Guidance For Preparing Timber Sale Proposal Checklist by HC120727023519

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									                      Michigan Department of Natural Resources & Environment - Forest Management Division

                                                      GUIDANCE FOR
                          PREPARING TIMBER SALE PROPOSAL CHECKLIST
                               Instructions for completing Timber Sale Proposal Checklist (R4031-6)


BACKGROUND INFORMATION:
The Timber Sale Proposal Checklist (R4031-6) was originally developed in 2005 when our State Forests were
being certified under the Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) and Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) standards.
It was developed in order to aid Department staff in conforming to forest certification requirements, visual
management guidelines, and other Department procedures and guidelines. The checklist is a significantly
expanded version of a Visual Management Checklist utilized between 1986 and 2005.

The checklist is a key component of our Department’s environmental review system. The checklist provides a
list of considerations and potential applications that can be applied in the design and implementation of
vegetative management activities. It aids in considering all relevant Department policies, procedures, forest
certification standards, and forest certification work instructions when preparing an area for sale. The checklist
needs to match the timber sale proposal for any given sale - that is the point of the checklist. It verifies that we
did what we said we were going to do during the compartment review process, and it documents that we have
adequately evaluated resource impacts. Keep in mind that the checklist also documents decisions for the
public and for external auditors.

The Department’s timber sale program is the primary mechanism for conducting the majority of proposed
forest treatments. Annually, about 700 timber sale contracts are issued statewide, generating millions of
dollars of revenue. Review and evaluation of the state forest timber sale program and related procedures and
practices was, and will continue to be, a major focus of forest certification audits.

It should be noted that to be certified, the Department must be in conformance with all SFI Performance
Measures and Indicators, and all FSC Criteria and Indicators. This involves roughly 265 separate indicators in
the two Standards. These various indicators are summarized and consolidated into the checklist for staff
consideration during timber sale preparation.

A REVIEW OF CHECKLIST ITEMS:
The current checklist is composed of questions from the Visual Management Checklist, plus additional items
related to policy, forest certification work instructions and SFI and FSC indicators.

In the following guidance, the numbered questions appearing on the checklist are followed by statements that
clarify the intent or purpose of the question. The statements include:

   Excerpts from the DNRE Visual Management Handbook (VMH), dated April, 1997.
   Excerpts from Forest Certification Work Instructions (WI).
   Excerpts form the SFI Standard, 2010-2014 version (displayed in boxed text).
   Excerpts from the FSC Standard, version 3.0 of the Lake States Regional Standard
    (displayed in boxed text).
   Excerpts from DNRE policy and/or procedure.
   “Notes” that address questions received from staff, that clarify policy or procedure, or that add clarity.

As mentioned above, the checklist is a key component of the Department’s system for evaluating impact to the
forest resource from site disturbing activity. We use the checklist to address the following forest certification
requirements:
    SFI 1.5: Documentation of forest practices (e.g., planting, fertilization, and thinning) consistent with assumptions
    in harvest plans.
    SFI 3.1.1: Program to implement state or provincial best management practices during all phases of
    management activities.

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    SFI 3.2.1: Program addressing management and protection of rivers, streams, lakes, and other water bodies
    and riparian zones.
    SFI 4.1: Program Participants shall have programs to promote biological diversity at stand and landscape levels.
    SFI 5.1.1: Program to address visual quality management.
    SFI 14.1: Program participants shall take appropriate steps to comply with applicable federal, provincial, state,
    or local forestry and related social and environmental laws and regulations.
    FSC 6.1: Assessments of environmental impacts shall be completed -- appropriate to the scale, intensity of
    forest management and the uniqueness of the affected resources -- and adequately integrated into management
    systems. Assessments shall include landscape level considerations, as well as the impacts of on-site
    processing facilities. Environmental impacts shall be assessed prior to commencement of site-disturbing
    operations.
    FSC 6.1.a: Using credible scientific analyses and local expertise, an assessment of current conditions is
    completed to include: Disturbance regimes and sussessional pathways; unique, vulnerable, rare, and threatened
    communities; common plants, animals, and their habitats; water resources; and soil resources (see also
    indicators 7.1.a and b).
    FSC 6.1.b: Using available science and local expertise, the current ecological conditions are compared to both
    the historical conditions and desired future conditions within the landscape context. This comparison is done by
    employing the baseline factors identified in 6.1.a.
    FSC 6.1.c: Prior to the commencement of management activities, potential short-term environmental impacts
    and their cumulative effects are evaluated.
    FSC 6.1.d: Using assessments derived from the above information, management options are developed and
    implemented to achieve the long-term desired future conditions and ecological functions of the forest (see also
    Criterion 7.1).
    FSC 7.1.f: Environmental safeguards based on environmental assessments (see also Criterion 6.1.)
    FSC 8.2.d.1: The environmental effects of site-disturbing activities are assessed (e.g., road construction and
    repair, harvesting, and site preparation).

Additionally, the checklist addresses the following forest certification work instructions:

   WI 7.1: Complete the Timber Sale Proposal Checklist which will indicate the sale conditions to include in
    the Timber Sale contract. Ensure timber sale specifications match forest inventory prescriptions.

   WI 3.1: Operations on the State Forests lands will protect: water-quality; rare, threatened, and endangered
    species; special (cultural, ecological, geological, and historic) sites; site productivity.

   WI 3.1: FMD, Fisheries, and Wildlife Divisions will review and approve all intrusive operations performed or
    permitted by any DNRE division on State Forest lands at appropriate level(s), and these approvals will be
    documented.




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CHECKLIST QUESTIONS

INFLUENCE ZONES:
1. Which influence zones apply to this sale?
   Note: Codes similar to the 1997 visual management checklist are used, and in addition, coding is similar to the
   influence zone codes in Operations Inventory (OI). Check all boxes that apply. A number can be inserted to
   indicate a priority for overlapping influence zones.

MANAGEMENT OBJECTIVE:
2. What is the Management Objective for this sale?
   Note: Coding is similar to that used in the 1997 Visual Management Checklist. Check the primary reason
   for proposing and conducting the sale, i.e. for timber management, wildlife management, development or
   maintenance of a recreation site, or other.

CERTIFIED LANDS:
3. Is the land within the sale treatment area certified?
   A July 1, 2009 memo from Lynne M. Boyd, Chief, Forest Management Division and Russ Mason, Ph.D.,
   Chief, Wildlife Division to FMD and WLD staff stated: “…In 2008, Director Rebecca A Humphries,
   Michigan DNR, affirmed that lands specified in the original documentation, with the exception of Luce
   County and military lease lands, are and will continue to be in scope as part of the state forest system…In
   terms of forest operations, this means that all lands which currently are inventoried under either the OI
   system or IFMAP system, are identified in a state forest compartment, and go through the compartment
   review process are included in the state forest system…”

   An October 23, 2009 memo from Lynne M. Boyd, Chief, Forest Management Division and Russ Mason,
   Ph.D., Chief, Wildlife Division to FMD and WLD staff stated: “…The attached outlines the current inventory
   list of all lands under the administration and/or management of Wildlife Division and further identifies
   whether or not they are considered to be in scope as part of the state forest system. A general rule of
   thumb for the northern areas identified is that they are considered to be "in scope" if they are currently
   inventoried under either the OI system or IFMAP system, are part of a forest compartment, and go through
   the compartment review process…”

   Note: The following DNRE properties are excluded from scope of forest certification:
       Lands under long-term military lease to the Michigan National Guard.
       Lands leased to Luce County.
       Land under the administration of WLD that is not inventoried under the OI or IFMAP systems, are
           not in a forest compartment, or do not go through compartment review (a list of these properties is
           available from the Forest Certification intranet website).
       Excised lands planted to GMO corn.
       State fish hatcheries.
       State Forest nurseries (intensive non-forest use).
       Administrative office and facilities.
   Note: If the land is not certified, the sale number must have a special format and contract specification 7.10.1
   should be used.

AESTHETICS:
   SFI 5.1: Program to address visual quality management.
   SFI 5.1.2: Incorporation of aesthetic considerations in harvesting, road, landing design and management,
   and other management activities where visual impacts are a concern.
   FSC 6.5.b: Visual and Aesthetic Considerations: Forest owners or managers limit and/or reduce negative
   impacts on visual quality caused by forest management operations.




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  NRC Policy 2207 regarding management of State Forests states the following:
      “The Department shall consider all the values of forest resources.”
      “The Department shall manage the total forest system under a management concept which will yield a
       combination of products, services and total values to meet the economic and environmental needs of
       present and future generations. All important products of forest resources – timber, fish and wildlife,
       minerals (including oil and gas), recreation, environmental, and aesthetic values – shall be given fair and
       equitable consideration.”

   WI 6.2: Recreational opportunities on State Forest lands are integrated with forest management programs.
   Ongoing communications with Forest Unit Managers and District Supervisors also assure recreational
   facility development, enhancements, or reductions are integrated and made compatible with forest
   operations. Public and tribal participation regarding recreational facilities is encouraged during the
   Compartment Review process and other meetings held in the State.

4. Is there a seasonal restriction that will reduce the visual impact?
   VMH: When the treatment occurs can be a factor. Public use of certain areas or trails is often seasonal
   and at such times can often be avoided. Cutting while leaves are on will result in more conspicuous slash.
   In some cases, it may be well to avoid the color season.

   Note: Sale specifications found in the standard template, section 5.2.3, can be utilized to restrict timing of
   cutting operations.

5. Are there special restrictions to manage visual impact from slash or equipment operation?

   FSC 6.5 b: Logging and Site Preparation: Plans for site preparation specify the following mitigations to
   minimize impacts to the forest resources: (1) Slash is concentrated only as much as necessary to achieve
   the goals of site preparation and the reduction of fuels to moderate or low levels of fire hazard...

   VMH Leaving Tops. The more “out-of-place” tops appear, the more they will irritate observers. This
   includes any time they are allowed to fall or remain outside the actual area of harvest, in openings, in
   wetlands, or in water. Confine them within the harvest boundary.
   VMH Slash. While potentially a good source of special habitats and nutrient restoration, slash is also
   perhaps the single most unnatural, contrasting, and disliked feature of cover treatment, especially near
   travel routes or accessible viewing areas. Where undesirable, options include full-tree utilization, burning,
   rolling chipper, lop and scatter, pulling back from public travel routes. Pine slash is particularly
   conspicuous; use methods (identified in previous sentence) to minimize.
   VMH Operation of Equipment. Similar concerns exist for logging equipment, when skid trails, collection or
   haul routes are permitted outside of the harvested area.

   Note: Timber sale contract general conditions and requirements have a standard specification (5.2) that all
   operations shall be confined to the sale area unless approved by the Unit Manager or their representative.

6. Is any part of this sale a clearcut? If “Yes”, then answer the following:
   a) Was the actual or apparent treatment area reduced?
       VMH: We can control both the actual size, or with strategically placed uncut areas, the perceived size
       of a clearcut. From the observer’s viewpoint, smaller is generally better. There are a number of ways
       to provide this.
          Where forest fragmentation is not an overriding concern, develop over time a variety of smaller age
           class units where an extensive, essentially even age stand now exists.
          Leave narrow uncut strips extending across or into long, large clearcuts.
   b) Was an irregular treatment boundary designed?
       VMH: Natural-appearing, curved cutting lines are much more appealing than straight lines.
   c) Were “leave trees” strategically located?
       VMH: Strategically located uncut “leave” trees soften the view, reduce apparent size, and add variety
       and appeal. “Leaves” can include strips, clumps, islands, protruding fingers, or individuals. Or, it may
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     be certain components of stands, resulting in alternating species management (such as oak/pine or
     aspen/fir). Multiple objectives can be served when “leaves” are mast trees, flowering trees or shrubs,
     snags, or picturesque specimens. Clumps left on hilltops or knolls can be especially effective. Where
     possible, “leave trees” should be vigorous and with branches extending to the ground.
     Note: The DNRE Within-Stand Retention Guidance, IC4140, helps address this issue.
d)   Were uncut buffers left?
     VMH: Large or small uncut buffers can be effective along travel routes or trails. Road curves or
     intersections are particularly sensitive.
     Note: The DNRE Within-Stand Retention Guidance, IC 4140, helps address this issue.
e)   Was the stand age class in the area staggered?
     VMH: Where acceptable, large stands can be broken into smaller staggered age classes in groups or
     strips. Frequently, one of the first cut units can buffer the next cut a decade or two later.
f)   Was a feathered look created?
     VMH: The contrast of a sharp cutting edge with tall mature trees on one side and nothing on the other
     can be softened by doing only partial cuts around the perimeter, or leaving scattered trees and clumps
     of varying size and species.
g)   Was the clearcut adapted for skyline considerations?
     VMH: Try to avoid creating conspicuous gaps in tree skylines. Be aware of clearcuts in hilly areas
     which may be visible from some distant vantage point. Soften bare ridgelines with leave trees.
h)   Is the area being converted to selective management?
     VMH: Where the species mix permits, consider converting from a clearcut to selective management.
     Note: When appropriate to achieve the management objective, can the species mix within the clearcut
     area be altered so that in the long-term the area can be converted to selective management.
i)   If Travel was selected in Question 1, was the area adapted for travel?
     FMD Policy and Procedures 251: Consideration of any cutting of timber adjoining a highway must
     include the value of the trees for aesthetic, snow and wind protection, wildlife benefits and recreational
     purposes. In certain areas and with some species, it may be desirable to permit no cutting or to permit
     removal of only marked trees, while in other areas all timber should be removed. All cuttings along
     township, county and state roads will conform to the Slash Disposal Law.
     Note: The Slash Disposal Law requires in the cut over area the disposal of all cutting, slash, and debris
     within 50 feet of the edge of the cleared right-of-way.
     VMH - Consider:
          (1) Relative merits of cutting on only one side vs. both sides of road at same time or alternating.
          (2) Feathering in the cutting edge to avoid the abrupt change.
          (3) Running outlying edge in and out from the road edge, either slightly, or in a “mushroom”
              fashion, see diagram 1:
          (4) Open scenic vistas.
          (5) Leaving certain species.




j)   Is this clearcut adjacent to another clearcut area where the trees are less than three (3) years old or less
     than five (5) feet high? If “Yes”, describe alternative methods to provide for visual quality on the site.
     (Alternatives can include leaving residual trees in new clearcut, if the adjacency requirements cannot be
     met.)
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        SFI 5.3.3: Trees in clearcut harvest areas are at least 3 years old or 5 feet high at the desired level of
        stocking before adjacent areas are clearcut, or as appropriate to address operational and economic
        considerations, alternative methods to reach the performance measure are utilized by the Program
        Participant.

        FMD Policy and Procedures 251: Expanding existing clearcut areas with subsequent cuttings will be
        avoided until satisfactory stocking of desired trees is present in the existing clearcut area.

   k)   Is the clearcut greater than 100 contiguous acres? If “Yes”, enter justification in the Comments/
        Narrative section on page 5.
        SFI 5.2.1: Average size of clearcut harvest areas does not exceed 120 acres, except when necessary
        to meet regulatory requirements or to respond to forest health emergencies or other natural
        catastrophes.

        FMD Policy and Procedures 251: Clearcutting shall be limited to 100 contiguous acres. When larger
        areas are deemed desirable, a letter of justification for the larger area shall be attached to the timber
        sale proposal to be submitted to the Division Office through channels for approval.

        Note: FMD Policy and Procedures 251 is satisfied if the Timber Sale Proposal Checklist includes
        appropriate justification for the sale to exceed 100 contiguous acres.

7. Is this sale, or any part of this sale, classified as a plantation or pine-dominant type? If “Yes”, then answer
   the following:
   a) Was diversity of the area enhanced?
        VMH: Where possible, design to avoid large contiguous expanses of same-age pine. Vary densities
        and alignments. Include small openings, patches of hardwood, shrubs or picturesque trees.
   b) Were thinning adaptations used?
        VMH: Avoid carrying row thinnings all the way out to roads, or offset the last few trees, at row ends.
        Avoid cutting trees on plantation edges which are the only ones with branches and needles down to the
        ground.
   c) Were special landing locations designed?
        VMH: Where possible, use the interior of the pine stand, or use as opportunity to create attractive
        grassy opening along monotonous plantation edge.
   d) Was the “ARM” harvest system used?
        VMH: Consider Boise Cascade’s “ARM” system. Uncut strips of several rows are left at intervals
        parallel to the road, creating the perception of a “light” forest running off into the distance. These can
        be cut after reforestation has progressed.
   e) If Travel was selected in Question 1, was selective harvesting used adjacent to the road?
        VMH: Selectively harvest the strip adjacent to the road to create a more ragged and natural edge.
        Note: When appropriate to achieve the management objective, then this can be considered.
   f) Was the pine/hardwood edge contrast softened?
        VMH: Soften the contrast where pine meets other types.
   g) Were stumps cut lower than the General Specifications?
        VMH: Cut stumps as low as possible.
   h) Were uncut islands left?
        VMH: Leave small uncut islands of pine when doing final cut. Sacrifice or salvage later.

8. Are any recreation sites such as trails, pathways, or campgrounds affected by the sale? If “Yes”, then
   answer the following:
   a) Was an uncut buffer left?
      VMH: Large or small uncut buffers can be effective along travel routes or trails. Road curves or
      intersections are particularly sensitive.
   b) Was the area next to the site converted to a selectively managed type?
      FMD Policy and Procedures 251: The zone of 100 to 330 feet around campgrounds, picnic areas and
      water access sites will be managed to enhance these areas. The policy is that generally only marked
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     trees shall be cut in this zone. Cutting plans will be reviewed by a representative of the Division's
     Recreation and Trails Section.
     VMH: Where the species mix permits, consider converting from a clearcut to selective management.
     Note: Policy 251 requires that cutting plans (either inventory prescriptions and/or timber sale
     proposals) which affect recreational sites or infrastructure must be reviewed by a representative of the
     FMD Recreation and Trails Section.
  c) Were clumps or strips of trees left to reduce visibility?
     VMH: Strategically located uncut “leave trees” soften the view, reduce apparent size, and add variety
     and appeal. “Leaves” can include strips, clumps, islands, protruding fingers, or individuals. Or, it may
     be certain components of stands, resulting in alternating species management (such as oak/pine or
     aspen/fir). Multiple objectives can be served when “leaves” are mast trees, flowering trees or shrubs,
     snags, or picturesque specimens. Clumps left on hilltops or knolls can be especially effective. Where
     possible, “leave trees” should be vigorous and with branches extending to the ground.
     Note: The DNRE Within-Stand Retention Guidance, IC 4140, helps address this issue.
  d) Was a trail or pathway rerouted to a better location? (Use spec 5.2.42 for snowmobile trails)
     VMH: …along particularly sensitive recreational trails…one approach is rerouting to better locations…
  e) Was only one side of the site treated per entry year?
     FMD Policy and Procedures 251: Before cutting any timber within 100 feet of a trail, one must consider
     effects of tree removal from the aesthetic and recreational standpoint. Fallen trees or logging debris
     shall not be left on the trail. In many situations, it will be desirable to cut on one side of the trail only,
     reserving the other side until stand regeneration has occurred. Cutting plans will be reviewed by a
     representative of the Division's Recreation and Trails Section.
     VMH: Consider the relative merits of cutting on only one side vs. both sides of road at the same time or
     alternating.
     Note: Policy 251 requires that cutting plans (either inventory prescriptions and/or timber sale
     proposals) which affect recreational sites or infrastructure must be reviewed by a representative of the
     FMD Recreation and Trails Section.
  f) Does the contract require slash to be reduced or treated?
     VMH: Lop or pull back slash.
     VMH: Leaving Tops. The more “out-of-place” tops appear, the more they will irritate observers. This
     includes any time they are allowed to fall or remain outside the actual area of harvest, in openings, in
     wetlands, or in water. Confine them within the harvest boundary.
     VMH: Slash. While potentially a good source of special habitats and nutrient restoration, slash is also
     perhaps the single most unnatural, contrasting, and disliked feature of cover treatment, especially near
     travel routes or accessible viewing areas. Where undesirable, options include full-tree utilization,
     burning, rolling chipper, lop and scatter, pulling back from public travel routes.
COMMUNITY RELATIONS:
  SFI 14.1: Program Participants shall take appropriate steps to comply with applicable federal, provincial,
  state and local forestry and related social and environmental laws and regulations.
  SFI 18.1.2: Appropriate contact with local stakeholders over forest management issues through state,
  provincial, federal or independent collaboration.
  FSC 1.1.c: Forest management plans and operations meet or exceed all applicable laws and administrative
  requirements with respect to sharing public information, opening records to the public, and following
  procedures for public participation.
  FSC 1.1.a: Forest management plans and operations comply with applicable federal, state, county, tribal,
  and municipal laws, rules, and regulations.
  FSC 1.3.a: Forest management operations comply with all binding treaties or other agreements to which
  the U.S. is a party, including treaties with American Indian tribes.
  FSC 2.3.a: The forest owner or manager maintains relations with community stakeholders to identify
  disputes while still in their early stages. If disputes arise, the forest owner or manager initially attempts to
  resolve them through open communication, negotiation, and/or mediation. If negotiation fails, existing
  local, state, federal, and tribal laws are employed to resolve claims of land tenure.



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9. Were sale boundaries clearly identified on maps and on the ground?

   FSC 1.5.a: Forest owners or managers implement measures to prevent illegal and unauthorized activities
   in the forest.
   FSC 2.1.b: Affected land boundaries are clearly identified on the ground by the forest owner or manager
   prior to commencement of management activities.

   WI 7.2: Forest ownership boundaries are to be clearly established before any timber harvesting or other
   management activity is conducted adjacent to neighboring owners.
   FMD Policy and Procedures 251: Tree marking paint will be used to mark boundaries of sale areas.
   Ribbon lines are not acceptable.

10. Were neighbors notified of DNRE’s intent to harvest adjacent to their property?

   FSC 4.4.c: Viewpoints and feedback are solicited from people and groups directly affected by forest
   management operations and its associated environmental and aesthetic effects (e.g., logging, burning,
   spraying, and traffic). Significant concerns are addressed in management policies and plans.
   FSC 4.4.d: Forest owners or managers of large and mid-sized forests provide opportunities for people
   directly affected by management operations to provide input into management planning.
   FSC 4.4.e.3: Public notification is sufficient to allow interested citizens of the affected jurisdiction and/or
   other people and groups directly affected by management operations the chance to learn of upcoming
   opportunities for public review and/or comment on the proposed management.

   WI1.5: NRC Policy 1005 (Public Involvement in Activities of the Department) assures social impact
   considerations through public involvement processes. The general policy begins with: “Citizen participation
   and interest in the activities of the Department shall be encouraged in all possible ways. Attention to citizen
   questions, inquiries, complaints, and requests shall be considered a principal duty by employees at all levels.”

   Note: The question is asking whether there is private property next to or near the timber sale, and if so,
   was an effort made to contact the property owners?
   Note: This question is not intended to imply that staff MUST contact neighboring landowners, but when
   staff determine it is desirable to do and if it is done, then it should be noted on the checklist.

11. Which of the following applies to this sale? Check one.
    a) Access may be through private land.
    b) Access may be through other public land.
    c) Access may be through state forest land.
    d) Access may be through private or other public land.
    e) Access may be through private or state forest land.
    f) Access may be through other public or state forest land.
    g) Access may be through private, other public, or state forest land.

   FSC 1.5.a: Forest owners or managers implement measures to prevent illegal and unauthorized activities
   in the forest.
   Note: If the Department does not have permission to cross private property, then it is good business
   practice to inform a potential purchaser that it is their responsibility to acquire permission to cross private
   property.
   Note: If access across private property is necessary, a contract specification may be needed to inform
   bidders and the contract holder of who will obtain permission to cross private property.

12. Are there any known Tribal resources affected by this sale? [Note: tribal resources may include adjacent
    lands, bodies of water, critical habitats, and riparian corridors, as well as other resource uses such as rights
    to hunt, fish, or gather.] If “Yes”, enter comment.

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   SFI 6.1.1: Use of information such as existing natural heritage data, expert advice or stakeholder
   consultation in identifying or selecting sites for protection.
   SFI 18.2: Program Participants with forest management responsibilities on public lands shall confer with
   affected indigenous peoples.
   SFI 18.2.1: Program that includes communicating with affected indigenous peoples to enable Program
   Participants to a. understand and respect traditional forest related knowledge; b. identify and protect
   spiritually, historically, or culturally important sites; and c. address the sustainable use of non-timber forest
   products of value to indigenous peoples in areas where Program Participants have management
   responsibilities on public lands.
   FSC 1.3.a: Forest management operations comply with all binding treaties or other agreements to which
   the U.S. is a party, including treaties with American Indian tribes.
   FSC 2.2.b: On ownerships where customary use rights or traditional and cultural areas/sites exist, forest
   owners or managers consult with concerned groups in the planning and implementation of forest
   management activities.
   FSC 3.2.b: Steps are taken during the forest management planning process and implementation to protect
   tribal resources that may be directly affected by certified operations such as adjacent lands, bodies of
   water, critical habitats, and riparian corridors, as well as other resource uses such as rights to hunt, fish, or
   gather.
   FSC 3.3.a: Forest owners or managers make systematic efforts to identify areas of cultural, historical,
   and/or religious significance. They invite participation of tribal representatives (or other appropriate
   persons, where tribal entities are lacking) in the identification of current or traditionally significant sites
   within the forest proposed for certification.
   FSC 3.3.b: Forest owners and managers consult with tribal leaders (or other appropriate persons, where
   tribal entities are lacking) to develop mechanisms that ensure forest management operations protect from
   damage or interference those areas described in FSC 3.3.a. and incorporate these special places into
   forest management and operational plans.
   FSC 3.4.a: Forest owners or managers respect the confidentiality of tribal knowledge and assist in the
   protection of tribal intellectual property rights.

   WI 9.1: The 12 federally recognized Michigan Tribes will be invited to DNRE FMU open houses, and will
   be notified of Compartment Reviews. The FMD Unit Managers will be responsible for appropriate written
   notifications.

   WI 9.1: The Office of the State Archeologist (OSA) shall be notified of all Compartment Review plans and
   of other Department undertakings that may affect tribal sites of historical significance. Prior to initiating
   active management activities, DNRE management staff shall check the OSA electronic database
   (Archeological Concerns) to determine if locations involve sites of historical significance such as tribal
   religious, cultural or historical sites. The OSA maintains an extensive and regularly updated inventory of
   such sites. Sites of known historic or archaeological significance should be treated in accordance with
   recommendations of the Department of State's Michigan Historical Center.

13. Does the sale involve undivided interest parcels? If “Yes”, have all interested parties been informed?
   FSC 4.4.a: On lands with multiple owners, a process is provided that assures the opportunity for fair and
   reasonable input from the landowners and/or shareholders.
   Note: Undivided interest parcels are lands where multiple owners each have a dead to the same parcel of
   land. One owner may own 3/5, another 1/10 and another 3/10. This occurrence is uncommon in most of
   the State, except in the Crystal Falls area.

   FMD Policy and Procedures 251: In order to remove timber from lands in which the State owns an
   undivided interest, all owners must be in agreement. The Forest Management Division will administer the
   removal at no cost to the other owners and receipts will be divided among the owners according to their
   respective proportions of ownership.


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UNIQUE RESOURCES:
14. Are there any known or potential occurrences of special concern, threatened, or endangered species that
    may be affected by the sale? Note that specs 5.8.1, 5.8.3, 5.8.4, and 5.8.7 are to protect potential
    occurrences. If “Yes”, answer a) and b).
       a) Was the occurrence known and reviewed at Compartment Review?
           If “Yes”, follow recommendations.
       b) Is this a new occurrence that was not known at Compartment Review?
           If “Yes”, was the occurrence reported to the Statewide Endangered Species Coordinator, and was
           proposed management action developed in collaboration with other divisions?
     SFI 4.1.2: Program to protect threatened and endangered species.
     SFI 4.1.3: Program to locate and protect known sites associated with viable occurrences of critically
     imperiled and imperiled species and communities also known as Forests with Exceptional Conservation
     Value. Plans for protection may be developed independently or collaboratively, and may include Program
     Participant management, cooperation with other stakeholders, or use of easements, conservation land
     sales, exchanges, or other conservation strategies.
     SFI 4.2.1: Collection of information on Forests with Exceptional Conservation Value and other
     biodiversity-related data through forest inventory processes, mapping or participation in external
     programs, such as NatureServe, state or provincial heritage programs, or other credible systems. Such
     participation may include providing non-proprietary scientific information, time, and assistance by staff, or
     in-kind or direct financial support.
     FSC 6.2.a: Although species that are state and/or federally listed as threatened, endangered, of special
     concern, or sensitive, and their habitats are identified, their specific locations remain confidential.
     FSC 6.2.b: If scientific data indicate the likely presence of state and/or federally listed as threatened,
     endangered, of special concern, or sensitive populations, either new surveys are carried out before field-
     management activities begin or the forest owner or manager assumes their presence and makes
     appropriate modifications in forest management.
     FSC 6.2.e: If a state and/or federally listed as threatened, endangered, or special concern, or sensitive
     species is determined to be present, its location is reported to the manager of the species’ database.

   Note: If a new occurrence is discovered, it should be reported to the Endangered Species Coordinator
   (ESC) who will ensure the new occurrence is recorded into the MNFI data base. The reporting can be
   done either by FMD staff or by staff from other divisions, but the initiating division (normally FMD) has a
   responsibility to confirm that the occurrence was reported. This reporting will also allow the ESC to
   determine whether the occurrence merits his/her direct involvement.

   The other part of the issue is that management actions should be coordinated with other divisions. The
   ESC does not need to be involved, unless there is conflict, potential conflict, or if more qualified opinion or
   assistance is needed. Very often coordination will be between the WLD biologist and FMD forester or
   manager, and this will satisfy requirements for collaboration in the majority of cases.

   WI 1.4: Prior to the initiation of field inventory, determine if area contains occupied habitat for threatened,
   endangered, or special concern species (plants and animals), or Species of Greatest Conservation Need
   (SGCN) (animals, fish). Reference the Michigan DNRE Approach to the Protection of Rare Species and
   Rare Species Assessment Guidelines for DNRE Staff on State Forest Lands (IC 4172).




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WI 3.1: Species & ecological site protection: Most forest operations are reviewed by the Natural Heritage
Unit of Wildlife Division or MNFI as a matter of course. For forest operations that are not reviewed by the
Natural Heritage Unit or MNFI, the operating division will have the lead responsibility including coordination
with the DNRE ESC for the protection of rare, threatened, and endangered species and special ecological
sites, and will document the potential impacts as part of the operations approval process.

CONSERVATION AREA MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES (IC 4450):
  Legal Requirements: Threatened and Endangered species are protected by federal and state
  endangered species laws (Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended: 16 U.S.C. §§ 1531–1544;
  Michigan Endangered Species Protection Law: Part 365, P.A. 451, 1994 as amended). Any activity on
  state forestland that may take* a T or E species must be coordinated with the DNRE Endangered
  Species Coordinator. Permits are required for any activity that results in the take of a T or E species.
  Permits may be issued only for scientific, zoological, or educational purposes, or for propagation in
  captivity to ensure survival of a species. The DNRE Endangered Species Program coordinates permit
  requirements for federally listed species with the US Fish and Wildlife Service.
       “Take” means, in reference to fish and wildlife, to harass, harm, pursue, hunt, shoot, wound, kill,
        trap, capture, collect, or attempt to engage in any such conduct. “Take” means, in reference to
        plants, to collect, pick, cut, dig up, or destroy in any manner. (MCL 324.36501)
   Protection and Management:
   i. The objective in all cases is to avoid the taking of T & E listed species.
   ii. Special Concern and Candidate Conservation species, when and where possible, should be treated
   with similar management consideration as Threatened and Endangered species.
   iii. Protection, maintenance, and/or enhancement of species health and habitat are key objectives.
   iv. Conflicts, or potential conflicts, between species should be referred to the DNRE Endangered
   Species Program Coordinator for assistance.
   v. Data on specific locations of Threatened and Endangered species must not be shared with anyone
   outside the DNRE without express approval of the DNRE ESC. All comments regarding E/T species
   for Compartment Review should be placed in “locked comments” in the Operations Inventory database.
   vi. If there is a probability of a listed plant or animal being in or near a proposed forest treatment, a field
   survey may be necessary. Requests for additional survey work should be forwarded through the Forest
   Management Unit Manager to the Forest Resource Management Section Manager.

STATE FOREST LAND RESOURCE ASSESSMENT ACTIVITIES PROCEDURE CHECKLIST (IC4123):
   Check the Michigan Natural Features Inventory (MNFI) database for rare species. (Remember, if this
   database does not indicate an element occurrence, it may only mean that no rare species have been
   documented to date. It does not necessarily mean there are no rare species present in the area.)

Use the “Michigan DNRE Approach to the Protection of Rare Species” Guidance document (IC4172) for
determining whether rare species are present.
   In summary:
        Check the Michigan Natural Features Inventory (MNFI) database for potential areas of concern,
          but also consider potential habitat, local knowledge, and references. – (see Documentation
          Checklist in Guidance Document)
        Review listed species biology and habitat needs.
        Determine if there are potential impacts to rare species.
        Request technical assistance as needed.
        Review any concerns with the Michigan DNRE’s Endangered Species Coordinator as needed.
        Request special surveys where staff has determined there is a high likelihood of finding a rare
          species within a proposed treatment area. – Utilize process for requesting a Rare Species
          Survey in Guidance document (IC4172).
Note: Forms for reporting T&E species to MNFI are on the web at:
            http://web4.msue.msu.edu/mnfi/contact/surveyforms.cfm



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15. Is there a SPECIAL CONSERVATION AREA or other ecologically unique feature in or adjacent to the sale
    area? If “Yes”, enter a comment describing the feature.
   SFI 6.1: Program Participants shall identify special sites and manage them in a manner appropriate for
   their unique features.
   SFI 6.1.1: Use of information such as existing natural heritage data, expert advice or stakeholder
   consultation in identifying or selecting sites for protection
   SFI 6.1.2: Appropriate mapping, cataloging and management of identified special sites.
   FSC 6.1.d: Using assessments derived from the above information, management options are developed
   and implemented to achieve the long-term desired future conditions and ecological functions of the forest.
   FSC 6.4.a: Forest owners and managers protect and reserve ecologically viable representative areas that
   are appropriate to the scale and intensity of the operation.
   FSC 9.3.a: Forest management plans and activities are appropriate for maintaining, enhancing, and/or
   restoring attributes that make an area an HCVF.
   FSC 9.3.b: Active management in HCVFs is allowed only when it maintains or enhances high conservation
   values.
   WI 1.4: Special Conservation Areas (SCAs) are areas of state forest land that have had one or more
   conservation objectives, interests, or elements identified. Conservation objectives listed in the SCA
   category have been identified through a variety of methods and mechanisms, and it is important to
   understand how the objective was determined.

   WI 1.4: Identified SCAs, HCVAs and ERAs will be managed to conserve, protect, maintain, and/or enhance
   their defined conservation objectives or values. The management methods used will vary depending on
   the objective and type of designation.

   Note: SCAs include, but are not limited to, High Conservation Value Areas, Ecological Reference Areas,
   and Biodiversity Stewardship Areas.
   Note: “other ecologically unique features” may include small isolated features that are not identified as a
   SCA.

16. Are there any geologically unique features in or adjacent to the sale area? If “Yes”, enter a comment
    describing the feature.
   SFI 6.1.1: Use of information such as existing natural heritage data, expert advice or stakeholder
   consultation in identifying or selecting sites for protection.

   WI 3.1: Operations on the State Forests lands will protect: …special (cultural, ecological, geological, and
   historic) sites…”

   WI 3.1: The State Historic Preservation Office of the Department of History, Arts, and Libraries is the State
   authority for identifying and protecting cultural, geological, and historic sites. For forest operations that are
   not reviewed by the State Historic Preservation Office of the Department of History, Arts, and Libraries, the
   operating division will take the lead in ensuring the protection of these as part of the operations approval
   process…
   Note: This work instruction is currently under revision. The Office of the State Archeologist is the State
   authority for protecting archeological, cultural, and historic sites. The "Archeological Concerns" database
   can be consulted to identify locations of sites of potential concern.

17. Are there any historically or culturally significant features in or adjacent to the sale area? If “Yes”, enter a
    comment describing the feature. (General spec 5.7 also protects historic sites)
   SFI 6.1.1: Use of existing information such as natural heritage data, expert advice or stakeholder
   consultation in identifying or selecting sites for protection.



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   FSC 4.4.b: Input is sought in identifying significant sites of archeological, cultural, historical, or community
   importance, that are to be designated as special management zones or otherwise protected during
   operations.
   FMD Policy and Procedures 251: Sites of known historic or archaeological significance should be treated
   in accordance with recommendations of the Department of State's Michigan Historical Center.
   WI 3.1: Operations on the State Forests lands will protect: …special (cultural, ecological, geological, and
   historic) sites…”
   WI 3.1: The State Historic Preservation Office of the Department of History, Arts, and Libraries is the State
   authority for identifying and protecting cultural, geological, and historic sites. For forest operations that are
   not reviewed by the State Historic Preservation Office of the Department of History, Arts, and Libraries, the
   operating division will take the lead in ensuring the protection of these as part of the operations approval
   process…
   Note: This work instruction is currently under revision. The Office of the State Archeologist is the State
   authority for protecting archeological, cultural, and historic sites. The "Archeological Concerns" database
   can be consulted to identify locations of sites of potential concern.
18. Does the sale area contain stand level habitat elements that need to be protected during harvest, i.e.,
    snags, den trees, coarse woody debris, large over-mature trees?
   SFI 4.1.1: Program to promote the conservation of native biological diversity, including species, wildlife
   habitats, and ecological community types.
   SFI 4.1.4: Development and implementation of criteria, as guided by regionally appropriate best scientific
   information, to retain stand-level wildlife habitat elements such as snags, stumps, mast trees, down woody
   debris, den trees, nest trees.
   FSC 5.3.a: Adequate quantities and a diversity of size classes of woody debris (considered a reinvestment
   of biological capital under this criterion – not an economic waste) are left on the forest floor to maintain
   ecosystem functions, wildlife habitats, and future forest productivity.
   FSC 6.3.c.1: Biological legacies of the forest community are retained at the forest and stand levels,
   consistent with the objectives of the management plan, including but not limited to: large live and declining
   trees, coarse dead wood, logs, snags, den trees, and soil organic matter.
   WI 1.4: Determine how proposed management action may impact the area and identify specific elements
   that protect, maintain or enhance biodiversity, e.g. snags, coarse wood debris, edge, perches.
   See “Within Stand Retention Guidance”, IC 4110.

FOREST HEALTH AND REGENERATION:
   SFI 2.4: Program Participants shall manage so as to protect forests from damaging agents, such as
   environmentally or economically undesirable wildfire, pests, and diseases, and invasive exotic plants and
   animals, to maintain and improve long-term forest health, productivity and economic viability.
   SFI 2.4.1: Program to protect forests from damaging agents.
   SFI 2.4.2: Management to promote healthy and productive forest conditions to minimize susceptibility to
   damaging agents.
   SFI 2.4.3: Participation in, and support of, fire and pest prevention and control programs.

19. Will slash be distributed uniformly across the site, removed from sale or chipped? If “No”, enter justification
    comment for concentrating slash. [Note: site preparation, fuel reduction and creating small piles for rabbit
    habitat are acceptable reasons to concentrate slash.]
   SFI 7.1.b: Program or monitoring system to ensure efficient utilization, which may include provisions to
   ensure a. management of harvest residue (e.g. slash, limbs, tops) considers economic, social, and
   environmental factors (e.g. organic and nutrient value to future forests) and other utilization needs; b)
   training or incentives to encourage loggers to enhance utilization;
   FSC 6.5.b.2: Slash is concentrated only as much as necessary to achieve the goals of site preparation and
   the reduction of fuels to moderate or low levels of fire hazard.
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                                                                                                    IC4031-6 (04/28/2010)
   FMD Policy and Procedures 251: Slash Disposal
   In general, on State forest lands not adjoining a public road, the slash may be left as it falls except no slash
   is to be left hanging in standing trees. However, in accordance with (Part 519 of Act 451, PA 1994) all
   slash resulting from a State forest timber cutting operation shall be removed for a distance of 50 feet from
   edge of the cleared portion of a public road right-of-way. “Public roads” are city streets, County roads and
   State trunk lines. All roads crossing State forestlands are open to the public, but are not necessarily
   "public roads."…The Unit should prescribe additional slash removal specifications whenever conditions
   warrant such as on landing areas, on lands adjoining certain trail roads, and in high hazard fuel types.

   Michigan Woody Biomass Harvesting Guidance, IC 4069: “…Where practical, residues should be returned
   to the harvest area and dispersed rather than accumulated”.

20. Does the sale contain a regeneration harvest? If “Yes”, answer 20a) and 20b)
    a) Does the sale involve difficult to regenerate species?

   SFI 2.1.2: Reforestation, unless delayed for site-specific environmental or forest health considerations or
   legal requirements, through planting within two years or two planting seasons, or by planned natural
   regeneration methods within five years.
   FSC 6.3.a.3: Measures are taken to ensure the retention of endemic and difficult-to-regenerate species.
   WI 2.1: Reforestation of difficult to regenerate stands or endemic species will be a consideration when a
   stand is prescribed for harvest. Stand examiners need to make comments in the narrative section of
   Operations Inventory (OI) or in IFMAP in the Treatments database (Next Steps comment field) reflecting an
   acceptable species mix should the stand not regenerate to the management objective and this must be
   agreed to at compartment review. If type conversion occurs without this pre-approval, after-the-fact
   approval is acceptable. Stands that can not be regenerated to the desired management objective or
   approved alternative will not have a regeneration harvest prescribed.

   b) Is desirable advanced regeneration present and protected from damage?
   SFI 2.1.5: Protection of desirable or planned advanced natural regeneration during harvest
   FSC 5.3.c: Harvest practices minimize residual stand damage. For example: …Provisions that define
   acceptable levels of residual damage are included in operational contracts…Bumper trees are utilized and
   equipment is selected and used in a way that minimizes unintentional damage to residual trees.
   FSC 6.5.b: Logging and Site Preparation – Logging damage to regeneration and residual trees is
   minimized during harvest operations.
   WI 2.1: When desirable advanced regeneration is present within a stand, comments should be included in
   OI or IFMAP that will lead to the inclusion of relevant timber sale contract specifications and the retention of
   this regeneration. Management guides and FMD Reforestation policy should be consulted in these regards
   as needed.

   Note: Contract specifications can be included to protect advanced regeneration. For example, requiring no
   more than a percentage of seedlings and/or saplings to be damaged by logging operations or excluding or
   leaving patches of advanced regeneration.

21. Are there any fire or forest health risks in the sale area that required attention?
    (Note that 5.2.1 Slash and 6.1 General Industry Safety Standards also cover this issue.)
    a) If “Yes”, are these addressed?
   SFI 2.2.4: Use of integrated pest management where feasible.
   SFI 2.4.2: Management to promote healthy and productive forest conditions to minimize susceptibility to
   damaging agents.
   SFI 4.1.7: Participation in programs and demonstration of activities as appropriate to limit the introduction,
   impact, and spread of invasive exotic plants and animals that directly threaten or are likely to threaten
   native plant and animal communities.

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   FSC 6.9.d. Forest owners or managers develop and implement control measures for invasive exotic species.

   WI 2.3: 1) Responses to specific forest health issues like gypsy moth, emerald ash borer, and oak wilt are
   managed by the Forest Management Unit with technical direction and advice from the Forest Health
   Management Program Leader in cooperation with the Forest Health Monitoring Program Leader, USDA-
   FS, Michigan Department of Agriculture, other state, and federal agencies as needed. 2) Fire protection
   and management is accomplished under the FMD Protection Program area including wildfire suppression,
   prescribed burning, and assistance to local fire departments. 3) Insects and disease. The following
   silvicultural guidelines to reduce timber losses to insect and disease using non-chemical methods are
   derived from a combination of forest health research, common practice, Timber Sale specs (VMS, 2005)
   and silvicultural guidelines addressing a range of forest health issues…

   WI 2.3: Consideration should be given to the potential spread or increase of invasive exotic species in the
   planning and operational stages of all treatments. FMD Forest health specialists will provide direction and
   advice to the FMUs in regard to control of invasive exotic species.
   Note: This question also asks reviewers to determine whether leaving residual trees has an adverse impact
   on future regeneration (for example, jack pine budworm issues).

WATER QUALITY AND SITE PRODUCTIVITY:
   SFI 2.3.6: Criteria that address harvesting and site preparation to protect soil productivity.
   SFI 3.1.1: Program to implement state or provincial BMPs during all phases of management activities.
   SFI 3.1.2: Contract provisions that specify BMP compliance.
   SFI 3.1.4: Monitoring of overall BMP implementation.
   SFI 3.2.1: Program addressing management and protection of streams, lakes, and other water bodies and
   riparian zones.
   FSC 1.1.b: Forest management plans and operations comply with state Best Management Practices
   (BMPs) and other government forest management guidelines applicable to the forest, both voluntary and
   regulatory (see also Criterion 6.5).
   FSC 6.5.a: A set of forestry best management practices (BMPs), approved by the state forestry agency or
   otherwise appropriate jurisdiction (e.g., BIA), that address water quality and soil erosion is adhered to (see
   also 1.1.b). These guidelines may include provisions on riparian management zones (RMZs), skidding,
   access roads, site preparation, log landings, stream crossings, disturbance of sensitive sites, and wetlands.

22. Sustainable Soil and Water Quality Best Management Practices (BMPs). [Note: General spec 5.3 requires
    all contracts to comply with the Sustainable Soil and Water Quality Best Management Practices manual.]
    (Answer questions on occurrence within sale area, identification on map, whether RMZ is identified,
    permits requirement, and related sale specs.)
         (a) Stream crossings
         (b) Lakes
         (c) Ponds
         (d) Vernal ponds
         (e) Perennial streams
         (f) Intermittent streams
         (g) Bogs
         (h) Marshes
         (i) Fens
         (j) Forested or non-forested riparian areas
         (k) Floodplain greater than or equal to 2 square miles in size
         (l) Special designation, such as trout stream, natural river, wild or scenic river
         (m) Other
   SFI 3.2.2: Mapping of streams, lakes, and other water bodies as specified in state or provincial BMPs and,
   where appropriate, identification on the ground.
   SFI 3.2.3: Implementation of plans to manage or protect streams, lakes, and other water bodies.

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                                                                                                IC4031-6 (04/28/2010)
   SFI 3.1.2: Contract provisions that specify conformance to best management practices.
   SFI 3.2.4: Identification and protection of nonforested wetlands, including bogs, fens, vernal pools, and
   marshes of significant size.
   SFI 3.2.5: Where regulations or best management practices do not currently exist to protect riparian areas,
   use of experts to identify appropriate protection measures.
   SFI 14.1: Program Participants shall take appropriate steps to comply with applicable federal, provincial,
   state and local forestry and related social and environmental laws and regulations.
   FSC 1.1.a: Forest management plans and operations comply with applicable federal, state, county, tribal,
   and municipal laws, rules, and regulations.
   FSC 6.3.c.3: Forest management practices maintain or restore aquatic ecosystems, wetlands (including
   peatlands, bogs, and vernal pools), and forested riparian areas (see also Criterion 6.5).
   FSC 6.5.b: Stream and Water Quality Protection: Stream crossings are located and constructed in a way
   that minimizes fragmentation of aquatic habitat and protects water quality.

   FMD Policy and Procedures 251:
     Any required permits for stream crossings and specifications for road construction in this zone shall be
     obtained before the sale is offered. Also refer to "Road and Bridge Section" of Policy Manual and the
     Best Management Practices.
     All Department operations involving lakes and streams must adhere to the requirements of Part 301 of
     Act 451, PA 1994 (Inland Lakes and Streams) and Part 91 of Act 451, PA 1994 (Soil Erosion and
     Sedimentation).
       Part 301 of Act 451, PA 1994 (Inland Lakes and Streams)
          a) Plans for all proposed construction activities, including State forest timber sale contracts,
          involving a proposed structure, i.e.; bridge, culvert, in or over a stream with a watershed above the
          crossing point of two square miles or greater, will be submitted by the Unit on the appropriate
          application form through channels to the UP Field Deputy or Resource Management Deputy. The
          Deputy will be responsible for acquiring discharge data and completion of structural design.

   WI 3.1: Operations on the State Forests lands will protect: water-quality, rare, threatened, and endangered
   species, special (cultural, ecological, geological, and historic) sites, Site productivity.

   WI 3.1: Water quality: The operating division will be responsible for protecting water quality, and will
   document potential impacts as part of the operations approval process. The current Michigan water-quality
   Best Management Practices manual (Sustainable Soil and Water Quality Practices on Forest Land, 2009)
   will be the standard guide for water-quality protection in State Forest operations. The manual will be used
   as a guide for such operations, and appropriate professional expertise will be used to adjust the
   recommendations of the manual to ensure protection of water quality as defined by relevant laws and
   regulations. Road and trail construction or maintenance contracts will require compliance with BMP
   standards…
   Note: See Sustainable Soil and Water Quality Practices on Forest Land, 2009

23. Are the following road construction standards applied? Check No, Yes or N/A if Not Applicable.
       a) Minimize road construction
       b) Methods employed to minimize visual or environmental impact of new roads
       c) Temporary roads are closed
       d) Landing areas identified and restored
       e) Existing erosion problems are identified.
       f) Existing erosion problems are corrected
       g) Failed drainage structures are identified
       h) Failed drainage structures are corrected
       i) Other




                                                  16 of 22
                                                                                               IC4031-6 (04/28/2010)
SFI 2.3.7: Road construction and skidding layout to minimize impacts to soil and water quality.
SFI 3.1.2: Contract provisions that specify conformance to best management practices.
SFI 3.1.4: Monitoring of overall best management practices implementation.
SFI 5.1.2: Incorporation of aesthetic considerations in harvesting, road, landing design and management,
and other management activities where visual impacts are a concern. FSC 1.1.a. Forest management
plans and operations comply with applicable Federal, state, county, tribal and municipal laws, rules, and
regulations.
FSC 6.5.b: Transportation System (including permanent and temporary haul roads, skid trails, and
landings): The transportation system is designed, constructed, maintained, and/or reconstructed to
minimize the extent of the road network and its potential cumulative adverse effects. Access to temporary
and permanent roads is controlled to minimize significant adverse impacts to soil and biota while allowing
legitimate access, as addressed by Principles 3 and 4 and identified in the management plan. Failed
drainage structures or other areas of active erosion caused by roads and skid trails are identified, and
measures are taken to correct the drainage problems and stabilize erosion.
VMH Roads:
   Designate location of road system.
   Minimize necessary disturbance.
   Avoid pushing up dirt, trees and stumps.
   Leave stumps upright, bury, screen, hide among standing trees, or use for road blockage.
   Avoid seasons or situations which result in soil exposure, soil compaction or rutting.
   Gently curving roads are more appealing.
   Design to minimize visibility from public travel routes.
   Blocking roads after use can reduce access to particularly troublesome sites, but remember that such
   roads can still be walked.
   Seed with grass or wildlife cover.
VMH Landings:
   Look for opportunities for landings to make scenic vistas, wildlife openings and viewing areas, and
   increased diversity in the landscape.
   Save and restore top soil.
   Locate within area of harvest.
   Unless existing values will be degraded, use already existing openings to create fewer stumps.
   Avoid areas adjacent to roads, travel routes, and private residences.
   If accumulation of trimmings cannot be avoided, dispense and smooth the area or push into adjacent
   harvested area.
   Seed with appropriate native plant mix or approved temporary cover.
Note: See Sustainable Soil and Water Quality Practices on Forest Land, 2009

FMD Policy and Procedures 251:
  A new road constructed by a purchaser and any other road which is not essential for public access as
  determined by the Unit may be closed by the purchaser with a gate approved by the Unit during the
  period the timber sale contract is in force to protect the property of the purchaser from theft and
  vandalism. A road which shows evidence of use before reconstruction or repair shall not be closed,
  even though it is repaired by the purchaser. Lack of shrub or tree growth shall be considered evidence
  of use.

   A road may be closed by bulldozing a raised earthen barrier across the road, by felling trees on the
   road, or by placing obstructions (such as boulders) on the road. Cables or pipes shall not be used. If a
   gate is recommended, a highly visible one such as a farm type gate properly marked is a must.

WI 3.1: Operations on the State Forests lands will protect:
    water-quality,
    rare, threatened, and endangered species,
    special (cultural, ecological, geological, and historic) sites, Site productivity

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                                                                                           IC4031-6 (04/28/2010)
    WI 3.3: An emergency road closure may be invoked when there is a public safety and/or a significant
    environmental concern. A significant environmental concern includes, but is not limited to: deep rutting or
    the potential for deep rutting, sediment flow into a stream, flooding, failure of a bridge, culvert failure that
    results in significant stream sedimentation, threats to threatened or endangered species, and threats to
    special cultural or historic sites.
24. Were the following soil erosion hazards identified and are plans in place to protect them? Check No, Yes or N/A
    if Not Applicable.

   Note: The question pertains to either current or planned roads and skid trails that could act as a soil erosion
   hazard. If the current or planned roads and skid trails are not a risk to soil erosion, then items (a) and (b) do not
   apply. If there are no sensitive soils in the area, then item (c) does not apply.
      (a) Roads
      (b) Skid trails
      (c) Sensitive soils
      (d) Other

   SFI 2.3.3: Use of erosion control measures to minimize the loss of soil and site productivity.
   SFI 2.3.4: Post-harvest conditions conducive to maintaining site productivity (e.g., limited rutting, retained
   down woody debris, minimized skid trails).
   SFI 3.1.2: Contract provisions that specify conformance to best management practices.
   SFI 3.1.3: Plans that address wet-weather events (e.g., inventory systems, wet-weather tracts, definitions
   of acceptable operating conditions).
   FSC 1.1.a: Forest management plans and operations comply with applicable Federal, state, county, tribal,
   and municipal laws, rules, and regulations.
   FSC 6.3.c.2: Forest management practices maintain soil fertility and organic matter, especially in the A
   horizon, while minimizing soil erosion and compaction. If degradation of soil quality occurs, as indicated by
   declining fertility or forest health, forest owners or managers modify soil management techniques.
   FSC 6.5.b: Logging and site preparation: Logging operations and construction of roads and skid trails are
   conducted only during periods of weather when soil is least susceptible to compaction, surface erosion, or
   sediment transport into streams and other bodies of water. Silvicultural techniques and logging
   equipment vary with slope, erosion hazard rating, and/or soil instability with the goal of minimizing soil
   disturbance. Areas that exhibit an extreme risk of landslide are excluded from management activities that
   may precipitate landslides. Plans for site preparation specify the following mitigations to minimize impacts
   to the forest resources: …Top soil disturbance and scarification of soils is limited to the minimum
   necessary to achieve successful regeneration of desired species.
   FSC 6.5.b Transportation system: …Failed drainage structures or other areas of active erosion caused by
   roads and skid trails are identified, and measures are taken to correct the drainage problems and stabilize
   erosion.

   FMD Policy and Procedures 251:
      Part 91 of Act 451, PA 1994 (Soil Erosion and Sedimentation)
            a) Plans for all proposed department construction activities including roads leading to timber sale
            areas (but not including actual timber sale areas) which expose one acre or more of ground, or
            come within 500 feet of a lake or stream (including minor stream crossings not covered by Part
            91) will be submitted by the Unit through channels to the UP Field Deputy or Resource
            Management Deputy.
   Note: See Sustainable Soil and Water Quality Practices on Forest Land, 2009

   WI 3.1: Site Productivity: Forest Operations shall strive to maintain forest and soil productivity, and avoid
   excessive soil disturbance. Minimize the loss of soil and site productivity, and modify soil management
   techniques if soil degradation occurs.




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   WI 7.1: BMP’s. The following items on the Timber Sale Inspection Form (R-4050) relate to BMP’s. Follow
   the guidelines in the BMP manual (Sustainable Soil and Water Quality Practices on Forest Land, 20094)
   when evaluating these features as follows:
          i) Landings. Be sure they are located away from streams and other water bodies. Fueling,
               maintenance and repair should only be conducted on properly located landings except in
               emergencies.
          ii) Cleanup of Area. Check to be sure that any spills have been cleaned up according to the
               requirements of the General Sale Condition 5.6.1. Additionally the site should be kept clean of
               trash generated by the harvest operations.
          iii) Soil Protection. Check to be sure that operations affecting soil erosion, compaction and rutting
               are in compliance with contract specifications.
          iv) Road construction, Road Maintenance, Location of Skid Trails and Roads. These three items on
               the form should be used to check that road construction, road maintenance and the location of
               roads and skid trails, including road closures, are in compliance with contract specs and the
               BMP manual. Careful attention should be given to these features to assure that they are not
               causing negative site impacts such as rutting, erosion or runoff into streams, lakes and ponds.
          v) BMP Applications. This is a general BMP category to consider anything related to BMP’s that
               has not specifically been addressed in the previous items. Restricting operations in RMZ’s, and
               avoiding vernal pools are some examples of issues that should be checked here.

25. Were soil compaction and rutting risks present and are plans to prevent damage in place? Check No, Yes or
    N/A if Not Applicable.. Seasonal Restrictions Required?
       a) Saturated soils
       b) Organic soils
       c) Poorly drained or somewhat poorly drained soils
       d) Fine textured soils (loam, silt and clay soils)
       e) Other

     SFI 2.3.1: Use of soil maps where available
     SFI 2.3.2: Process to identify soils vulnerable to compaction and use appropriate methods to avoid
     excessive soil disturbance
     SFI 3.1.3: Plans that address wet-weather events (e.g., inventory systems, wet-weather tracts, definitions
     of acceptable operating conditions).
     SFI 3.2.4: Identification and protection of nonforested wetlands, including bogs, fens, vernal pools, and
     marshes of significant size.
     FSC 5.3.c: Harvest practices minimize residual stand damage. For example: Soil compaction, rutting,
     and erosion are minimized…
     FSC 6.5 b: Logging and Site Preparation: Plans for site preparation specify the following mitigations to
     minimize impacts to the forest resources: …Top soil disturbance and scarification of soils is limited to the
     minimum necessary to achieve successful regeneration of desired species.

   Note: See Sustainable Soil and Water Quality Practices on Forest Land, 2009

   WI 3.1: Site Productivity: Forest Operations shall strive to maintain forest and soil productivity, and avoid
   excessive soil disturbance. Minimize the loss of soil and site productivity, and modify soil management
   techniques if soil degradation occurs.

   WI 7.1: BMP’s. The following items on the Timber Sale Inspection Form (R-4050) relate to BMP’s. Follow
   the guidelines in the BMP manual (Sustainable Soil and Water Quality Practices on Forest Land, 20094)
   when evaluating these features as follows:
          vi) Soil Protection. Check to be sure that operations affecting soil erosion, compaction and rutting
               are in compliance with contract specifications.



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26. Will ruts deeper or longer than the rutting guidance of 12 inches deep and 50 feet long be allowed in the sale
    areas? Check No, Yes or N/A if Not Applicable. If “Yes”, enter justification comment for deeper or longer ruts.

     SFI 2.3.4: Post-harvest conditions conducive to maintaining site productivity (e.g. limited rutting, retained
     down debris, minimized skid trails).
     SFI 2.3.7: Road construction and skidding layout to minimize impacts to soil productivity and water quality.
     SFI 3.1.3: Plans that address wet-weather events (e.g., inventory systems, wet-weather tracts, definitions
     of acceptable operating conditions).
     FSC 5.3.c: Harvest practices minimize residual stand damage. For example: Soil compaction, rutting,
     and erosion are minimized…
     FSC 6.5 b: Logging and Site Preparation: Plans for site preparation specify the following mitigations to
     minimize impacts to the forest resources: …Top soil disturbance and scarification of soils is limited to the
     minimum necessary to achieve successful regeneration of desired species.

   Note: See Sustainable Soil and Water Quality Practices on Forest Land, 2009

   WI 3.1: Site Productivity: Forest Operations shall strive to maintain forest and soil productivity, and avoid
   excessive soil disturbance. Minimize the loss of soil and site productivity, and modify soil management
   techniques if soil degradation occurs.

   WI 7.1: BMP’s. The following items on the Timber Sale Inspection Form (R-4050) relate to BMP’s. Follow
   the guidelines in the BMP manual (Sustainable Soil and Water Quality Practices on Forest Land, 20094)
   when evaluating these features as follows:
          vii) Soil Protection. Check to be sure that operations affecting soil erosion, compaction and rutting
               are in compliance with contract specifications.

27. Were site contamination standards requiring equipment to be parked away from riparian management zones,
    sinkholes, or supplies of ground water adequately addressed with sale specs? (General Specifications 5.6 &
    5.6.1 address trash and oil spills) Check No, Yes or N/A if Not Applicable.

      SFI 3.1.1: Program to implement state or provincial BMPs during all phases of management activities.
      SFI 3.1.2: Contract provisions that specify BMP compliance.
      SFI 3.2.1: Program addressing management and protection of rivers, streams, lakes, and other water
      bodies and riparian zones.
      FSC 6.7.d: Equipment is parked away from riparian management zones, sinkholes, or supplies of ground
      water.
      FSC 6.7.a: In the event of a spill of hazardous material, forest owners or managers immediately contain
      the material, report the spill as required by applicable regulations, and engage qualified personnel to
      perform the appropriate removal and remediation.
      FSC 6.7.b: Waste lubricants, anti-freeze, containers, and related trash are stored in a leak proof
      container until they are transported to an approved off-site disposal site.
  Note: See Sustainable Soil and Water Quality Practices on Forest Land, 2009

 WI 3.1: Water quality: The operating division will be responsible for protecting water quality, and will
 document potential impacts as part of the operations approval process. The current Michigan water-quality
 Best Management Practices manual (Sustainable Soil and Water Quality Practices on Forest Land, 2009)
 will be the standard guide for water-quality protection in State Forest operations. The manual will be used as
 a guide for such operations, and appropriate professional expertise will be used to adjust the
 recommendations of the manual to ensure protection of water quality as defined by relevant laws and
 regulations…

 WI 7.1: BMP’s. The following items on the Timber Sale Inspection Form (R-4050) relate to BMP’s. Follow the
 guidelines in the BMP manual (Sustainable Soil and Water Quality Practices on Forest Land, 20094) when
 evaluating these features as follows:
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       viii) Landings. Be sure they are located away from streams and other water bodies. Fueling,
              maintenance and repair should only be conducted on properly located landings except in
              emergencies.
         ix) Cleanup of Area. Check to be sure that any spills have been cleaned up according to the
              requirements of the General Sale Condition 5.6.1. Additionally the site should be kept clean of
              trash generated by the harvest operations.
         x) Soil Protection. Check to be sure that operations affecting soil erosion, compaction and rutting are
              in compliance with contract specifications.
         xi) Road construction, Road Maintenance, Location of Skid Trails and Roads. These three items on
              the form should be used to check that road construction, road maintenance and the location of
              roads and skid trails, including road closures, are in compliance with contract specs and the BMP
              manual. Careful attention should be given to these features to assure that they are not causing
              negative site impacts such as rutting, erosion or runoff into streams, lakes and ponds.
         xii) BMP Applications. This is a general BMP category to consider anything related to BMP’s that has
              not specifically been addressed in the previous items. Restricting operations in RMZ’s, and
              avoiding vernal pools are some examples of issues that should be checked here.

RETENTION:
28. Were the retention guidelines followed? Check:
     None If “None” was selected, was it approved at Compartment Review?
     3-10 % Acreage Acreage used with: Clearcut w/ Reserves, Clearcut Patch, Clearcut Strip, Seed Tree,
       Seed Tree w/ Reserves, Shelterwood, Shelterwood w/ Reserves.
      3-10% BA Basal Area used with: Single Tree Selection, Group Selection, Thinning.
      Combination: used when acreage and individual trees are left.

   SFI 2.3.4: Post-harvest conditions conducive to maintaining site productivity (e.g. limited rutting, retained
   down woody debris, minimized skid trails).
   SFI 2.3.5: Retention of vigorous trees during partial harvesting, consistent with silvicultural norms for the
   area.
   SFI 4.1.1: Program to promote the conservation of native biological diversity, including species, wildlife
   habitats, and ecological or natural community types, at stand and landscape levels.
   SFI 4.1.4: Development and implementation of criteria, as guided by regionally appropriate science, for
   retention of stand-level wildlife habitat elements (e.g., snags, stumps, mast trees, down woody debris, den
   trees, nest trees).
   FSC 5.3.a: Adequate quantities and a diversity of size classes of woody debris (considered a reinvestment
   of biological capital under this criterion—not an economic waste) are left on the forest floor to maintain
   ecosystem functions, wildlife habitats, and future forest productivity.
   FSC 6.3.a.5: When even-aged management is employed, live trees and native vegetation are retained
   within the harvest unit in a proportion and configuration that is consistent with the characteristic natural
   disturbance regime in each community type. Exceptions may be allowed when retention at a lower level is
   necessary for purposes of forest restoration and/or rehabilitation or to maintain community types that exist
   on the site (e.g., oak-hickory, jack pine). The level of retention increases proportionally to the size of the
   harvest unit.
   FSC 6.3.c.1: Biological legacies of the forest community are retained at the forest and stand levels,
   consistent with the objectives of the management plan, including but not limited to: large live and declining
   trees, coarse dead wood, logs, snags, den trees, and soil organic matter.

   See Within-Stand Retention Guidance (IC 4110) .
   WI 1.4: Determine how proposed management action may impact the area and identify specific elements
   that protect, maintain or enhance biodiversity, e.g. snags, coarse wood debris, edge, perches. (see “Within
   Stand Retention Guidance” and “Rare Species Assessment Guidelines” in References section).
   Note: Method of retention will vary with site conditions and a combination of basal area and acreage
   techniques may be a legitimate option for all types of silvicultural methods of harvest.


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MANAGEMENT INTENTIONS:
29. Were all management intentions, as agreed upon during the Compartment Review process, provided for in
   this sale?

   SFI 1.1.5: Documentation of forest practices (e.g., planting, fertilization, and thinning) consistent with
   assumptions in harvest plans.
   FSC 7.1.a.2: The management plan describes desired future conditions that will meet the long-term goals
   and objectives and that determine the silvicultural system(s) and management activities to be used.
   FSC 7.1.c.2: Prescriptions are prepared prior to harvesting, site preparation, pest control, burning, and
   planting and are available to people who implement the prescriptions.

   Note: If the sale proposal did not go through the compartment review process, ensure DNRE resource
   assessment guidelines are followed as outlined in IC 4123.

   WI 2.1: Silvicultural practices will encourage regeneration that moves the stand toward its desired future
   condition as determined by the management objective agreed to at compartment review…Stand examiners
   need to make comments in the narrative section of Operations Inventory (OI) or in IFMAP in the
   Treatments database (Next Steps comment field) reflecting an acceptable species mix should the stand not
   regenerate to the management objective and this must be agreed to at compartment review.

   WI 7.1: Ensure timber sale specifications match forest inventory prescriptions.

COMMENTS/NARRATIVE:
Note: Include justification for 100 acre clearcuts (question 5 k) and further clarification on other questions. In
addition, general items of note or of interest could be included.




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