacher
evaluation system. The 2011-2012 school year has been termed the “gradual implementation”
year or pilot year for the new system. The evaluation tool being implemented this year applies
only to classroom teachers and some special educators. The evaluation tool/rubric for school
nurses, special education, guidance counselors, library/media specialists, and other service
providers is still in the developmental stages and is scheduled to be rolled out during the 2012-
2013 school year.

10.    Integrate the school’s library/media services into the school’s curriculum and
       instruction.

Classification: Completed

Response:        The library/media specialist provides all ninth grade students an orientation to our
library facility and instruction in the use of online catalogs for access to our resources and state-
side inter-library loan, use of subscription on-line databases, and efficient searching and
evaluation of internet-based resources.

The library media/specialist works cooperatively with teachers in all content areas to assist
students in the research process as well as digital portfolio development.
The library/media specialist provides professional development opportunities for teachers to
learn more about catalogs, subscriptions, on-line databases and other tools their students’ have
available to them.
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The districts’ Curriculum Advisor Board (CAB) has been reactivated and redesigned. The new
Program Supervisor for library/media specialists is a participant in all Program Supervisor
Meetings as well as holding a position on the CAB.

Our library/media specialist has also developed a documented library of resources for each
academic department by course.

One of follow-up subcommittees to develop our two-year report to NEASC was chaired by our
library/media specialist.

11.    Ensure an adequate and dependable source of revenue to provide and maintain
       appropriate school programs to support student learning.

Classification: In Progress

Response:    The following is an excerpt from the Superintendent’s presentation of the
proposed 2012-2013 school budget to the school committee on January 17, 2012.

       As I stated in my budget cover letter, I am presenting a budget that is not
       substantially different from the previously adopted budget. Included in this years’
       budget are only those items that are either required by or support the new Basic
       Educational Program regulations (BEP) which have been in effect since July 1,
       2010.

       The budget ensures that Cranston Public Schools students are provided with a
       comprehensive program of study that is “guaranteed and viable” in each content
       area and provides for student participation in athletics and curricular activities.

       I may point out that despite the difficult times that we have had in the past, our
       schools are still very successful. Last year, 16 of our 17 elementary schools met
       Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), as well as all three middle schools. I would
       debate if large urban ring/urban high schools statistically, can achieve AYP given
       the large percentage of students whom have special needs. As the Committee
       knows, the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC), the
       prestigious accrediting body just completed its 5 year report on Cranston East
       and it was virtually flawless and we even received accolades from the
       Commissioner on that achievement. Our 2011 graduations were wonderful: at
       Cranston High School West, 96% of the students went on to college and at
       Cranston High School East, just a couple of tenths of a point below 80%, went on
       to college. Our students went to some of the top colleges and universities in the
       country, many of them to trade and technical schools, and many going on to
       defend our country and our freedom in the military.

In addition, the Superintendent developed a school budget forecast that includes an average
budget increase of $2,546,215 per year for the next six years.

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Response to Special Progress Report (from Commissioner’s
           Letter of August 4, 2009)
1.     Describe the school’s plan to ensure effective, ongoing curriculum development,
       evaluation and revision in light of the elimination of the district-wide program
       administrator and the lack of funds to support the curriculum related professional
       development.

Classification: Completed

Response:      Under the direction of Curriculum Coordinator, Dr. Nancy Sullivan, extensive
work on curriculum development has occurred over the past two (2) years. With her leadership
and support, several content areas have already completed extensive curriculum review and
revision. Presently, there are five (5) content areas that are working on curriculum development.
Standard templates have been incorporated into their work providing a consistent format for all
curriculum writing. Our curriculum work integrates all relevant academic expectations and
GSEs. School-wide rubrics aligned with all academic expectations have been developed and
implemented. Suggested instructional strategies, as well as sample lesson plans are also included
in the curriculum documents. Additionally, a calendar for curriculum review, revision, and
implementation has been developed extending through the 2015-2016 school year.

2.     Assess and report to the Commission on the quality and faithfulness of the delivery
       of the administrative/leadership services and the degree to which they meet the
       Commission’s Standard on Leadership and Organization given the reappointment
       of responsibilities for the school’s day-to-day operation such as 504 program
       coordinators teacher evaluation, NECAP testing, grade 8 transition and morning
       bus/lunch duties.

Classification: No Action

Response:      There has been no change in the status of the eliminated Assistant Principal
position at CHSW. The proposed budget for the 2012-2013 school year also has no provision for
the reinstatement of the position.

Our administrative team continues to work very hard to monitor and address routine issues of
student attendance, discipline, and supervisory duties. Additional responsibilities such as
NECAP testing, 504s, grade 8 transition, etc. have been equitably divided amongst the
administrative team. Our administrative team works very hard to fulfill all of their
responsibilities and to maintain the positive, safe and respectful learning environment that has
characterized CHSW. Despite their dedication and investment in their roles and expectations,
they are overloaded with their responsibilities every day. With the implementation of the new
teacher evaluation process, which requires that all teachers are evaluated every year and with a
significantly more time consuming evaluation tool, this has proven to be a very challenging year
to us all.



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3.     Describe the manner in which the duties of the paraprofessional secretary have been
       replaced/reappointed to other personnel to ensure an adequate level of timely
       service.

Classification: No Action

Response:       There has been no change or future plan for change relative to the status of this
position/situation since my last report in 2009.

4.     Provide the Commission with an assessment of the success of the redesign of the
       recently adopted guidance service delivery model.

Classification: Completed

Response:       To improve upon our initial restructuring, we modified our grade specific
structure. Cranston West counselors share grades 9/11 and 10/12. They are still able to focus on
issues pertinent to specific age groups but are now able to share resources and combine talents.
Counselors are able to focus their efforts on programming for specific grades. Career and
Technical Center (CACTC) counselors are now program specific, and all are now able to follow
their students throughout their years in the CACTC. These counselors are able to increase their
knowledge of career paths and opportunities for the specific programs they service. This
structure allows counselors to meet with students within their programs to provide guidance and
have program specific discussions. Overall, the numbers of counselees are much more evenly
distributed. Counselors feel they are more able to successfully implement and support
components of the Individual Learning Plan (ILP) as required under RI regulations.

5.     Describe the school’s development of a plan to address facility, health and safety
       issues that have been identified by the RGB Architectural Firm in the Cranston
       Area Career and Technical Center due to a lack of routine maintenance and failure
       to replace and repair equipment in a timely manner, issues including but not limited
       to:

              The inconsistency of the heating ventilation and air conditioning system and
               the control system for it.

       Classification: In Progress

       Response:    The heating, ventilation and air conditioning system is scheduled for the
       summer of 2013 at a cost of $1.6 million.

              The inadequate public address/communication/intercom system.

       Classification: Completed

       Response:      The intercom system has been repaired.

              The need for roof and window replacement/repair
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Classification: In Progress

Response:      A new roof is scheduled to be done during the summer of 2013. Window
repair/replacement is done on an as-needed basis.

      The presence of mold in the lower level of the facility.

Classification: In Progress

Response:       This problem exists due to the lack of air circulation. This problem will
be resolved with the installation of a new HVAC system in the summer of 2013.
Presently, this is not an existing problem.

      The malfunction dust collection system in the construction area.

Classification: Completed

Response:     According to our Director of Plant Operations, he has no knowledge of
any problem of malfunction with the dust collection system in the construction area.

      The inadequacy of electrical service to support school programs.

Classification: Completed

Response:        The Director of Plant Operations indicates that there are no inadequacies
of electrical service to support school programs at this time.

      The need to replace/upgrade door hardware to ensure full handicapped
       accessibility

Classification: In Progress

Response:      Door hardware is replaced as needed/requested. Full handicapped
accessibility will be completed with the full implementation of the feasibility study (see
attachment) in 2013.

      The chronically unreliable elevator.

Classification: Completed

Response:      The elevator has been repaired and is fully functional.

      The state of disrepair of various plumbing fixtures in the girls and boys
       lavatories.

Classification: Completed
                                                                                       10
       Response:      The plumbing fixtures in both the girls and boys lavatories have been
       replaced/repaired and are fully functional.

              Instance of crumbling masonry in floors and stairways.

       Classification: Completed

       Response:      Masonry repairs to floors and stairways have been completed.

              The chronic seasonal infestation of bees/hornets.

       Classification: Completed

       Response:     The infestation of bees and hornets are addressed by exterminators as
       requested when such problems arise.

              The increasingly dysfunctional walk-in cooler in the culinary arts area.

       Classification: Completed

       Response:      The walk-in cooler has been repaired and fully operational with no
       reported problems for the past two (2) school years.


Responses to Highlighted Recommendations requested in the
             March 24, 2010 letter from NEASC.

1.     Describe how grouping pattern reflect the diversity of the student body, foster
       heterogeneity, reflect current research and best practices, and support the effective
       implementation of the curriculum.

Classification: Completed

Response:      Cranston has moved to remove all labels from its classes. Currently, in our course
of study, only Honors and/or AP classes carry any label. All students are expected to meet
minimum GSE’s levels in all classes, though some classes may move at different paces. Course
descriptions can be found within the course of study.

Students are encouraged to take any class. Students are not tracked, but rather are placed into
classes based on their individual strengths. No student is denied access to or the opportunity to
take any class. Classes are assigned based upon recommendation and consultation between the
student, teacher, parent, and guidance counselors.

2.     Report the school’s progress in establish small personalized learning communities.

Classification: Completed
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Response:       With a student population of almost 1600 students and a school physical plant that
is much like a small college campus, providing a small personalized learning environment is a
challenge. Our campus is laid out in such a way that various buildings and wings of buildings
are designed to be content specific. In many cases, these programs house labs and equipment
that are fixed and must remain in those specific areas. Therefore, it is not possible for us to
divide the school into wings or houses by grade or program specificity. We are at a point where
we feel that despite our size and physical constraints, we have created a personalized learning
environment and community for all of our students. Every student is assigned to an advisory of
approximately fifteen (15) students. Each advisory has an advisory teacher assigned that will be
the advisory teacher for each of those students for the entire four (4) years of their high school
career. The advisory meets every day for seven (7) minutes. Every other Wednesday there is an
extended advisory period which meets for twenty-one (21) minutes. During the extended
advisory period, advisory teachers lead students through a variety of age and grade specific
personalization activities that are contained in our personalization curriculum. This curriculum
was designed by teachers, administrators, students and parents. Additionally, all four years that
students are at Cranston High School West they are assigned to the same guidance counselor,
assistant principal and school nurse.

3.     Submit an example of the format used to report the progress in achieving the
       school’s civic and social expectation and describe the processes that currently exist
       for employing the data from those reports to make the requisite judgments.

Classification: Completed

Response:      Refer to response in Section I, highlighted recommendation #1 on page 1.


Response to Highlighted Recommendations requested in the
            Special Progress Report review letter dated October 28, 2011.
1.     Submit detailed progress addressing the remaining facility issues, including a
       timeline for the proposed work.

Completion: In Progress

Response:      Plans and design for the HVAC system at the Cranston Area Career and
Technical Center have been submitted to the R. I. Department of Education. The payment for
this project will be through the Department of Education. It is a 1.6 million dollar project and
will be going out to bid in September 2012. Work on this project will begin in June 2013. We
have also submitted a building assessment and evaluation study to RIDE regarding repair and
renovations to the building (see attachment). At this time RIDE has not approved any capital
money for this, but my understanding is it will be presented as part of RIDE’s 2011-2012 Capital
Budget.


Section II – Evaluation Report Recommendations
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Standard for Accreditation: Mission and Expectation for Student Learning

1. Clarify the targeted level of expectation in all academic rubrics.

Classification: Completed.

Response:     School-wide rubrics for all twenty-five (25) academic expectations have been
developed and distributed to all teachers in all content areas. All common tasks, comprehensive
course assessments, and other major assessments incorporate these school-wide rubrics.


2.     Develop indicators of student success in meeting social and civic expectations and
       implement a method for tracking their performance.

Classification: Completed.

Response:     Refer to response in Section I, highlighted recommendation #1 on page 1.


3.     Ensure the regular review of the mission statement and expectations for student
       learning using a variety of relevant data, including data gathered through
       assessments using school-wide rubrics.

Classification: Completed

Response:      Three years ago, under the direction of a consultant from the Rhode Island
Department of Education, administrators and teachers from both Cranston High School West and
Cranston High School East, reviewed and revised our schools’ academic expectations. They
were revised to align with the state grade 10 GSEs. School-wide rubrics have been developed
for each academic expectation identifying a benchmark measure of proficiency as a score of “3”
(out of 4). Realizing that we are due to review our academic expectations and transition to a
statement of core beliefs and values, we are in the process of developing a schedule with the
Central Office and the city’s high schools to accomplish this work.


Standard for Accreditation: Curriculum

1.     Ensure that all school-wide expectations are fully integrated into all curriculum
       guidelines.

Classification: Completed


Response:     Refer to Section I, highlighted response #3 on page 3
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2.     Inform all teachers in each department of the specific school-wide expectations for
       which they are responsible.

Classification: Completed

Response: Refer to Section I, highlighted recommendation #2 on page 3.


3.     Develop a plan to ensure that the curriculum engages all students in all classes in
       inquiry, problem solving, and higher order thinking.

Classification: Completed.
Response:      Our High School Diploma System in conjunction with our academic expectations
requires that all students in all classes are required to demonstrate proficiency in inquiry,
problem solving, higher order thinking as well as other 21st. Century Skills.

Requirements for a Cranston High School Diploma:

       A.     Successful completion of the minimum required coursework both in total
              and for specific subjects.

       B.     Successful completion of Comprehensive Course Assessments that
              include performance tasks that assure common expectations and
              proficiencies have been met. A composite measure of student proficiency
              will be recorded in the student’s transcript.

       C.     Completion of state assessment according to a timetable determined by the
              Board of Regents. Students must participate in these assessments.
              Students are required to pass a state-approved assessment to graduate.
              Students will be required to meet a level of proficiency as determined by
              the State.

       D.     Successful completion of a Graduation Portfolio presentation including
              Common Tasks that, when viewed in combination with other graduation
              requirements, demonstrate that necessary proficiencies have been met.

       E.     Successful completion of community service activity(ies) demonstrating
              one or more of the school’s identified expectations for learning.

       F.     Each student will create an Individual Learn Plan (ILP) aligned to
              personal, academic, career, and social goals.

This system is a combination of all of the assessment measures (multiple types of assessments),
student supports, and school and district requirements used by a school to show what students
know and are able to do. Components required for graduation as a part of the diploma system
include:
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        Completion of a minimum of 24 Carnegie Units

        Diploma Assessments (exhibitions, end-of-course exams, graduation
         portfolios, common tasks, artifacts of different types, demonstrations) chosen
         by the school, local assessments and state assessment. It is the school’s
         responsibility to provide each student with the necessary and appropriate
         support and “opportunities to learn” in order for his/her to develop the
         knowledge and skills needed to prepare them for success in post-secondary
         learning experiences and in the work place.

        For the class of 2014, students must take the NECAP or other state assessment
         and achieve a minimum score as determined by the State (currently a “2”,
         partially proficient).


4.     Align the curriculum with the school-wide expectations to ensure that all students
       have sufficient opportunity to practice and achieve each of the academic
       expectations for student learning.

Classification: Completed

Response:     For the past 18 months, the faculty and staff of CHSW have put forth a
tremendous effort in the area of alignment to the GSE’s. This work has been completed on the
departmental level, with members of each department spending countless hours of faculty
meeting, department meeting and common planning time to ensure that the area of alignment is
strengthened and solidified.

Each department has convened both school-wide and district-wide, with colleagues from
Cranston High School East and the New England Laborer’s/Cranston Public Schools’ Charter
School, to complete this work. Led by the Department Chairs and Program Supervisors for each
discipline, each department has unpacked the GSE’s for their alignment to the curriculum. This
work has occurred on a collaborative basis, with members of the Special Education Department
and the English Language Learners Department, joining all other departments from the
beginning in an attempt to provide for Universal Design.

Once the GSE’s were unpacked and aligned to each department, with each discipline and course
taking “responsibility” for specific GSE’s, the departments then turned to assessment. CHSW
began to review already developed Common Task assessments for their relevance to the GSE’s
and alignment to the curriculum. Additionally, new Common Tasks were developed so that for
all courses, students receive, at a minimum, one Common Task per quarter. This will allow
students the opportunity to demonstrate proficiency in the GSE’s a total of 28 times per school
year at a minimum, for use in their Digital Portfolios. Additionally, for students scored as not
proficient on a given task, the student will receive the opportunity to revise this task in an
attempt to gain proficiency. All Common Tasks have had to go through a formal process of
calibration and validation before any task is deemed “ready” for use in any department. The
validation and calibration process ongoing as teachers continue to develop new common tasks.

                                                                                             15
One overall example of this work can be found in the area of mathematics. A district committee
was formed over three years ago to look at mathematics instruction. What we found was that
students were not receiving access to the GSE’s under our current format. As a result, CHSW
switched our course offerings in mathematics to reflect this major stumbling block. All students
at CHSW are now enrolled in Algebra I at our minimum level for mathematics, with the
sequence following geometry and Algebra II, plus one math related course. For those students
who struggle in mathematics, a “double period” Algebra I course is offered in the 9th grade as a
“ramp up” and to provide more support. Cranston Public Schools has also switched to
Springboard for our Algebra I and Geometry courses. All CHSW mathematics teachers have
received, and continue to receive, training in the Springboard strategies, with three of our
teachers chosen to become national trainers for the Springboard curriculum.

Several years ago CHSW revised its science offerings to become a “Physics First” curriculum
model. This provides that students are enrolled in Foundations for Physics in the 9th grade,
followed by Chemistry and Biology in grades 10 and 11 which we feel is more compatible with
our mathematics course progression. Additionally, CHSW is in the process of a five year cycle
with the Charles A. Dana Center of the University of Texas at Austin to completely rewrite and
align our science curriculum. This school year marks the implementation of this new
curriculum. CHSW has begun the same process this year with the DANA Center in the area of
mathematics.

Cranston Public Schools has also embarked on a curriculum review cycle. Under the direction of
PBGR coordinator Dr. Nancy Sullivan and Executive Director of Educational Programs and
Services Jeannine Nota, a formal curriculum review cycle is now in place for every department
over the course of the next five years, in an attempt to review and update our current curricula.

Finally, CHSW has, in conjunction with CHSE and the NEL/CPS Charter School, developed 25
analytic rubrics which coincide with the District Wide Academic Expectations for Student
Learning. These rubrics have been developed by a committee of approximately 30 teachers over
the course of the past three months. Each rubric is aligned to the state’s GSE’s.

5.     Design and implement a standard format for all curriculum guides that includes the
       integration of relevant school-wide expectations and suggests instructional strategies
       that include the use of school-wide rubrics.

Classification: Completed

Response: Refer to Response to Special Programs Report (from Commissioner’s letter of
August 4, 2009) on page 8 #1.


6.     Design and implement a plan for curriculum coordination and integration among
       departments.

Classification: Completed



                                                                                              16
Response:      For the past several years, curriculum coordination and interdisciplinary
instruction has existed to a limited extent. With the ratification of the most recent teacher
contract this past summer, there are increased opportunities for this type of integration and
coordination to take place. Common planning time exists during the regular school day for all
inclusion teachers. The new contract has also provided for increased common planning time
after school providing for increased time and opportunities for departments to work
cooperatively in the development of curriculum coordination and interdisciplinary lessons.

7.     Allocate sufficient resources for full implementation of the curriculum.

Classification: Completed

Response:      Beginning with the 2010-2011 school year, the district has provided resources for
a renewed focus on the curriculum. A Curriculum Coordinator was appointed, as well as the
reinstatement of the Program Supervisor positions which had been cut two years prior due to
budget cuts. The Curriculum Advisor Board (CAB) has also been reactivated. Funds for
professional development and curriculum development have also been allocated. Due to this
renewed focus on curriculum, our Program of Studies has been reviewed, revised and approved
by the School Committee. Many courses have been reviewed and revised, or in some cases,
discontinued. Energetic new Program Supervisors have developed and presented new courses
for approval to the CAB. Hopefully, provided the economic situation improves, the development
of new courses and the addition of new staff will continue to provide our students with increased
academic opportunities.


8.     Expand the use of assessment results to develop, evaluate, and revise curriculum.

Classification: Completed.

Response:      Cranston West has had a Data Analysis Committee for several years now. This
committee reviews all NECAP assessment results. The committee chair compiles and analyzes
the results. Together, the chair and the principal present this information to our leadership team.
We review the data and discuss how best to share and implement this information with
departments. Teachers then discuss and strategize how best to implement their strategies into
their curriculum and instruction. Most recently, with the implementation of comprehensive
course assessments (CCAs), common tasks (CTs), STAR assessment testing, and NWEA testing,
teachers are provided with increased assessment data that they can analyze and draw conclusions
from to inform curriculum and instruction.


9.     Engage more faculty in the curriculum review process.

Classification: Completed.

Response:     In the past two years, with the appointment of a Curriculum Coordinator, the
reinstatement of the Program Supervisor positions and the reactivation of the Curriculum
Advisory Board (CAB), the curriculum review work has been and continues to be extensive.
                                                                                                17
Several content areas have already completed curriculum work, many others are currently in
process and others are scheduled to begin. All of this curriculum work has been orchestrated by
the Curriculum Coordinator, Nancy Sullivan and each curriculum writing team is led by the
content area program supervisor. Each curriculum writing team is composed of teachers in each
respective content area that have volunteered to do this important work.



10.       Provide effective professional development to support the development and
          implementation of the curriculum.

Classification: Completed.

Response:      During the past three years, professional development opportunities have
increased significantly in the area of curriculum development and implementation. For three (3)
years, Cranston has worked with the DANA Center from the University of Texas on curriculum
development in the science area. This school year, similar curriculum development has begun
with our math department through the DANA Center. This relationship and curriculum work is
scheduled through the next several years and will begin with the English Department next year.
Nancy Sullivan has provided curriculum professional development for all curriculum writing
teams in all content areas, as well as all teachers in the Career and Technical Center in their
specialized content area. Additionally, many teachers have had professional development
through summer grant opportunities such as E2T2; RITES; RITTI; Achieve 3000; and for
science teachers through the East Bay Collaborative.

Standard for Accreditation: Instruction
1.        Ensure that instruction strategies in all classes employ practices that engage
          students as active and self-directed learners, personalize instruction, make
          connections across disciplines and promote self-assessments.

Classification: Completed

Response:     We have been in the process of addressing this recommendation for the past few
years. With the implementation of the new teacher evaluation tool this year, there is increased
focus on student engagement, student centered learning, 21st century skills, and student self-
assessment and reflection. We are encouraging teachers and providing them direction and
guidance to implement these strategies through the following:

         All students, with guidance from their advisory teacher and their guidance counselor,
          develop an Individual Learning Plan (ILP). Students develop this learning plan with
          career, academic, and personal goals in mind. It encourages them to take direction their
          learning, personalize their learning experience, makes disciplinary connections and
          promotes self-reflection.
         All students must successfully complete four common tasks/portfolio worthy projects per
          course per year. These projects must have a minimum DOK of a “3”. Projects must be
          inquiry and research based tasks that require students to be motivated and self-directed.
                                                                                                18
         Students have the latitude to personalize their learning by selecting which projects they
         include in their portfolio presentation. They further personalize, make connections, and
         self-assesses through required written reflections for each individual artifact as well as a
         summative reflection for their final portfolio presentation.
        Recent learning walks have determined a need for greater emphasis on these aspects of
         instruction in many teachers’ classrooms. These results have been reported to the faculty
         in Learning Walk Reports highlighting the need for greater emphasis in these areas. The
         need for instructional improvement in these areas have also been the topic of discussion
         in Leadership Meetings, Faculty Meetings, Department Meetings, and Common Planning
         Time.
        Additionally, professional development opportunities that are available in the areas of
         differentiated instruction, best practice, student-centered learning, team teaching, etc. are
         communicated to all teachers encouraging them to attend. The recent DANA Center
         work has also promoted and encouraged these instructional strategies. Arrangements are
         also made for teachers to be able to visit other teacher’s classrooms to observe successful
         and effective teaching strategies.
        Feedback from administrators and department chairs, walk-throughs, written and formal
         evaluations provides teachers with suggestions regarding student-centered lessons and
         activities.


2.       Provide more formal opportunities for teaches to share instructional strategies.

Classification: Completed.

Response:      The newly ratified teachers’ contract beginning with the 2011-2012 school year,
provides for increased opportunities for teachers to share instructional strategies.

Common Planning time for special education and regular education teachers that team teach
continues with one CP period per cycle. Beginning with their most recent contract, all teachers
have combined four hours per month with department meetings and/or common planning time.
Additionally, teachers that are members of the curriculum writing team, DANA curriculum team
or are working on special projects are provided additional opportunities to discuss and share
instructional strategies.

3.       Increase significantly the integration of technology support teaching and learning.

Classification: In Progress.

Response:       Refer to Response to highlighted recommendation #5 page 5.

4.       Implement a program of focused professional development targeted to meet specific
         instructional needs.

Classification: Completed


                                                                                                   19
Response:       For the 2011-2012 school year, a program of focused professional development
has been implemented. The focus of the PD is on the implementation of the new teacher
evaluation process that targets improved teacher quality and practice. All teachers are provided
with at least eight (8) hours of PD that addresses the new teacher evaluation process which
includes a heavy emphasis on student engagement, teacher questioning techniques and strategies,
student self-directed learning, assessment and reflection, interdisciplinary instruction and 21st
Century skills.

Additionally, teachers are provided with other PD opportunities that may arise that are pertinent
to their instruction or content area. A variety of PD opportunities and experiences are
occasionally provided to teachers during common planning, department meetings, or faculty
meetings. The opportunity for teachers to visit other teacher’s classrooms or participate in walk-
throughs is also encouraged or provided for upon request.

Standard for Accreditation: Assessment
1.     Develop a system to collect and analyze data that measures the degree to which the
       school is meeting the academic learning expectations defined in its mission.

Classification: Completed.

Response:      At Cranston High School West, we have a data analysis committee that reviews
all of our assessment scores. The chair of that committee and the principal present the data to
our leadership team and discuss the analysis and the way to best utilize it in their departments.
Department Chairs take this information and discuss it with their departments. From this
information, teachers strategize how to best implement these strategies into their curriculum and
instruction.

Another measure of the degree to which we are meeting our academic expectations is through
the rate of success that our seniors experience through the presentation of their senior graduation
portfolio. Senior graduation portfolio presentations are judged by a panel of adult judges. Their
presentations must incorporate a demonstration of technological skills, oral presentation skills,
research and it is required that their presentation must reflect three specific academic
expectations. All pieces of work must include a reflective essay and the entire presentation must
include a summative reflective essay.

Additionally, our high school reform work that we are currently involved in to achieve approval
of our high school diploma plan is also reflective of the degree to which we meet academic
expectations. Once our course mapping is completed in all content areas, we will be able to
analyze our effectiveness in providing all students with fair and equitable access and opportunity.
The completion of a gap analysis and course taking patterns of our student population will yield
data that is indicative of our effectiveness in exposing all students to our academic expectations
and GSEs.


2.     Develop and implement a method for assessing and reporting student progress in
       both civic and social expectations.
                                                                                                20
Classification: Completed.

Response:     Refer to Response to Section I Response to Highlighted Recommendation #1
page 1.


3.     Articulate clearly the learning expectation that will be assessed for each learning
       activity.

Classification: Completed

Response:      School-wide academic expectations were reviewed and revised two years ago.
They are written in language that incorporates the state’s GSEs. Accompanying school-wide
rubrics have been developed and implemented for each of the academic expectations. Teachers
are expected to reference these academic expectations during planning, instruction, and
assessment. Academic expectations are reflected in all teacher plan books, student handbooks,
the High School Diploma Handbook and on the school website. They are posted in classrooms,
written on blackboards, and referenced in all curriculum documents as well as district-wide
assessments such as common tasks and comprehensive course assessments.


4.     Expand the use of school-wide rubrics.

Classification: Completed

Response:       During the 2010-2011 school year, a rubric development committee was
established under the leadership of Mrs. Jeanine Nota, Director of Education Program, from the
central office. This committee was made up of teachers from both Cranston High School East
and Cranston High School West with representation from all content areas. The existing school-
wide rubrics were reviewed by the administration, program supervisors and department chairs.
At the conclusion of the 2010-2011 school year, they were adopted and implemented at the
beginning of the 2011-2012 school year. These rubrics are used in all major assessments in all
content areas as appropriate.



5.     Allocate time for teachers to meet collaboratively to discuss and share student work
       and assessment data.

Classification: Completed.

Response:       A new three year contract with the Cranston Teachers Association was ratified
this past summer. Beginning with the 2011-2012 school year, this new contract provides for
increased common planning time for teachers to meet collaboratively to integrate curricula,
discuss and share student work and assessment data. The current common planning time that
exists for teachers, in addition to monthly faculty and department meetings includes:
                                                                                           21
        A common planning period for all regular and special education teachers that team teach
         over the course of our weekly period rotation schedule.
        One hour common planning sessions for all teachers in all content areas three times per
         month; these common planning sessions occur after school on weeks that there is not a
         faculty or department meeting.


6.       Implement ongoing professional development in of the area of assessment practices.

Classification: Completed

Response:      All Cranston Teachers are required by contract to participate in at least eight (8)
hours of professional development. During the previous two (2) school years, all CHSW
teachers received professional development in the area of developing, implementing, validating,
and calibrating common tasks and comprehensive course assessment. This process continues as
we move forward developing new CTs and CCAs and reviewing and revising existing ones.


7.       Develop and implement a process to report the school’s progress in achieving all
         school-wide expectations to the community.

Classification: Completed

Response:       A process for reporting to and informing the school community of our school’s
successes, academic progress, and achievements has been and continues to be in place. The
following is a list of the various informational mechanisms that we employ to inform our school
community.

        School Report Night
        School Website (newly revised for 2011-2012)
        Quarterly School Newsletter
        School Newspaper (student run)
        Local Media
        All assessment scores sent home to parents
        Community Nights
        Grade-level Parents Night
        Open House
        Honors and other awards programs
        School Improvement Team
        Parent and community participation on Senior Portfolio Presentation judging panels
        The newly implemented parent portal through our ASPEN student data system




                                                                                               22
Standard for Accreditation: Leadership and Organization
1.     Ensure that the principal and faculty share a common mission in order to achieve
       the school’s mission and expectations for student learning.

Classification: Completed

Response:       As time has gone on, there continues to be a mutual and common vision shared by
the principal and faculty for the mission and expectations for student learning at CHSW. Faculty
members, department chairs and administrators work collaboratively in a variety of school
initiatives. With support from the faculty and staff for the principal’s philosophy and
expectations of a safe, healthy, organized and respectful learning climate, the school atmosphere
was significantly transformed in a very short time. Teacher support and involvement has
increased as indicated by the number of teachers participating in committees such as the
committee on school-wide rubrics, grading policy, attendance policy, homework policy,
personalization and the School Improvement Team to name a few. It is doubtful that any school
will every have 100% support and sharing of a common vision, but we believe that at CHSW the
faculty support of our vision is significantly high.

2.     Assess the effectiveness of student grouping patterns in light of current educational
       research.

Classification: In Progress

Response:     Refer to Section I Highlighted Recommendations #8 page 6.

3.     Increase formal opportunities for common planning time and integration of
       curricula.

Classification: Completed

Response: Refer to Standard for Accreditation: Curriculum #6 page 17 and Standard for
Accreditation: Assessment #5 page 22.

4.     Expand the development of small personalized learning communities.

Classification: Completed

Response:    Refer to Section I Responses to Highlighted Recommendations requested in the
March 24, 2010 letter from NEASC #2 page 12.


5.     Develop and implement a master schedule that supports effective implementation of
       curriculum to the greatest extent possible.

Classification: In Progress

                                                                                              23
Response:       During the 2006-2007 School year, a joint committee of faculty and
administrators from Cranston High West and Cranston High School East researched a variety of
master schedule models. Meetings and visits to several different high schools around the state
were conducted over a period of approximately a year and a half. The variety of educational
needs of the students at both schools was carefully considered. After many hours of research and
discussion, the committee proposed that we implement an AB Block Schedule for both schools.
Our proposal and supporting data and information was shared with the faculties of both high
schools, the CTS, the School Improvement Team, and the district administration. After
receiving support for the proposal at all levels, a formal proposal was submitted to the
Superintendent of Schools. Unfortunately, due to the budget constraints that were encountered at
approximately the same time, no action was taken on the proposal.

During the 2011-2012 school year, a new Master Schedule Committee was created under the
leadership of Ms. Jeanine Nota, Director of Educational Programs. This committee, composed
of teachers from both Cranston High School West and Cranston High School East, is charged
with researching possible master schedules that will maximize the effectiveness of the
implementation of our curriculum and learning opportunities for all students at our high schools.

6.     Establish appropriate student loads to enable teachers to meet the learning needs of
       individual students.

Classification: Completed

Response:      In recent years there have been increased efforts on the part of the CHSW
Administration and Central Office to keep teachers loads within the contractual limit to
maximize the effectiveness of instruction and interaction with students. Within the past two(2)
years we have had several situations where enrollments in particular classes have necessitated
the need to hire new staff to expand sections of particular courses. To keep teacher loads
manageable and to provide student access to courses, the central office has been very receptive
and supportive to providing us with the resources to address this situation. Class sizes that
exceed the contractual cap are extremely rare and perhaps non-existent with the exception of an
occasional physical education class that may have student or two over due to scheduling
complications.


Standard for Accreditation: School Resources for Learning

1.     Establish and implement a formal procedure for evaluation of special education,
       health, guidance and library/media programs and services.

Classification: In Progress

Response:     Refer to Section I Response to Highlighted Recommendation #9 page 6.


3.     Evaluate the health services staffing with regard to ensuring a full range of health
       services.
                                                                                              24
Classification: Completed

Response:      The school nurse-teacher appraises, protects and promotes the health and safety of
students. She also provides services to faculty and staff with health, medical, and safety matters.
The school nurse-teacher provides basic school health services including, but not limited to, the
following:

        Facilitates positive student responses to normal development
        Promotes health and safety
        Directly involved with referrals and follow-up of diagnosed or suspected health problems
        Follow-up for mandated school entry physical examinations
        Validate appropriate immunizations (1588) against preventable communicable diseases
        Vision screenings (grade 9)for health conditions that can directly affect student learning
         ability
        Provide health assessments
        Medication administration & assistance
        Health record maintenance and review
        Preventive and emergency school-based health services
        Health education
        Facilitates access to health care through referrals to family physicians, dentist, etc.
        Actively collaborates with others to build student and family capacity for adaptation,
         self-management, self-advocacy, and learning.
        The nurse also collaborates with parents, teachers, mental health staff, and other health
         care providers to develop care plans, identify available health resources, and provide
         health referrals to address specific health problems discovered through health screenings
         and assessments.

With almost 1600 students and nearly 200 faculty and staff, one full time nurse cannot provide
all these services on a daily basis. CHSW would certainly benefit from the addition of at least a
part-time school nurse/teacher.


4.       Ensure that the LMC service programs and materials are fully integrated into the
         school’s curricula and instructional programs.

Classification: In Progress

Response:      Current economic conditions have greatly stressed our ability to move forward.
The intention was that one of our librarians (LMSs) would become a member of the re-
established Curriculum Advisory Board and would be invited to participate in Leadership Team
meetings with department chairs and administrators. This became unworkable since there has
been only one librarian (LMS) at West, from September 2009 to the present. Susan Rose, was
appointed district Library Program Supervisor at the start of the 2011-2012 school year and now
serves on the Curriculum Advisory Board and participates in district-level leadership.

                                                                                                 25
5.     Involve the LMC in the process of curriculum development and review.

Classification: Completed

Response:      Beginning with the 2011-2012 school year, the new LMC Program Supervisor is
a member of the Curriculum Advisory Board and attends all Program Supervisor meetings. She
is an active participant in all curriculum and instruction related discussions that are made by
these two groups. Our librarian, to the best of his ability, continues to provide ongoing support
and resources for all teachers relative to curriculum development and instruction. (Refer to #4,
page 26)

6.     Design and implement a plan to significantly increase the utilization of the LMC by
       students and staff.

Classification: In Progress

Response:       Having lost the second librarian (LMS) position in September 2009, the
remaining librarian endeavors to maintain the same level of activity as before in the library.
Reforms to curriculum and instruction - including development and use of common tasks, and
portfolio-based assessment – have changed the nature of LMC use. There is a great reduction in
the number of research assignments. Students are getting far less experience with the research
process. There has been a steady increase in use of LMC computers - PCs in the lab and laptops
in the library classroom - for portfolio up-loads. There has been a marked increase in use of the
computer lab and laptops for NECAP, STAR, other standardized testing, and RIDE student
surveys. This has also reduced instructional time in the LMC. The librarian (LMS) has continued
to provide an orientation and instruction in the use of library catalogs, inter-library loan,
WebPath Express, a growing array of online databases and e-book collections, and citation for all
our freshmen. Support and instruction have been provided in collaboration with teachers
whenever needed. The library secretary position was eliminated for the current 2011-2012 school
year. The principal and librarian put a new plan and schedule in place to cope with the lost
secretary. As part of this plan, the library is now closed the fourth period of every day to provide
for the librarian’s lunch time and preparation period. This closed period restricts individual
students’ access to the library and also further restricts the available time for scheduling classes
that require the librarian’s collaboration. The librarian continues to open the library at 7:00 daily,
and keeps the library open until 3:00 except when his presence is required at meetings or when
the library is needed for meetings and work sessions. It is hoped that the budgetary cutbacks that
have affected the library program are temporary.

Our LMC services have been stretched to a bare-bone existence. Our LMC staff was cut from
two librarians to one for the 2009-2010 school year. Another cut was made for the 2011-2012
school year with the elimination of the library secretary position.



Standard for Accreditation: Community Resource for Learning


                                                                                                   26
1.     Ensure that the school site and plant is able to fully support all aspects of the
       educational program.

Classification: Completed

Response:      The district administration and school committee are responsible for funding and
supporting staffing needs which directly impacts daily cleanliness and maintenance of the school
plant as well as all capital improvements. Due to the recent economic situation and budget cuts
impacting staffing, the daily cleanliness of the building, although still acceptable, is not as
thorough as it once was. Problems with daily cleanliness arise when a custodian is out and there
is no substitute provided for the individual. In that situation, areas are either not thoroughly
cleaned or not cleaned at all.

With respect to the condition of the buildings and capital projects, some are in progress and
several have been completed. Two years ago the gymnasiums were fully refurbished. A new
digital control system for the heating system was recently installed with funds from federal
stimulus money. A new sprinkler system has been installed in all buildings. Installation of
energy-efficient lights in all buildings is nearing completion. The installation of new windows in
the main building is ongoing. With respect to the physical concerns of the CACTC, please refer
to Section I Response to Highlighted Recommendation- Special Progress Report (from
Commissioner’s letter of August 4, 2009 #5, page 9).


2.     Provide a predictable and reliable estimate of resources available to support
       instructional efforts and publicize and argue upon funding priorities.

Classification: In Progress
Response:      This is primarily a function of the district administration and school committee
with input from principals, directors, and building-level administrators. The budget process
includes not only input from administrators as previously referred to but is also the topic of
discussion in a variety of district level and public school committee public work sessions.
Additionally, please refer to the superintendent’s budge presentation referred to in Section I
Highlighted Recommendation #11 on page 7.


3.     Develop, fund and implement a plan to ensure the appropriate maintenance and
       cleanliness of the school plant.

Classification: Completed

Response:        The building custodial foreman develops and implements the buildings’ cleaning
schedule. This schedule is communicated to all custodians on a daily and as-needed basis
depending upon custodial absenteeism and/or special functions. Additionally, a schedule of
custodial responsibilities exists for each custodial position in the facility. For any type of
emergencies involving elevators, electrical, plumbing, or heating, a plan of notification of
specialists is in place.

                                                                                               27
4.     Assess the sufficiency of the amount of custodial staffing.

Classification: Completed

Response:   Refer to Standard for Accreditation:            Community Resource for Learning
Recommendation #1 page 27.



6.     Reallocate or provide sufficient certified staffing to support the school’s mission and
       expectation for student learning.

Classification: Completed

Response:      Refer to Response to Highlighted Recommendation #11 on page 7 and
Accreditation Standard: Leadership and Organization recommendation #6 on page 24.


7.     Ensure adequate and dependable source of revenue to provide and maintain
       appropriate school programs to support student learning.

Classification: In Progress.

Response:      Refer to response Highlighted Recommendation #11 page 7.

III – SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE REPORT
       None at this time

IV – STATEMENT OF CORE VALUES AND BELIEFS
A district-wide committee composed of members of the city’s high schools is scheduled to begin
work this summer reviewing our existing Mission and Academic Expectations and transitioning
to our Statement of Core Values, Beliefs and Learning Expectations.

What we currently have in place is:

The Mission of Cranston Public Schools
The student completing an education program in Cranston Public Schools is an inquisitive,
literate, culturally aware, life long learner, with positive self-esteem, who is able to think
creatively and analyze information critically. The student is a resourceful technologically
proficient worker, who contributes to team efforts. As a responsible citizen, the student is an
ethical, self-reliant, and socially responsible member of the global community.


Academic Expectations
                                                                                                  28
1. The Cranston high school graduate exhibits proficient communication skills.

A. Interactive Listening
B. Oral Presentations
C. Report Writing
D. Procedural Writing
E. Persuasive Essay
F. Text-based Writing
G. Reflective Writing
H. Narrative Writing
I. Poetry Writing
J. Reading and Responding to an Informational Text
K. Reading and Responding to Literary Text

2. The Cranston high school graduate exhibits proficient problem solving,
   research, and critical thinking skills.

A. Problem Solving
B. Research
C. Number and Operations
D. Geometry and Measurement
E. Functions and Algebra
F. Data, Statistics and Probability
G. Think Sequentially
H. Investigate, Analyze, and Interpret Information Resources: when applicable - to form and
    support options
I. Investigate through Inquiry
J. Understand Systems and Energy
K. Relate Form to Function
L. Apply Scientific Principals to Real-Work Situations
M. Patterns of Change

3. The Cranston high school graduate will engage in and will be culturally
   aware of music, visual arts or performing arts through performance,
  creation, or response.

• Performance of Art Forms
• Creation of Art Forms
• Response to Art Forms

4. The Cranston high school graduate exhibits proficiency in reflection,
   evaluation, and use of technology.

• Annually collect and maintain proficient artifacts in a “working” portfolio
                                                                                              29
• Create and present a graduation portfolio

Social Expectation

The Cranston high school graduate is a respectful, ethical, responsible, and a courteous
individual, who can work both independently and cooperatively by following the rules
outlined in the Cranston Public Schools Student Handbook.

• Annually collect student information related to citizenship, effort, attendance, and discipline

Civic Expectation

The Cranston high school graduate is a contributing member of his/her community, and as such
functions as an informed, involved citizen who advocates for positive changes in surrounding
environment.

• Annually collect student information related to participation in various school activities and
  community service.

Since Cranston is a multi-high school district and given the fact that the Commissioner’s Review
Process of our Diploma System by the State of RI treats CHSE and CHSW under one umbrella,
the faculties of CHSE and CHSW both formally voted to adopt the mission of Cranston Public
Schools as our position on student learning. This stemmed from the one district, one voice idea.
The academic expectations listed above are the result of the hard work of a representative group
of faculty members from all disciplines from both schools. The expectations resulted from a
direct link to the GSE’s. The expectations were also formally adopted by the faculties of both
CHSE and CHSW. It was decided by these groups that students must be good communicators,
good problem solvers, be culturally aware, be reflective, and be able to use technology, all 21 st
century skills.

V – EXAMPLES OF THE DECISION MAKING PROCESS

The main focus of what has been guiding our decision making process is what students must be
able to do in order to graduation from Cranston Public School. This has been summarized in six
specific items, found in our Diploma System Handbook.


1.     Successful completion of the minimum required coursework credits, both in total and for
       specific subjects(24 credits).

2.     Successful completion of Comprehensive Course Assessments that include performance
       tasks that assure common expectations and proficiencies have been met.

3.     Completion of state assessments according to a timetable determined by the BoR.
       Students must participate in tests known as the New England Common Assessment
       Program (NECAP). The NECAP test results will count toward graduation. Beginning
                                                                                                    30
       with the class of 2014, students will receive a score of at least a “2” (partially proficient)
       in order to graduate.

4.     Successful completion of a Graduation Portfolio presentation including Common Tasks
       that, when viewed in combination with other graduation requirements, demonstrate that
       necessary proficiencies have been met.

5.     Successful completion of community service activity(ies) demonstrating one or more of
       the school’s identified expectations for learning.

6.     Each student will create an Individual Learning Plan (ILP) aligned to personal, academic,
       career, and social goals.

With these ideas firmly entrenched, teachers set out to create an assessment system that all
students could use to demonstrate proficiency. Departments assembled to create Common
Tasks, assessments used across common courses, for example all US History students, that all
students would use to demonstrate proficiency. These CT’s would ask the students to
communicate or problem solve a scenario based on what the students had learned in a unit of
study. These assessments, aligned strictly to the GSE’s, were then validated and calibrated.
Students are assigned CT’s at a rate of one per quarter per class. Once the student has achieved a
proficient level in the CT it is then uploaded to the digital portfolio, which may then be used for
the Senior Presentation. It should be noted that each CT must align to one of the 25 Academic
Expectations. Students will be expected to demonstrate proficiency in each of these Academic
Expectations, as noted in the Diploma Handbook.


VI – STRENGTHS NOT REPORTED PREVIOUSLY

None at this time.


VII – RESTRUCTURING

None at this time.


VIII - FOLLOW-UP PROGRAM

The follow-up program was completed through the efforts of the CHSW Leadership Team which
includes Administrators and Department Chairs. Additionally, various members of the district
level staff were also instrumental in providing information to the writing team enabling us to
respond with the most accurate and updated information. Various aspects of this report were
reviewed and discussed at school improvement team meetings and at general faculty meetings
providing both parents and teachers with opportunities for input.

The follow-up team included:
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Steven C. Knowlton, Principal
Sandra Tessier, Teacher/School Improvement Team Chair
Kim Magnelli, Assistant Principal for Academic Affairs
Suzanne Coutu, Assistant Principal/Director CACTC
Paul DePalma, Assistant Principal
Frank DeVall, Assistant Principal
David Schiappa, Assistant Principal for Special Education and Related Services
Mona Boscia, ELA Department Chair
Carolyn Lannon, Math Department Chair
Steven Krous, Science Department Chair
Anthony Loporchio, Social Studies Department Chair
Al Pannone, World Language Department Chair
Dwight Barrett, LMS
Abigail Mollicone, School Nurse/Teacher




                                                                                 32
                                 STATISTICAL DATA SHEET


School:        Cranston High School West              Principal:        Steven C. Knowlton

City, State:   Cranston, RI 02830                     School Telephone:      401-270-8049

E-Mail Address: sknowlton@cpsed.net                   FAX:          401-270-8526

Daters of Evaluation:                  October 2007

       Grades:        9-12       School Enrollment: 1715 at time of evaluation

       Grades:        9-12       School Enrollment: 1583 at present time

          Based on the state’s definition of a dropout, indicate the dropout rate for
          the most recently completed school year as well as for the preceding two years:
                                3.1    %              2011
                                3.4    %              2010
                                7.3    %              2009


       DISPOSITION OF ALL VISITING COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS
                     TWO-YEAR REPORT        FIVED-YEAR REPORT
                     NUMBER     PERCENTAGE  NUMBER      PERCENTAGE
     COMPLETED                    7              10%               65             89%
    IN PROGRESS                   49             67%               8              11%
  PLANNED FOR THE
       FUTURE                     0              0%                0               0%
      REJECTED                    0              0%                0               0%
     NO ACTION                    17             23%               0               0%
       TOTAL*                     73             100%              73             100%
*The totals should reflect the number of recommendations in the original decennial evaluation report.
Both total numbers should be identical. Do not include highlighted recommendations.

Electronic Signature of
Principal/Headmaster            Steven C. Knowlton

Electronic Signature of Chair
of Follow-up Committee          Sandra Tessier               Position: Teacher/S.I.T. Chair


Date of Progress Report Submitted:           March 1, 2012
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