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									 INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES, TOURISM
AND BIODIVERSITY WORKSHOP SERIES:
  NEW INFORMATION AND WEB-BASED
          TECHNOLOGIES


     PACIFIC ISLANDS WORKSHOP



  Apia, Samoa, 3-5 November 2008
          OVERVIEW
              1. CBD
 Biodiversity and the Convention
     Role of the Secretariat
     Relevant CBD decisions
        2. WORKSHOP
       Specific objectives
        Expected results
Outcomes of the previous workshop
           BIODIVERSITY IS...
Biological diversity - or biodiversity - is the term given
to the variety of life on Earth. It is the result of billions
of years of evolution, shaped by natural processes and,
increasingly, by the influence of humans.

It forms the web of
life of which we are
an integral part and
upon which we so
fully depend.
BIODIVERSITY IS...
    1) Variety of species
   2) Genetic differences
  3) Variety of ecosystems
WHY IS BIODIVERSITY IMPORTANT
     FOR YOU AND THE WORLD?


 Protecting biodiversity is in our self interest, providing the
   goods and services that sustain our lives including:
 •   Provision of shelter and building materials
 •   Stabilization and moderation of the Earth's climate
 •   Purification of air and water
 •   Provision of food, fuel and fibre
 •   Cultural and aesthetic benefits
 •   etc
      WHAT ARE THE
    CHALLENGES FACING
      BIODIVERSITY?
Species have been disappearing at up to 1000
   times the natural rate
•   An estimated 34,000 plant and 5,200 animal
    species face extinction, including one in eight
    birds and one third of all amphibians
•   20% of known bird species have already
    disappeared
•   41% of mammals are in decline and 28% are
    under direct threat
•   45% of the Earth's original forests are gone.
    Forest areas of about four times the size of
    Belgium are being lost every year.                  Human activities are
                                                        creating the greatest
                                                      wave of extinction since
                                                      the natural disaster that
                                                      wiped out the dinosaurs
                                                        65 million years ago
 The Convention on
 Biological Diversity

    Opened for signature in Rio in 1992
            (Earth Summit)

First global, comprehensive agreement to
address all aspects of biological diversity:
genetic resources, species, and ecosystems

 It recognises - for the first time that the
 conservation of biological diversity is 'a
 common concern of humankind' and an
integral part of the development process.
        Ratified by 191 countries
     (including the European Union)
The CBD is an international
governmental agreement
 The Parties are the primary
 audience

 The CBD Secretariat has a specific
 mandate :
    • To service CBD meetings
    • To report to the Conference
            of the Parties (COP)
    • To coordinate with relevant
            international bodies
     • To perform functions
            requested by the COP
      Interactions at various levels
International CBD, other conventions
              UN Agencies
              IGOs and Regional Organizations
National      Ministry of Tourism
              Ministry of Environment
              Ministry in charge of ILCs
              National NGOs
Local         Tour service providers and managers
              Business owners and managers
              Local NGOs
The Convention on Biological Diversity


                  Objectives (Article 1):


         The conservation of biological diversity




          The sustainable use of its components



       The equitable sharing of benefits arising out
          of the utilization of genetic resources

                                                    →
        The Convention on Biological
     Diversity and Traditional knowledge

Governments acknowledged in the Preamble:
The close dependance of many indigenous and local
  communities on biological resources and the
  desirability of sharing equitably benefits of
  traditional knowledge, innovation and practices
  relevant to the conservation of biological diversity
  and the sustainable use of its components.
Article 8(j) Traditional Knowledge
     Parties have undertaken to:

     • Respect, preserve and maintain knowledge,
     innovations and practices of indigenous and
     local communities embodying traditional
     lifestyles relevant for the conservation and
     sustainable use of biological diversity and

     • Promote their wider application with
     the approval and involvement of the holders
     of such knowledge, innovations and practices
     and

     • Encourage the equitable sharing of the
     benefits arising from the utilization of such
     knowledge, innovations and practices
           Other relevant CBD
           programmes of work

•Indigenous and Local Communities (ILC)
Article 8(j)
•Tourism
•Islands
•Invasive and alien species
•Protected Areas
•Information and Communication Technologies
   Why a Workshop on ILC, TOURISM
AND BIODIVERSITY : NEW INFORMATION
   AND WEB-BASED TECHNOLOGIES

 In paragraph 7 of decision IX/13 E, on Article 8(j) and
 related provisions, the Conference of the Parties requested
 the Executive Secretary to convene , subject to the
 availability of financial resources, further
                               regional and sub-regional
                               workshops on community-
                               friendly communication tools
                               on traditional knowledge
                               related to the conservation
                               and sustainable use of
                               biodiversity
            SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES
1) development and management of biodiversity-friendly
   tourism activities;

2) new information and web-based technology capacity of
   ILC tourism operators;
3) marketing and development of the culturally and
   biologically sustainable aspects of indigenous tourism
   products and experiences via the Internet;
4) develop network and exchange information;
5) use successful tools from the first workshop
      The participants are expected to
1) improve their web-based technological
capacities, thereby increasing their ability
to market and develop
their sustainable tourism products;
2) more effectively portray to their target
market through their website their
understandings of and unique connections
to conservation and sustainable use of
biodiversity;
3) use their websites as internal
communication and management tools
within their local communities and to
connect them with broader stakeholder
networks;
             Feedbacks from the Arctic
“This is more than timely for me: the tools for our web site will be
shared and presented to my board; we will create a focus group on
                     what needs to be done.”

      “Biodiversity goes hand in hand with ethnodiversity”

  “The workshop demonstrates the aboriginal communities can
   bring to the world and can be source of inspiration to non-
                          indigenous.”
PRACTICAL OUTPUTS
  *concrete tools/improved
  websites
  *web portal for the region
  *exchange of services
  *networking and partnerships
  *a scientific and collective paper
  on the workshop methodology
  *knowledge and vision sharing
  within the region and with other
  regions
THANK YOU!

								
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