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					                                 Unit    1
            English IV/English IV Honors




MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM              1
Unit 1
How do individuals establish identity and goals?


OVERVIEW                                                               Suggested Pacing: 10 block periods



Key Concepts
1. Analysis of character traits fosters a personal connection with literature and prompts self-reflection.
2. Understanding historical and cultural roles of individuals promotes and develops an understanding of
   a culture.
3. The synthesis and communication of ideas transfers into written expression and values.
4. Society is comprised of individuals, therefore each individual in some way influences society.




Unit Performance Assessment
Anecdotally Me: A Personal Statement Essay

See teacher’s notes, activity sheet, and rubric

Students will write personal statement essays using anecdotes. For example, students could write
college application essays, statements of personal strengths, or descriptions of personal goals.



EdVantage
Students will demonstrate the Enthusiasm for Learning strategic objective by reflecting on their greatest
personal strengths, weaknesses, and primary values or beliefs. This reflection should engage students
because they are learning about themselves and thinking about their individual traits in a new way. In
addition students demonstrate the Continually Participate in the Democratic Process strategic objective
by participating in large and small group discussions. This enhances students’ interests in others’ needs
and points of view. These activities also foster respect and tolerance for others, cooperation, and self-
control.


General Notes
This unit begins the survey of British literature. The epic is featured in from Beowulf, from The Battle of
the Pelennor Fields, from The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, and “The Seafarer” in which
Anglo-Saxon ideals and beliefs are exemplified. Many concepts are highlighted in this unit that will not
be covered in further units, such as initial reading, writing, and handwriting skills.




 MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                            2
Next Generation Sunshine State Standards
Focus Benchmarks
The following is a list of the state benchmarks addressed most frequently and in the greatest depth
during this unit. Other benchmarks may be addressed from time to time, aligned to specific learning
objectives.

LA.1112.1.5.1 - The student will adjust reading rate based on purpose, text difficulty, form, and style.
LA.1112.1.6.1 - The student will use new vocabulary that is introduced and taught directly.
LA.1112.1.6.3 - The student will use context clues to determine meanings of unfamiliar words.
LA.1112.1.6.9 - The student will determine the correct meaning of words with multiple meanings in
context.
LA.1112.1.6.10 - The student will determine meanings of words, pronunciation, parts of speech,
etymologies, and alternate word choices by using a dictionary, thesaurus, and digital tools.
LA.1112.1.7.3 - The student will determine the main idea or essential message in grade-level or higher
texts through inferring, paraphrasing, summarizing, and identifying relevant details and facts.
LA.1112.1.7.8 - The student will use strategies to repair comprehension of grade-appropriate text when
self-monitoring indicates confusion, including but not limited to rereading, checking context clues,
predicting, note-making, summarizing, using graphic and semantic organizers, questioning, and clarifying
by checking other sources.
LA.1112.2.1.3 - The student will analyze, compare, evaluate, and interpret poetry for the effects of
various literary devices, graphics, structure, and theme to convey mood, meaning, and aesthetic
qualities.
LA.1112.2.1.7 - The student will analyze, interpret, and evaluate an author's use of descriptive language
(e.g., tone, irony, mood, imagery, pun, alliteration, onomatopoeia, allusion), figurative language (e.g.,
symbolism, metaphor, personification, hyperbole), common idioms, and mythological and literary
allusions, and explain how they impact meaning in a variety of texts with an emphasis on how they
evoke reader's emotions.
LA.1112.2.1.8 - The student will explain how ideas, values, and themes of a literary work often reflect
the historical period in which it was written.
LA.1112.2.2.1 - The student will analyze and evaluate information from text features (e.g., transitional
devices, table of contents, glossary, index, bold or italicized text, headings, charts and graphs,
illustrations, subheadings).
LA.1112.2.2.2 - The student will use information from the text to answer questions or to state the main
idea or provide relevant details.
LA.1112.2.2.3 - The student will organize information to show understanding or relationships among
facts, ideas, and events (e.g., representing key points within text through charting, mapping,
paraphrasing, summarizing, comparing, contrasting, outlining).
LA.1112.3.1.1 - The student will prewrite by generating ideas from multiple sources (e.g., brainstorming,
notes, journals, discussion, research materials or other reliable sources) based upon teacher-directed
topics and personal interests.
LA.1112.3.2.1 - The student will draft writing by developing ideas from the prewriting plan using primary
and secondary sources appropriate to the purpose and audience.
LA.1112.3.2.2 - The student will draft writing by establishing a logical organizational pattern with
supporting details that are substantial, specific, and relevant.
LA.1112.3.3.1 - The student will revise by evaluating the draft for development of ideas and content,
logical organization, voice, point of view, word choice, and sentence variation.


 MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                        3
LA.1112.3.4.2 - The student will edit for correct use of capitalization, including names of academic
courses and proper adjectives.
LA.1112.3.4.3 - The student will edit for correct use of punctuation, including commas, colons,
semicolons, apostrophes, dashes, quotation marks, parentheses, ellipses, brackets, and underlining or
italics.
LA.1112.3.4.4 - The student will edit for correct use of grammar and usage, including but not limited to
parts of speech, verb tense, noun/pronoun agreement, subject/verb agreement, pronoun/antecedent
agreement, parallel structure, modifier placement, comparative and superlative adjectives and adverbs,
and unintended shift in person or tense.
LA.1112.3.4.5 - The student will edit for correct use of varied sentence structure, including the
elimination of dangling or misplaced modifiers, run-on or fused sentences, and unintended sentence
fragments.
LA.1112.3.5.1 - The student will prepare writing using technology in a format appropriate to the purpose
(e.g., for display, multimedia).
LA.1112.4.2.6 - The student will write in a variety of expressive and reflective forms that uses a range of
appropriate strategies and specific narrative techniques, employs literary devices, and sensory
description.
LA.1112.5.1.1 - The student will use fluent and legible handwriting skills.
LA.1112.6.1.1 - The student will explain how text features (e.g., charts, maps, diagrams, sub-headings,
captions, illustrations, graphs) aid the reader's understanding.
LA.1112.6.2.4 - The student will understand the importance of legal and ethical practices, including laws
regarding libel, slander, copyright, and plagiarism in the use of mass media and
digital sources, know the associated consequences, and comply with the law.
LA.1112.6.4.2 - The student will routinely use digital tools for publication, communication and
productivity.




 MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                          4
Unit 1
How do individuals establish identity and goals?



KEY CONCEPT1
Analysis of character traits fosters a personal connection with literature and prompts self-reflection.

Learning Objectives
        Students will be able to:
        LA.1112.1.5.1
        LA.1112.1.6.1
        LA.1112.1.6.3
        LA.1112.1.7.3
         LA.1112.1.7.8
        LA.1112.2.1.3
        LA.1112.2.2.1
        LA.1112.2.2.2
        LA.1112.2.2.3
        LA.1112.3.1.1
        LA.1112.6.1.1




Vocabulary
Below is a list of subject-specific, academic word list, and/or state assessment words relating to this Key
Concept. Word walls, vocabulary journals, games, and graphic organizers support vocabulary building.

       Culture (cultural, acculturate, agriculture, cultivation, cult, etc.) The root word is colere which is
        Latin for "to inhabit, to cultivate, or to honor.” The definition can be found in Writer’s Choice
        p. 885. (The word is from the Academic Word List - List 2.)
       Epic (epical, epically, etc.) The root word is epos which is Greek for "word or song.” The
        definition can be found in Literature on p. 20.
       Infamous (fame, famous, famously, infamy, etc.) The root word is fama which is Latin for "to
        report; rumor; reputation.” The definition can be found in Literature on p. 31.
       Kenning (oar-steed = ship) A compound expression in Old English and Old Norse poetry with
        metaphorical meaning.
       Lament (lamentable, laments, lamenting, etc.) The root word is lamentum which is Latin for "to
        sorrow; to weep.” The definition can be found in Literature on p. 31.




 MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                                  5
                                                                                                                             KEY CONCEPT 1
Unit 1
How do individuals establish identity and goals?




                                                                                                             UNIT 1
KEY CONCEPT 1 AT A GLANCE Suggested Pacing: 4 block periods




                                                                                                             KEY CONCEPT 1
                      LEARNING
    PERIODS                                        SUGGESTED INSTRUCTIONAL APPROACHES
                      OBJECTIVE

BLOCK - 1         LA.1112.2.2.1       Introduce students to the textbook and point out key features
                  LA.1112.3.1.1       such as the table of contents, the index, the glossary, and other
                                      helpful sections.
                                      Review information about the Anglo-Saxton time period. (pp. 4-
                                      17)
                                      Give students an opportunity to brainstorm heroic qualities. Ask
                                      them to think of questions they have about Anglo-Saxon heroes.


BLOCK – 2         LA.1112.1.6.1       Pre-teach key vocabulary from Beowulf. Remind students of the
                  LA.1112.1.6.3       changes in the English language over time.
                  LA.1112.2.1.3       Provide students with sample passages from the text and have
                                      them use context clues to determine word meanings. Model
                                      using context clues.


BLOCK - 3         LA.1112.1.6.2       As the class reads or listens, stop occasionally so students can use
                  LA.1112.1.7.3       their main idea, detail graphic organizers to record key points.
                                      Review main idea and detail with students. Use the background
                                      information from Beowulf as an example.
                                      Have students create a chart for keeping track of main ideas and
                                      details as they read.


BLOCK - 4         LA.1112.1.7.8       Have students use information from the text to answer questions.
                  LA.1112.2.2.2       Remind students that Beowulf is an Old English text with
                                      unfamiliar words, names, and events.
                                      Model reading strategies such as re-reading, questioning, and
                                      summarizing.
                                      Introduce the term kennings and explain their use in Beowulf.
                                      Give examples from the text. Have students write their own
                                      kennings.




 MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                          6
                                                                                                                   Unit 1
  Unit 1
  KEY CONCEPT 1


Learning Objectives:




                                                                                                                   KEY CONCEPT 1
                  ADVANCED PATHWAY                               ADDITIONAL SUPPORT PATHWAY

         Days 1, 2, 3, and 4                                 Day 1
         Students write an essay comparing and               Students receive additional support such as graphic
         contrasting today’s standards of heroic qualities   organizers like the Frayer model as they determine
         with the Anglo-Saxon ideals.                        meaning.



                                                             Days 2, 3, and 4
                                                             Students receive additional support such as guided
                                                             notes or drawing as they determine main idea.




                                            ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

                 Recommended Readings for Teachers
                     Literature, “The Anglo-Saxon Period and the Middle Ages: 449-1485” pp. 4-18
                     Literature, “Guide to Readability” p. T78
                     TSR, “Context Clues” p. 115
                     TSR, “Guided Note Taking” p. 173
                     TSR, “Guided Reading” p. 102
                     TSR, “Poetry” p. 502, particularly “Guided Poetry Reading” p. 508




          MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                         7
UNIT 1
How do individuals establish identity and goals? complexities of the American Dream?
How does following one’s convictions reflect the


KEY CONCEPT 2
Understanding historical and cultural roles of individuals promotes and develops an understanding of a
culture.



  Learning Objectives
   Students will be able to:
       LA.1112.1.6.9
       LA.1112.1.6.10
       LA.1112.1.7.3
       LA.1112.2.2.2
       LA.1112.3.2.1
       LA.1112.3.2.2
       LA.1112.5.1.1




Vocabulary
Below is a list of subject-specific and/or state assessment words relating to this Key Concept. Word
walls, vocabulary journals, games, and graphic organizers support vocabulary building.

       Medieval (medium, median, mediate, immediate, mediocre, mediocrity, Mediterranean, etc…)
        The root word is medi which is Latin for "middle or half.” The definition is “pertaining to the
        Middle Ages” which occurred from 449-1485 A.D. (Students may know A.D. as C.E., the
        common era).
       Renaissance (naive, naivety, nascent, natal, prenatal, native, nativity, etc.) The root word is
        nasci which is Latin for "to be born.” The definition can be found in Literatre p. 73 and R15.
       Romanticism (romance, romantic, romanticize, Roman; romance languages, etc.) The root
        word is romanicus which is Latin for "Rome.” The definition can be found in Literature p. 74 and
        R16.
       Victorian (victor, victory, vanquish, invincible, etc.) The root word is victor which is Latin for
        "win.” The definition is “pertaining to Victoria,” the time period of Queen Victoria of England
        which occurred from 1837-1901 A.D. (C.E.).




 MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                               8
Unit 1




                                                                                                           UNIT 1
How do individuals establish identity and goals?



KEY CONCEPT 2 AT A GLANCE




                                                                                                           KEY CONCEPT 2
                                                                       Suggested Pacing: 3 block periods

                                                            INSTRUCTIONAL APPROACHES
   PERIODS          LEARNING OBJECTIVE


BLOCK -1         LA.1112.1.6.9               Pre-teach vocabulary and explain/define etymology.
                 LA.1112.1.6.10              Model finding related words in a dictionary or thesaurus.
                                             Have students work in cooperative groups to find
                                             etymology of remaining words.
                                             Read or play from Battle for The Lord of the Rings: The
                                             Battle for Pelennor Fields from The Return of the King.
                                             Model determining meaning of multiple meaning words by
                                             stopping occasionally and pointing out examples in the
                                             text and how to determine meaning in context.


BLOCK - 2        LA.1112.1.7.3               Inferring/paraphrasing/summarizing mini-lesson.
                 LA.1112.2.2.2               Model reading first paragraph of “A Brief History of
                                             Heroes” and show examples of
                 LA.1112.3.2.1
                                             inferring/paraphrasing/summarizing.
                 LA.1112.3.2.2               Have students complete the selection in pairs, taking turns
                 LA.1112.5.1.1               reading and taking notes. Students will compare notes to
                                             other pairs to check for accuracy.
                                             Draft paragraph on most appealing type of hero using
                                             notes.
                                             Revise paragraph and add details for homework.


BLOCK - 3        LA.1112.3.2.1               Introduce UPA.
                 LA.1112.3.2.2               College essay/personal statement mini-lesson.
                 LA.1112.5.1.1               Model brainstorming and selecting specific writing ideas.
                                             Students work in cooperative groups to brainstorm ideas.
                                             (minimum of five per student.)
                                             Students develop hook individually then work
                                             cooperatively to add details and create an organizational
                                             structure.




 MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                         9
                                                                                                                     Unit 1
  Unit 1
  KEY CONCEPT 2

Learning Objectives:




                                                                                                                     KEY CONCEPT 2
                    ADVANCED PATHWAY                             ADDITIONAL SUPPORT PATHWAY

          Day 1                                               Day 1
          Students find words with multiple meanings on       Teacher assigns one group that needs help with
          their own. Have students find a minimum of ten      vocabulary. Teacher begins students’ cooperative
          multiple meaning words.                             group work by scaffolding etymology work (possibly
                                                              through Quicksketches) and then moving students
                                                              to groups of four.

          Day 2
          Students research further examples of the type of   Day 2
          hero that most appeals to them. Students include    Teacher pulls students individually out of their
          at least three examples, complete with details to   groups to scaffold selection of most appealing hero.
          support their selection.                            Teacher monitors drafting more closely and
                                                              prompts students more frequently.

          Day 3
          Students find and complete the common               Day 3
          application.                                        Teacher provides students with Open Mind graphic
                                                              organizer or a Quickwrite and uses free-association
                                                              to brainstorm ideas.

                                            ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

                 Recommended Readings for Teachers
                 TSR, “Before, During, and After (BDA) Reading Strategies” p. 83
                 TSR, “Etymology and Word Roots” p. 127
                 TSR, “Paired Reading” p. 100
                 TSR, “Paraphrasing and Summarizing” p. 91
                 Writer’s Choice, “Writing a College Application Essay” p. 20




           MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                        10
MODEL LESSON

Unit 1:
How do individuals establish identity and goals?


Key Concept 2:
 Understanding historical and cultural roles of individuals promotes and develops an understanding of a
culture.

How has the concept of hero (societal values) changed to reflect changes in society over time?

This Model Lesson includes the following Instructional Approaches:
     Active Reading, Paraphrasing and Summarizing to examine heroes and values from different
       time periods and cultures
     Annotating to Identify Elements of a Hero in the text
     Inferring Cultural Values from the text
     Analyzing Historical Influences
     Compare and Contrast Heroes Through Time Periods
     Establishing Main Idea through Strategic Note Taking through Synthesizing Information from the
       text


Rationale
Understanding the development of the hero over time helps an individual establish personal identity
within a culture. This lesson provides students with the opportunity to examine heroes and values from
different time periods and cultures in order to draw conclusions about their own values. This lesson also
serves as a bridge to the UPA which addresses the EdVantage Goal Setting objective.

Learning Objectives
Students will be able to:
       Determine main idea through summarizing, inferring, paraphrasing, and identifying relevant
       details. (LA.1112.1.7.3)
       Use information from the text to answer questions, state the main idea, or provide relevant
       details. (LA.1112.2.2.2)

Materials
Glencoe Literature: British Literature, “A Brief History of Heroes” pp. 73–76
Glencoe Literature: British Literature, “Reading and Thinking with Foldables” pp. R20
Hero Foldable Directions Activity Sheet
Hero Foldable Directions Rubric

www.tatsbox.com/hero: information on the heroic archetype with links to other resources

TSR: “Preview the Text” pp.79-81, “Process in Active Reading” p. 89, “Paraphrasing and Summarizing”
pp. 91-92, “Student Sample” p. 93, “Strategies for Active Reading” p. 98, “Annotating the Text” p. 98,


 MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                         11
“Shared Reading” p. 99, “Guided Reading” pp. 102-103, “Question-Answer Relationships” p. 106, “Main
Idea Organizers” pp. 177-179, “Strategic Note Taking” p. 186, “Guidelines for Synthesizing Information”
p. 187

Assessment
Before
    Warm-Up
       Have students complete the Anticipation Guide: Hero or Not? Use the student responses to
       facilitate a whole-class discussion on the concept of heroes. Ask students to preview the text
       and respond to the guiding questions on page 73: “What does it mean to be a hero? Definitions
       of heroism have changed through the ages, but are there certain qualities that all heroes have in
       common?”

During
    Modeled Reading: Read the opening paragraph and the section titled “The Renaissance Hero”
       and use think aloud (TSR, p. 94) to model reading strategies such as: questioning the text,
       making predictions, making connections, summarizing, using context clues, etc. Pause
       occasionally to discuss and interact with students. Make a chart on the board or overhead and
       show students how to take notes in preparation for creating the foldable. Tell students that in
       column 1 they will define each type of hero. In column 2, they should provide real-world
       examples. Students should find quotes from the text that illustrate the main idea and take
       notes on the characteristics of each hero type using relevant details.

         Sample Notes for Renaissance Hero:
Definition                                                 Examples

 a well rounded man who is accomplished in many            generals and statesmen
  areas
                                                              o   present – Eisenhower as general and
 Emphasis on “man’s capacity for greatness”                       President, President John F. Kennedy,
                                                                   President Obama, General Petrais
 Classical tradition of education to “cultivate the
  single, noble virtue of manliness” – classical idea of      o   past – Romulus (founder of Rome),
  “virtus” (“moral excellence and goodness”)                       Scipio (war leader)

 “proficient in warfare, scholarship, government,
  literature and even the art of love”
                                                            anti-heroes (“provides contrast to concept of
 anti-hero: Machiavelli offered opposite view of            Renaissance Hero”):
  focusing on the advancement of the individual’s
                                                              o   Past – Cesare Borgia
  interest (“provides contrast to concept of
                                                              o   Present – Bernie Madoff
  Renaissance Hero”)

 “better to be feared than loved” “practiced cruelty
  rather than charity”


 MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                        12
       Individual Reading: Students read the remainder of the article and complete the chart for the
        foldable by taking individual notes.
       Paired Note-taking: Students compare notes from the individual reading with a partner and
        check for comprehension of the text and use of relevant details to describe the hero from each
        section. The pairs may then compare their notes with another pair for further reinforcement of
        the content.
       Hero Foldable: After students have compared notes to check for accuracy, each student will
        create a foldable that showcases each type of hero (Anglo-Saxon, Renaissance, Romantic,
        Victorian, Quiet, 20th Century, and the Multicultural Media Age Hero). Students should cite the
        page number for examples from the text. The directions for creating a book-look foldable are
        an example. Staples or tape could be used instead of glue. Students could also create a cover
        page. The organization of the book (where to put the headings, descriptions, illustrations, etc.)
        is left to the discretion of the teacher. It is recommended that a sample template be produced
        and made available to students.

After
       Individual Writing: Have students draft a paragraph to the following prompt: “Explain which
        type of hero most appeals to you and why. Cite examples from the selection and connect to
        your own personal experiences.”

        Sample Student Draft:

                 The kind of hero I pick is the Quiet Hero because when I look around me I see lots of
        people in today’s world that don’t make it to the news programs but who keep on doing the daily
        grind or just doing their jobs to keep their lives and family lives on track. There are lots of people
        like policemen and firemen who put their lives on the line every day but nobody notices about it.
        Except maybe the people they save. Some of these people even die on their jobs but don’t even
        get noticed. So in conclusion it’s often the unsung hero who keeps the world going.

Homework
    Individual writing: For homework have students draft a paragraph to the following prompt:
     “Explain which type of hero most appeals to you and why.”
      In the topic sentence of your paragraph, state the type of hero from the text with which you
         identify.
      Cite at least two characteristics from the text that describe that type of hero. Use correct
         punctuation marks for each quotation and cite the page number in parentheses after each
         quote.
      Connect that hero to your own experience. Include at least one reason why you identify
         with this type of hero.
      Include a concluding sentence that briefly restates the type of hero you identify with and
         why.

        Suggested Student Response:




 MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                             13
                Identify with the Quiet Hero because of the people I see in the world around me. There
       are many people who may never make it to the news programs whose daily work makes all of
       our lives better and safer. As the text points out, in the 19th century “the earnest, unpublicized
       work of those who provided people with their basic needs was now considered heroic” (75). The
       writer Virginia Woolfe said, “Since so much is known that used to be unknown, the question now
       inevitably asks itself, whether the lives of great men only should be recorded. Is not anyone who
       has lived a life, and left a record of that life, worthy of biography – the failures as well as the
       successes, the humble as well as the illustrious? And what is greatness? And what smallness?”
       (75). Some of these people who are not well-known or written about may even die on their jobs,
       like firemen or policemen. Unfortunately, they are often forgotten by most people weeks later,
       except maybe by their grieving families. It is the lives of these often unsung quiet heroes who
       make the world a better place for all of us.

Making Connections
    History
       Have students compare and contrast heroes through the different time periods and discuss
       what historical factors influenced the development of the hero using their prior knowledge.

      Identity
       Have students reflect on how a person’s hero reflects the values of the individual and society in
       forming personal identity.

                                   Anticipation Guide: Hero or Not?

Read each statement and decide whether you agree or disagree that the person being described is a
hero. Be prepared to explain your reasons or give examples to support your opinion.

    Agree/Disagree

   1. __________ A parent runs back into a burning house to save her baby.

   2. __________ A man deliberately drives a truck carrying explosives into a military barracks and
      blows it and himself up.

   3. __________ A Greek soldier runs 26 miles from the battlefield to Athens to deliver the message
      of victory. He dies after delivering the message.

   4. __________ A father with arthritis works 20 years in a steel mill to save money for his son’s
      college education.

   5. __________ A Japanese man with a parachute on his back skis down Mt. Everest. He is the first
      to ever attempt it.

   6. __________ A mother whose daughter was killed by a drunk driver organizes M.A.D.D. She
      petitions state and federal governments for tougher legislation.



 MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                          14
    7. __________ In the midst of a fierce Vietnam battle, a soldier wipes out a machine gun nest
       single handedly then dives on a live grenade to save his buddies.

    8. __________ Although white students taunt her mercilessly, a 15-year-old girl is the first African
       American student to attend Little Rock Central High in the 1950’s.

    9. __________ An off duty policeman shoots and kills armed thieves attempting to rob a
       convenience store.

    10. __________ A scientist gives up friends and family (his wife leaves him and his children don’t
        know him) to discover a cure for a dreaded disease.



                                       Hero Foldable Assignment
                                 “A Brief History of Heroes” (pp. 73-76)

1. Create the foldable based on the pictoral instructions given.
2. For the foldable assignment, please fill in the foldable based on the following directions:
    A. On the front of each fold, write the name and definition of each of the following types of heroes
        from the text and the notes taken during the paired note-taking exercise:
         Anglo-Saxon Hero
         Renaissance Hero
         Romantic Hero
         Victorian Hero
         Quiet Hero
         20th Century Hero
         Multicultural Media Age Hero

    B. On the inside of the fold (on the back side of the name and definition), for each hero write:
        Two quotes from the text that provide details that support or explain the definition on the
           front
        List two people given in the text as examples of that type of hero
        List two people from your own background knowledge as examples of that type of hero




 MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                         15
MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM   16
                                             Hero Foldable Rubric
                              Hero Foldable – “A Brief History of Heroes” pp. 73-76

   Create a foldable using the Layered Look Book Foldable instructions.

   Title your foldable and draw an image or find an image to go along with the title.

   Label each flap with the type of hero. Above the label, write the definition of the type of hero. Under
   the flap, write two quotes from the text that provide details that support or explain the type of hero, list
   two people from the text as examples of that type of hero, and list two people from your own
   background knowledge (historical figures, literary figures, family members, etc.) as examples of that
   type of hero.

                          4                     3                  2             1 Unsatisfactory           0
                     Excellent           Satisfactory           Lacking                               Not Present
Title and         The title clearly         The title         The title is         The title is      There is no title
Image               reflects the          adequately         unclear or the      unclear and the        or image
                 content, and the         reflects the      image does not       image does not
                      image is        content, and the       clearly relate       clearly relate
                   appropriate              image is
                                         appropriate
Neatness and       The flaps are         The flaps are      The flaps are not    The flaps are not    There are no
Organization     labeled neatly in           labeled        labeled neatly or     labeled neatly      labels on the
                       order              somewhat           are not in order     and are not in          flaps
                                      neatly and are in                                order
                                              order
Definition        The definitions      The definitions      The definitions      The definitions      There are no
                      indicate          indicate some        indicate some       do not indicate       definitions
                   knowledge of         knowledge of         knowledge of         knowledge of
                 the text and are     the text and are      the text but are        the text
                    well-written         well-written       not well-written
Quotes from       There are two          There is one          The quotes        There are many       No quotes are
the Text        quotes from the        quote from the       provided do not      missing quotes         provided
                text that support           text that          support the
                the definition for       supports the         definitions of
                    each type of         definition for        the types of
                        hero             each type of            heroes
                                               hero
Examples of       Four examples       Three examples         Two examples        One example is      No examples are
Heroes           are provided for     are provided for      are provided for       provided for         provided
                    each type of         each type of         each type of          each type of
                         hero                  hero                hero                 hero
Completeness      Constructed as         Constructed          Constructed           Constructed       Constructed
                   directed with        correctly with       correctly with       correctly with     incorrectly or
                  title, definition    title, definition,   title, definition,   title but missing   not attempted
                    from text, 2      at least 1 quote,     at least 1 quote         definition,
                      quotes, 2       1 example from         and 1 example           quotes, or


     MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                             17
                examples from        text, and 1        from the text or      examples.
                   text, and 2      example from             from
                examples from        background           background
                   background        knowledge             knowledge
                   knowledge
Demonstrated        Complete          Substantial           Moderate             Lack of        No definitions or
Knowledge        understanding      understanding        understanding       understanding       examples are
                      of the            of the                of the             of the            provided
               assignment with     assignment with      assignment with     assignment with
                  accurate and     good definitions     good definitions       missing or
                textually based     and examples         and limited or       incomplete
               information and      from the text             missing          definitions
                good examples      and background        examples from
                       from           knowledge            the text and
                   background                              background
                   knowledge                                knowledge
Accuracy         All quotes are    Most quotes are       At least half of      Few of the         None of the
                    accurately         accurately        the quotes are        quotes are         quotes are
                   quoted and         quoted and            accurately          accurately         accurately
                     correctly          correctly          quoted and          quoted and          quoted or
                  documented         documented           documented          documented         documented
                    with page          with page            with page           with page          with page
                     numbers            numbers              numbers             numbers            numbers
Requirements       Above and       All requirements            Most               Some          Few or none of
                   beyond the        are met with         requirements       requirements             the
               requirements of     sufficient details     are met with        are met with       requirements
                the assignment      and some color      some details and    little detail and       are met
                   with color,            used          some color used      no color used
                  pictures, and
                    additional
                quotations and
                    examples
Legibility        All writing is    The majority of       The writing is     The writing is     There is little or
               legible and neat,     the writing is         somewhat        not legible and       not writing
               and the foldable    legible and most      legible and the    the assignment
                 is neatly done    of the foldable is     assignment is       is not neatly
                                      neatly done           somewhat              done
                                                           neatly done

                                                                 Total Points_________________________




     MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                         18
                                                                                                                Unit 1
Unit 1




                                                                                                                KEY CONCEPT 3
How do individuals establish identity and goals?



KEY CONCEPT 3
Society is comprised of individuals, therefore each individual in some way influences society.




Learning Objectives
Students will be able to:
       LA.1112.1.6.1
       LA.1112.1.6.3
       LA.1112.1.7.3
       LA.1112.1.7.8
       LA.1112.2.1.7
       LA.1112.2.1.8
       LA.1112.2.2.3




Vocabulary
Below is a list of subject-specific and/or state assessment words relating to this Key Concept. Word
walls, vocabulary journals, games, and graphic organizers support vocabulary building.

       Admonish (admonition, monster, monstrous, summon, monitor, etc.) The root word is monere
        which is Latin for "to warn.” The definition can be found in Literature p. 79 and R64.
       Blanch (blank, blench, etc.) The root word is blanc which is French for "white.” The definition
        can be found in Literature p. 79 and R65.
       Flourish (florid, flourishing, flower, etc.) The root word is florere which is Latin for "to blossom;
        to prosper.” The definition can be found in Literature p. 79 and R70.
       Rancor (rancorous, rancid, rank, etc.) The root word is rancere which is Latin for "to stink;
        grudge.” The definition can be found in Literature p. 79 and R76.




 MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                                  19
                                                                                                               UNIT 1
Unit 1
How do individuals establish identity and goals?




                                                                                                               KEY CONCEPT 3
KEY CONCEPT 3 AT A GLANCE

   PERIODS            LEARNING OBJECTIVE                         INSTRUCTIONAL APPROACHES


BLOCK -1         LA.1112.1.6.1                     Preview vocabulary with students. Have them practice
                 LA.1112.1.6.3                     identifying context clues using examples from the text.
                 LA.1112.2.1.7                     Review the Anglo-Saxon beliefs and practices. Students
                 LA.1112.2.1.8                     can use a Venn Diagram or a T-chart to compare and
                                                   contrast the Anglo-Saxon period in the modern day.
                                                   Model reading strategies as you guide students through
                                                   lines 1-26 of “The Seafarer.”


BLOCK - 2        LA.1112.1.7.3                     Review reading strategies with students and have them
                 LA.1112.1.7.8                     take notes during paired reading of “The Seafarer” lines
                 LA.1112.2.2.3                     27-124.
                                                   Cooperative groups – Use reading strategies, find main
                                                   idea, and analyze poetry
                                                   Students revise personal narrative essays making sure
                                                   the information is organized in a structure that provides
                                                   maximum impact.




 MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                           20
                                                                                                                        Unit 1
  Unit 1
  KEY CONCEPT 3




                                                                                                                        KEY CONCEPT 3
Learning Objectives:




                   ADVANCED PATHWAY                                 ADDITIONAL SUPPORT PATHWAY

        Day 1                                                    Day 1
        Students analyze diction in “The Seafarer.”              Teacher begins students’ cooperative group work
                                                                 by scaffolding with those who need more guidance
                                                                 with lines 27-57, using a graphic organizer, such as
                                                                 flowcharting, then moving students to groups of
                                                                 four.


        Day 2                                                    Day 2
        Teacher discusses college choices with students          Teacher pulls students individually to monitor
        and has them bring the application for the college       revision more closely and prompts students more
        of their choice to class. Students fill in application   frequently.
        for that college and answer the essay questions.

        Teacher pulls students individually to review
        drafting for maximum impact, originality,
        sentence variety, wordiness, and diction.



                                              ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

                Recommended Readings for Teachers
                Literature, “Analyze Diction” p. 752
                Literature, “Rewrite Wordy Sentences” p. 972
                “Life in 999: A Grim Struggle”

                TSR, Flowcharts p. 170
                Writer’s Choice, “Definition of Diction” p. 885




           KEY CONCEPT


         MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                             21
                                                                                                            Unit 1
Unit 1




                                                                                                            KEY CONCEPT 4
How do individuals establish identity and goals?



KEY CONCEPT 4
The synthesis and communication of ideas transfers into written expression and values.




Learning Objectives
Students will be able to
       LA.1112.3.3.1
       LA.1112.3.4.2
       LA>1112.3.4.3
       LA.1112.3.4.4
       LA.1112.3.4.5
       LA.1112.3.5.1
       LA.1112.4.2.6
       LA.1112.6.2.4
       LA.1112.6.4.2




Vocabulary
Below is a list of subject-specific and/or state assessment words relating to this Key Concept. Word
walls, vocabulary journals, games, and graphic organizers support vocabulary building.

       Copyright (copyrightable, copyrighter, uncopyrighted) The word comes from
        English from “copy” and “right.” The definition is in Literature on p. 472.
       Libel (libeled, libeling) The root word is libellus which means “little book.” The
        definition is a false and malicious published statement that damages someone’s
        reputation.
       Plagiarism (plagiarize) The root word is plagiaries which is Latin for “kidnapper.” The
        definition is in Literature on p. 211.
       Slander (slanderer, slanderous) The root word comes from the Latin word scandalum
        which means “cause of offense.” The definition is in Literature on p. 156 and p. R78.




 MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                               22
                                                                                                        Unit 1
Unit 1
How do individuals establish identity and goals?




                                                                                                        KEY CONCEPT 4
KEY CONCEPT 4 AT A GLANCE Suggested Pacing: 2 block periods
   PERIODS               LEARNING OBJECTIVE                       INSTRUCTIONAL APPROACHES


BLOCK -1         LA.1112.3.3.1                        Define plagiarism and provide examples of types
                 LA.1112.3.4.2                        of plagiarism. Explain the consequences of
                 LA.1112.3.4.3                        copyright infringement. Lead a whole class
                 LA.1112.3.4.4                        discussion on the ethics of plagiarism.
                 LA.1112.3.4.5
                 LA.1112.3.5.1
                 LA.1112.4.2.6
                 LA.1112.6.2.4


BLOCK - 2        LA.1112.3.5.1                        Students work in pairs to proofread and edit
                 LA.1112.6.4.2                        revised essays. Use computers to produce final
                                                      essays using standard formatting guidelines.




            ADVANCED PATHWAY                              ADDITIONAL SUPPORT PATHWAY
Day 1                                                 Day 1
Teacher pulls students individually to review draft   Teacher pulls students individually to monitor
and publication for maximum impact.                   revision and publication of writing.


                                     ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

        Recommended Readings for Teachers
        Literature, “Edit and Proofread” p. 215
        Literature, “Peer Review” p. 214
        TSR, “Peer Editing” p. 240
        TSR “Proofreading Symbols and Editor’s Marks” p. 238
        Writer’s Choice, “Writing a College Application Essay” p. 20
        Writer’s Choice, “Writing as Self-Discovery” p. 8




 MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                         23
Unit 1
How do individuals establish identity and goals?



PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT
Anecdotally Me: A Personal Statement Essay
T PERFOR

Learning Objectives
Students will write personal statement essays using anecdotes. For example, students could write
college application essays, statements of personal strengths, or descriptions of personal goals.

Teacher Notes
This UPA covers the focus content dealing with the Writing Process. Teachers can emphasize the
importance of clear and effective communication for a specific audience and purpose. Emphasis should
also be put on establishing a logical organizational pattern with supporting details. Teachers should
explain that the college application essay, all by itself, cannot make or break a student’s chances for
admission, but it’s often the deciding factor for close calls. Therefore, it is important that students
spend an adequate amount of time and energy composing their essay. A college admission essay can:
          show how a student reacts to challenging situations
          reveal his values and priorities
          explain factors in his background that have influenced him
          discuss how he will contribute to life on campus
          relate the reasons why he and the institution mesh
An essay gives a brief glimpse into a student’s lifestyle and character. Together the teacher and student
work to make sure that the admissions officers see the most polished version possible.
         Teachers could also consider asking the student to keep a journal during the first unit, noting
activities, interests, work, and life experiences; commenting on family history, culture, and values; or
reflecting on personal, local, national, or international issues of interest. Journal entries may then
provide material to include in the application essay.
    If a student already has a college application essay topic, that student may use it to complete this
assignment. If a student is not planning to attend college or is still undecided about which college to
attend, recommend using one of the following essay prompts:
         1. Describe an activity, interest, experience, achievement in your life, or risk you have taken
              (this could be a book, movie, or an activity or experience at work, home, or school) that has
              been particularly meaningful to you.
         2. How has your family history, culture, or environment influenced who you are?
         3. What qualities or unique characteristics do you possess that would allow you to contribute
              to the university community?
         4. Discuss some issue of personal, local, national, or international concern and its importance
              to you.
         5. Indicate a person who has had a significant influence on you, and describe that influence.
         6. Describe a character in fiction, an historical figure, or a creative work (as in art, music,
              science, etc.) that has had an influence on you and explain that influence.
         7. From the Florida State application: For almost one hundred years, the Latin words “Vires,
              Artes, Mores” have been the guiding philosophy behind FSU. “Vires” signifies strength of all


 MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                           24
            kinds – moral, physical, and intellectual; “Artes” alludes to the beauty of intellectual pursuits
            as exemplified in skill, craft, or art; and “Mores” refers to character, custom, or tradition.
            Describe how one or more of the values embodied in these concepts are reflected in your
            life.


Adaptations and Notes

           ADVANCED PATHWAY                                 ADDITIONAL SUPPORT PATHWAY
Teachers can consider requiring an honors student       Teachers can consider suggesting that the student
to go online to the FACTS.org website or to the         choose prompt 1, 2, 4, 5 or 6 and write the essay
specific college to which the student wishes to         as more of a self-discovery and personal reflection
apply and submit the actual essay prompt to the         piece.
teacher for consideration as a UPA prompt. Once
the prompt has been approved, the student will
write the essay accordingly.




        Recommended Readings for Teachers
        Writer’s Choice Grammar and Composition, 12, Personal Writing: “Using a Journal” and “Writing
        a College Application Essay” 1.4
        TSR, “Personal Narrative” pp. 517-518

        Websites


Scoring Rubric

Sample Instructions
                                       “Welcome to the Real World”

         As you enter your senior year, you may be starting to plan for life after high school. For many of
you, this life will include a college of some sort. The first step in attending college is, of course, the dreaded
college application. In order to make the application process easier on you, we will be spending the next
couple of weeks working on one of the most daunting tasks of completing an application—the essay. All
by itself, the essay can’t make or break your chances for admission, but it’s often the deciding factor for
close calls. Therefore, it is important that you spend an adequate amount of time and energy composing
your essay.

The Purpose
So why exactly do colleges want you to write an essay? I mean, not all of you will be English majors in
college. Well, an admissions essay can . . .
         show how you react to challenging situations,

 MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                              25
         reveal your values and priorities,
         explain factors in your background that have influenced you,
         discuss how you will contribute to life on campus, and
         relate the reasons why you and the institution mesh.
An essay gives a brief glimpse into your lifestyle and character. Together we will work to make sure that
the admissions officers see the most polished version possible (the version you bring out for Thanksgiving
dinner with grandma).

The Prompts
If you already have a college application essay topic, you may use it to complete this assignment. If you
are not planning to attend college or are still undecided about which college to attend, you may use one
of the following essay prompts from the Florida University application:
     1. Describe an activity, interest, experience, achievement in your life, or risk you have taken (this
         could be a book, movie, or an activity or experience at work, home, or school) that has been
         particularly meaningful to you.
     2. How has your family history, culture, or environment influenced who you are?
     3. What qualities or unique characteristics do you possess that would allow you to contribute to the
         university community?
     4. Discuss some issue of personal, local, national, or international concern and its importance to you.
     5. Indicate a person who has had a significant influence on you and describe that influence.
     6. Describe a character in fiction, an historical figure, or a creative work (as in art, music, science,
         etc.) that has had an influence on you and explain that influence.
     7. From the Florida State application: For almost one hundred years, the Latin words “Vires, Artes,
         Mores” have been the guiding philosophy behind FSU. “Vires” signifies strength of all kinds –
         moral, physical, and intellectual; “Artes” alludes to the beauty of intellectual pursuits as
         exemplified in skill, craft, or art, and “Mores” refers to character, custom, or tradition. Describe
         how one or more of the values embodied in these concepts are reflected in your life.

The Plan
For this assignment, you will be expected to complete the following:
          Mining Your Life (a bit of brainstorming)/Identifying Themes of your Autobiography (choosing
             a topic)
          Planning and Plotting (creating an outline)
          The Real Deal (a rough draft) including feedback from at least one, preferably two, adult
             mentors who have read and commented on your essay
          The Real Deal Version 2.0 (the revised final copy)
As we progress through this assignment, you will receive handouts and rubrics for each section. With a bit
of hard work and creativity, you could have an essay to use for a variety of application purposes.

The UPA Assignment: The Real Deal Version 2.0
Write a 3-5 paragraph essay that is approximately 500 words long on one of the prompts above. The
paragraph configuration may depend on which prompt you choose. Whether it is 3 or 5 paragraphs, you
must include an introduction with a FADQQ device and a strong, engaging thesis, 1 to 3 body
paragraphs, and an insightful conclusion.



 MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                           26
This essay must be typed in 12 point Times New Roman (or another equally readable font) and double
spaced.

FADQQ: Facts, Anecdote, Declaration, Description, Question, Quote


                                Personal Statement Essay – Peer Evaluation

Directions: Rank each aspect of the college application essay on a scale of 1-5, 5 being the best. Below
your ranking, explain why you chose that value. Be sure to cite specific reasons and provide helpful
feedback. At the bottom, circle your recommendation for admission based on the essay alone.

Organization and Focus (clear main ideas and supporting details, stays on topic)

1       2        3        4       5

Explanation:



Originality (vivid details, fresh word choice, creativity, risk-taking)

1       2        3        4       5

Explanation:



Writer’s Voice (consistent throughout, engaging, conveys individual personality)

1       2        3        4       5

Explanation:



Freedom from Error (spelling, grammar, punctuation, usage)

1       2        3        4       5

Explanation:

Overall Success (interesting topic clearly developed: “works”)

1       2        3        4       5

Explanation




 MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                         27
Admission (circle one):         accept          reject        wait-list

Adapted from www.nytimes.com/learning

Scoring Rubric

Name: _________________________________________________________ Class: ________

                                    Personal Statement Essay Rubric

5 – Clearly a knowledgeable, practiced skilled pattern
4 – Evidence of a developing pattern
3 – Superficial, random, limited consistencies
2 – Unacceptable skill application
1 – Skill not present




 MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                          28
      Skill application demonstrates use which represents →                    5     4   3   2       1

      Ideas and Content
      Addresses the topic with an interesting, well-defined focus

      Development of Ideas
      Uses fully developed, relevant and insightful examples
      Voice
      Addresses a clear and specific audience consistently
      Organization
      Organizes information to convey content in a sophisticated way
      with an individual voice
      Sentence Fluency
      Uses highly effective sentence structure
      Word Choice
      Uses tone and diction skillfully
      Conventions
      Is virtually free of grammatical distractions
      Originality
      Uses vivid details, fresh word choice, and displays creativity and
      risk-taking
      Format
      Essay is typed using MLA format (heading, double-spaced, 12
      Point Times New Roman, 500 words)
      Presentation
      Presents to the class and responds to questions and suggestions
      from audience.
                                                                      Total:       /50           %

      Comments:




MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                      29
      Activity Sheets
                           Characteristics of a Good Personal Statement

      Before you write a single word, make sure you know what is expected of a successful personal
      statement essay.

      A good essay...

      -Is thoughtful and honest
      A strong personal statement is reflective; that is, it demonstrates that you have thought about
      and gained a clear perspective on your experiences and what you want in your future. It does not
      simply tell a reader what you think he/she wants to know. Instead, it gives the reader a vivid and
      compelling picture of you--in essence, telling the reader what he or she should know about you.
      Remember that the focus of the essay is YOU--your achievements, your obstacles, your goals,
      your values.

      -Strives for depth, not breadth
      A good essay is not a list of your accomplishments. Remember when your mom told you that it's
      quality, not quantity, that counts? Well, the same adage applies for your college essay. A reader
      will be much more interested in how your experience demonstrates the theme of your essay, not
      the number of accomplishments you can list. What is NOT interesting: an essay that devotes one
      paragraph each to a variety of different topics. This type of approach denies you the ability to
      give depth to your essay.

      -Follows the conventions of good writing
      A good essay uses appropriate grammar and syntax, uses precise and vivid language, and does
      not contain any spelling errors.




MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                         30
      -Conforms to guidelines
      If the essay instructions tell you that the essay should be two pages long, on white 8.5x11 inch
      paper, then the essay should be two pages long, on white 8.5x11 inch paper. Less is not more,
      and more is not better, either.

      -Answers the question!
      A good essay is the result of a writer who has examined the essay question and written an essay
      that explicitly addresses that question. For example, if you are asked to describe your greatest
      accomplishment or any unusual circumstances or challenges you have faced, then your reader
      will expect you to use vivid language that will enable the reader to visualize your
      accomplishment and share your sense of success.

      -Benefits from several drafts and feedback from others
      Revision allows an essay to grow. Revising is not editing; revising is the act of "re-seeing" and of
      looking for those parts of the essay that would benefit from more explication, more (or less) vivid
      language, or even deleting parts that simply don't work to move your primary theme forward.
      Similarly, feedback from others can help you identify those parts of the essay that work well--and
      those that don't.

      -Contains a catchy introduction that will keep the reader interested
      It is important to recognize that essay readers will read hundreds, maybe even thousands, of
      essays during the application review period. That means that an essay with a catchy
      introduction, one that gets right to the point and uses precise language and vivid imagery, is
      going to stand our more than an essay that is predictable and conventional in its opener.
      -Transforms blemishes into positives
      It's okay to have flaws! The essay is your chance to show how you have transformed blemishes.
      For example, if your essay theme is "overcoming obstacles" and you earned a poor grade in a
      class, but went to a community college at night to repeat the course, it is important for your
      reader to know this because it is an example of your perseverance. The reader does not want to
      hear complaints about poor grades or circumstances, but rather wants to know how you have
      overcome them.

      -Demonstrates your knowledge of the major/college
      No one expects you to know everything about the college or university to which you are applying.
      However, readers will want to know that you have done your homework. For example, if you
      write an essay that states your interest in becoming an engineer, but the college does not have
      an engineering program, then you haven't done your homework.

      -Exudes confidence--you will be successful no matter what
      A good essay doesn't beg or brag. Colleges and universities want to admit the best students, and
      the best students are those who can demonstrate their ability to pursue their goals regardless of
      where they are admitted. Think of this as quiet confidence--the kind that reveals itself through
      your description of lifelong interests, sustained commitment, and/or perseverance in the face of
      adversity.

      COLLEGE ESSAY BLUNDERS!
      Just as you should know what to do, you should also know what NOT to do! Here are some of
      the biggest blunders students make in their essays:


MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                                  31
      The essay repeats information contained elsewhere in the application
      Sometimes students, to be on the safe side, simply repeat in the essay the same information
      that is in the application itself. This strategy results in the reader gaining no more insight into
      what drives you than he/she discerned from the rest of the application packet. Remember, your
      reader already knows from your application, for example, that you are in the California
      Scholarship Federation and a member of the Ethnic Studies Club. What the reader doesn't know
      is why you chose to participate in these activities and how your involvement in these activities is
      evidence of your particular interests and talents--your essay's theme. If one of these
      experiences is a good example of your essay's theme, then by all means include it. If you're just
      including it because you think that you'll impress the reader with everything you've ever done,
      think again.

      Here's an example of this blunder:
      In my junior year I was a cheerleader for my school. I worked really hard at it, and found it to be
      fun and challenging. I was also part of my school's Kids in the Kitchen program, which helped to
      make food available to poor people in my community. Cheerleading and volunteer work kept me
      very busy. I spent approximately twenty hours each week cheering and another five hours
      volunteering. I learned a lot from this experience and can manage my time effectively and
      maintain a positive attitude in the face of adversity.

      The writer complains about his/her circumstances rather than explains them.
      Remember that admissions officers want to know how resilient you are. While it is certainly
      okay to write about obstacles you've faced, what is important to your reader is how you
      overcame the obstacle, not what a terrible obstacle it was.
      Here's an example of this blunder:
      Because my mother is a single parent, she has had to make a lot of sacrifices to keep me and my
      brother in a private school. It means that we have to go without a lot of things, which is
      sometimes embarrassing. But even though everyone in my school knows that we are poor, no
      one is willing to give me a break. This is especially true of my English teacher, Sister Magdalena.
      Because she didn't like me, and she is not comfortable with poor people, she gave me a C in
      English when I really should have gotten a B.

      The writer discusses money or a college's ranking as a motivating factor for applying to a
      particular major/college.
      Yes, we all want to attend college to earn more money. And we all want to attend the most
      prestigious colleges. But college faculty who read your essay want to know that you are
      motivated by a love of learning. So, even though money or a school's ranking may be important
      to you, keep this information out of your essay.

      Here's an example of this blunder:
      I want to study engineering because a recent US News and World Report article said that
      engineering is the fastest-growing industry in the nation and the best place to study engineering
      is UCLA. With a degree in engineering, I will be able to buy a house for my mom.




MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                          32
      The writer makes claims in the essay that are not backed up by the application.
      The essay is a component of the application and is read within the context of the application. A
      description of yourself as the top student in the school should be supported by your grades.
      Similarly, claims made about your extracurricular experiences should be backed up by the
      application. For example, a student who claims that her lifelong ambition is to save the
      environment would want this claim supported by examples of involvement in environment-
      related hobbies, clubs and classes.


+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

                   Choose from the following topics for your personal statement.
                       Please write out the question at the top of the page.

      Tell one story about yourself that would best provide us, either directly or indirectly, with an
      insight into the kind of person you are. (For example, the story can simply relate a personal
      experience or a humorous anecdote; it can tell about an especially significant academic
      encounter or about an unusual test of character. The possibilities are unlimited.)
       It has been said [Andy Warhol] that “in the future everyone will be famous for fifteen
        minutes.” Describe your fifteen minutes.
       Tell us about the neighborhood that you grew up in and how it helped shape you into the kind
        of person you are today
       Explain how your experiences as a teenager significantly differ from those of your friends.
        Include comparisons.
       What is the best advice you ever received? Why? And did you follow it?
       If you were to look back on your high school years, what advice would you give to someone
        beginning their high school career?
       Describe a risk that you have taken and discuss its impact on your life.

      Solution Key (if applicable)
      N/A




MANATEE CORE CURRICULUM                                                                              33

				
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