IB THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE by W7p21g

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									IB THEORY OF
 KNOWLEDGE
   An Overview
TOK COURSE
        Student as the knower
        Encourages critical
         thinking about knowledge
         itself
        Opportunity to step back
         from the relentless
         acquisition of new
         knowledge
        Encourages students to
         share ideas with others
        Understanding of
         knowledge as a human
         construct
                    AIMS
Designed to enable students to:
 develop a fascination with the richness of
  knowledge as a human endeavour, and an
  understanding of the empowerment that follows
  from reflecting upon it;
 develop an awareness of how knowledge is
  constructed, critically examined, evaluated and
  renewed by communities and individuals;
 encourage students to reflect on their
  experiences as learner, in everyday life and in
  the their studies, and to make connections
  between academic disciplines and between
  thoughts, feeling and actions;
            AIMS (continued)
   encourage an interest in the diversity of
    ways of thinking and ways of living of
    individuals and communities, and an
    awareness of personal and ideological
    assumptions, including participants’ own;
   encourage consideration of the
    responsibilities originating from the
    relationship between knowledge, the
    community and the individual as citizen of
    the world.
           REQUIREMENTS
    100 hours over two years.
    IB Final Assessment in Year 12:
1.   Oral Presentation on a contemporary
     issue chosen by the student: internally
     marked – 20 marks
2.   Essay chosen from an IB prescribed list
     of questions: externally marked – 40
     marks
WAYS OF KNOWING
        Sense
         perception
        Language

        Reason

        Emotion
SENSE PERCEPTION
           Nature of sense
            perception
           Limitations
           Influence of culture,
            language and beliefs
           Role in various areas
            of knowledge
                   LANGUAGE
   Nature of language
   Language and culture
   Language and thought
   Language and
    knowledge
   Language and areas of
    knowledge
   Does the language we
    use affect our
    understanding of the
    world or the past?
   How important are
    technical terms?
                   REASON
   Nature of reason
   Reason and
    knowledge
   Does all knowledge
    require some kind
    of rational basis?
   Strengths and
    weaknesses of
    reason
                        EMOTION
   Nature of emotion
   Can we ever know
    anything purely through
    emotions?
   How do emotions interact
    with reason, sense
    perception an language?
   Emotion and knowledge
   Does the role of emotion
    vary across the different
    areas of knowledge?
      AREAS OF KNOWLEDGE
   Mathematics
   Natural Sciences
   Human Sciences
   History
   The Arts
   Ethics
Mathematics
Natural Sciences
Human Sciences
History


   1.   Nature of History
   2.   Methods of Gaining
        Knowledge
   3.   History and
        Knowledge Claims
   4.   History and Values
The Arts
Ethics
          LINKING QUESTIONS
   Belief
   Certainty
   Culture
   Evidence
   Experience
   Explanation
   Interpretation
   Intuition
   Technology
   Truth
   Values
       KNOWLEDGE ISSUES,
    KNOWERS AND KNOWING
 Nature of knowing
 Knowledge communities
 Knowers and sources of
  knowledge
 Justification of knowledge claims
Theory of Knowledge: Presentation Structure

                                            Other Real-Life
                                              Situation
    Real-Life Situation

                                                          Other Real-Life
                                                            Situation
         extraction




    Knowledge Issue                     Knowledge Issue(s)
      (recognized)        progression      (developed)
          CLASS ACTIVITIES
   Class discussions, debates and seminars
   Student presentations and group activities
   Reading feature articles, texts, plays,
    novels and biography
   Guest speakers
   Videos
   Role play
   Reflective writing and the maintenance of
    an on-going journal
   Written exercises and essays
        TINTERN TOK CAMP
    Compulsory three day camp at the
     commencement of Term 1 each year.
    Aims :
1.   Provide for Year 11 students a general
     introduction to TOK;
2.   Complete a variety of sessions on a TOK
     Area of Knowledge;
3.   Focus Year 12 students on the
     assessment requirements;
4.   Promote close working relationships
     between all IB students.

								
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