APES Syllabus 2009 by jgLkfF24

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									                          A.P. Environmental Science Syllabus
                                      2009-2010

General scope and sequence for the course

   Unit       Topic                                                                    Relevant Text
                                                                                          Chapters
     1        Sound Science, Stewardship and Sustainability                         1, 22
     2        Ecosystems and Biogeochemical Cycles                                  2, 3, 4
     3        Human Demographics and Wealth Gap                                     5, 6
     4        Biodiversity and Natural Capital                                      10, 11
     5        Water Resources and Water Pollution                                   7, 17
     6        Atmosphere and Global Warming                                         20
     7        Conventional Non-renewable Energy                                     12, 13
     8        Renewable Energy                                                      14, 23
     9        Soil, Food and Pest Control                                           8, 9, 17
    10        Hazardous Chemicals and Human Health                                  14, 19, 22
    11        Solid Waste and Atmosphere Pollution                                  18, 20.5, 21

AP Environmental Science Course Overview
AP Environmental Science is a college level course with the ability to transfer college credits if you pass
the AP Exam in May. The goal of AP Environmental Science is to provide students with the scientific
principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world,
to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative
risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing
them. Environmental science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas
of study. The curriculum draws upon various scientific disciplines including:
      Earth Systems and Resources
      The Living World
      Human Population Dynamics (and Policies)
      Land and Water Use
      Energy Resources and Consumption
      Pollution
      Global Change
In addition the course will provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies
required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world including:
      Analyzing and interpreting information and experimental data, including mathematical
         calculations.
      How to identify and analyze environmental problems, to evaluate the ecological and human
         health risks associated with these problems, and to critically examine various solutions for
         resolving or preventing them.
      A laboratory and/or field investigation component. A minimum of one class period per week will
         be spent engaged in laboratory and/or field work.
The following themes provide the foundation for the AP Environmental Science course:
1. Science is a process.
      Science is a method of learning more about the world. Science constantly changes the way we
         understand the world.
2. Energy conversions underlie all ecological processes.
      Energy cannot be created; it must come from somewhere.
      As energy flows through systems, at each step more of it becomes unusable.
3. The Earth itself is one interconnected system.
      Natural systems change over time and space.
      Biogeochemical systems vary in ability to recover from disturbances.
4. Humans alter natural systems.
      Humans have had an impact on the environment for millions of years
      Technology and population growth have enabled humans to increase both the rate and scale of
        their impact on the environment.
5. Environmental problems have a cultural and social context.
     Understanding the role of cultural, social, and economic factors is vital to the development of
        solutions.
6. Human survival depends on developing practices that will achieve sustainable systems.
     A suitable combination of conservation and development is required.
     Management of common resources is essential.

Course Structure and Prerequisites
Students enrolling in AP Environmental Science must have completed 2 years of science course work.

Class: The class meets 80 minutes for 3 times a week. Class time will be used to investigate
environmental topics in depth using a variety of methodologies including lecture, lab and field activities,
video with pre- and post-viewing activities, primary source readings with seminar style discussion,
simulations and case studies.

Homework and Quizzes: As you are taking a college level course, you will be required to do all reading
of the textbook outside of class time and will often need to finish class assignments at home. You will be
expected to be prepared for a quiz every week and a test at the end of each of the 11 units.

Tests: Each unit test will include 50 multiple choice and 1 free response question and will require you to
read and understand the text along with whatever I have covered in class.

Labs: Students are expected to keep a lab notebook with graph paper (cost of $3 from me) that includes
all of the steps and analysis of each investigation in a scientific experiment. Students will also complete
pre-lab assessment questions and/or a data table during the actual experiment. A fully typed lab report
will be due following certain labs. *Results, Analysis, and Conclusion must include mathematical and
graphical support in all applicable situations.*

Current Issues: Environmental science is a rapidly changing field; there are daily news reports and
scientific findings adding to our collective knowledge. You are to select ONE article a month related to
the current topic of study. For each article write a BRIEF summary and personal response to your article
on a notecard. Include all environmental topics covered in the article and evaluate the article for bias.
Some of these articles will be organized into a Current Issues Binder during the second semester. These
are to be turned in on the last Friday of the month. You will be asked to share your article with the class at
least once over the course of the year.


Grades                   90% to 100% A
                         80% to 89% B
                         70% to 79% C
                         60% to 69% D
                          < 60%      F
Textbook
                         th
Environmental Science, 10 Edition, by Richard T. Wright

Activity Sources
The Habitable Planet, Annenberg Learner.org
Laboratory Investigations in Environmental Science, William Molnar
Environmental Issues: Measuring, Analyzing and Evaluating, McConnell and Abel
AP Environmental Science Lab and Field Experiences, College Board
The Environmental Literacy Council
The Case Study Collection, SUNY Buffalo
Population Connection, Washington DC 20036
                             Environmental Science Outline
Unit 1: Ecological Principles and Sound Science (2 weeks…8/17-8/28)
Lecture Topics:
     Science as a way of knowing
     Stewardship of the Earth and our ecological footprint
     Environmental Timeline: Neolithic, Industrial and Green Revolutions
     Environmental problems, their causes and solutions
        Sustainable Practices and Behaviors that are necessary
     Fishing methods and sustainable fishing practices
Readings from Textbook:
     Ch. 1 Toward a Sustainable Future
     Ch. 22 Economics, Public Policy and the Environment
Readings for Discussion:
     Ch. 1 Environmental Problems, Their Causes and Sustainability
        Living in the Environment by G. Tyler Miller
     Tragedy of the Commons, Garrett Hardin
     We’re too insignificant to effect the Planet
     The Land Ethic, Aldo Leopold
Labs, Quantitative Activities and Field Experiences:
     Introduction to Experimental Design and Analysis: Paper Towels and the ANOVA
     Poster project to design an experiment to test the validity of claims made in a magazine ad
     Environmental Ranking Survey (Nita Ganguly)
     Tragedy of the commons lab: Students form fishery companies and compete for economic
        success. They quickly see the Tragedy of the Commons. Follow up: Students read an article
        about sustainable fishery management in Australia and cooperatively modify the Fishbanks rule
        and the simulation is repeated under these sustainable management practices.
     Tragedy of the commons simulation
     Molnar Investigation 20: Doubling Time and Exponential Growth
     Online calculation of personal ecological footprint http://myfootprint.org
Videos and Guest Speakers:
     The Man who planted trees
     Junk Science by John Stossel
     Engineers without Borders of CSU can come to talk about engineering solutions to global
        problems www.engr.colostate.edu/ewb/
     Heifer International guest speaker
Case Studies and Simulations:
     PCBs in the Last Frontier: A Case Study on the Scientific Method-by Michael TessmerChemistry
        Department Southwestern College, Winfield, KS
     Search for the Missing Otters: Progressive disclosure case where students analyze maps and
        graphical data to unravel the mystery of otter decline in the Bering Sea.
Relevant Laws and Regulations:
     Magnuson Act and Regional Fishery Councils

Unit 2: Ecosystem and Biogeochemical Cycles (4 weeks…8/31-9/25)
Lecture Topics:
     Earth’s lithosphere, hydro/cryosphere, biosphere, atmosphere (and exosphere)
     The structure of Ecosytems: trophic levels, biotic and abiotic factors
     Community ecology: Niche, competition and symbiotic relationships
     Aquatic and Terrestrial Biomes
     Energy Flow and Nutrient Cycles (biogeochemical cycles)
     Ecological Succession, invasive and non-native species
     Biotic potential vs. Environmental Resistance, Evolution by Natural Selection
     Habitat degradation and fragmentation
     Rule of 70, Exponential and logistic growth curves
     Population Genetics: Variation and susceptibility to extinction
Readings from Textbook:
     Ch. 2 Ecosystems What They Are
    Ch. 3 Ecosystems How they Work
    Ch. 4 Ecosystems How they Change
Readings for Discussion:
    Of Mice and Mast: Connections among oak, mice, deer, gypsy moth and tick populations
    OP/ED: A tree or a life: Preserve the yew or harvest them, for cancer treatment?
Labs, Quantitative Activities and Field Experiences:
    Owl Pellet Analysis Lab: observe, record and analysis food chain dynamics in owls from
        ecosystems in the NW, SW, NE and SE of the United States.
    Natural Selection Simulation Lab
    Breeding Bunnies: Quantitative simulation of population genetics and genetic variation
    Calorimetry Lab: 1 law of thermodynamics and energy transfer, Source:
                            st

        www.pembinatrails.ca/shaftesbury/mrdeakin
    Webquest at www.savetherainforest.org
    Quadrant Sampling Field Trip: Students estimate the size of a plant population
    Population Growth in Duckweed- Determination of population growth parameters with and without
        nutrient enrichment
    Invite Raptor Center in to speak about Coloradoan ecosystems, habitats, and predators as early
        warnings of environments problems
Videos:
    Annenberg Film: The Habitable Planet Unit 3 Ecosystems
    Journey to Planet Earth: State of our Planet’s Wildlife
    Short Clip of Cane Toads Video about non-native species introduction, on youtube
Case Studies and Simulations:
    Quantitative simulation of natural selection predator-prey dynamics and coevolution
    Coyote removal in Texas: Progressive disclosure investigates the effect of coyote removal on
        trophic structure in an ecosystem using analysis of graphical data.
    Asian Oysters in the Chesapeake: Town meeting simulation investigates the pros and cons of
        introducing a non-native species to save an economically important way of life.
Relevant Laws and Regulations:
    Endangered Species Act, The Lacey Act, CITES

Unit 3: Human Demographics and Wealth Gap (3 weeks…9/28-10/16)
Lecture Topics (Key Concepts):
     Demographic Transition, developed vs developing nations
     Population profiles (population pyramids)
     Exponential and logarithmic growth models
     Consequences of Affluence and Poverty
     The Debt Crisis and a new trend toward Social Modernization
     The MDGs (Millenium Development Goals) and ICPD (Int’l Conf on Pop and Development)
Textbook Readings:
     Ch. 5 The Human Population: Demographic
     Ch. 6 Issues in Population and Development
Readings for Discussion:
     Lifeboat Ethics, Garrett Hardin
Labs, Quantitative Activities and Field Experiences:
     Predict Percentages of School, US and World that have cell phones, computers, internet
        connection, avg. # of automobile per person, square footage of house, etc.
     Power of the Pyramids Activity and Country Demographics Power Point
     Quadrant Sampling Field Trip: Students estimate the size of a plant population
     Something's Fishy: Mark recapture technique simulation from Nita Ganguly
     Population Growth in Duckweed- Determination of population growth parameters with and without
        nutrient enrichment
     Calculation of population parameters and resource use of developed vs developing nations
     Letter to Grandchild about how it was
     World of 100 Presentation: Create Demographic Poster or Video if the World was only 100
        people how many would be poor, without clean water, use biomass for cooking energy, etc.
     Make it Happen Priority Pyramid
Videos and Guest Speakers:
      World Population Video by Population Connection
      NOVA: World in the Balance-The People Paradox
      World of 100 The Miniature Earth Project
      The Story of Stuff, analyze what parts of video are fact based comments vs. politically based
       comments
    Heifer International invited to speak about global concerns and sustainable solutions they are
       providing
Case Studies and Simulations:
    Aid Game (GingerBooth.Com) Students make decisions about aid packages for developing
    Global Monopoly Game with Wealth Gap Modification and nonequitable capital assigned to
       participants to symbolize developed vs. developing nations

Unit 4: Biodiversity and Natural Capital (2 weeks…10/19-10/30 end of quarter)
Lecture Topics:
     Biodiversity = Speciation – Extinction
     Measures of Biodiversity: Species richness, evenness and diversity
     Biological Wealth as needed for goods (natural resources) and for recreation
     Biomes under pressure
     Conservation, Preservation and Restoration
Readings from Textbook:
     Ch. 10 Wild Species: Biodiversity and Protection
     Ch. 11 Ecosystems as Resources (EcoCapital)
Readings for Discussion:
     Of Mice and Mast: Connections among oak, mice, deer, gypsy moth and tick populations
     OP/ED: A tree or a life: Preserve the yew or harvest them, for cancer treatment?
Labs, Quantitative Activities and Field Experiences:
     Biodiversity Lab: Statistical Analysis of Different Parking Lots
     Invite Idea Wild (Wally Vansickle) to speak about Biodiversity Projects
Videos and Guest Speakers:
     Wally Van Sickle of Idea Wild (a local non-profit company) will speak on the importance of
        preserving biodiversity hot spots around the world and how his organization raises money to buy
        equipment needed to research, protect and educate in these regional hotspots
     President of Save the Rain Forest Organization www.savetherainforest.org will speak to whole
        school on why rain forests are so important and how we can protect them
     Annenberg Film: The Habitable Planet Unit 9 Biodiversity Decline
Case Studies and Simulations:
     Asian Oysters in the Chesapeake: Town meeting simulation investigates the pros and cons of
        introducing a non-native species to save an economically important way of life.
Relevant Laws and Regulations:
     Endangered Species Act, The Lacey Act, CITES

Unit 5: Water Resources and Water Pollution (3.5 weeks…11/2-11/24)
Lecture Topics:
     Properties of water, The Hydrologic cycle, point vs non-point sources of water pollution
     Human Impact of water cycle and aquatic ecosystem
     Waste water treatment
     Eutrophication, Net primary productivity, Dissolved oxygen and oxygen sag curves
Readings from Textbook:
     Ch. 7 Water: Hydrologic Cycle and Human Use
     Ch. 17 Water Pollution and Its Prevention
Readings for Discussion:
     Excerpts from The Closing Circle, Barry Commoner
Labs, Quantitative Activities and Field Experiences:
     Field Trip: Analysis of the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of Poudre River near
        the school. Data will be used to calculate Shannon Diversity Index and Water Quality Index
        (Molnar 12).
     Online Extension: The Bear Creek Watershed Students investigate the effects of municipal
        development, acid mine drainage and agricultural runoff on biodiversity and water quality
     Wastewater Treatment Plant Webquest online
      Dissolved Oxygen Lab: Measuring primary productivity of nearby streams using DO as an
       indicator of productivity. Students use the Winkler Method to measure dissolved oxygen. Source:
       Adapted from the AP Biology Student Lab Manual –Dissolved Oxygen and Aquatic Primary
       Productivity
      Estuarine Pollution: The Chesapeake Bay. Students calculate the effect of treated sewage on
       the water quality of the Chesapeake Bay
      Food Web Project: Using the macroinvertebrates collected on the field trip and an online source
       of Colorado Species Interactions, students construct a food web.
      Aquatic Net Primary Productivity Lab: College Board AP Biology Lab using Chlorella and nutrient
       enrichment
Videos
    Annenberg Film: The Habitable Planet Unit 3 Oceans and Unit 8 Water Resources
Case Studies and Simulations:
    Idagon Watershed Management : Students use a STELLA model to make decisions about water
       diversions balancing demands for hydropower, irrigation and salmon runs.
Relevant Laws and Regulations:
    The Clean Water Act, NPDES
                                                                            nd
Unit 6: Atmosphere and Global Warming (3.5 weeks…11/25-12/18 end of 2 quarter)
Lecture Topics:
     Global air and oceanic circulation patterns
     El Nino and La Nina
     Global climate change and fossil fuel use
     Geological Time and radioactive dating
     Climate effects on biomes and ecosystems
Readings from Textbook:
     Ch. 20 The Atmosphere: Climate and Climate Change only (not including Ozone depletion)
Readings for Discussion:
     Recognizing Gaia, James Lovelock
Labs, Quantitative Activities and Field Experiences:
     Specific Heat and Climate (Molnar 3)
     Coriolis effect demonstration lab
     Formation of deserts (Molnar 4)
     Producing Climatograms and Biome SPOONS: Students are assigned to produce cards for an
        individual Biomes. The cards include climatograms, geographical, climatic and biological
        characteristics of their biome. Students are then grouped and play a game where they have to
        collect all cards from a particular biome and identify the biome. Other students amy verify or
        dispute the claim.
     Mapping ground level Ozone in our school using Schoebein paper
     Measuring particulate air pollution in our school
     Acid Rain Lab (Carolina Environmental Science Resource Manual) Investigates the effect of
        bedrock, wind patterns, CO2 and SOx emissions on pH of water. Students measure the alkalinity
        of local surface waters
Videos:
     NOVA: Gaia or NOVA: What's up with the Weather?
     Annenberg Film: The Habitable Planet Unit 2 Atmosphere
     Little Ice Age Big Chill by History Channel or Hockey Stick section only of An Inconvenient Truth
Case Studies and Simulations:
     Daisyworld
     Virtual Courseware: Earth's Energy Budget and Global Warming
Relevant Laws and Regulations:
     Clean Air Act, Montreal Protocol, Kyoto Treaty

Unit 7: Conventional Non-renewable Energy (3 weeks…1/4-1/22)
Lecture Topics:
     Laws of thermodynamics (review)
     How fossil fuels are formed, located and extracted
     Natural gas, coal and oil
     Peak Oil
    Petroleum oil use other than for energy: plastics, materials, medicines
    Nuclear fission and half life
    Safety and disposal of radioactive waste
Readings from Textbook:
    Ch. 12 Energy from Fossil Fuels
    Ch. 13 Energy from Nuclear Power
Labs, Quantitative Activities and Field Experiences:
    Tour Rawhide Coal Power Plant (discussing the issues of have reliable, consistent energy and
        what is done to improve efficiency of energy usage and decrease waste biproducts
    Tour Wind power plant after Rawhide tour and hear the benefits and difficulties
    Energy efficiency calculations
    Measurement of energy transfer efficiency: Students use an immersion heater to heat a known
        mass of water. Using electrical and calorimetry equations they calculate and compare the
        electrical energy input to the heat energy gained by the water.
    Personal Energy Use Audit (Molnar 25)
    Solar Absorption Lab (Molnar 26)
    Solar water heater design contest
    Semester Long “Environmental Science in the News”, a binder that keeps and analyzes
        environmental science articles of different topics from this class
Videos:
    Annenberg Film: The Habitable Planet Unit 10 Energy Challenges
    Peak Oil Speech by Richard Heinberg, Eugene OR January 29 2006
                                                                          th

    Addicted to Oil, Thomas Friedman reporting on Discovery Channel
    Renewable Solutions Video
Case Studies and Simulations:
    Policy debate: Should we Drill in the ANWR? Balancing land use and energy independence
    Students research and present a Powerpoint or Web Page on renewable forms of energy.
        Presentations must include an economic and feasibility analysis.

Unit 8: Renewable Energy (2 weeks…1/25-2/5)
Lecture Topics:
     Principles of Solar Energy
     Indirect Solar Energy: Hydropower, Wind Power, Biomass Energy
     Transportation Energy Renewables: biofuels, hydrogen
     Peak Oil
     Nuclear fission and half life
Readings from Textbook:
     Ch. 14 Renewable Energy
     Ch. 23 Sustainable Communities
Readings for Discussion:
     Energy Innovators stories about what is being done to solve the energy problem
Labs, Quantitative Activities and Field Experiences:
     Energy efficiency calculations
     Measurement of energy transfer efficiency: Students use an immersion heater to heat a known
        mass of water. Using electrical and calorimetry equations they calculate and compare the
        electrical energy input to the heat energy gained by the water.
     Personal Energy Use Audit (Molnar 25)
     Solar Absorption Lab (Molnar 26)
     Solar water heater design contest
Videos and Speakers:
     NOVA: Saved by the sun
     Modern Marvels Video: Renewable Energy Future
     Annenberg Film: The Habitable Planet Unit 12 Looking Forward, Our Global Experiment
     Sustainable Dave website from Boulder, He may come speak to a class
Case Studies and Simulations:
     Policy debate: Should we Drill in the ANWR? Balancing land use and energy independence
     Students research and present a Powerpoint or Web Page on renewable forms of energy.
        Presentations must include an economic and feasibility analysis.
Unit 9: Soil, Food and Pest Control (4 weeks…2/8-3/5)
Lecture Topics:
     Structure and Interaction among the Earth's Crust, Mantle and Core
     Plate tectonics, earthquakes and volcanism
     Mining methods and environmental degradation
     Soil erosion and soil conservation practices
     Forestry and Public Lands
     Pesticides, resistance and IPM
Readings from Textbook:
     Ch. 8 Soil and the Soil Ecosystem
     Ch. 9 The Production and Distribution of Food
     Ch. 17 Pests and Pest Control
Readings for Discussion:
     Easter's End, Jared Diamond
     Excerpts from Silent Spring by Rachel Carson
Labs, Quantitative Activities and Field Experiences:
     Rock Cycle Webquest
     Rock ID lab
     Plate tectonics and geological activity: Students use GIS software to map earthquake and
        volcanic activity and superimpose plate boundaries.
     Ore processing: Students are given a "rock" made up of sand, salt and iron fillings held together
        by paraffin. They must design methods to extract the salable ores: iron and salt. They keep track
        of energy, equipment and transport costs. In the end they calculate the percent composition of
        their ore as well as an analysis of the relative processing costs.
     Field Trip: Soil profiles and percolation rates at Westminster Open Space. Samples from each
        horizon are analyzed in the lab for nutrient content, particle size distribution, pore space and
        water holding capacity.
     Soil salinization Lab: Students design their own procedure, collect, graph and analyze data under
        three different scenarios.
Videos:
     NOVA/Frontline: Harvest of Fear (GMOs)
     Annenberg Film: The Habitable Planet Unit 7 Agriculture
     The True Cost of Food by The Sierra Club Sustainable Consumption Committee
     Buyer by Fair The Promise of Product Certification by Bullfrog Films
Case Studies and Simulations:
     Policy debate: GMOs the European approach, American approach or neither
     Policy Debate: Mining in Colorado, the economic and environmental consequences
     Malaria and DDT: To spray or not to spray. A role play case regarding The WHO's decision to
        allow limited spraying in area's where malaria is a problem
Relevant Laws and Regulations:
     Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act

Unit 10: Hazardous Chemicals and Human Health (4 weeks…3/8-4/9 spring break 3/15-3/19)
Lecture Topics:
     Risk perception, Risk assessment vs Risk Management
     The risks of being poor
     Toxicology: Routes of exposure, acute vs chronic effects
     Dose Response, Synergism and Antagonism, biomagnification in food chains
     Economic Impacts: cost-benefit analysis, externalities
     Consumer and environmental safety, governmental regulations
Readings from Textbook:
     Ch. 15 Environmental Hazards and Human Health
     Ch.19 Hazardous Chemicals: Pollution and Prevention
     Ch. 22 Pollution and Public Policy
Readings for Discussion:
     Recycling is garbage!
     Excerpts from Silent Spring by Rachel Carson
Labs, Quantitative Activities and Field Experiences:
    Energy and Recycling (Molnar 8)
    Personal trash collection and analysis of % recyclable material by mass, Landfill speaker
    DHMO dihydrogen monoxide has MSDS and other activities to do with it, who would ban it and who
        would keep it
    LC50 in Brine shrimp or daphnea
Videos:
    Tom Brokaw Estrogen mimickers (in my Norris Folder)
    Annenberg Film: The Habitable Planet Unit 6 Risk, Exposure and Health
    A segment of The Corporation on “externalities” by Mongrel Media
Case Studies and Simulations:
    STELLA: The Cats of Borneo
    Town Meeting: What do we do with the Flowing Railroad Site; Modified from the EPA site this
        case presents students with a hypothetical abandoned waste site. They must learn what toxics
        are present, where they are, where they are headed and the potential health effects. In the end
        the town must decide the best method to reclaim the land weighing economic, social and
        personal impacts.
Relevant Laws and Regulations:
    The Clean Air and Water Acts
    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)
    NEPA, TSCA, CERCLA, FIFRA

Unit 11 Solid Waste and Atmospheric Pollution (ozone depletion) (3 weeks…4/12-4/30)
Lecture Topics:
     Disposal of municipal solid waste
     The recycling solution
     Combustion: waste to energy
     Primary and secondary sources of air pollution
     Heat islands and temperature inversions
     Indoor air pollution
     Stratospheric ozone, CFC’s and UV light
     Strategies for reducing ozone depletion
Readings from Textbook:
     Ch. 18 Municipal Solid Waste: Disposal and Recovery
     Ch.21 Atmospheric Pollution
     Ch. 20.5 Depletion of Ozone Layer
Readings for Discussion:
     Recycling is garbage!
     The Ozone Layer is Being Repaired
     US Electronic Waste gets Sent to Africa by Ron Claiborne 8/2/009
Labs, Quantitative Activities and Field Experiences:
     Field trip to CSU’s Engines and Energy Conversion Lab and Industry Partners: Global
        Innovations Center’s clean burning cookstoves for developing countries, Solix Biofuels producing
        combustible oils from algae, Envirofit retrofitting 2 stroke engines to reduce air and noise
        pollution, Enefficiency improvement ideas for the electricity grid
     Energy and Recycling (Molnar 8)
     Visit Larimer County Landfill or have them come speak in class
     Personal trash collection and analysis of % recyclable material by mass
Videos:
     Electronic Waste in Ghana by Greenpeace, on you tube
     Toxic US E-Waste: Third World Problem on you tube ABC World News with Charles Gibson
Case Studies and Simulations:
     Carry all your trash and recyclables for 1 week, weigh and analyze
Relevant Laws and Regulations:
     The Clean Air and Water Acts
     Ozone and CFC’s regulation in the 70’s

								
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