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					                                   Teaching Guide


                                        For


                           Native Landscaping

                                      Module




                     Illinois Career & Technical Education
                     Math and Science Curriculum Project

                                        2009




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IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
                                   Table of Contents

Acknowledgements

Problem Solving Activity
Overview of Module
   • Scenario Focus
   • Description of the Problem to be solved
   • TDL Cluster Knowledge and Skills and Performance Elements Addressed
   • Illinois Learning Standards Addressed
   • Objectives
   • Measurement Criteria
   • Teacher Notes
   • Time Required to Complete Problem
   • Support Materials and Resources Necessary for Completion of Scenario
Lesson 1 with Handout 1, 2, 3 and 4
Lesson 2 with Handout 5
Lesson 3
Lesson 4
Lesson 5 with Handout 6
Lesson 6 with Handout 7


Teacher Assessment Materials
    •    Final Evaluation and Measurement Criteria
    •    Rubrics
    •    Example of Acceptable Student Solution

Appendix
         Glossary of Terms




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IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
Acknowledgements

Business/Industry/Government Partner(s)
   Casey-Westfield School District #4
   502 East Delaware
   Casey, IL 62420
   Mr. Clyde Frankie
   (217)932-2175

    Scotty’s Garden and Furnace
    902 N. State Highway 49
    Casey, IL 62420
    (217)932-5364

Other Educators
  Jerry O’Hare
  Mentor
  Blackhawk Community College

Developers:
  Jennifer Franklin/Mindy Allen
  Casey-Westfield School District #4
  (217)932-2175
  franklinj@cw.k12.il.us




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IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
Scenario Focus

Overview of Module
The students will be pairing with Casey-Westfield School District #4 to design the
landscaping for the new addition of the high school, which is currently being built.
The students will learn about native vs. exotic plant species, perennials vs. annuals,
soil types, climate zones, measurement, landscape architecture, environmental
design and engineering. The students will be graded on their progress as they go
along in the module. They will also be graded on their final design. The first day
will be a project introduction. Day two will be a lab introducing exotic vs. native
plant species. Day three they will be divided into their groups, given the problem
statement and blueprints. Day three the students will go to Scotty’s Landscaping.
One of the workers will talk to them about perennials vs. annuals, shrubs, trees,
edging and barriers. The students will write down ideas of plants they would like
to use. On days four and five the students will go to the computer lab to work on
looking up plants and beginning their designs. Day six the students will go into the
area to be landscaped and take measurements to figure out area and how many
plants they will need for their design. Day seven the students will resume back in
the classroom to go over the measurements they collected the day before and
figure out quantity and arrangement of plants. Day eight the students will go back
to the computer lab to finish looking up plants and entering their designs. On day
nine they will present their plans. In addition, these plans may evaluated by a math
teacher for cost analysis.

Primary Career Cluster: Architecture & Construction

Primary Career Pathway: Design/Pre-Construction

Related Occupations: Environmental Designer, Environmental Engineer, Landscape
    Architect

Recommended Subject Areas: Earth Science, Biology, Botany




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IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
Scenario Problem Statement
Casey-Westfield High School’s 1947 edition was condemned in the spring of 2006.
A referendum in the district was passed in the spring of 2007 to build a new
addition to the high school. This new addition is currently under construction. The
school district purposely did not do any landscaping on the new high school building
so that they could get community input on the design. The Casey-Westfield School
District would like to contract with you to submit a landscape design with cost
analysis for implementation of the design.

Use internet searches, other CITED sources and community resources you need to
prepare a design plan for the new addition’s landscaping. You are to present the
plan to the class. The top design in each class will present to the Casey-Westfield
Building Committee to be considered for implementation.


Cluster Knowledge and Skills and Performance Elements
   1. Employ basic methods of data collection and analysis to provide information
      for projects-access research methods available to formulate project
      planning and problem-solving and provide appropriate precedents for
      development of a project.
   2. Apply the basic principles of environmental impact to enhance project
      acceptance and quality-evaluate and align sustainable design elements to add
      value to the project.
   3. Apply basic organizational, spatial, structural and constructional principles to
      the design of interior and exterior space-develop design alternatives to
      address a given problem.
   4. Identify the relationship between available resources and requirements of a
      project/problem to accomplish realistic planning-use available
      resources/materials effectively to complete project or resolve a problem.
   5. Work as an individual and as a team member to accomplish assignments-use
      human relations skills to work cooperatively with co-workers representing
      different cultures, genders and backgrounds and track team goals to
      contribute constructively and positively to the team and manage personal
      skills to accomplish assignments.
   6. Use mentoring skills to inspire others to achieve-use motivational techniques
      to enhance performance in others.




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IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
    7. Read technical drawings and documents to plan a project-interpret
       blueprints and drawings to assist with project planning and use architect’s
       plan, manufacturer’s illustrations and other materials to visualize proposed
       work and to transfer specific data.

Illinois Learning Standards
Science
13B.2 Explore natural resources conservation and management programs,
         calculating home/school electric or water usage, etc., to propose plans for
         increased efficiency, evaluating their effect on natural resources and the
         local economy, researching the past, current and future local landfill plans
         or examining state wildlife programs for controlled breeding or population
         maintenance.
13.B.3 Explore policies which affect local science or technology issues,
         researching applicable issue of local concern (e.g., subdivision development,
         groundwater contamination), developing classroom criteria to measure
         effectiveness of policies, developing survey instruments to assess depths
         of informed opinions on issues, collecting pertinent data from expert local
         sources, or analyzing data and policy correlation.
12E.4 Explain how external and internal energy sources drive Earth processes
         (e.g., solar energy drives weather patterns; internal heat drives plate
         tectonics).
12B.3 Identify and classify biotic and abiotic factors in an environment that
         affect population density, habitat and placement of organisms in an energy
         pyramid.
12B.4 Compare physical, ecological and behavioral factors that influence
         interactions and interdependence of organisms.



 What I Want Students to Know                  What I Want Students to be Able to Do
    •    Perennials vs. annuals                •   Find area
    •    Exotic species vs. native species     •   Use a tape measure
    •    Characteristics which make            •   Use a measuring wheel
         quality soil                          •   Determine spacing of plants given
    •    Abiotic vs. biotic factors                measurements of area and plant growth
    •    Zone systems of plants                •   Read a blueprint
    •    pH scale                          .
    •    How pH affects plants



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IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
Objectives
  • Students will be able to explain the difference between perennials and
     annuals
  • Students will be able to differentiate between exotic and native species
  • Students will have an understanding of the zone systems of plants and how
     this ties in with weather patterns
  • Students will know the pH scale and how this affects plant growth
  • Students will be able to take measurements of an area (tape measure and
     measurement wheel)
  • Students will be able to find area from their measurements
  • Students will be able to determine spacing of plants given area
     measurements and growth information of the plants
  • Students will be able to give examples of abiotic and biotic factors of the
     area
  • Students will be able to explain the impact of soil health and layering on
     plant growth
  • Students will be able to read a blueprint.


Measurement Criteria
1.  The design was creative and used the space wisely.
2. The design included a variety of plants with other barriers, edging, etc. as
    needed.
3. A list of materials (plants, barriers, edging, etc.) was provided and cost
    projections were calculated correctly.
4. The presentation included visuals such as, the design and cost data.
5. The presentation met the 7 requirements of effective business presentations:
      Evidence of preparedness and practice
      Started on time
      Dressed appropriately
      Showed enthusiasm and confidence
      Maintained eye contact, showed friendliness and respect
      Spoke slowly and distinctly without grammatical errors or slang
      Welcomed questions and answered completely;
      Accepted reactions without being defensive.
      Met time requirements (not including question & answer session)




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IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
Teacher Notes
    •    A sample blueprint is provided; however, since you may be doing an area
         other than our school, you or the students will need to obtain a copy of the
         blueprint for that area.
    •    If possible find a place students can go on a field trip to look at plants. If
         the place has someone available to talk to them and answer their questions
         that would be a great help. The students seem to respond better to
         someone they view as an expert.
    •    I put students in groups of 3-4. I combined a higher academic student with
         a middle achieving and a lower achieving student.
    •    I had student use the rubric and do a self-evaluation and evaluation of each
         group member.

Time required to complete Problem: 9 or 10 fifty minute class days

Module Support Materials Summary
  • Beans for exotic species activity
  • Colored pencils for exotic species activity
  • Blueprint of area to be landscaped
  • Web addresses given that will help students find plants for their projects
             o www.artandlindaswildflowers.com
             o www.environmentalalmanac.blogspot.com
             o www.champaign.org/justkids/homework_help/illinois_champaign/illinoi
               s_plants.html
             o www.dnr.state.il.us
             o www.directgardening.com
    •    Tape measures
    •    Measuring wheel-if you have access this was easier than using the tape
         measures for the students




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IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
Lesson 1                The Problems Associated with Exotic Species
Time Estimate: 50 minutes
Objectives
1. Students will be introduced to exotic vs. native species
2. Students will be able to track two exotic species (gypsy moth and garlic
   mustard) and show the problems associated with exotic species.
3. Students will discover how exotic species and biogeography are related


Materials & Resources
•   Handout 1, Exotic Species
•   Handout 2, Gypsy Moth Populations and a copy of US map
•   Handout 3, Spread of Garlic Mustard
•   Handout 4, Map of Eastern United States
•   Colored pencils
•   Bag of dried beans
•   Teacher Resource: Material from Handout 1, 2, and 3 was adapted from
    www.inhs.uiuc.edu


Agenda
Step        Minutes                                 Activity
    1            5      -Introduce activity by tossing a handful of dry beans on a table.
                        Explain the distribution of the beans across the table is due to a
                        number of factors: the friction between the table and the
                        beans, the force with which the beans were thrown, the
                        direction of the toss and the size and weight of the beans.
                        -Discuss how the beans have distributed across the table the
                        same way plants and animals distribute. Plants and animals
                        distribution is a result of: climate, soil type, competition from
                        other species and extreme environmental events (floods,
                        droughts, earthquakes, fires). These distributions have
                        developed over a very long time and each organism is adapted to
                        the particular set of conditions that determine where it now
                        lives.


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IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
   2            10      -Distribute copies of Handout 1, Exotic Species. Share the
                        stories of the exotic species: the gypsy moth and garlic
                        mustard.
                        -Discuss what native species are.
   3            10      -Distribute copies of Handout 2, Gypsy Moth Populations and a
                        copy of US Map.
                        -Direct students to color in the states listed on the handout in
                        which the gypsy moth is now found. Students should use three
                        colors to indicate the population density levels.
                        -Spot introductions (populations that are too small to warrant
                        calling an entire area infested) may be shown by a dot or star of
                        a fourth color placed in the infested area of a state, e.g.,
                        Northeastern Illinois.
                        -Students should provide a title for their maps.
   4            20      -Divide the class into pairs and distribute Handout 3, The
                        Spread of Garlic Mustard and seven copies of Handout 4, Map of
                        Eastern US, to each pair.
                        -Students will transfer the distribution data from the master
                        map (Handout 3) to the blank maps. Each of the seven
                        distribution maps created by the students will show the spread
                        of garlic mustard during only one of the year ranges indicated on
                        the master map.
                        -Students must carefully determine the number of dots to be
                        entered and the precise location for each. Partners should
                        monitor each other’s work as the data are transferred.
                        -Each map should be given a title and labeled to indicate the
                        years when the data were collected.
   5             5      -Review work as a class.




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IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
                                                                   Handout 1 for Lesson 1
                                                                   Native Landscaping


                                   Exotic Species

Background information
Organisms are adapted to a set of conditions that meet minimal physiological
needs: among these are sufficient moisture, heat, oxygen and food. The
requirements of organisms have an important influence on where they live and how
they are distributed. These requirements, and larger features of the environment,
are recognized as significant in plant and animal distribution. These larger
features include mountain ranges, river valleys, rift valleys, oceans, seas, islands,
continents, and the spatial relationships among these geographical features. The
study of the where’s and why’s of plant and animal distribution is called
biogeography.

Imbalances can occur in nature by the accidental transport of plants and animals
from one location to another without their array of natural enemies (organisms
that use those species for food) that served to regulate their population sizes.
Humans are more often than not the culprits, sometimes accidentally, but often
intentionally, bringing organisms for their perceived values. Many introduced
organisms cause little disruption; they do not greatly increase in number or out
compete native species and may actually be beneficial. A good example is the
soybean, now one of the main crops of Midwestern agriculture. But many aliens
cause serious problems and become pests in both agricultural and natural systems.
We are going to look closely at two organisms, an insect (the gypsy moth) and a
plant (garlic mustard), and the problems associated with their introduction into the
United States. Both are forest dwellers, but the same principles apply to any
ecosystem.

Gypsy moths were introduced into Massachusetts in 1869 and now commonly occur
within many of the eastern, southern, Midwestern and far western states. This
insect is a major defoliator (leaf feeder) of forest trees and is likely the number
one forest pest in much of the United States. The dispersal of gypsy moths is
most often accomplished by humans. Although the gypsy moth can be a pest in its
native habitat (Eurasia), outbreaks are less frequent and of shorter duration than
those in the United States because many natural enemies in its native habitat use
the gypsy moth as a food source. These enemies include insects, such as predatory

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IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
beetles and parasitic wasps, and birds and small mammals. The gypsy moth became
a serious pest in our country because it was introduced without any of its natural
checks (enemies). In addition, gypsy moths are extremely prolific (a female can lay
up to 1000 eggs) and it was introduced into an area of the United States (eastern
deciduous forest) that had an ample supply of food and favorable climatic
conditions.

The first collection of garlic mustard in the United States was made on Long
Island, New York, in 1868. Scientists speculate that well-intentioned European
settlers brought the plant with them for food or medicine when they came to
America. Garlic mustard is native to northern Europe and into Eurasia. It is an
extremely aggressive species that has invaded our northern and central woodland
communities, showing a preference for disturbed, shaded habitats. This plant is
able to grow or reproduce before and after the growth and reproductive periods
of most other plants. Within ten years after invasion by garlic mustard, the native
species of a site decline. Garlic mustard is a major threat to Illinois woodlands and
to the plants and animals that live there.




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                                                              Handout 2 for Lesson 1
                                                              Native Landscaping

                     Gypsy Moth Populations in the United States

States with Widespread                       Population Density
Gypsy Moth Populations                       of Gypsy Moths
Connecticut (CT)                             High
Massachusetts (MA)                           High
New Jersey (NJ)                              High
New York (NY)                                High
Pennsylvania (PA)                            High
Delaware (DE)                                Medium
Maryland (MD)                                Medium
Michigan (MI)                                Medium
Maine (ME)                                   Low
New Hampshire (NH)                           Low
Ohio (OH)                                    Low
Vermont (VT)                                 Low
Virginia (VA)                                Low


Isolated Areas Where Gypsy Moths Have Been
Found (Spot Introductions)
State                                   Area of State
Illinois (IL)                           Northeast
Indiana (IN)                            Southwest
Oregon (OR)                             Northwest
Washington (WA)                         South
Wisconsin (WI)                          North Central
Minnesota (MN)                          Southeast




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Native Landscaping                 12
IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
The Spread of Garlic Mustard in the US   Handout 3 for Lesson 1




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                                   Handout 4 for Lesson 1
                                   Native Landscaping




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Lesson 2                Problem Statement
Time Estimate: 50 minutes
Objectives
1. Students will understand the problem to be solved.
2. Students will identify steps for completion of the plan.


Materials & Resources
•       Handout 5, Landscape Design MEMO
•       Blue prints of area to be landscaped
•       Teacher Resource: Sample Blueprint


Agenda
Step        Minutes                                 Activity
    1          10       -Distribute Handout 5, Landscape Design MEMO and go over
                        what is expected with the students.
    2           5       -Divide the students into their groups. Each group is given a set
                        of blueprints to use to put their designs on.
    3          25       -Allow time for students to go to the area they are to landscape.
    4          10       -Students meet back in groups and brainstorm what they need
                        to do.




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IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
                                                      Handout 5 for Lesson 2
                                                      Native Landscaping




Casey-Westfield School District Unit #4
502 East Delaware
Casey, IL 62420

To: Landscape Designer (Student)
From: Casey-Westfield Building Committee
Re: Landscape Design

Casey-Westfield High School’s 1947 edition was condemned in
the spring of 2006. A referendum in the district was passed in the
spring of 2007 to build a new addition to the high school. This
new addition is currently under construction. The school district
purposely did not do any landscaping on the new high school
building so that they could get community input on the design.
The Casey-Westfield School District would like to contract with
you to submit a landscape design with cost analysis for
implementation of the design.

Using internet searches, other CITED sources, and community
resources you need to prepare a design plan for the new
addition’s landscaping. Once the mathematics is returned you will
need to write a business report and present to the class your
design. The top design in each class will present to the Casey-
Westfield Building Committee to be considered for
implementation.




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IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
                                   Sample Blueprint, Lesson 2
                                   Native Landscaping




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IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
Lesson 3                Computer Research
Time Estimate: 100 minutes
Objectives
1. Students will research and identify flowers, trees and shrubs for ideas of plants
   to put in their plan.


Materials & Resources
Websites:
www.artandlindaswildflowers.com
www.environmentalalmanac.blogspot.com
www.champaign.org/justkids/homework_help/illinois_champaign/illinois_plants.html
www.dnr.state.il.us
www.directgardening.com


Agenda
Step      Minutes                                    Activity
   1            5       -Discuss any computer rules.
                        -List websites on the board as options of places students can
                        use to look up plants. Explain to the students they can use other
                        websites as long as they are appropriate.
  2            85       -Allow time for students to work in groups looking up plants.
  3            10       -Go over field trip plans to a local greenhouse for the next day.
                        -Have students make a list of the things they want to look for;
                        such as plants, edging and barriers.




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IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
Lesson 4                Field Trip
Time Estimate: 50 minutes            (may require more time for travel)
Objectives
1. Students will get information on plants and other resources they may use in their
plan.
Materials & Resources
• Paper
• Pen or pencil
• Greenhouse (willing to let students come for a field trip)
• Travel Arrangements


Agenda
Step       Minutes                                    Activity
   1           10       -Discuss expectations and inform students that they will need to
                        write down ideas of plants, edging and barrier they want to use.
                        -Travel to local greenhouse
  2            30       -Allow time for students to look at plants, edging and barriers at
                        the greenhouse.
                        -Meet with greenhouse staff and give students an opportunity
                        to ask the greenhouse staff questions.
  3            10       -Travel back to school and answer any questions the students
                        have about their project.




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IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
Lesson 5                Develop Design
Time Estimate: 50 minutes
Objectives
1. Students will research various resources to gain ideas for design.
2. Students will be able to take measurements and calculate the size of the area to
   be landscaped.
3. Student will compile all the information they have gathered and develop their
   design.
Materials & Resources
•       Handout 6, Worksheet for Plants and Measurements
•       Landscaping magazines and books
•       Tape Measure/measuring wheel
•       Copies of Blueprint
•       Graph paper


Agenda
Step        Minutes                                Activity
    1           10      -Discuss expectations-have students compile all the information
                        they have gained from the greenhouse trip and computer labs.
                        -If students need more ideas, suggest magazines, etc.
    2           45      -Discuss tape measure safety, construction safety and review
                        places they will be measuring.
                        -Allow time for students to go the area and take measurements.
                        (They should measure each side.)
    3           45      -Distribute Handout 6, Worksheet for Plants and
                        Measurements.
                        -Working in groups, students are to determine where the plants
                        will go on the blueprints.
                        -Summarize plans by completing Handout 6.
    4           45      -Complete design for presentation on blueprint or sketch on
                        graph paper.




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IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
                                                          Handout 6 for Lesson 5
                                                          Native Landscaping

                      Worksheet for Plants and Measurements


Plants chosen for the west side of the new building:
Name                How Many                    Source




Plants chosen for the south side of the new building:
Name                How Many                    Source




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IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
Plants chosen for the east side of the new building:
Name                How Many                    Source




Amount of area to be covered by grass seed: ___________________


Edging
Type                     Size                 Source




Barrier (rock/mulch)
Type/Color           Size                     Source




Additional items (benches, ponds, etc.)
Item                Source




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IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
    Lesson 6              Researching, Preparing and Presenting the
                          Presentation
    Time Estimate: 150 minutes or 3 class periods

    Objectives
     1. Students will determine costs for their design.
    2. Students will prepare and deliver a PowerPoint presentation.
    Materials & Resources
    •       Handout 1 from Lesson 1
    •       Handout 7, Group Work Rubric
    •       Computer with internet access and presentation software
    Agenda
    Step        Minutes                             Activity
        1            45    -Allow time for students to work in groups and research
                           and determine appropriate costs for the items in their
                           design.
                           -Have students prepare written document or spreadsheet
                           that itemizes all costs of the project.
        2            45    -Allow time for students to organize their data into a
                           PowerPoint presentation and to prepare their presentation.
        3            50    -Have each group give their presentation and answer
                           questions about their landscape design and costs.
        4            10    -Distribute Handout 7, Group Work Rubric and have
                           students evaluate themselves and their group members.




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IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
                                                                                           Handout 7 for Lesson 6
                                                                                           Native Landscaping


                                       Group Work Rubric
  Requirement          Attempted           Acceptable             Admirable             Awesome
                          0    1          2     3     4       5     6     7         8     9    10
                      -Seldom            -Sometimes           -Cooperative         -Always willing
                      cooperative        cooperative          -Did their part of   to help and do
                                         -Could have          the work             more
Contributions         -Did not do        done more            -Usually offered     -Did more than
                      any work           -Sometimes           useful ideas         others
                      -Rarely            offered useful                            -Routinely
                      offered useful     ideas                                     offered useful
                      ideas                                                        ideas
                          0        1      2     3     4        5     6     7        8     9    10
                      -Rarely listens    -Often listens to,   -Usually listens     -Always listens
                      to, shares         shares with, and     to, shares with,     to, shares with,
                      with, or           supports the         and supports the     and supports
Working               supports the       efforts of others.   efforts of others.   the efforts of
with others           efforts of         -Sometimes not       -Does not cause      others.
                      others.            a good team          problems in the      -Tries to keep
                      -Often is not a    member               group                people working
                      good team                                                    together.
                      member
                         0         1      2     3     4        5     6     7       8      9    10
                      -Does not          -Sometimes           -Focuses on the      -Almost always
                      focus on the       focuses on the       task and what        focused on the
                      task and what      task and what        needs to be          task and what
   Focus on           needs to be        needs to be          done most of the     needs to be
                      done.              done.                time.                done.
   the task           -Lets others       - Other group        -Group               -This person is
                      do the work.       members must         members can          very self-
                                         prod and remind      count on this        directed.
                                         to keep this         person.
                                         person on task.


Member being evaluated:
________________________________

Group members:
_______________________________________



Total Points: ______________



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IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
                                   Teacher


                      Assessment Materials




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IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
                                   FINAL EVALUATION

Problem Statement to be solved
Casey-Westfield High School’s 1947 edition was condemned in the spring of 2006.
A referendum in the district was passed in the spring of 2007 to build a new
addition to the high school. This new addition is currently under construction. The
school district purposely did not do any landscaping on the new high school building
so that they could get community input on the design. The Casey-Westfield School
District would like to contract with you to submit a landscape design with cost
analysis for implementation of the design.

Using internet searches, other CITED sources, and community resources you need,
prepare a design plan for the new addition’s landscaping. You are to present your
design to the Casey-Westfield Building Committee to be considered for
implementation.

Final Evaluation Criteria
1. The design was creative and used the space wisely.
2. The design included a variety of plants with other barriers, edging, etc. as
   needed.
3. A list of materials (plants, barriers, edging, etc.) was provided and cost
   projections were calculated correctly.
4. The presentation included visuals such as, the design and cost data.
5. The presentation met the 7 requirements of effective business presentations:
        Evidence of preparedness and practice
        Started on time
        Dressed appropriately
        Showed enthusiasm and confidence
        Maintained eye contact, showed friendliness and respect
        Spoke slowly and distinctly without grammatical errors or slang
        Welcomed questions and answered completely;
        Accepted reactions without being defensive.
        Met time requirements (not including question & answer session)




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IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
Final Evaluation Scoring Guide or Rubric: Two rubrics were used to evaluate.
One for the actual project design and the second for the presentation.



                            Rubric for Project Landscape Design
                                                                                               Exceeds
                             Poor                  Fair               Acceptable                                    Total
                                                                                              Acceptable
                              1                     2                     3                                         points
                                                                                                  4
                      The group was not    The group was        The group was           The group was
    Creativity        creative in doing    somewhat creative in creative in doing their extremely creative in
                      the project.         doing their project. project.                doing their project.
                                                                                  The group did an
                      The design was not The design was      The group did a good
      Design          completed.         somewhat completed. job on the design.
                                                                                  exceptional job on
                                                                                  their design.
                                                                   The group used all
                                                                                           The group used all
                                                                   the space but could
                      The group did not    The group somewhat                              the space with
                                                                   have made a better
  Use of Space        use all the space    used at least half of
                                                                   choice of some of the
                                                                                           appropriate plants,
                      available.           the space wisely.                               barriers, and edging
                                                                   plants, or other
                                                                                           for low maintenance.
                                                                   additions.
                                                                                           Students used a lot of
                                                                   Students used many      different plants and
                      Students used the Students used some         different plants and    placed them
      Variety         same type of plants different plants but     placed them to          strategically to
                      through.            lacked variety.          enhance                 enhance
                                                                   attractiveness.         attractiveness with
                                                                                           low maintenance.
                                                                                          The students
                                                                                          completed the cost
                                                                                          analysis with all
                      The students did     The students                                   calculations being
                                                                  The students
                      not complete the     completed the cost                             correct. The cost
                                                                  completed the cost
 Cost Analysis        cost analysis list   analysis but there was
                                                                  analysis with one or
                                                                                          was in line with other
                      with accurate        more than one error in                         projections even
                                                                  less calculation error.
                      computations.        the calculations.                              though they used a
                                                                                          variety of plants and
                                                                                          they provided for low
                                                                                          maintenance.

                                                                                             Total Points:




Native Landscaping                                                                                       27
IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
                                             Rubric for Student Presentations1

                           Poor                      Fair                Acceptable                   Exceeds
                                                                                                                         Points
                            1                         2                      3                           4
                  Audience cannot                                                             Student presents
                                            Audience has             Student presents
                  understand                                                                  information in logical,
                                            difficulty following     information in logical
Organization      presentation because                                                        interesting sequence
                                            presentation because     sequence which
                  there is no sequence                                                        which audience can
                                            student jumps around.    audience can follow.
                  of information.                                                             follow.
                                                                                             Student demonstrates
                                            Student is
                  Student does not have                              Student is at ease      full knowledge (more
                                            uncomfortable with
                  grasp of information;                              with expected           than required) by
  Subject                                   information and is
                  student cannot answer                              answers to all          answering all class
 Knowledge                                  able to answer only
                  questions about                                    questions, but fails to questions with
                                            rudimentary
                  subject.                                           elaborate.              explanations and
                                            questions.
                                                                                             elaboration.
                                            Student occasionally                              Student's graphics
                  Student uses                                       Student's graphics
                                            uses graphics that                                explain and reinforce
  Graphics        superfluous graphics
                                            rarely support text
                                                                     relate to text and
                                                                                              screen text and
                  or no graphics                                     presentation.
                                            and presentation.                                 presentation.
                  Font, size, and color                              Easy to read from all    Easy to read from all
                                            Hard to read, good
                  distract from                                      points but font, size    points in the room, good
 Creativity                                 use of font, size, and
                  presentation, hard to                              and color                use of font, size, and
                                            color
                  see                                                unimpressive             color
                  Student's
                                            Presentation has         Presentation has no
                  presentation has four                                                       Presentation has no
                                            three misspellings       more than two
 Mechanics        or more spelling
                                            and/or grammatical       misspellings and/or
                                                                                              misspellings or
                  errors and/or                                                               grammatical errors.
                                            errors.                  grammatical errors.
                  grammatical errors.
                                                                  Student maintains
                                            Student occasionally                              Student maintains eye
                  Student reads all of                            eye contact most of
                                            uses eye contact, but                             contact with audience,
Eye Contact       report with no eye                              the time but
                                            still reads most of                               seldom returning to
                  contact.                                        frequently returns to
                                            report.                                           notes.
                                                                  notes.
                                            Student's voice is       Student's voice is
                  Student mumbles,                                                            Student uses a clear
                                            low. Student             clear. Student
                  incorrectly pronounces                                                      voice and correct,
                                            incorrectly              pronounces most
    Oral          terms, and speaks too                                                       precise pronunciation of
                                            pronounces terms.        words correctly. Most
Communication     quietly for students in                                                     terms so that all
                                            Audience members         audience members
                  the back of class to                                                        audience members can
                                            have difficulty          can hear
                  hear.                                                                       hear presentation.
                                            hearing presentation.    presentation.

                                                                            TOTAL POINTS:                       ____

   1
    Adapted from Evaluating Student Presentations, Information Technology Evaluation Services, NC
   Department of Public Instruction


   Native Landscaping                                                                                         28
   IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
Examples of Acceptable Product are below:



                            Casey-Westfield High School
                                Landscaping Project


Plants chosen for the west side of the new building:
Name              How Many                Source

Centurion Crab        1                    Scotty’s
Pom Pom Juniper       2                    Scotty’s
Three Tier Juniper    1                    Scotty’s
Miscanthius Maiden Grass 1                 Scotty’s
Amada Pink Mum        12                   Scotty’s
Sundance Yellow Mum 12                     Scotty’s
Pansies               12                   Scotty’s
Japanese Maple        1                    Scotty’s
(Crimson Prime)
Knockout/Homerun Rose 1                    Scotty’s
Sedona Cobblers       15                   Scotty’s
California Poppy      1 pack               Garden Gate Magazine
Nioble Tree           1                    Scotty’s



Plants chosen for the south side of the new building:
Name              How Many                Source

Japanese Maple        2                    Scotty’s
(Crimson Prime)
Miscanthus Maiden Grass            1       Scotty’s
Clematis-purple       5                    www.directgardening.com
Tulip-Greenland       6                    www.directgardening.com
White Fringe Tree     1                    Garden Gate Magazine
Deadnettle            3                    Garden Gate Magazine
Sedona Cobblers       5                    Scotty’s




Native Landscaping                                                   29
IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
Plants chosen for the east side of the new building:
Name              How Many                Source

Redbud (2-3)                       2         www.directgardening.com
Clematis-purple                    2         www.directgardening.com
Trailing Gardenia                  12        www.directgardening.com
Tulip-Greenland                    4         www.directgardening.com
Water lily-white                   6         www.directgardening.com
Peony tree-white                   12        www.directgardening.com


Amount of area to be covered by grass seed: 162,277 ft2

Edging
Type                     Size                Source

Color Scape-pebbles                          Lowes
Brown Egg Rock                               Lowes
Decorative Stones                            Lowes



Barrier (rock/mulch)
Type/Color        Size                       Source

Nature’s Pride
Red colored Mulch                  20 bags   Lowes


Additional items (benches, ponds, etc.)
Item              Source
Macourt Aruba
50 Gallon              Lowes
Preformed Lawn Pond

Old castle Portage stone
Tan/Charcoal            Lowes




Native Landscaping                                                     30
IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
Native Landscaping                 31
IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
                       APPENDIX




Native Landscaping                 32
IL PBL Math Science Project 2009
                                   Glossary of Terms

Abiotic factors-are the nonliving parts of an ecosystem

Acid-is on the low end of the pH scale, less than 7

Annual-is a plant which lives for one growing season

Area-found by taking length x width

Base-is on the high end of the pH scale, more than 7

Biotic factors-are the living parts of an ecosystem

Exotic species-are species which are not natural to an area, they are brought in
and often become invasive

Native species-organisms which naturally belong to an ecosystem

Perennial-is a plant which survives for more than two years

pH scale-measures how basic or acidic a substance is, it ranges from 0-14

Plant zones-is a scale used to measure the hardiness of a plant




Native Landscaping                                                          33
IL PBL Math Science Project 2009

				
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